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Box 9, Folder 2, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_002.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 2, Complete Folder
  • Text: FULTON COUNTY This agreement is made and entered into this d!=iY of _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , 19 _ _ _ by and between the Atlanta Urban Corps of the City of Atlanta (hereinafter referred to as the Urban Corps) and the Sout~ern Regional Education Board (hereinafter referred to as the SREB). WHEREAS, the Urban Corps Program for the period Septembe 29, 1969, through December 19, 1969, is a cooperative effort of the Urban Corps and the SREB; and WHEREAS, the parties are desiring delineating their respective obligations resultant therefrom; NOW, THEREFORE, the parties do hereby provide and agree as follows: 1. SREB will appoint in cooperation with the Urban Corps approximately 60 interns under the internship pro gram support ed by a grant from th e Economic De v e lopme nt Administrat ion . The majority of thes e internships will be on a part-time bas is and will be e ligible for college work st udy support. Said interns, for the purposes of this agre ement are desi g nated "Urba n Corps Interns . " 2. SREB will pay Urban Corp s int e rn s d i r e ctly from i ts project funds at rates agreed upon between the Urban Corps and SREB and refle cted in int e rn appointme nts. 3 0 The Urban Corp s will enter into a greements with cooperating c oll eges a nd other organi zation s p rovidipg for financia l support of Urban Corps internship s. All funds collected under these agreements wi ll be transferred to SREB to assist in offsetting the costs of the internships. �4• In a·ddi t ion, the City will pay a lump sum of _ ______ _._ $ 5,094.00 to SREB for interns assigned to its 21 departments. 5. The Urban Corps will service the internships and administer the program with technical advice and assistance from SREB. 6• To suppleme nt the staff of the Urban Corps, SREB has a ppointed an education couns e lor to work full-tim e on t h e e ducational dimen s ions of the program and on r e lations with are a colleges. 7. Neither th e SREB nor the Urban Corp s will incurr r es pons i bil i ty for inc i d e nta l co s ts to the agencie s t o which th e intern s are assig n e d fo r u til i zation of c on s umable s u pplies wi t h r egard to the d u tie s o f the intern s or pre p a r atio n of repo r t s o f i nt e rn s hi p except wh e re s uch a g e nc i es are a ge nci es o f the City of Atlanta. I N WI TNES S WHEREOF, th e par ti e s hav e h ere unto s e t their h and s t hi s 19 - -=--- - - ---------d ay of - -FOR THE CITY OF ATLANTA: Witne ss IVAN ALLEN , J R., MAYOR Wit n ess FOR THE SOUTHERN REGIONAL EDUCATI ONAL BOARD : Witness APPROVED AS TO FORM : Witness APPROV ED: Cit y Attorney Ken Millwood, Director Atlanta Urban Corps - 2 - �FULTON COUNTY This agreement is made and entered into this day of _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , 19 _ _ _ , by and between the Atlanta Urban Corps of the City of Atlanta (hereinafter referred to as the Urban Corps) and the Sout ~ e rn Regional Education Board (hereinafter referred to as the SREB). WHEREAS, the Urban Corps Program for the period Septembe 29, 1969, through Dec e mber 19, 1969, is a cooperative effort of the Urban Corps and the SREB; and WHEREAS, the parties are desiring delineating their re~p e ctive oblig ation s result a nt the r e f r om; NOW, THEREFO RE, the parties do hereby provide and agree as follow s : 1. SREB will appoint in cooperation with the Urb a n Corps approxima t e ly 60 int e rn s under the int e rnship program s upported b y a grant from t h e Economic Dev elopme n t Admini s trat ion . The majority of th e se int e rnship s will b e on a part-time bas i s a nd wil l be eligib l e f o r col l ege work s tudy s u pport. Said int e r ns, f o r the p u rpo ses of this agreement a r e design ated "Urban Corps I nt e rn s ." 2. SREB will pay Urban Corps int e rns directly from it s pro ject f u nds a t rat es agr eed u po n between the Urban Corps and SREB and reflected in intern appointments . .3. The Urban Corps will enter into a greeme nts with cooperating coll ege s a nd o the r organ iz a tion s providipg f or fi nancial support of Urban Corps i n t e rn s hips. All f unds coll ect e d u nd e r these a greeme nt s will be t rans ferre d to SREB to assist i n off s e tting the costs of the i n ternships. �4. In addition, the City will pay a lump sum of $ 5,094.00 to SREB for 21 interns assi g ned to its departments. 5. The Urban Corps will service the internships and administer the program with technical advice and assistance from SREB. 6. To supplement the staff of the Urban Corps, SREB has appointed an education counselor to work full-time on the educational dimensions of the program and on relations with area colleges. 7. Neither the SREB nor the Urban Corps will incurr responsibility for incidental costs to the agencies to which the interns are assigned for utili z ation of consumable supplies with r e g ard to the duties of the interns or prepara tion of reports of int e rnship e x cept where such a g encies ar e a g encies of the City of Atlanta. IN WIT NESS WHEREOF , the parties have hereunto set their hands th i s -"--- ----- --day of--- -------- 19 FOR THE CITY OF ATLANTA: Wit ness IVAN ALLEN, JR ., MAYOR Witne s s FOR THE SOUTHERN REGIONAL EDUCATI ONAL BOARD: �BY-LAWS OF ATLANTA URBAN CORFS , INC. (April 17 > 1969) ARTICLE I PURroSE AND FUNCTIONS A non-profit corporation organized to solicit funds from individuals ~ foundations , businesses and government to provide an internship program to employ university students who will work in various phases of local and municipal government > thus giving students an opportunity to contribute constructively to the Atlanta area by aiding in the improvement of all phases of urban life . .ARI'ICLE II Membership in the Atlanta Urban Corps , Inc. > shall be composed employees , interns and friends of the Atlanta Urban Corps, Inc. ot all ARTICLE III BOARD OF TRUSTEES Section l . Trustees . (a) Number of Trustees. The control of this corporation shall be vested i n a Board of Trustees which shall consist of leading members of the communi ty ~ local college pr esidents and student representatives . (b) Duties. The Board of Trustees shall make appointments and decisi ons necessary to carry out the purpose and functions of the corporat i on and shall be responsible for the admini stration of. moni·e s held by the corporation . (c) Meet i ngs. The Board of Trustees shall meet with t hree days noti ce given by any member of the Board of. Trust ees or aeymember of the Executive Board or any administrat ive officer of the corporation . Secti on 2 . Term. The t erm of r egul ar members of the Board of Tr ust ees shall be f or one yearbegi nning on April 1 of each year . Section 3. Election. Members of t he Board Bf Trustees shall be nominated and elected by the membership of t he cor poration . Section 4. Vacancies. Vacancies shall be filled by the Board of Trustees . Trustees so cha.s en shall hold office f or the unexpired portion of the term of their predecessors . �ARI'ICLE IV EXECUTIVE BOARD Section 1. Members and Duties. The Board of Trustees shall elect an Executive Board consist:i..ng-ofnot-· less than six or more than twelve members which shall administer those funds budgeted and appropriated by the Board of Trustees and shall further handle all administrative tasks normally handled by the Beard unless otherwise directed . The Executive Board shall be chosen as follows: There shall be an equo..l number of students . c:.:d non- student representatives ) with the students being chosen from nominees designated by the College Relations Board, an organization made up of representatives of the major participating c ::<1."' .::t;.-- :. • .:. T::o of the members of the Executive Board shall be the Student Director of the corporation and the Staff Director. Section 2. Meetings. The Executive Board may meet upon one day's notice given by anymember of the '.Board without formal notice. A majority of the . Board shall be a quorum and a majority of those in attendance shall be suffic ·.t ,~1t to act . ARTICLE V FOWERS Section 1. Grants or Gifts. The corporation shall be empowered to receive grants and gifts, by will or in any,r other manner ~ in any form of property ) in trust or otherwise , wh0rever situated , to carry out any of its purposes. All of s~ch grants and gifts shall be faithfully administered in accordance with the terms on which they are made. Section 2. Use of Assets. All property and income of the corporation shall be used exclusd.•,:ely for the-pur:poses set out in the Charter , and no part thereof shall be used for the benefit of any person whomsoever ·except in a manner consistent with such .purposes. Section 3. G~_?e~a~_ Po~-~ . The corporation shall have the power to retain all g:::-ants and gifts in the original form in which they were received unless otterwise required by the terms thereof ; to buy, sell ~ exchange or otherwise deal in stocks, bonds ~ securities ~ real estate and any other form of property at public or private sale ; to invest and reinvest any of its funds or proIB rty belonging to it at any time in such securities and other property ? real or pezrsonal, regardless of .:hether such investments are legal investments for trust funds under the laws of Geor gia or any other State and to borrow money and secure the p~ym:ant thereof by mortgage, pledge~ deed or other instrument or lien upon all or any part of the property of the corporation . All of the foregoing powers may be exercised without order of court or other authority. Section 4. Statutory Powers. The corporation shall be vested with all of tbe rights> rowers, and privileges which may be necessary or proper to achieve tbe purposes in the charter subject to the provisions hereof ; and the corpora.t ion shall have all of the powers and privileges enumerated in #'2.2-1827 and \A , U. C . - By-Laws) - 2 - �22-1828 of the Georgia Code, as amended :. together with such other powers and privileges as may now or hereafter be given to corporations by law. ARTICLE VI IvIEETINGS Section 1 . Annual Meeting. The corporation may hold meetings at any time with three (3} days' notice , oral or written , without any minimum requirement as to number of meetings. Section 2. Other Meetings. Other meetings shall be called at the discretion of the Board of Trustees , Executive Bom·d or administrative heads. Section 3. Quorum. A quorum at any,· meeting of the corporation shall consist of a majority of those in attendance . ARTICLE VII LIQUIDATION OR DISSOLUTION On liquidation or dissolution _ the assets of the corporation shall be dedicated to a charitable #501 c (3) organization as designated under the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code . ARTICLE VIII .AMENJ;)MENT TO BY- LAWS The Board of Trustees shall have the power to amend these By- Laws by a majority vote of those in attendance at any properly- called meeting . ARTICLE IX . '. ., OFFICERS .., !· Section 1 . The Board of Trustees and/or the Executive Board shall have the power to designate any officers they deem necessary. All officers they might choose shall be members in good standing of the Atlanta Urqan Corps . Section 2. The administrative authority of the corporation shall be vested in two officers to be chosen by the Executive Board with the advice and consent of the Board of Tr ustees . One offi cer shall be the Student Director who shall have general responsibilities for all student interns including their recruitment within the program . The other prime administrative offi cer shall be the Staff Director who will be a full --time profes:3ional in charge of all non- student aspects of the program including fiscal matters and other administrative duties not directly involved with student participation . Section 3 , Officers shall serve for one year and be elected by the Executive Board with student officers being chosen from nomi nees designated by the College (A .U. C. By- Laws ) - 3 ~ �R~lations Board. Vacancies will be filled for unexpired terms by the F::ecuti vc Board. As mentioned previously ~ those offices to be filled will ~~ designated by the Board of Trustees. .' ~~OT-r.: : Th~se By- Lr,,ws were tentatively approved at the first meeting of the 17, 1969 . A Committee was appointed by the Trustees tc- woroughly study these By- Laws andmake recommendations at the next 'f:·ustees m0cting. The Committee consisted of Mr . Norm Shavin, Dt. Walter Bloc> , and Miss Dusty Kenyon. 'I-··:s'.:;ces : _~-r il (A.U . C. By- Laws) �. ·- .. - FULTON COUNTY This agreement 1.s made and entered into this 1 d~y of September 29th , 19_6~9__ , by and between the Atlanta Urban Corps of the City of Atlanta (hereinafter referred to as j 1 the· Urban Corps) and the.Southern Regional Education Board (hereinafter referred to as the SREB). WHEREAS, the Urban Corps Program for the period Septembe 29, 1969, through December 19, 1969, is a cooperative effort of the Urban Corps and the SREB; and WHEREAS, the parties are desi~ing delineating their respective obligations resultant therefrom; NOW, THEREFORE, the parties do hereby provide and agr ~e as follows: 1. SREB will appoint 1.n cooperation with the Urban Corps approxi~ately 60 interns under the internship program supported by a gra nt f rom the Economic Development Administration. Th e majority of th e se internships will be on a part-time b a si s and will be eligible for coll ege work stud y support. Said int e rns , for the purposes . of this agreement are designated "Urban Corps Interns." 2. SREB wi ll pay Ur ban Corps interns directl y f rom it s project f u n ds at r ates agreed upo n b et ween t h e Urban Co rps and SREB and ref lec te d in int e rn a p po intme nts . 3. The Urban Corps will enter into agreements with cooperating colleges and other organizations providing for financial · support of Urban Corps internships. All funds collected under these agreements will be transferred to SREB to assist in offsetting .the costs of the internships. �__ ... 4. In addition, the City will pay a lump sum of $ 5,094.00 to SREB for 21 interns assigned to its departments. 5. The Urban Corps will service the internships and administer the program with technical advice and assistance from SREB. 6. To supplement the staff of the Urban Corps, SREB has appointed an education counselor to work full-time on the educational dimensions of the program and on relations with area colleges. 7. Neither the SREB nor the Urban Corps will incurr responsibility for incidental costs to the agencies to which the interns a re assigned for ut i li zation of consuma hle s uppli e s with r egard to th e duties of the int e rn s or pre parat i on of reports of internship ex cept where such agencies are a ge ncies of th e City of Atlant a. I N WITNESS WHEREOF , t h e pa rt i e s h a v e h er e unt o set their hand s this 19 69 November --- - ....__________day of-----17th ---·· TY OF ATLANTA: , J R ., MAYO R FOR THE SOUTHERN REGI ONAL {l?/1LC APPROVED : 143.215.248.55-~ Ken Millwood, Atlanta Urban / , �CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE 501 CITY HALL ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 December 8, 1969 CHARLES L. DAVIS DIRECTOR OF FINANCE W. ROY SMITH DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE EDGAR A . VAUGHN, JR . DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE JAMES R . FOUNTAIN, JR. DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Mr . George J. Berry Deputy Chief Administrative Officer Mayor's Off ice City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear George: This is to acknowledge your letter of November 25, 1969, which relates to my letter of November 24 regarding certain contracts that have been entered into by the City of Atlanta Urban Corps and various agencies, connnissions, educational institutions and a comment I made in my letter of November 24 regarding the holding of payments for certain funds of the Urban Corps. The next to the last paragraph of my letter contains a mis-statement I would like to correct; that is to delete the wording "for income". This paragraph should have read: "In a review of my files, I do not have filed with this office an agreement relating to the number of interns the City is to receive and the consideration the City is to pay f or these interns. By a copy of this letter, I am asking the Accounts Payable Auditor not to process any payments of these funds allocated for the Urban Corps unt il this agreement is received." The letter to Mr. Ken Mi llwood was dictated on Saturday, November 22, and signed that day by me for delivery to Mr, Mil lwood on November 24. Your transmittal of the agreement was stamped received by this office on Monday, November 24 which is the day I was in New York. In your letter of November 25, you state: "Not withstanding the fact you had this contract in hand before your letter was written, your threat to cut off the Urban Corp's funds is highly improper". As I explained to you over the telephone on Tuesday, November 25, the agreement was not in my hands prior to dictating my letter of November 24, and I do not consider it improper to say that I am cutting off funds of the Urban Corps. As a matter of fact, I could make no payments to the Urban Corps under the contract until the contract was thoroughly executed and received in this office. If yot.rstatement had reference to positions that are established by Ordinances and on the payroll of the City, I can see your concern but this was certainly not the intent of my letter of November 24. �\ Mr. George J. Berry Page Two December 8, 1969 George, since our correspondence, we have received from your office the signed executed agreement on the Urban Corps, and we have also received a requisition for payment to the Urban Corps for the sums due them. This payment is has been processed and is in the hands of the Urban Corps at this time. I trust that this concludes this subject. Sincerely, Charles L. Davis Director of Finance CLD:lek �Southern Regional Education B::>ard November 20, 1969 MEMORANDUM TO: Members of the Atlanta Service-Learning Conference FROM: the Steering Committee SUBJECT: Curriculum and Finance Conference Session The next Conference meeting has been scheduled Thursday, December 11, at Spelman College . We shall be meeting from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm in Giles Hall. For parking: turn off Northside Drive onto Greensferry and follm-r it to Henry Street to the parking lot behind Spelman College. As indicated an the enclosed agenda, this session of the Conference will be led by the Curriculum and Finance Work Groups and will deal with these. topics in relationship to the service-learning concept. Research finJ.ings related to the service-learning concept are now becoming available. They underscore the importance of the forthcoming session since the impact of financial support and a cademic credit on a servicelearning program are shown. He look forward to seeing you at the meeting on December 11. Sponsored by the City of Atlanta, the Atlanta Urban Corps, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, the Colleges and Universities of Atlanta, Department of Health, Education and 1-Telfare, the Southern Regional Education Board, Volunteers in Service to America, and the Peace Corps, the Atlanta Service-Learning Conference is exploring, both in theory and practice, the service-learning concept, in which the accomplishment of a needed task is integrated with educational growth. Resource Development Project 4o4 872-3873 �AGENDA ATLANTA SERVICE-LEARNING CONFERENCE DECEMBER 11, 1969 GILES HALL, SPEI.MAN COLLEGE WILLIAM R. RAMSAY, SOUTHERN REGIONAL EDUCATION BOARD, CHAIRMAN 9:00 AM Registration, Room 211 Giles Hall 9:30 AM Discussion of Curriculum and Service-Learning Bill Pendleton, Professor of Sociology, Emory University, Work Group Chairman Topics: 12: 30 PM 2:00 PM Description of a curricular service-learning project Criteria for academic credi t Service-learning for breadth or depth? Transfer of service-learning credit Optimal level of service-learning in four year college Lunch Break.· Discussion of Finances and Service-Learning Bill Jones, Personnel Officer for Region IV, Department of Health, Education and ·w elfare, Work Group Chairman Topics: 5:00 PM Organizational arrangements Funding models Effective funding sources Alternative sources of support Sharing of costs Participant stipends Charges to host agency Adjournment �November 25 , 1969 Mr . William R. ~amsay Dtrect01: velopment Project Southern ltegton l Eduction Board 130 6th Street , N. W. Atla.nt, Georgia 30313 Re n1.1rce ~ r Bill : Plese make the following deposit: Spel n Coll se Wilberfot"Ce Univ reity Bl yton Busin •• Coll ge Sincer ly, Bugh H. S on Fin nee Dir etor mts:dl Enclosure $ 465 . 60 $ 1,571 . 60 43 . 20 .$ $ 2,080 . 40 �November 6, 1969 MEMORANDUM TO: Charles L. -Davis FROM: Dan E • .;Sweat, Jr . SUBJECT : Refund to Phyllis Wheatley Branch YWCA On June 18, 1969, a check from the above agency in the mount of 500 was tran mitted by the Urban Corps to Mr . Fountain for deposit. The intern that was a signed to this agency has sine dropped out of th program and it is neces ary for u to r ·e fu.nd to them a pro-rata amount of their advance. Accordingly, a M. for the correct amount is nclosed and it would b appreci ted U you would proc s for payment. a. DESJr : sm · At chment �November 26, 1969 Miss Cola Stamper 1836 Silverhill Road Stone Mountain, Georgia Dear Cola : I enjoyed the opportunity to talk with you Tuesday. I spoke to Ken Millwood, and he is expecting a call from you. nwnber at the Urb n Corps Office is 524-8091 . Ken's 1 will be out of town until Friday, December 5; but I would appreciate your letting me know what progress we made when l get back. Sincerely yours. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Chief Administrative Officer DESJr:sm �December 2, 1969 lv!EMORANDUM To: Cha:des Davis From: George J . Berry Subject: Urban Corps A s you know , the present Urban Corps operation is funded only through Decembel' 31 , 1969. It is essential that we give the present staff proper notice in the event that the program is not funded for the coming year. It would be a ppreciated, therefore , if you could advise no later than December 15 , 1969 as to the status of the Urban Corps Program for 1970. GJB:ja cc: Ken Millwood �November 24, 1969 Mr . William Ramsay Director Research Development Project Southern Regional Education Board 130 Sixth Street , N. w. ~ t~anta, Georgia 303 3 Dear Bill : Please make the following deposit : Spelman College • $452 . 40 Morris Brown College $J60 . 48 Grady M $119.00 & I Project Sincerely , Hugh H. Saxon, Jr. Director of Finance HHSjr : sz Enclosures �Southern Regional Education Board 130 Six th Street, NW· Atlanta, Georgia 30313 · 404 875-9211 November 6, 1969 Mr . Dan Sweat City of Atlanta City Hall Atla nta, Georgia Dear Mr . Sweat: SREB in conjunction with the Urban Corps National Development Office is sponsor i ng a one- day meeting t o discuss servi ce-lea rning opportuni ties in t he South . Approximat el y 50 mayors and 100 college pr e s ident s have been i nvited to participate. We would like t o ext end to you an invit a t i on t o attend and t o appear on a panel wit h representatives of t h e Atlanta Urban Corps and a student leader . We expect t he morning panel to present models and to stimulate discussion for the afternoon workshops. Would you relate your experi ence s in developing the urban program in the City of Atlanta and the benefits to the city and to the students for being involved in such a program. We look forward to seeing you on the 14th. Sincerely, 15Y\:J,.JL U , ~ Michael A. Hart Project Assi st ant Re source Development Project MAH:ht Enclosure �PRELIMINARY AGENDA UR.BAN SERVICES AND LEARNING EXECUTIVE PARK MOTOR INN ATLANTA, GEORGIA NOVEMBER 14, 1969 A meeting for city and college leaders on the o~portunities for combining urban service for students with educational programs. Sponsored By: Southern Regional Education Board Urban Corps National Development Office 9:00 A.M. Registration 9:30 A.M. Opening Remarks - 9:45 A.M. Urban Corps Idea - Michael Goldstein w. R. O'Connell 10:00 A.M. The Service-Learning Concept - W.R. Ramsay 10: 15 A .M. Break 10:30 A.M. Urban Corps as a Service-Learning Device Panel Discussions: Urban Corps Staff Member Student Representative of City Government Representative of a College 12:00 P.M. Luncheon - Chaired by w. R. O'Connell Welcome and Remarks - Mayor Ivan Allen Address 1:30 P.M. Community Resources Workgroups 1. Role of the City 2. Role of the College 3:15 P.M. Reports of Workgroups 3:45 P.M. Closing Statements: "Where Do We Go From Here" 4:00 P.M. Adjourn �CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE 501 CITY HALL ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303 November 7, 1969 CHARLES L . DAVIS DIREC T OR OF FINANCE W. ROY SMITH DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FI N ANCE ED G AR A. V A U G H N , JR . DEPUT Y DIRECTOR OF FINANCE JAMES R . FOUNTAIN , JR . DEPUT Y DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Mr. Dan Sweat Mayor' s . Office City o f Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Sweat : This is to ac knowledge your letter of November 5 , 1969, in which you t r ansmitted to us a copy of the 1970 proposed Urban Corps Pr ogram, and you reque s ted that we present t h is matte r to the Finance Corrnnittee for thei r considera tion. I certainly agree wi t h your thought s t hat the Urban Cor ps is certainly a va luable pr ogram t o t he City a nd should rec eive s ome funding fr om the Ci ty for 1970. Si ncerely, Charles L. Davi s Director of Finance CLD:lek �ME1 OR1- NDUM ,eorge Berr y., Governmental Liaison Charles Davis, Director of" Financ e TO: FRO.;: D TE : Novemoer 1 2 , 1 9 6 9 Ken t ill ood; Director SUBJEC:i'; Urban Corps 19'70 Budget Proposal 'l'bere seems to be some question as to the de.rivation of the requ~st for $13 9,693 'tat the Urban Corps has made of the City of Atlanta . The 'budget was derived on a eash ino.o - outflo'-1 basie with.out aesig.ning specific usages of income to specific souro s. In d riving thi budget~ ~ u~ed inc-oree sources re re ente.d as -U1e f oll·o wing: (1) College Work-Study ... (2) Agenci (3) City of Atl 30 80%. of salaries of eligible studezts of Ralaries of interns they e ploy ta - SO of salaries of interns they e ploy (~) Cit of Atlanta - Supportive Grant This pl as sugg ted by Mr. Berry as ethod of the City's fin ncial p rtioip tion b ed on servie Th priv t . nci s wer ked top y only 30 b . c li ted financial position nd in~ effort to keep Corp in non- cop titive situ tion ith the eolle v r itie The City of Atl. nt Ur n Corps coneept. derivin r ndcr d. u e of their th Vrb n e . nd uni- h City ct Atlanta to hare adl!Uni t~ tiv xp n a a City gov rnm nt hould City o a.ftoT-d it. Th ervic Th r u t of $1 , 93 c n b vi din S0\- grant co binati n outlin d boYe. The th 1970 prQgr will b $75 11 849. ein the City could onably ~~e.ct tQ a ining 6~~3 ~ can th n be vi ·a , �Memorandum Geprge Ber:t'y e C"nar1ee Davis Nov1_mber J.2 , 196 9 matching share of interns used by City depart~ents. This cost r epresents 34% of the salaries of interns assigned to the City for 1 970. In using this $64- 34 1i- in oomputing cost pen1 man year, the result is, $614, 3ij4 fox• ~ .1 .e: yearo .: $1,.l.t59. 02 per man y ar (The 52 nian y,ea.r.s quQted by Mr. Dan Sweat in hiQ memo of rov ember S, 19 69, is inaccurate because it doea not allow fo:t'1 part-time employment . _ Using 52 man year s, th cost is $1,237.39 man pr year.) The cost to the private agenci s parti~ipating is: 93 an years for $116,808 ~ $1,256 pr man ye r. Ace pting the afgwnent t hat th City truly benefits from all the inte'I'ns in th Corp , the eo t per an year would b ..• rn many ( 'fhi figure do will contribut r - $139~693 a not inclu 17 £ull om $1,042 per many r 31 t ff bers who in t{)tal an y,ears to th · opet> tion.) th I beli v th s co putations m the City's involvemont or re onable in oompa ison to th t of the non-profit enci I fe l the key point i not on of in nc , but one of purpose. Th Urban Corps 1 al.though it h involv d fin ncial . ti , 1$ not d on percentaz of CO't, cost per any ar, or whop y how much. It i ba ed entirely on rvio·e to the eommuni ty and ducation l enric ent of the tud nt . It wo.u ld ae to me that it is o th at l ast $1 0, 00 to 'th City to ,c ontinu uch an nter ,ri �I· November 13 , 1 969 Mr. William Rams ay Director Rese arch Development Project Southern Re g ional Education Board 130 Sixth Street , P . W. Atlanta, Georgia 30313 Dear Bill: Please make th e fol~owin g depo s it: Georg i a State University $271.20 DeKa l b College $717 . ~ 11' Sincerely , Hugh H. Saxon, Jr. Director of Finance HHSjr:sz Enclosures �\ ' \ \ ATlANTA VROAN CORT'S I '- 30 COURTLAND STREET, N .E . / PH O N E ( 4 04 ) 5 24-809 1 / ATLA N T A , GEORGIA 30303 ME MO R A N D U M TO: FROM: George Berry, Governmental Liaison Charles Davis , Director of Finance DATE: November 12, 1969 Ken Millwood , Director SUBJECT: Urban Corps 1970 Budget Proposal There seems to be some question as to the derivation of the request for $139,693 that the Urban Corps has made of the City of Atlanta. The budget was derived on a cash income - outflow b asis without assig ning specif ic usages of income to specific sources. In deriving this budget, we used income sources represented as the following: (1) College Work-Study - 80 % of salaries of eligible students (2) Agencies - (3) City of Atlanta - 50 % of salaries of interns they employ (4) City o f Atl a nta - Supportive Gr a nt 30 % of salaries of interns they employ This plan was s u ggested by Mr. Berry a s a method o f deriving t he City 's financial p articip ation based on services rendered . The pr ivat e a g encies were a sked to p a y o n l y 30 % becaus e o f t heir l imit ed financia l po s it i on and in an e f f ort to keep t h e Urban Cor p s in a non- competit ive situa tion with t he colle g e s and u niversities . The Ci t y o f Atlant a h as been a nd is now an a c t ive s p onsor o f the Ur ban Corps conc ept . Th e summer Urban Corps p rogram was regarded oS a succe s s by b o th loc al a n d national f i gures . We requ ested the Citj of Atlant a to s h a re a larger part o f the c ost o f defraying a dministrative expens e s because it is the typ e of community activ ity a Ci t y g overnme nt should b e involved in . Al s o, qu ite f r a n k l y , the City can afford it . Th e City gains ben efit thr ough communi t y service, publicity ,_ and student involvemen t f rom the Urb an Corps pro gram in total , not onl y from the s tudent s who work directly with Ci ty department s . The reque st of $1 3 9, 69 3 c a n be vi e wed i n a different l ight than t he 50% -grant combination ou t l ined above . The administrative costs of the 1970 program will be $75,3 4 9. Being a City sponsored prog ram, the City could reasona bly e xpect to a bso rb ~ t h i s t otal cost. The remaining $64,344 can t hen be viewed as representing the City's �Memorandum George Berry & Charles Davis November 12, 1969 matching share of interns used by City departments. This cost represents 34% of the salaries of interns assigned to the City for 1970. ~n using this $64,344 in computing cost per man year, the result is: $64,344 for 44.1 man years= $1,459.02 per man year (The 52 man years quoted by Mr. Dan Sweat in his memo of November 5, 1969, is inaccurate because it does not allow for part-time employment. Using 52 man years, the cost is $1,237.39 per man year.) The cost to the private agencies participating is: 93 man years for $116,808 = $1,256 per man year. Accepting the algument that the City truly benefits from all the interns in the Corps, the cost per man year would be: \~1 man years-$139,693 = $1,042 per man year (This figure does not include the 31 staff members who in total will contribute some 17 full man years to the operation.) I believe these computations make the City's involvement more reasonable in compasison to that of the non-profit agencies. I feel the key point is not one of finance, but one of purpose. The Urban Corps, although it has involved financial ties, is not based on percentages of cost, cost per man year, or who pays how much. It is based entirely on service to the community and educational enrichment of the students. It would seem to me that it is worth at least $140 , 000 to the City to continue such an enterprise. - 2 - �ME MO R A N D U M TO : FROM: George Berry , Governme ntal Liai s on Charles Davis, Dire ctor of Finance DATE: Novemb er 12 , 1969 Ken ~illwood , Dire ctor SUBJ ECT : Ur ban Corps 19 70 Budget Proposal There s eems to be s ome que s tion a s to t he derivation of t he reques t for $13 9,69 3 tat t he Urban Corps has made of t he City of Atlanta. Th e budget wa s d eriv ed on a cash income - outfl9\1 bas i s wi thout a ss i gning s pecific us a ges of income to s pecific sour•oes . I n deriving t h i s budget , we u s ed income s ourc es repre sented a s t he foll owing: (l) College Work - Study - 80 % of s alaries of el ig i bl e student s (2) Age nc ies - (3 ) City of At l ant a - 50 of salarie s of i nterns t hey mploy (4) Cit y of Atl ant a - Support i ve G~ant 30 % of salaries of intern s they employ This plan was suggested by Mr. Ber ry s a method of deriv ing the City's finan~ial par t i cipation based on serv ices render ed. The priva t e ag naies wer a ked t o pay onl y 30 b cause of t heir limited financia l position and in an ffort to keep t he Ur b n Corps in a non- competitive situation with the colleges and universit ies . The City of Atl nta h been and is no an ctiv e s onsor of the Ur ban Cor ps concept. The summer Urban Corp program was r rd d a success by both local and nation 1 figure • W re u e tcd the City . of At l ant to share a. larg r par t of t he coat of d r ying administrative expense · b cau it is the typ of community activity a City gov rnment should be invo l ved in . Also, quit f r nkly, 'th City c n afford it. The City ains benefit through commu nity s rvic , publicity , and otudent involvement from the Urb n Corp program in total . not only from th stud nts who work directly with City d partm nts. 0 The reque t of 8139,698 c n be vi v din a diff r nt light th th SO - grant combin tion outlined abov · . The admini trativ cot of the 1970 program will b $ 7 5,849 •. Being City spon or d program~ the City could re son bly xpect . to b orb thi total cot. Th r ining 6~,344 can th n b vi w d as r pr nting th City'a �. ~ .oranc.twn George ..,.rry i Cbarl NoY . ber 12 , li69 tel ing share of inte.t"'ns u. ed. by City d pru:"tments. ·rhis eost r ~e nts 31¼" of 'th s lar-ie o intern ~ igned to the Cit for 1 910 .. r,, ln tl in,· this $~tt 3-.'i in co puti11g cost par .ma.n vec11· , the result ( 'i'h-c 5 2 wan y l".:. q~ot .d b Mr. D n S t in his . · o of -.ovet'tlHrr S, 19 9. i~ , inaccu~ e bee u it doeo not allow ~o.r part-t~ -ploy.ent .. ~ ·ins 5 many ars~ the eoct i,Q $1~2 37 .. 39 ~r -an Y. a.r-~) The co.st to t 'h e priv ta 93 genei e participating is: }' Acc.~ pting th a.fg-.1: er.t th th City truly 1:.enafit.s fro i ·n tern i-n th Corp , the co... t p.er nan y ar would b r ( Thi · ill th 31 'tat e.n Y~ ra 'to I n . l.l t.ne r w o in to'tal tion.) I Th d on It at ·-- - t .., �. I \ November 20, 1969 Mr. Jay Fountain Deputy Director of Finance City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Jay: Please make the following deposits in the Urban Corps account: DRAWN BY ACCOUNT NUMBER AMOUNT G- 16- 7645 Clark College $4,797.60 G-16-7645 Georgia Tech $.2 ,185.6 8 G-16-7645 Georg·ia College at Milledgeville $1,696.00 $206 .80 of the Georgia Tech amount is a work-study payment for the Fall Program. Sincerely, Hugh H. Saxon, Jr. Director of Finance llHSjr:sz Enclosures cc: Mr. George Berry ~ �November 19, 1969' Mr . William Ramsay Director Research Development Project Southern Regional Education Board 130 Sixth Stre et, N . W. Atlanta, Georgia 30313 near Bill : Please make the following deposit: Comptoller General's Office Sincerely, Hugh H. Saxon,Jr. Director of Finance HllSjr: sz Enclosure $476.00 �URBAN CORPS SERVICE-LEARNING CONFERENCE November 14, 1969 PRELIMINARY LIST OF PARTICIPANTS I. College and University Representatives: ALABAIVfA Mr. Edward LaMonte, Assistant Director, Center for Urban Studies , University of Alabama at Birmingham Mr. J. King Chandler, III, Director of Urban Studies, Jef ferson State College , Birmingham Mr. Paul Harris, Vice-President for Ad.ministration, Miles College, Birmingham Mr. James Williams, Assistant to the President , Miles Col l ege, Birmingham Dr. Donald E. Hayhurst, Political Science Department, Auburn University, Auburn FLORIDA Dr . Thomas W. Fr yer, Jr. , Director of the Downtown Campus , Miami -Dade Junior College, Miami Prof. Jame s Feeney, Professor , New College , Tampa Mr . Marshall Barry , Di rector , Project R.E.A. L., New College, Tampa Dr. Thomas Wood, Department of Political Sc i ence , University of Miami , Coral Gables GEORGIA Dr. Samuel W. Williams, Act ing Academic Dean, Morehouse College , Atlanta Mr. Edward M. Neal , Inst r uctor of Hist ory , West Georgia Col l ege Carrollton Miss Charlene Bowen, student, West Georgia College, Carrollton �- 2 - GEORGIA (continued) Mr. Richard Hanners, Counselor, Kennesaw Junior College, Atlanta Mr. Jerry Roseberry, Director of Financial Aid, Kennesaw Jr. College, Atlanta Mr. W. Kirk Jackson, Director of Development, Atlanta University, Atlanta Mr. Donald R. Nelson, Coordinator of Community Services, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta Marvin Arrington, Student Advisor, Emory University, Atlanta lflr. Miss He:en Stanton, student, Emory University, Atlanta Miss Phe Thompson, student, Emory University, Atlanta Mr. Tom Saylor, student, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta Mr. Wally Bloom, student, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta Mr. Miller Templeton, student, Georgia Institute of Tc.:chnology, Atlanta Mr. Donal'1 Wray, Director of Field. Services, Institute of Government, University of Georgia, Athens Dr. Alb ert Kleckner, Assistant Vice-President for Instruction, Univ.? r.:.lity of Georgia, Athens Mr. Jerry Wilkinson, Assistant to the President, Spelman College, Atlanta LOUISIANA Mr. Dale Kreeger, Office of Financial Aid, Tulane University, New Orleans �- 3 LOUISIANA (continued) Mr. Gary Bair, Director, Board of Directors, C.A.C.T.U.S., Tulane University, New Orleans MISSISSIPPI Prof. Bennie L. Reeves, Assistant Professor of History, Jackson State College, Jackson Mr. Charles Watts, student, Jackson State College, Jackson Mr. Jack L. Woodward, Director of Financial Aid, Millsaps College, Jackson NORTH CA'9.OLII•;i\ Mr. Larry Owen, Director, Community Service and Continuing Educr1i:,ion Cer.!ter, u~1iversity of North Carolina at Charlotte Mr. Norman W. Schul, Chairm•rn , Di vision of So-:::Lal and Behavioral Sciences, UniYersity of l';m~th Ca.rolinc at Gns.:rlotte Mr. Rich2..rd Shackleford, Assistant Prog:cam Director of the Er dah2. -Cloyc1 Union, North Carolina Stct.i~e Uni Yersity at Raleigh Mr. Law£ence A. Goldblatt, student, University of North Car ol~_!1a Ste,te University at Raleigh Mr. Will Scott, Chairman, Department of Sociology and Social Servic8 , Nol"th Car oJ.ina A & T Sta,te U'::·tiverzi ty, Greensboro Miss Delcine E. Elliott, student, North Carolina A & T State UnivE-~· si ty, G:-eensboro Mr. Julius Cocyening , Director of Urban Affairs, Wake Forrest Univer sity, Winston Salem Mro Carl Whitney, student, Davidson College, Davidson Mr. Alan Wentz, student, University of North Carolina, Charlotte �I - 4 OKLAHOMA Prof. Kenneth C. Govants, Assistant Professor, O~lahoma State University, Oklahoma City SOUTH CAROLINA Miss Betty J. Alverson, Director, Student Center, Furman University, Greensville Mr . Robert Alexander , Director of Volunteer Services , University of South Carolina, Columbia Mr. Louis James, student, University of South Carolina, Columbia Miss Leslie Poe , student, University of South Carolina, Columbia Miss Vicky Vann, Vice-President of Community Services , Student Christian Assoc., Converse College, Spartenburg Mr . B. B. Taylor , Student Christian Assoc., Converse College , Spartenburg TENNESSEE Mr . William L. Bowden , President, Southwester n at Memphis , Memphis Mr. Mark Mccrackin, Center for Urban Affairs , Vanderbil t University , Nashville Dr . Philip D. Vair o , Dean of Profess ional Studies , Univer sity of Tennessee at Chatta nooga Mr. Robert S. Hutchison , Executive Director, GovernmentIndustry-Law Center, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Dr. C. 0. Atchison , Director of Development, Tennessee State University, Nashville TEXAS Dean Milton Wilson, Dean, School of Business, Texas Southern University, Houston �- 5 - WEST VIRGINIA Mr. Thomas Bee, Assistant Director, Off-Campus Education, Alderson-Broaddus College, Philippi II. City Representatives: ALABAl'AA Mr. R. J. Cunningham, Mayor's Youth Coordinator, Birmingham Mr. William Hayes, Jefferson County Personnel Board, Birmingham FLORIDA Mr. Robert D. Johnston, Assistant to the City Manager, Fort Lauderdale GEORGIA Mr. Ken Millwood, Director, Atlanta Urban Corps, Atlanta Miss Sue Zander, Assistant Director, Atlanta Urban Corps, Atlanta Mr. Hugh Saxon, Director of Finance, Atlanta Urban Corps, Atlanta Mr. Elmer George, Executive Director, Georgia lflUnicipal Association, Atlanta Mr. William Graham, Planning Department, City of Savannah Mr. Danny Brown, Student Director of Development, S.P.U.R. the Urban Corps of Savannah Mr. Jack Adams, student intern, S.P.U.R.--the Urban Corps of Savannah, Personnel Department, City of Savannah LOUISIANA Mr. Gideon T. Stanton, III, Executive Director, C.A.C.T.U.S., Tulane University, Planning Committee for the New Orleans Urban Corps, New Orleans �- 6 - LOUISIANA (continued) Mr. Inmond Deen, student, Tulane University, Planning Committee for the New Orleans Urban Corps, New Orleans MISSISSIPPI Mr . James L. Harrison, Director of Public Relations, Office of the Mayor, Jackson NORTH CAROLINA. Mr. Nicky Maison, Assistant to the City Manager, City of Winston Salem Mr. C. Curtis Branscome, Administrative Assistant, Office of the City Manager, Charlotte Mr. K. M. Michalove, Executive Director, Buncombe County Planning Council, Asheville SOUTH CAROLINA A representative from the Office of Mr. Aaron Marsh, City Manager, Greenville TENNESSEE Mr. George Podelco, Administrative Assistant, Office of the Mayor, Nashville Mr. Nick Sieveking, Co-Director, Program Development, The Urban Observatory, Nashville Mr. Leonard Hackel, Mayor's Youth Coordinator, Memphis Mr. Robert F. Maffett, Administrative Assistant to the Mayor, Chattanooga TEXAS A representative from the office of Mr. Scott McDonald, City Manager, Dallas A representative from the office of Mr. Harold Mc~.ahan, City Manager, Fort Worth �- 7 - III • Atlanta Urban Corps : Student Interns Their Colleges Their Assignments Miss Caretha Daniels Georgia State Univ. Atlanta Grady Hospital Mr. Lloyd Keys Morehouse College Atlanta City Finance Depts. Mr. Emmett McCord DeKalb Jr. College Atlanta Rent-a-Kid Project Miss Linda Robinson Georgia State Univ. Atlanta Consumer Affairs Project (comptroller) Miss Wanda Thompson Georgia State Univ. Atlanta Grant Park Community School Mr. Julius Stephens Morehouse College Atlanta Rent-a-Kid Project Miss Truly Bracken Agnes Scott College Atlanta Kennesaw National Park Miss Tia Sinkfield Spelman College Atlanta Atlanta Youth Council Miss Babs Kalvelage Georgia State Univ. Atlanta Atlanta Service Learning Confer ence Mr. Kytle Frye Emory School of Law Atlanta Atlanta Service Learning Conference Urban Corps staff Miss Blanche Radford Clark College Atlanta Mr. Carl Paul Georgia Tech Atlanta RepresentativeWheat St. Baptist Church ~iss Betty Peters Clark College Atlanta Literacy Action Foundation �November 1 8, 1969 Hr . ilton F arris , Chai rman Boar d of Aldorme, F inance Co ittee Gulf Oil Corporati on P. o. Box 7245 , Station C tlanta , Georgia 30309 Dear . Farris : Let xt nd y appreciation to .ou and the oem e rs of your committee for the opportunity to p r esent the 1970 Budget Pr oposal for the Atl nta Jrban Corps . Hopefully , t le Propo s l i s de tailed enough to give a concise p icture of the need of t he Program next year. Because of t h necessity of mak ing a brief pr esentation , I fear many of the i m ortant facts a out t e Corps were not voice. I believe t.~ese several points will make t he oun t wa arc req uesting mor r e sonable f rom a rcturn-on·-investment vi . point. (1) The Or ban Corp provides an bund nt npo :r sourc t hat has been overlooked. The majority of the student s involved ar in colleg (2 ) or in graduate or in the upper level rofe sional ehool. The jobs the tudents perfor r all isting job that hav ecn left undono due to lack of manpower , nd ith t he creative cooperation between t h Urban Corps and City dmi ni s t.r tors, ny v ry n ce s ary task~ c perfo d by int rns. (3 ) Accor ding to th f i gur es provide by th yor' Office, t h int rns ill pr ovid 52 n r of 1 bor t n v rage cot of $2,690.00. Thi cost i xtr l y lo b don th e rning po r pot ntial of a coll g g r adu t or near-gr du t e . Alo, it doe not include th 17 n y ar orked th propo - - t f. () Th Orban Corp offor th potenti l tr ining progr or the City by cqu intinq with th po ibiliti s of gov rnment lo , gr uation. io on can deny that with onl pproxi t ly 8,000 City loye ( xclu i t rd of due tion nd th Library) h ving coll d gre , th t the r cruit ent of highly quali 1 �Mr. Milton Parris November 18, 19€9 Page 2 people into city government has been a major problem. These are only the quantifiable poten.tials of an effective Orban Cor ps program. The very real potentials of community benefit, educational enrichment, a counter-measure to student rad icalization, and the benefit to the individual student are also deeply rooted into the Urban Corps concept. As further clarification, let me say that t he budget ks for $75,349 to finance t he administration oft Urban Corps for one year. An additional $64,344 (makina total of $ 13916 3) is ne ded to meet the rity's share of the salaries of internc. working in city epartroents. (This cost represents 34~ of th se interns total stipend which is conparable to the 30 pai d by non- city agencies.) Thank you for your consideration of th's s ry and to the Urban Corps proposal . We welco e your Committee' valu tion of the benefits of our Progr to the City, nd hope you ill discus its value .ith interns ·orking both in City Hall and in non- city gencios. Sine rely, -K'LM en Millwood Dir ctor K sz cc : Mayor Iv n Mr. Charle llen, Jr • . - . Davia Mr • • Gregory rigg • 1111 T. Knight Mr. Ch rl s L ft ich r. Sam sell Mr. G. Ev rr tt illic n �ATlANTA VROAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND STREET , N .E . / PHONE ( 4 0 4 ] 52 4 -8091 / ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 November 17, 1969 Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. City of Atlanta City Hall 68 Mitchell Street , S. W. Atlanta , Georgia 30303 Dear Mayor Allen : On b ehalf of the Southern Regional Education Board, the Urban Corps National Development Office, and the Atlanta Urban Corps, let me extend to you a p preciation for the welcoming remark s you made to our Conference on November 1 4 . The endorsement of the South ' s leading urban administrator lent invaluable credibility to our efforts. More i mportant to us locally, I personally thank you for the expression of support you gave me in the budget hearing the afternoon of that same day . I was unaware that I was to make the presentation until I was introduced at the meeting. Your assistance in clarifying some imp ortant p oints to the other gen tlemen present was e x tremely help ful. I believe y ou a re well aware of the success of the Atlanta Urb an Corp s so far, and of the benefits it can offer this City in the future. Howeve r, sometimes men dealing with the g ruesome ta sk of mapp ing a g reat city 's f inancial future can see only dollar s a nd cents . The y sometimes overlook the b enefits o f stud ent inv olvement p ote ntia l a nd the manpower r esources pote nti a l o f a smal l b ut effective pro g r am s uch a s our s. Hope full y , y o u will be able t o cont inue y o u r suppor t of t he Urban Cor p s during the v ery e xha u sti v e de ci sio n mak i ng t a s k s t he Bu dget Commit tee mu s t soon perform. Again, my thanks f o r your suppo r t i n both last Fri day's meetings and for all future support you may give the Atlanta Urban Corps. KM:sz �November 26, 1969 MEMORANDUM To : Ken Millwood From: George Ber:ry I have forwarded youl" Miscellaneous Requisition No . 4 to Finance . I have changed it, however, so that it authodzes the payment of $ 5,094 . 00 and have deleted the $ 206 . 80. ln the interest of keeping down confusion, it would be appl"·eciated if you would submit a separate M. R. for this latter amount attached to a memorandum explaining the facts . GB:ja �November 26, 1969 Mr . Charles L. Davis Directo r of Finance City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Charles: l am enclosing the Urban Corps' M . R . Number 4 in the amount of $5, 094. 00. This .amount is payable to the Southern Regional Education Board under the terms of the agreement £orwarded to your office on November 21 , 1969. Very truly yours, George J . Berry Deputy Chief Administrative Officer GJB :ja Enclosure �I -- Mr. J Fount - .........y Director of F1nan.ce City~ tlmlt City Rall Atlant , Georg· 30303 J BY ity G-16 7645 G- '1 7645 197.. ' 5,137 20 o-l.6,;.7645 111 1 ' �November 5, 1969 Mr . Ch rle L. D vis Director of Finance 501 City Hall Atlanta , Georgi D ar Charles : l m ttaching a copy of the Atlanta Urban Corps Budget and Program Proposal for 1970 . Thi' pi-oposal ha been prepared by the st · fi of the Urb n Corp . A I understand th document, it propo es program · of 60 Interns in the Spring: 500 Interns in th Summer: and 100 Interns in the Fall . The gros - progi-am. cost will be $650, 6Z3 of which $510, 930 will be m · t by contractual greements with colleges and agencies le ving a n t cost of $139,693. For this amount, the City will receiv the aervic of 30 Intern• in th Spring; 1S0 Interns in the Summer; d 40 Intern, in the Fall . Thi is total of 220 lnt rne for twelve we k t rm which work out to 52 man ye rs which in turn WQrk out to bout $2,690 per many ar. It would be appr ci ted if you would pre nt thi• propo al to the Financ Committe for poasibl inc:lu ion in th 1970 Budg t. l would ho13 th t w could giv the Urb n Corp• Stall some indication early poaaibl ao that th y c n make th ir plans c:cordingly. My own thought is that th Urb n Corpe concept ha• prov · n itself worthy of ,upport if city financ a will allow it . Sine I' ly youre, E. Sw at, J r . Chief Admini trative Offi c DE ,Jr:vl ~c: Ken Millwood 11 -d ia �November 6, 1969 , Ir. Jav Founta:i.:r. Deputy-Director of Financ_ City of At lanta City Hall Atlanta , Georgia 3 0 303 Dear Jay: Please make the folloiin8 depos~ts in the Urban Corps a ccount: DRA m BY ACCOU NT NU BER G-16 7645 De Kalb Colleg e MOU.f! $4,003.20 Ac knowledgement of receipt will be appreciated. Sincerely , Hugh H. Saxon, Jr. Director of Financ e HHSjr: sz Enclo cc: re Mr. G orge Berry '=- �s November 6, 1969 t-'i r . William R. Ramsay Director Researc1 Deve l opment Pr oject Southern Regional Education Board 13 O Sixth Street, 11. W. At l ar..ta , Geor g ia 30313 Dear Bill : Please ma ke the follo i ng deposits : DRAW BY. A10U T: Blayton Busine ss College $ Morri s Bro n College $346 . 4 8 Sincer ly, Hugh H. Saxo n, Jr. Director of finance HHSjr:sz Enclosures cc: r. Gorge Berry~ 3 0 .24 �November 13 , 1 969 Mr. Jay Fountain Deputy Director of Finance City of Atlanta City Hall 68 Mitchell Str eet, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 303 0 3 Dear Jay ; Please make th e fol lowing deposits 1n the Ur ban Corps account ; AC COUNT NUMBER: G-16- 7 645 DRAWN BY: AMOUNT: Southwestern at Memphi s $22 3. 20 Spelman Col l ege $10 2.08 Ac knowl edgement of r e ce pt wil l be appreciated . Sincerely , Hugh H. Saxon, Jr. Director of Finance HHSjr:sz Enclosures cc : Mr. George Berry �~L~ CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT OF LAW 2614 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 HENRY CIT Y ROBERT S. WIGGINS MARTIN McFARLAND EDWIN L . STERNE RALPH C. JENKINS JOHN E . DOUGHERTY CHARLES M. LOKEY THOMAS F . CHOYCE JAMES B . PILCHER L. BOWDEN ATTORNEY FERRIN Y . MATHEWS ASSOCI A T E C I TY ATTORN EY S ASSISTANT C I TY ATTORNE Y October 23, 1969 HORACE T . WARD DEPUT Y CIT Y ATTORNE Y ROBERT A . HARRIS HENRY M. MURFF CLAI M S A TTORNEY S Mr. George Berry Deputy Chief Administrative Officer 206 City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 JAM E S B . HENDERSON SPE CI A L ASSOC I AT·E CI TY AT T O RN EY Dear Mr. Berry: I recently received from your office, through Mr. George Howell, certain papers relating to the Urban Corps and the Southern Regional Education Board. One of the papers is a letter dated Oc-tober 17, 1969 from Mr. William R. O'Connell, Jr . to Mayor Allen , setti ng f orth c ertain stipu lat i ons fo r the cont i nuation of the Ur ba n Cor ps i n ternship pr ogr am thr ough Dec ember , 1969 . The problem appears to be whether t he above l etter mi ght be agr eed to and thereby become a contr ac t i n accordance with t h e terms of a resolution adopted October 6 , 1969 . In an effort t o unders tan~ the problem, I have examined your f ile on the Urban Corps and r ea d cons i der able papers . I am s t i ll no t c ertain t ha t I fully comprehen d it . The reso l ution a do pted Oc t ober 8, 1969 s tates that irthe Mayor is authorized to execute an agreement with the Southern Regional Education Board providing that the Board will assume all financial responsibility f or t he payroll cos t s of the Urban Corps f or the fall 1969 -. ,r The res ol u tion further allows the payment of not more than $8000.00 for interns that are used solely by the City . I do not feel that simply having the Mayor sign Mr . O'Connell's letter agree ing to . the terms therein would be sufficient under the circumstances. This is not to say that a contract cannot be raised �Mro George Berry October 23, 1969 Page 2 by the acceptance of a tetter or the exchange of letters, but such a procedure is more suitable for private persons than for public bodies. In order to satisfy the requirements of the resolution of October 8, 1969, an agreement containing specific details is necessary. At the same time, the document should be in the nature of a formal contract, not solely for the sake of formality, but for the sake of clarityo According to my understanding, it appears that SREB officials had some objections to a proposed contracto It might be that some other approach will he· acceptable to them and also satisfy the requirements of the resolution. I remain available to assist you further instructions. H1W/cj cc: George Howell and await �Octob r l4, 1969 rd N . .. 3 313 I o · cloeln l tputy City Attom Y• p a.tory. V ry ty QJ c~: J y 0\1.1'8• �o~tober 8~ 1969 Mr. Jay Fountain Deputy DU' ctor of Finn.nee Ci.ty of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, orgi 30303 Dear Jrzy: the following deposit : .AMOUNT · ACCOUNT !iUMBER: Brown Un~v rsity a-J.6... 7645 Acknowledg nt of r e 1pt will be a.ppr~ t:?1 ;t d. Sine r ly, 1ttJGH H. SAXON, Jr. Dir. _ o~ o't Financ ~- Geor: lo ur $115.20 �Octob r 9, 1969 Fount in ctor O' Finsnc City Of Atl t .• J Deputy D City .l Atl:_enta, Georgia 30303 . J&yf fol1owi.ne; t posit: DRAWN BY: ACCOONT Ackno' 1 dg · nt ot r pt ill . appr e1 . d. Sincerely, HOOH H. SAA Dir C or , J • ot F > \\ s.L-0 �RESOLUTION BY FINANCE COMMITTEE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE MAYOR AND BOARD OF .ALDERMEN OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA that th re olution adopted ay 1,, 1969. authQ,:izing the Mayo,: to enter into contracts with certain colleg and universitie to provide financial support for inte,:n nnder the Coll ge Work Study Program be nd is hereby amended to add the following wiiversity: Wilbet"force University, Th purpo e of thi th qthority to execu wilv r ity s resolution i ilbe:rforce, Ohio to provid th contr cts on beh lf of th p rt of th Atl nta Urban Co rp ayor with City with s id Prog,r m . �CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE 501 CITY HALL ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 Oc tob t 2., 1969 CHARLES L. DAVIS DIRECTOR OF FINANCE W. ROY SMITH DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE E DG AR A . VAUGHN, JR . DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE JAMES R . FOUNTA I N , JR . DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Mr . Ken Hill ood • At lanta Urban Co 30 Court l a Str t , . . t lanta, Georgia 30303 ar Ken: R.efere e 1 e to your of S Mr. Geor • Berty' • r• l y of S pt 1969 , a v---~t•. oul d lrea th t all '.tn11amiia ·collector' • ire• t t the r •• In Yi Corpe acc ou t . itl 1 q al wr• t • t rour ' ....1.,. Ch&rl•• L. Davi• Dir tor of 1 ce CLD:dhf cc: · • �ATLANTA VRBAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND STREET, N .E . / PHO N E; (404] 524-8091 / ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303 MEMORANDUM TO: Dan Sweat FROM: Ken Millwood SUBJECT: DATE: October 6, 1969 ~'-~ Auditorium Parking . I have found -chat at least 10 of the 17 automobiles in the Old Municipal Auditorium parking lot are not owned by City of Atlanta employees. Of these 10, at least 2 are known to be Georgia State students registered this quarter. They are: v(l) _____, A~(2) Mr. William E. Smith - 1601 Lakeland Circle Miss Lynn Friedman - 1850 Lenox Road I have been unable to find out if the remaining eight are employed by the Civil Defense. Their names are: Myrel D. Kaufman 3510 Roswell Road, #A-2 William Pirshall - 1868 Shepherd Circle Phillip Woodruff - 5742 New Peachtree Virginia Hinchcliff - 240 Lakeview Avenu~ 0"~ j Elizabeth Chaney - 3704 Largo Lane~ ._,,.,.....,r,.,~ Margaret Cato - 2709 Ellen Way, Decatur Williard Ingram ·- 2096 Chestnut Hills Circle Clarence Dick - 128 E. Pharr Road, Decatur Any help you can give us in the parking problem will be appreciated. �October 14 , 1969 MEMORANDUM To : Mr . Ken Millwood From: Dan E . Sw at, Jr . Subject : Space for 1970 Urban Corps Program I have your memo ugg sting the use of the room behind your present quarters at the auditorium £or the additional space required if you:r 1970 progr mi pproved . I agre that this looks like the best approach and will take it up with the committe e of the Board of Aldermen re pon ible for the operation of the building. However , I think it would b . a good idea while you re d v loping your coming year's prog1"am to dev lop some information on lt rnate sp ce. You ar aware that the pre mt sp ce is not ide 1 with the parking restrictions and 1 ck of ir conditioning . . I would suggest that you inv stig te prices on priv tely own d r ntal pace . Also, you might ch ck with the Atlanta Hou ing Authority to determine if they h ve anything in urban r . new 1 area that might b used temporarily. The Atlanta. Board of Education might b nother ourc . It wUl mak our r qu t to the Aldetmanic Committ look b tt r if we -are · bl to y that we have inv tig ted alt ~tiv · nd thia is th roost fea ible solution. DESJr:ja. �ATLANTA VRDAN CORPS 30 COURTL AN D STREET , N .E . / PH ON E ( 40 4 ] 52 4 -8 0 9 1 / A T L AN T A, GEORGI A 3 0 3 0 3 MEMORANDUM TO: Dan Sweat FROM: Ken Millwood RE: Urban Corps Office Space Date: October 9, 1969 ¥-.,\..'t/\ I am directing this to you for lack of knowledge of the proper channel. The Urban Corps is now planning for its needs, in terms of manpower, and financing for 1970. One critical need will be expanded office ·space. Our staff will include some twenty-five (25) people after January 1, 1970 (20 of which will be interns). We had fifteen (15) staffers this surmner and at that we were crowded. This condition led to a degree of inefficency and a lack of proper co~ordination o After January 1, we will need to use the room behind our present office. This space was previously used by the Atlanta Youth Council but is now vacant. We can house ten (10) or twelve (12) of our staffers in there (although they will still be cramped). I am asking you to either give me permission to use the room yourself if possible or to inform me of the proper procedure for obtaining this permission. If we will not be able to use this space, I would like for you to offer your suggestions as to how we might solve our office problemo �: -~--. . ' . ,.,., -~ ,.., r ( " , _.... --..:....C°' ' --- �Oetob r 14, 1.969 • Jay Fo tin l)e:puty Director of F City ot A-tl City H · · - Atlanta,, Georgio. 30303 J PL e t d posit : ACCOUNr NO, G-16-7645 DBAl· 0 !n itut ot T cbnology Coll o-16-7645 ity $1,818 .. 4o $1,197.28 3,317,74 161.28 l'Tl .·12 Uni 0-16-1645 485.12 will t ' St t · tJni.ver.Dity c--16-7645 c~l.6-7~5 $5,. 98,08 Sj~,l..~~ Cal.leg a-.l.6-7645 G-16-7645 .AMO\llfr: EY: �October 10, 1969 • William Ra ay · ource lop nt Project Southern Regional Educ tion Bo rd Atlant, G orgia Dear Bill : the foll Pl ing posits in our payroll Dr wn by Argount ry Hol $2,227.20 360.00 a Coll g Metropolitan Atl nta Ho Acknowl de of r ceipt ing Conference 111 be appreciated. Siner ly1 H. S on, Jr. nc Dir ctor cc: 4count: Mr. Geor e rry Addendum: Kirkwood Community Church-653.00 �October 15, 1969 MEMORANDUM To: Charles L. Davis From: Geo:rge Betry Subject: _Attached Payment to Norrell Temporal'y Sel'vices The Urban Corps ha solicited a contribution of $ 250 from th~ Atlanta Transit System, Inc. That check is enclosed. The Urban Corps has incuri-ed an obligation of $179. 06 to Norrell Tempo:rary Services . It is their request that these funds be used to meet this obligation. It would , therefore, be appreciated if you would process their mi cellaneous requisition #83 , which is attached. GB :j a Enclosures �oetober 6, 1969 Mr. Jay F-.:>untain Deputy Director of Fin . ee City of Atl n.t.a Cicy Hall Atlanta, Georg1' 30303 r Jay: Pl e make the fol.lowing depo _it · ACCOUNT NUMBER1 AMOUNT: re A ·OW1.e"""-"=--nt ot rec ipt will be HWH Ht SAXON, Jr . Dir 01' ot Financ I jz.: o: Mr . Geo - B~ ~ r Uniw.ra it)" ppreoiat 161.28 �October 24, 1969 Mr. Bill Ramsay Directol" Research Development Project Southe 1· n Regional Education Board 130 Sixth Stre et, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30313 Dea r Bill: Please m a ke the following depo s it in the Atlanta Urba n Corps account: Drawn By: B layton B usine ss College Morris Brown College .A. mo m t: $ 12. 24 $ 260. 48 Sincerely, Hugh H. Saxon, Jr. Director of Finance HHSjr:sz Enclosures / . I i' ./ ! i . ... - �October 30 , 1969 MEMORANDUM To : Charles L . Davis From; George Berry Subject : Urban Corps Appropriations This is to request that you carry forward into 1970 the existing gener l fund appropriations for the Urban Corps . As you are aware, we are still receiving funds based on the summer program. Perhaps before the first of the year we will be able to review the receipts and expenditures and to adjust the appropriations and anticipations that are presently being carrie d . GB:ja �30 COURTLAND STREET , N .E . / PHONE [ 4 04] 524 -8 0 9 1 / ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303 MEMORANDUM TO: FROM: George Berry DATE: October 6, 1969 Ken Yiillwood SUBJECT: Payment for Temporary Typist In order to prepare our report on the Summer Urban Corps program for pri nting, it was ne cessary to hi re a temporary typist . We have ar ranged to u se necessary donated funds to cover the cost of the typist. I am enclosing a check from the Atlanta Transit Company in the amou_n.t of $250, which added to the $80 balance from a previous check and subtracting the amount of $179.06 for this bill, will leave us a balance of $150. 94. Enclosed is all the necessary inf ormation for payment. �October 13, 1969 Mr . R oy Elrod Auditorium Manager City uf Atlanta Atlanta , Georgia Dear Roy : Attached is a memorandum from Ken Millwood of the Urban Corps, which I requested him to write in connection with se• curity problems at th Urban Corps office . I hope that you can h ve ·some action taken to provide more security to the e offices . Sincerely your , Dan E. Swe t, Jr. Chief A dmini tr tiv DESJr: m Offie r �October 16, 1969 MEMORANDUM To : Charles L . Davis From: George Berry Subject: Urban Corps The Urban Corps staff has solicited and received an unanticipated contribution to their p:rogram from Cousins Properties, Inc. in the amount of $100. 00. It is the request of the Urban Corps staff that these funds be used to compensate two young persons who came to work for the Urban Corps three weeks early to assist in the staff work and were not able to be paid for this period of tin'le . In eff ct, this $50 . 00 will be i.n payment of three weeks work. In view of the fact that the Urban Corps solicit d thls contribution for this purpose and no City funds are involved, it is requested that you honor their request. GB:ja Attachment �Oetobel- 15, 1969 Mr. William R. .~ D!rect<>r Rea arch Developnent P.roj ct Sou.t Regional -..-tio a."18.rd )30 h Street, N. • At.r.Jl,I.I,_; Georgia 30313 Sont & $216,00 COll.Ccr Cf(.00 I / COUncil Jt!. OI2 lie Attain ( Soe1 �Mr. Bill ~ Da ctor Res arch -ay velopm nt Projeat Bou'bhern R giono.l Education B0a.rd 130 S beth Street , N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30313 D a.r Bill: Pl . . - inak e(tountt the fol.l owing deposit to Dra.w By: Canm,u.nity Council ot the Atla.uta Child Serviq a & Femi~ Counseling c ·nt r s n, Jr. or ot Financ Hugh H. Dir HHSjr: • olo ur the Atl t .Amount: $ ,oo Urb ;n C.orp �ATLANTA VROAN CORPS 30 COURTL AN D STRE ET . N .E . / PHON E ( 404) 5 2 4 -8 091 / A TL ANTA , GEORGIA 3030 3 MEMORANDUM TO: FROM: Mr. George Berry Ken Millwood SUBJECT: DATE: October 14, 1969 {\.....\V\. Payment of Attached: Bill Please use the donation money to cover the cost of this bill. The bala.~ce as of October 6, 1969 was $150.94 subtracting the amount of $113.13 leaves us $3'7.Sl unused. �AT·LANTA CIVIC CENTER ROY 0 . ELROD DIRECTOR 395 PIEDMONT AVE ., N.E. ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30312 PHONE: 523-6275 October 15, 1969 Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Chief Administrative Officer City Hall Atlanta, Georgia D ear Dan: Pursuant to your letter of October 13 , and memorandum from . Mr. Millwood, this is to advise that proper steps are being taken to improve security at the Urban Corps Offic es . I regret the thefts very much and hope that this sort of thing will not happen again. Mr. Millwood has a master key to his office doors and to the outside entrance door. He has been requested to lock all doors, including the outside door, when he l e aves. I find that the outside door has been left open several times. At pr esent, no one has keys except the night watchman, Audi torium Foremen, and Mr. Millwood. With only these keys out, and all doors locked, perhaps the problem will be solved. Pl ea s e advis e Mr. Millwood to contact me if h e has further difficulties. ours, p;? ~j:? Dir ector ROE/mf cc : Elip Spence �October 24, 1969 Mr . Neil H . Cullen .A _ ociat Director of Oflice of Fi ld Studie i ld Studiee Ju tin Morrill Colle Michigan Stat Univ ;-sity Ea t Lan in Mic big n Dear Mr . Cull n: Th k you for your lett r in b half of Mi Judy Kni ht. 1 h ve for • ward d thi letter and th materi 1 which you nclo d to Mr . K n Mill ood, Director of Atl nt , U'rban Corpa . I h ve a ked Mr . Mill o to communic te with you dir ctly out ny possibility for iaa Knight to work with u in the City of .Atlanta. Thank you for your int r at in .Atlanta n.d th Ur n Corps . Sillc . rely your , D n t, Jr. Chi f .Adminiati- tive Offic r DESJr:• cc : K n Ulwo - �PROGRESS REPORT TO THE ATLANTA URBAN CORPS, INC., BOARD OF TRUSTEES The Atlanta U-/ban Corps completed its first quarter of operation on August 22, climaxing ate~ week intern program utilizing studente in urban problems The pr-ogr-am im-olved 225 students from 43 different colleges. 80% of the se stud.ents were from Atlanta area colleges. Apf'ro:dmately Interns were placed in 35 public interest non-profit agencies and 15 departments of the ~ity of Atlanta. Approximacely 45% of the students were black and 55% white. A ~yptcal example of a city department internship was a team of 15 students doing research and data analysis in the City fnnitation department. Others s~rved on the Mayor's staff doing research and another example was students compiling financial information for possible tax legislation in the City of Atlanta. The private public-interest agencies tended to utilize students more in the social and humanistic disciplines euch as counseling or working in recreation programs involving young people and actual communities. A typical example is an intern serving in the Emmaus House t eaching children from depriv"ed neighborhoods bas_ic reading skills and education courses during the summe r . Another exampl e involved ten students in a mentally retarded children I s c:9-mp S?onsored by the Decatur-Dekalb YMCA. Thi ~ su:nm-c!r our ope ra ting budgets was approximately $200,000 broken down a s f o llowr,< $52 , 000 Approprta tion from City of Atlanta $20 , 000 Southern Regional Education Board .. 1 j �$13,000 Private Business Contributors $75,000 College ·Work-Study Program (Grants from the Office of Education through Individual Colleges) Private Public -interest Agencies Volunteers in Service to America $20,000 $20,000 Approximately half, or 114 students, were spousored under the College WorkStudy program, which is a federally sponsored program of the Office of Education whereby the college pays 80% of the ' intern's stipend, with the agency involved supplying the remaining 20%. The College Work-Study progr am is available to every public college and grants vary according to requests and needs of the colleges involved. The student financial aid officer is in charge of these funds of each campus and can allocate them as he desires to " off-campus non-protit agencies " such as the Atlanta Urban Corps. This sununer we were fortunate in persuading financial aid officers to contribute heavily to the Atlanta Urban Corps, and evidently this figure will rise apprecialby next year. Interns salaries were $72.000 (1.80/hr) weekly for freshman and sophomores, $88.00 ($2.20/hr) weekly for juniors and seniors and $100.00 ($2.50/hr) for graduate students. We received 880 student applications for the summer program giving a very good indication that students are indeed very interested in participatin~ in summer internships and coll ege-c ommunity i nvo lvement programs . We received 300 reque sts from c i ty departments a nd publ i c interest-agencies requesting interns to serve as assistants during the summer. Unfortunatel y these position ' requests usually c an't be paid for at ful l cost by the agency, hence, the need for private donations for non-work-s t udy i nterns. We have alread y received over 75 requests for interns t o serve during the academic program. This summer the Urban Corps wa s administered by a student staff of 15 people whose abili t ies and dedication are directly attributable to the program's 2 �success. We started extremely late in the acade mic ye ar and ended up with a very substantial program involving numerous colleges and students. We were fortunate that much ground work had been done i n Atlanta and many of the organizations whose resources were needed had been involved early in the planning and understood the aspects of the program well. This was due to hard work done by many students in Atlanta . from various coll eges. A special note of thanks should go to Dave Whelan, Mark Dash and Rich Speer , whose early work in contacting the Board of Trustees and especially fund ra i sing later proved beneficial to the Urban Corps. We found that these students, through contacting various colleges, were primarily responsible for the h i gh number of applications we received with little ~ or no publicity. This summer the Urban Corps has administratively operated under the City of Atlanta and the Southern Regional Education Board, pr i marily f or contractural agreements purposes with the agencies and for le gal contracts wi th the colleges. A very large in determining administrative respons i bility was i n the que stion of who served as the paymaster. The Ci ty was most coope r ative this sum- me r in absorbing a de ficit spending s i tuation whereby i t abso r bed the cost o f the stude nt's st i pend unt i l coll e ge s could r eimburse them. Also , many agenc ie s we re tardy in pay ing the i r share of the studen t 's stipend. In some cas e s th i s meant a debt of $60 , 000 whi ch wa s carried ove r a t hree or fou r we ek pe r i od . Th i s is t he primary pr obl em in ut i l izi ng a group such as t he Boa r d of Tr ustees in ha nd • ling admi n is trative d ifficult ie s tha t ari se i n the Urba n Corps . I f t he Board o f Trustees had a large bank a ccount and could ab s orb tremendous deficits within a short period of time , no d iff ic ulty would ari s e. Otherwi s e, the City must be re- tained in some paymaster role or l egal role for contractural authority. (In my opinion, the Urban Corps as we know it today, should operate under its present sys tem through the summer of 1970 with the Board of Trustees taking ultimate control in September of 1970.) The financial and payroll p roblems incurred this : summer point to the need for extensive planning and lead time before the Trustees 3 �take over the Urban Corps operation. A special note of thanks should go to Dan Sweat, who helped us with space, payroll problems, contractural problems , and staff expenses during the inttial summer program. Unfortunately , those elected officials at City Hall do not com- pletely agree with Mr. Sweat. The City Finance Committee naturally closely scruntinizes our monetary requests. From a purel y financial point of view these members of the Board of Aldermen do, not agree thab we should have educational counseling as they put no emphasis on the educational aspects of the program. These financial people interpret the Urban Corps as a cheap summer employment program for summer months only. from the colleges and those This aga i n is an i ndication that more input is needed 11 educa tion' 1 spec trums o f the community . Naturally the ,more money that comes in from other sources the more autonomy we may have in making expenditures. From the first ideas of the Urban Corps to its actual implementations, there has been a tremendous emphasis on student input. Presently, we have a high deg re e of student participat ion in that all of our staff members are students. In my cpinion, student repreaentation·should be included on the Board o f Trustees, but these students should come from the ranks of those who have served as Urban Corps interns, rather than having student governments elect any ±nterested student to serve in that role. From operational experiences this summer, we have found that the program is best administe red by one individual re po rting to a small group of people rather than the original proposal o f having two people head the organization, one in the role of a student director and one in the role of the staff director. My sugge stion for continuing the student input is to make sure that the Director i s a young pe r son, p referably a graduate student h i mself and that the Board of Trustees function more closely to the Urban Cor ps . Presently, the Atlanta Urban Corps, Inc., exists only on paper. 4 The Internal �Revenue Service has granted the Atlanta Urban Corps, Inc., a tax exemption status. specific. The next step f~r the Board of Trustees i s to make the by-laws more Also, t4e membershi p of t he Board of Trustees should be revised to make sure that all sectors of the community are equally i nvolved and that no sector is overwe ighed, specjfically in r e f erence to t he r esources needed to " . operate the Urban Corp~. I am leaving· to attend 9raduate , School at Harvard University , but have found a replacemept who is very i nterested i n t he Urban Cor ps and knows a ·l ot · a-bout it f r om- his experie nce t h i s i,umme r . This studen t wa s rec r ui ted _.&nd_ interviewed by myself, Bill Ramsay·, Dan ~eat and o thers i ntimately in- valved i n the Urban Corps. Mr. Ken Mi llwood is a gradua te of · t he Un~ve r.~ity of Ge orgia School of Journalism and is " preeently pur~uing ·a - M8ste r 's Degr ee i n Georgi a State's Nt .ght School. Ken was Urban Corps Public Relations Di rector thi s eurmner and diri a n e xce llent job as you proba bly -know if -you e-aw news clippi nge abou t the Urban Corps this s ummer. The present., 1~ l an of t he Ur ban Corps i s to admini ~t. r atively r e port to the City ~ nd t he ,Southe rn· Reg ional Education Board as we · ·~ e done in the past. There are many pos sib ilities on t he hor±zon f or future· operations as f ar -·att- finance and o t her resour ce s are c oncerned . . The Urban Observatory, _a college aff iliated re s earch gr oup of the Mayor ' s Of fi ce, h a s asked for a grant of $30,000 to be give n to the Urban Corp-s for opera tional e xpe nses. has no t ye t been approved by HEW. This gran t The · Unite~ State s Commiss i oner of Education , Mr. J ames E . Alle n , J r . , had indi cated vtl'ry s t r ong support from HEW t o t he Ur ban Corps and o ther internship programs. _ Mr . Al len made a s t_atement rece n tly to Ur ban Corps intern, saying tha t r oughl y ha lf · o f the college wo r k-study allocat·ione should be s pent i n such involveme nt p rograms be tween the col l ege and the ..·- . . .. 5 �and the community. The Office of Education is presently implementing this guideline which means that next year the Urban Corps in Atlanta will absorb approximately $700,,000 of College Work-Study funding. We anticipate roughly 1;000 summer interns next year and 100 interns dur i ng the academi c year. We are also working closely with colleges in trying t o persuade them to grant academic credit with gu i delines to i nsure t hat educational .experieuce is indeed received. We are running into quite a b i t o f d if f i culty in the area of academic credit and welcome help fr om t he members o f the Board of Trustees. A very unique part of the Atlanta Urban Corps i s its Field and Education Staff. This summer this group o f students staf fe rs has structured seminars and visited with interns discussing urban problems as well as personal difficulties that may arise on the job. The Field and Educat i on Staf f should be an integral part of the ~Jrban Corps fro m now on, since it has proved so beneficial for the summer operat i on. Typical examples of seminars have ranged from speake r s such as Joe Bo one, Civil Ri ghts La ader in At lanta; to Members of the Mayor ' s Staff work i ng on Ur ban problems. We have t r ied to pick ,pe ople from all spec t rums of the urban sce ne t o give interns a good i dea o f what our problems are in Atlanta and what is being done and what should be d one ab out them. As a n integ ral part o f t he i n t e r nship program t his summer, e ach s t uden t submitte d a f inal re po rt de ta i ling h i s e xperienc e s and r e commenda t ions ab ou t the Ur ban Corps and ~bout his a g·e nc y of ci ty de par t me nt. The s e r ep ort s have been us ed by a ge nc ie s and city gov ernment in ob taining grant s and r e view ing their admi nis t r a t ive a nd p rogra m ope ra tio n . Other re port s have given t he Boa rd of Aldermen p lans for u r ban re newa l in Pl unket t own and many private agenc i es have used the s e repor ts in rai s i ng f und s and improvi ng thei r operation . A cata - logue of the s e re port s is availab l e for tho s e pers ons intere s ted and each report 6 �is on file in the Urban Corps office. The Atlanta Urban Corps has attained national prestige this first year due to the many people in Atlanta who were interes t ed in i ts succe ss. We have received unanticipated amounts of publicity from the local press to the nationally syndicated newspapers. We are the only program of our type which has been a b le t o obta i n suppo rt f rom the business communi ty, educational community, the government, and public service cormnuni ty. The greatest factor for success now rests with the educational and governmental sector. I urge those members of the business group on our Board of Trustees and other influential membe r s t o try t o persuade the new Mayor to suppor t the Urban Corps as much as Mayor Allen has. Also, we are i n desperate need of f unds as usual. Mem- bers of the business coummunity should help our student staff members i n raising these funds. The Urban Corps has proven that students can indeed contribute t o solving '·the urban problems o f Atlanta. We hope this is only the beginning and that fur- the r and more sophi sticate d cooperat-io'n can be come evident between t h e college and i ts community i n t he near f u ture. Mr . Ken Millwood, the new Director, will be in t ouch with you a later da t e t o ou t l i ne spec ific plans and progress r ep ort s of the Ur ba n Cor ps. We we lcome a ny of you to v i s i t our o ff ice a t a ny t i me . We are l oc a t e d up stairs in the Old City Auditori um~ The Fall Program of the Atlanta Ur ban Corps is now in operation. five (5 5) t o sixty-five ( 65) int erns wi ll be p l aced t his fall. Fift y - As in the past, the sponso rBhip of Atlanta Ur ban Corps is shar ed by SREB and the City of Atlanta. The interns hip s are to begin September 29, 1969, and r un for twe lve ( 12) weeks until December 19, 1969. ~~v~ Sam Williams Director Atlanta Urban Corps 7 �L ATLANTA VRBAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND STREET, N . E. / PHONE (404] 52 4 -8091 / ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 October 23, 1969 Mr. D~ Sweat Chief City Administrator City of Atlanta City Hall 68 Mitchell Street, S. W. Atla.-r:rt a, Georgia 30303 Dear. Mr. Sweat : Enclosed you will find a comprehensive summary of the Surmner Program with reconnnendations for the f'uture as compiled by Sam Williams. AE. the new Atlanta Urba..~ Corps Director, I can appreciate the need for close communication between the Board of Trustees and the Atlanta Urban Corps. Mfu,y fina..~cial problems a..~d administrative details must be overcome for the Board of Trustees to become an active force in the Urban Corps operation. You will be receiving notification in the near f'uture regarding "t.he next meeting of the Board of Trustees. At your convenience, please study the enclosed report. We solicite a....'-iy personaJ.. or professional suggestions that you might have concerning the Boa.rd of Trustees of the Atlanta Urban Corps, Inc. Ken Millwood Director KM:sz Enclosure �. Se pt • b r 5. 196 9 MEMORANDU TO Charl FRO Dan E . Swe t. Jr. SUBJECT Ur L . Davi , Director of F' Co nc • yor AU n contact d Alderman llto F rrl•, Chalrtna ot d it i• my utld ra a d ciaio F' nc Committe , Urb Corps wl w • raac:b d to provld t. for r mal er of t 4 le our ro d budget fo~ thia t ia lor adrniniatrati f • oftl. 1 •• ~1 •t• a ,t o rd of Ald r 0 Jr:lr �PROPOSED UDGET Atlanta. Urb a Corp• Project SOl)temb r 5,. 1969 through D <;emb r 31. 1969 ala.-i a: Db~actor 800 tor month Dit' ct.or ., 650 Dlz et -r $650 3t 200~ 00 2,600 . 00 Z,600. 0 2,000.0 l , 600 .. 00 To get 1 • ooo. 0 �THE ATLANTA URBAN LEAGUE, INC. An Educational Co mmun ity Se rvice Agen cy Coi,ering Over 48 Y ea rs of Preventive Social Se rvice 521·2355 • 239 AUBURN AVENUE, N, E. • ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303 NATIONAL URBAN LEAGUE AFFILIATE • 19(19 Ro :mey D .r 1. • United Appeal M ember Agency �- - 2 csi li l.At :c ls cc~ �- - -- ~ pt -- ~ -- ~ - - - ·-- r 26, 19 9 r Urb C ,rp al ( cc: • D Sweat cc: Mr. George B~rry ~ t 81J �Fount tn Deputy Director ot Fin~ce Ml". J City of Atl anta, City Hall At nta¾ Georgia 30303 .a:r· Jay-: ~l a~ make th tcll~wing deposits: AMOUNT: ACcotllfr NO . cou-g 0-16-7645 V se.r G-l.6-761+5 Y sbiva University $178 .64 Acknowl: dge nt o'f ceipt m:mI H. SAXON, Jr. Dirflcto~ ,o., F:1.nanc co: Mr·. Geor Berey 11 b $161.28 app,: 'diated . �September 30, 1969 Ml' . J&:y Fountain Deputy Dir ctor of Finana·e City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta., Georgia 30303 Dear Ja.y: Pl as make the following deposit ACCOUNT NUMBER2 G-16-7645 DRAWN BY: Georgi st .te University $1,232 .64 Georgi :tnstitut of T ehnology $1,235 .20 G-16-7645 ory Uni rsity $ 197~12 0-16...7645 Brown Uni r ity us.eo owl dge nt ot A Sin r ly, HUGH H. SAXON, Jr. Dir otoi- of Fin jr:a& Ml:'. Georg eeipt will be appreci t d . �September 29, 1969 MEMORANDUM To: Charles L. Da via From: D n E . S e at 1 Jr. S ubject: Urban C o rp E nroll s fol' F 11 A a re s ult of th ction of the Finance C ommitt ppropri ting 12. 000 fol' a dminis trative co ts. th Urb n Co rps i pro re 11Hsing on it a i ned t sk of opel'ating an abb2revi t ,d program this ! 11 nd pl nni.ng 1 rg r pro r m fol' this coming ye r for pres nt tion to th City thi s fall d urin. th r gul 'r bud get proce s . Th y h ve canva e e d City D partment n.d h v d t rmin d th t t n d pa rtmeot nd/ o r g ncl hav r,eque s te enl'oll fo~ this fall . Th tt ch d e ch d ul eta !Qrth requ te from. the t n dep rtm.ent for 24 enrolle e . Not th t inc the Het s typ d ,. th at D partn:lent h 1 r uced its r qu t to 1 tull.tim enroll thr part-tun th t ;re Oft th lis t. r th r th n the 2 full-tlm nd Thie ia to roqu at th t you t v r ction h nee e ry to pr , nt this 11 tlon to th prop l" utboriti to g t d chlon on h ther tht m ount of fun d can b utillz d for thi purpo1e and th n t ke th n c: • ry action to make uch lWlc • v lla bl to th Urban C o rp who ill then aathorlz th exp -nditur th South rn R lo l E cation B o r d ho ill act p y ter thl fall. It i th u.:nd rst din of th Urb n Corp• th t pre • nUy appl'opri te a ry fun • of th b n fltlng p rtm nt can b utillz d for thh pur o e . ha r vi w d th - re qu. at r to be r a a o able. DE Jr:ja bee: George Berl'y File Copy of the Dep rtmente l or th • nroll a, a d �ATLANTA URBAN CORFS-CITY PLACEMENTS DEPARTMENT No . of Interns Total Cost to Department Community Relations Commission 2 - Fu.11-Time-CWSP $ 720.00 Building Department 3 - Two full-time-CWSP One part-time-CWSP $ 733.00 Business License l Full-tDne-CWSP $ 260.00 Housing Resources 2 - One Full-time -CWSP One Part-Time-CWSP $ 415.00 Finance Department 6 - Six part-time(2 tentative) (full cost) $2,675.00 Personnel Department 2 - Two part-time-CWSP $ Sanitation Department l - One full-time-full cost $1,320.00 Water Department one.. / _,-. g;l.w() full-time- l,CWSP 255.00 tJ: , 865 .00 ~bC) . 0 0 ~ , f¥1:J.J GG£t 'Jkh-r ee prrt time 2,CioISP Youth Council 2-one full-time-CWS.P one riart-time-CWSP $ 47Y).OO Urban Corps* 4-Four part-time-CWSP $ Total Cost to City Departments (less Urban Corps intern costs) Urban Corps Intern's salary included in administrative budget 476.00 .$6 , 722 ,00 ,'7 .... I '!63 . oo �September 9, 1969 Mr~ Jnmond L . Deen, Jr.. Director of Finance Tulane Law School New Orleans, La . Dear Mr. Dean: We are aware of the important contribution that you made to the City of Atlanta through the Atlanta Urban Corps this swnmer . On behalf of the Cityr and personally, I wish to express ,o ur grateful appreciation for your fine work. Sincer.e ly., lva:n Allen, Jr. M ayor IAJr:lrd �September 9, 196 9 \ Mr.. Kytle Frye Atlanta Service- Learning Conference 811 Briarcliff Road, N . E . Apartment 10 Atlanta.. Georgia 30306 Dear Mr . Frye: We are aware of the important contribution that you inade to the City of Atlanta through the Atlanta Urban Corps this summer. On behalf of the City, and personally~ I wish to express ou.r grateful appreciation for your fine work. Sincerely, Ivan Allen. Jr. M yor lA.Tr:lrd �September 9, 1969 Miss Maggie Gerber Educ ation- Evaluation Staff 519 Candler Street, N . E . Atlanta,. Georgia 30307 Dear Miss Gerber: We are aware of the important contribution that you made to the City of Atlanta through the Atlanta Urban Corps this· summ.er . On behali of the City,, and personally, I wish to express 01ir grate!ul appreciation for your £ine work. Ivan Allen, Jr. ayor IA.Jr:lrd �• Septe mber 9, 1969 Miss Resna Hamm.er· Education-Evaluation Staff Director 1178 Briarcliff Road., N . E. Apartment #2 Atlanta, Georgia 30306 Dear Miss Hanuner~ We are aware of the im.po,1;tant contribution th t you made t-0 the City of Atlanta through the Atlanta Urban Corp thi summer. On be.ball of the City, and per o.a.a.lly, I i h to expre our grateful appreciation for your fine or-k. Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor IAJr·:lrd ,, ·.· '·. �September 9. 1969 Miss Patty Harwell, Secretary Georgia. Institute of Technology Box 33503 Atlanta, Georgia 30332 Deal" M iss Harwell: We are aware of the important contribution that you ma.de to the City of Atlanta through the Atlanta U rba.n Corps this summer. On be.half of the City., and perso:nally, I wish to express our grateful appreciation for your fine work. Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor IAJr:lrd �September 9, 1969 Miss Melinda Lawrence Atlanta Service-Learning Conference Box 649 Milledgeville,. Georgia 31061 Dear Miss Lawrence : We are aware of the important contribution that you made to the City of Atlanta through the Atlanta Urban Corps this summer. On behalf of the City. and personally. I wish to express ·o ur grateful appreciation for your fine work. Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. M ayor IAJr:lrd �Se pte mber 9. 196 9 Mr. Ken Millwood Public Relations Director 128 Meadowbrook Drive Marietta., Georgia 30060 Dear Mr. Millwood : We are aware of the important contribution that you made to the City of Atlanta through the Atlanta U r ban Corps this summer . On behalf o f tbe City., a nd personally. I wish to express our grateful appreciation for your fine work. Sincerely, Ivan Allen. Jr. M ayor . IAJr:lrd �September 9, 1969 Mr. Steve B . Mwamba Payroll Coordinator 1761 Pryor Road, S . W. Apartment #4 Atlanta, Georgia 30315 Dear Mr. Mwamba: We are aware of the important contribution that you made to the City of Atl nta through the Atlanta Urban Corps this summer . On behalf of the City,, and personally, I wish to express our grateful appreciation for your fine ork. Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. ayor lAJr:lrd �September 9, 1969 ·, Mr . James M . Rabb Pay;roll Coordinator 16 Williams Street Greenville,. S . C . Dear Mr. Ra.bb : We are aware of the irnportant c:ontribut-ion that you made to the City o.f Atlanta through the Atlanta Urban Corps this .swruner. On behaU of the City, and personally, I wiah to express our gr teful appreciation for your fine work. Sincerely. Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor lAJr:lrd �, September 9, 1969 Miss Barbara Rudisill Education Consultant Z31 Garden Lane Decatur, Georgia 30030 Dear Miss Rudisill: , We a.re aware of the important contribution that you made to the City of Atlanta through the Atlanta Urban Corp this summer. On behalf of the City, and personally. I wi h to expres·s oui- gr teful appreciation for your fine wor • Sincerely, Ivan Aile~ Jr. M yor IAJr:lrd I I �September 9, 19o9 Mr. Hugh H. Saxon Financ e Staff 36 35 Charles Drive East Point. Georgia 30344 Dear Mr. Saxon : 1 We are aware of the important contribution that you made to the City of Atlanta through the Atlanta Urban Corps this surruner . On beh 1£ o f the City, and personally,, I wi h to express our g~ teful appreciatio.n for your fine work. Sincerely, Iv n Allen, Jr. Mayor �September 9~ 1969 Mr. Tony Whedon Educational Consultant 1417 S. Gordon Street, S . W . Atlanta, Georgia 30310 Dear Mr . Whedon: We are aware ol the important contribution that you made to the City ol Atlanta. through the Atlanta Urban Corps this summer. On behall of the City, and personally, I wish to express our gr teful appreciation !or your fine ork. Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. M yor IAJr:lrd ... !' ', \ \ \ �September 10. 1969 Miss Dianne Wilson Development Staff Apartment 31-M 3 712 Gordon Road Atlanta, Georgia Dear M iss Wilson: We ar,e aware of the important contribution that you. made to the City of Atlanta through the Atlanta Urban Corps this summer. On behalf of the City, and personally, I wi h to expre s our grateful appreciation for your fine work. Si ncerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. M ayor lAJr:lrd �September 10, 196,9 Mr. Dave Whelan C /0 Dr. W. E . Whelan Placement & Development Director 7721 Nelan Drive Louisville, Kentucky Dear Mr. Whelan: We are aware of the important contribution that you niade to the City of Atlanta through the Atlanta Urban Corps this summ.er. On behalf of the City, and personally, I wish to expres our grateful appreciation for your fine work. Sincerely, Ivan Allen., Jr. M yor lAJr:bd �• September 10, 1969 Miss Dawn White Education-Evaluation Staff 13790 Thornton Avenue Detroit, M ichigan Dear Miss White: We are aware of the important contribution that you made to the City of Atlanta through the Atlanta Urban Corps this summer. On behaU of the City, and personally, 1 wish to express grateful appreciation for your fine work. OUJI' Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor . IAJr:lrd �September 9, 1969 Miss Dianne Lovejoy Receptionist 15 75 Beecher Street, S . W . Atlanta, Georgia 30310 Dear Miss Lovejoy: We are aware of the unportant contribution that you made to the City of Atlanta through the Atlanta Urban Corps thi summer. On behalf of the City. and per onally, I wi h to expre s our grateful appreciation for your fine ork. Sincerely, Ivan Allen,. Jr. M yor IA.1r:lrd �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 2, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 8, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 8, Complete Folder
  • Text: 1. ~c,._ '{ ~~ t.;--- CV /..,0 . ~ W «< 1/' '? ;-:; 0 ,(_; 0 -::- �ATLAN TA VRBAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND STREET , N .E . / PHO N E [404] 525 -2 6 62 / A TL AN T A , GEORGIA 30 3 0 3 AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE CITY OF ATLANTA URB.A.L~ CORPS AND A NON-CITY OF ATLAJ.WA AGENCY TO: FROM: THE CITY OF ATLANTA URBAN CORPS _ _ _ _....,(_N_am_e_o_f_Ag_e_n_c_y..,..)_ _ _ __ Hereafter called the "Agency" (Address) Whereas the above named Agency, a public private non-profit (delete one) organization desires to participate in the Atlanta Urban Corps, a program operated under the Mayor's of fice of the City of Atlanta, and in consideration for the assignment of Urban Corps student interns to the Agency, we do hereby agree to the following terms and conditions: (1) The Urban Corps shal l have the r i ght t o approve or reject requests for student interns submitted by this agency upon forms provided for t hat purpose by the Urban Corps. (2) The Agency shall ut i l ize such students as may be ass i gned t o it i n accordance with the specifications set f orth in its written request to the Urban Corps, and shall immediately not i fy the Urban Corps of any change in nat ure of assignment , duti es , sup ervis or or work location. (3) The Agency shall provide such s tudents as may be as s i gned to i t with a safe place t o work and wi t h adequate r e sponsible sup ervis i on. (4) The Ur ban Corps s hall have t he r i ght t o i nspect at any t ime the work b eing performed by such students as may be assigned t o the Agency, and shall have the right to interview such students and t heir supervisors. ( 5) The Urban Corps shall have t he right to require such students as may be assigned t o the Agency to att end such general or special meetings, or to appear at the Urban Corps office, indi vidually or as a group , a s shall b e nece ssary for the proper functioning of the program . (6) In accordance with the r equirements of the Federal law work perf ormed �--1 by such students as may be assigned to the Agency shall - - - - a. be in the public interest; b. will not result in the displacement of employed workers or impair existing contracts for services; c. does not involve the construction, operation, or maintenance of so ·much of any facility as is used, or is to be used, for sectarian instruction or as a place for religious worship, and; d. does not involve any partisan or nonpartisan political· activity associated with a candidate, or contending faction or group, in an election for public or party office. (7) The Agency shall require such students as may be assigned to it to submit time reports and follow such other procedures as may be established by the Urban Corps . (8) The Urban Corps shall have the right to remove any student assigned to the Agency from said assignment and from the Agency at any time for any reason without prior notice, and the Urban Corps shall not be obligated to replace said student. (9) The Agency warrants that it is in compliance with the provisions of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (P.L. (10) 88-352, 78 Stat. 252 ). The Agency shall indemnify, protect and hold harmless the AtJanta Urban Corps and the City of Atlanta from all claims, causes or actions whi ch may result from the assignment of students to the Agency. (11) The City of Atlanta Urban Corps shall be deemed the employer for purposes of this agreement, with the ultimate right to control and direct the services of such students as may be assigned to the Agency. Interns shall be designated as "casual" employees of the City of Atlanta and sub ject to fringe benefit limitations - 2 ~ �imposed on "casual" employees of said city. The Agency's rights shall be limited to the direction of the immediate details and means by which the result is to be accomplished. (12) The Urban Corps shall be wholly responsible for securing the com- pensation of such students as may be assigned to the Agency, except that the Agency shall become fully liable for such sums as may be due to provide the proper compensation in the even that the Agency, either knowingly or unknowingly, violates any applicable provisions of law ·or the terms of this agreement. (13) The Agency shall, by June 9, 1969, advance to the Urban Corps an amount equal to $250.00 per intern. This money shall be used as the Agency's 20% .., share of the intern' s gross earnings, Workmen's Compensation costs to the Urban Corps, employer's share of Social Security and an amount equal. to 5% of the intern's gross earnings for administrative costs to the Urban Corps and the City of Atlanta. The Agency shall, upon written request of the Urban Corps, provide such additional funds as may be requ:i.Jred where the amount previously advanced by the Agency proves inadequate. The Urban Corps shall, within sixty (60) days after the termination of work of such students as were assigned to the Agency, return to the Agency such of its funds as were not required under the terms of this Agreement . Remittance to the Urban Corps shall be made payable to the Atlanta Urban Corps, City of Atlanta. Number of interns Total Amount D~edthls due at $250 per intern dey~------------- ----~ FOR THE AGENCY: Authorized Signature Title - 3 - Witness �Based upon the statements and affirmations ira.de by the Agency through the above document, the Urban Corps, acting by and through the Mayor of the City of Atlanta, hereby agrees to the assignment of students to said Agencies, in accordance with said document and the applicable laws and regulations. Mayor of the City of Atlanta Dated City Clerk SEAL - 4- �:m c oLJH l l J\f,! [)S .l l l l [ .1 , NL ./ f' H O N l [ '1 0 -l ] !, 2!, 1 G6 2 / l\ TL ,U\J TA, G FO R G l /\3 0 3 03 AGREE~1Ei\1T BETWEEN THE ATLA.i.W A URBAN CORPS AND A NON-CITY OF AT LAN'r A AGENCY 1 ·To : FROM: The At l ant a Urban Cor ps - - - - - . - - - - - - - - - ~ - - - - - - - Hereafter calle d the (Name of Agency ) 11 Agency 11 (Addr e ss) Where as the above named Agency , a public private (delete one) organiz ation, desire s t o par ti c ipat e i n the Atlant a Ur ban Corps , and in considerat ion for the assi gnment of Urban Cor ps student i nt erns t o the Agency, we do hereby agree to the foll owing terms and condit ions : (1) The Urban Corps shall have t he right to approve or reject re quests for student int erns submi tt ed by this agency upon forms provided f or t hat purp os e by the Urb an Corps . (2) The Agency shall utilize such students as may be assigned to it in accordance with the specificat i ons s et f orth in its written request to the Urban Corps, and shall i mmediately noti fy t he Urban Corps of any change in nature of assi gnment, dutie s , supervi sor (3) or work location. The Agency shall provide such s t udents as may be ~3signed to it with a safe place t o work and with adequate respons ible supervision. (4) The Urb an Corps shall have the ris ht to inspect at any time the work bein~ perf ormed by such students as may be assigned to the Agency, and shall have the right t o interview such st udent s and their supervisors. (5) The Urban Cor p s s hall have the right to requi r e such stud~nts as may be a$s i gned to the Agency t o att end such general or special meetings, or to appear at the Urb an Cor ps offi ce , individually or a s a group, as shall be necessary for the proper f un ct i on i nc of t he program. (6) In a ccordance wi t h the requirements of t he Federal law work performed �CORPS 30 CU L.1 R l l. r, ;-,: D S T H I !. l . N , TL. . ..:-, f::: T;i. _ GEOf-'l GIA 3 0 303 by such students as may be assigned to the Agency s hal~ - - - a. be in the public interest; b. will not result in the displace:r:ent of employed workers or impair existing contracts for services; c. does not involve the constr ucticn , operation, or maintenance of so much of any facility as is used, or is to be used, for sectarian instruction or as a place for re l i ~iuus; and d. does not invol ve any partisan or non.:;:>artisan political activity associated with a candidate, or contending faction or group, in an election for public or party office (7) The Agency shall require such students as may be assi gned to it t o submit time reports and follow such other _procedures as may be established by the Urban Corp s . (8) The Urban Corps shall have the right to re~ove any student assigned to the Agency fr om said assignment and fror::1 t he Agency at any ti~e for any reason without prior notice, and the Urban Corps shall not be obligated to replace said student. (9) The Agency warrants that it is in coI_p liance with the provisions of the · Civil Rights Act of 1964 (P.L. 88-352, 78 Stat. 252). (10) The Agency shall indemnify, pr otect and hold harmless the Atlanta Urban Corps and the City of Atlanta from all claims, causes or actions which may result from the assignment of students to the A£e~cy. • • -:~ .... {_., I•--··; i (ll)a. ~•. ,_....r I., ...._:,-..... The Urb an Cor.ps •shall be deemed the em.:;:>loyer for purp_o ses of this agreement, with the ultimate right to control and direct the services of such students as may be as signed to the Agency. The Agency's ri ghts shall be limited to the direction of the immediate details and means by which the result is to be accomplished. �ATLAl~JTA \JRBA1~ C0T{ PS 30 CO UHT L. AND STRE[l . NE / PH ONF. [ tl0-'1 1 S7.5 -2 GG 2 / ,\ TL AN T A, G E O R Gl /.1 303 03 (12)a •. The Urban Corps shall be wholly responsible for securing the compensation of such students as may be assigned to the Agency, except that the Agency shall become fully liable for such sums as may be due to provide the proper compensation in the event that the Agency, either knowingly or unknowingly, violates any applicable provision of law or the terms of this a greement. (12) b. The Agency shall pay to the Urban Corps thirty (30) per cent of the gross compensation earned by such students as may be assigned to the Agency, in accordance with the below provisions. The Agency shall, upon receipt _of writtan notification of the amount due, advance to the Urban Corps an amount equal to thirty (30) per cent of the anticipated gross weekly ~ompensation of such students as are assigned to the Agency, multiplied by the number of weeks the students are expected to work. This thirty (30) per cent shall be used as the Agency's share of the intern's earnings, vlorkmen's Compensation costs to the Urban C rps, and overhead and administrative costs of the Urban Corps and the City of Atlanta. The Agency shall, upon written request of the Urban Corps, provide such additional funds as may be required to provide the requisite thirty (30) per cent of the actual gross compensation payable such students, where the amount previously advanced by the Agency proves inadeqiate. The Urban Corps shall, within sixty (60) days after the termination of work of such students as were assigned to the Agency, return to the Agency such of its funds as were not required under the terms of this Agreement. Remittance to the Urban Corps shall be made payable to the City of Atlanta, Urban Corps account. Dated this - - - - - - - day of - - - - - - - - -19---- For the Agency: Authorized Signature Title �AT lfa~-NTA \JR U.A1~J CORPS 30 C OURTLA /\! D S T P.U T . N .E .· / PH O N E [ '1 0 1\J ,?. ::, 2GG2 / A TL ,'.\"JTA . G E O f1 GI /\ 3 0 3 0 3 Based upon the statements and affirmations made by the Agency through the above docu.ment, the Urb an C· -rps hereby agrees to the assign..YCient of students to said Agency , in accordance with said document and the applicable laws and regulations . ·nated Signature of Authorized Urban Corps Official Title �,.. . -· N:rtt..:rrA UIIBAn CO•.PS COLLm2 ·rl'P~O.CTUHAL -~GIL'El{; ~NT ___,__ ·- CO~ . -------·--·· ··---·--···--- - - This ft.r;rae ,_l?nt, r.:.ail.e this _ ___ dtW of _____, 19_ ___ entered int o betwean ~ . i a h e m 11 c al l ed the I.nnt i tut -.\ 011!1 , and t he Ur ban Cor9s of the Ci ty c,f Atl a;:1.t a , a riubli c orc;anizati ... n w.~·t;.hin t be r:?eani n :?, o_ t bat tem M clefincd in the r e .·:ula.t i c1 r. c-,f the Del;)artnent d' Heril t h , Edm~at i on, aeti n;:, by alld t lm::w~h t he :Mayor of t he City of Atl axi.t a . mIERE!AG, the Inst it.u.t"1.on and t ie ¾:,ency d.es'.i.r e to enter i rit o an s.;_-: ree1...en'G ptu-:.:unnt to Title IV, --art C of the a::. a:~cnded , a nd t h@ re2Ulnt ious l-lit he1· Educt:~.ti cn Act of l S-65 ( ? .L . 69.,.329) f t he Depa:r tnent of Health, Etiucnt ~on and liel fare ar,!)li c nblo t heret o.~ i n or d01~ t ·:: prcroote , for,ter anddevcl op t he Atlanta Wr ok• fltudy proc;.,.·am 8.:."ld t o enj oy tha mutua.l b enofito arisin~~ )':l·crt.'l caid pros r ar. ; e r:.d. WRE'.?.Ef.S, tho A:r,e ncy wi l l benefi t cl ...rectl y fr om i t s pc.i:'t .'t.c:i.paM.,:n i n t he c ertif'ied by ·he L"lSt itu-~lon and nee r1t ed. by t he Ageuc,; . Sc~r:dule!il to be 1nstitutlon, w·.11 ::iet :forth the. t:r::::G cf wor k -c c,; be perfcr :.1;1d by stur..len'!:;s undcl" · t his Ae,1>;?ee.nt , the t otal m.1r.·.h~T of _pay , the tctal ,1~ of.' st udents t o be empl c:r~rl ., the boui·ly ra-tes of hours _per woalt the etud.entfl t 1ay wo1.·k , a nd t he t ot al l e-:1gth of t imo the st udents ar e t o 'bo eq pl o:i'etl . ,· �&'ECOND: Stud.ante wi ll be made av i l abl e t.o tho Aeency by the :rnstitutic.n fo1· th performance of opecif'lod uor ru.a i c-nmcnts . 'l'he Aeancy or~ the lnati tutni on, eithoi• on its ~m initiat ive c,r nt the :requeftt cf the Agency :, may remove studonta from. the A{;en.c y c,r from ~orlt on o, 1 .. e.rtieul.ar aasi~ ent, n:r."'V_d.ad thnt the I nst i .. t hat no student Hill be denied er11pl oyment or i:;ubj ected ,t o different t reatment unc!er th~.s .Agr-e0~~mt bec-au$e of race, ~ ea1,-:,r Cll" nat i c,na.l c,r~.:.: in, e.nd that tt will c omply wi th the p:i•cNia ions of -the Civil R4 ;hts .A.ct c.f l S~l~ ( P. L . e-8- 352) ns amendod, and the rot ul.e.tions of the Depa.rtrrrant cf Health, ;i;ducat ion and We1£ar et which i !'!,pl e - r~ent that Act • THIRD: . Tro.ns ortat ion f or stud.entFJ to arid n·cm wo~k w· 11 not bo provided by \ the Agency er the Institution . FOUR!:!! : I ment and shall  :-. e-c; r ap h 1.eal re;-: i on a nd prof'~c iency cf the u em.pl cye{a; w..d must not t h~ connt rueti-:.n , r. peraticn or rMintenance of oo much ,~f: any :facili ty used, c,r t..? be usetl , fer s ecuu·ian i nstructi on or ·v..s a. place of reli? i. UIB -woi·ship. .F'Urt hai· \'. no proj ect :nay invol ve pol i tica l activity or vork for t?n.J' politi cal party. S::::~ No student s hall 11eifc rm u c r'k · ll any project tmc:l ei· this Ar.ree~nt f c;r znol'.'a than f orty (4o) hours ln a ny w~k , or as c.ay otherti i se bo 1 ~ p r ovided ' ',\:·. \~ ~\ \ -~., ~ �.. . ... . ~ under applicabl EIGHTH : Federal l aw aml 1·e:~:ulat ions . This Agreer:1ent shall 2upecede nny and .all pr :lc-r Agreements between the Institution &."1d the ¾!,ency re::ru:·din:; the mutual operati on of a lTork-Study progr8lJl unde~· the provisions of ·the College ITINTH . ~ ork..Study- ProGram . This Agreement shall tako effect :lmmedla.tel y nnd :::hall teruti nat e- June 1, 1970 , and may be extended by written ar_i: r eem... nt of the p.G.l"tics he':?:et o fol' a period not to exceed three ( 3) months . \ ./ ,· , .. �The urban Corps ~r ~C!CI.UIB t~\e City of At ant a Sehe-dule ! Studentc "H1.ll be ~a-:~r,.od exclMi~l;r :c r u.bllc 'nerv:i.ee t1 -:-.eoci0G cf" er r.a~ ~.:einted \J~.th th~1 Cit :-/ ,f 1\tlnntn, I!\ "": ')Cific-l i ri tl;~ Irr;. r~rn1 l !,") AErnl:)1:::ent" :f'orre ;;,1·c.v.h l ..,._, t h e student, ccp ie., of 'iJhieh s !'Jall b-'Ml •wt;t a parl c: f thi a Get!etlulo . "ectrvi t1..?.s u1.th ·1mte:rin'5 Fronn,~ n throu::h enu of Ge hcmore year • • • ... . Gr~duate & PJ.· ~to~sional Student .. . .. . . . . ~ .. .. . • .$2.20 hour ., $2.50 hour e A [.rraduat9 gtuo.~nt :: a d~f'·!.ne": .'· ' C 'I~Y OF .P.\...TL T'J..~ CITY HALL May 15, 1969 ATLANTA. GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Are a Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDER S, Ad mi nis trati ve Assis tant MRS. ANN M. MO SES, Ex ecutive Secr etary DANE . SWEAT, JR ., Direct or of Governm ental Lia ison Mr. John Cox E x ecutive Director Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear John: Several weeks ago the decision was made that in order to get the Urban Corps Program established and functioning this summer it would be necessary to tie the administration of the Urban C c rps to an existing City ag e ncy. It was my recomme ndation that we use the Atlanta Childr e n and Y o uth S e rvices C o uncil as th e administrative v e hicl e for g etting the Atlanta Urban Corps underway. There was much pr e ssur e from the students and others to plac e the administration of the Urban Corps dir e ctly in the Mayor's Office and there has been much fe e ling all alon g that this is where it must be located if it is to gain th e str e n g th n e cessary to make it through its initial org a nization s ta ge s. I As w e have b e come mor e and mor e involv e d in th e l egal and finan c i a l m e chani c s of e stabli s hin g th e Urb a n Corps Pr o g r a m, it has become mor e appar e nt that w e should hav e g o ne ah e ad and ti e d it to th e Mayor's Offic e until such time as th e non-profit Urban C o rps organization can sta nd on its o w n. In vi ew of so m e o f the r e quir e m e nt s for contractin g a n d for g a1n 1ng progr a m s u p p o rt, it i s th e r e co m1ne n dati on of thi s o ffi ce , th e Cit y Attorn ey, th e D ir ect o r of Fina n ce that we g o a h ead and ti e· it t o th e M a yor's Offic e a t this poi n t . �Mr. C ox Page Two May 15, 1969 This sum.mer our payroll will total almost $270,000 which necessitates a special payroll account in the City's Data Processing and Finance Department. Since this account requires departmental sponsorship, that means all employees of that department would be tallied on the same le'dger and bank account which co~d confuse an already complicated system if lumped into a small department such as the Youth Council. The Accounting Department is creating a special billing department due to the size and number of checks to be issued. This can be done under no presently existing department since we will be billing other City departments and private agencies. In dealing with other City agencies, it is easier to influence their opinion and participation if they realize the Mayor is sponsoring the program. Also, this keeps us from inher itin g inter-departmental conflicts that virtually any department would have accumulated. C ontacting colleges at all levels is much easier from a formal relations point of view if it is done through the chief ~xe cu.ti ve' s office. This advantage can save us valuabl e time in Atlanta on certain campuses due to political problems. We will deal with six other government units in Atlp..nta at the hi ghest level; therefore, our base in Atlanta City G o vernment should be known and respected. Another point that keeps coming up from the students and others in the business and academic community is that 13 out of the 14 Urban Corps programs op e rating in the country are operating directly out of the chief executive's office of each city. The fourteenth agency is operated out of a Model Cities agency. Since you did not ask for th e program to be placed under th e Y outh C ouncil to start with and sinc e I hav e felt all along that we might have taken advantage of you and your staff by shoving this great a dm.inistrativ e burden upon you, it is our intention to go ahead and do w hat we should have don e in the fir s t place and plac e th e Urban C o rps under th e Mayor's Offi ce for th e ti1n e b e in g . If you hav e any stron g f ee lin gs about this e ith er way , I wo ul d appreciate you l e ttin g us know ri ght a way. �Mr. C ox Page Thr ee May l&, 1969 Thank you for your cooperation and h e lp. Sincerely y~urs, ·-l_;/4>./ I Dan S we at DS:fy cc: Mr. Charles Dav is Mr. James Pilche r Mr. Sam Williams �.. ..,/ D"an S we at DS:fy cc: Mr. Charles Davis Mr. Jame s Pilche r Mr. Sam Williams '- �May 15, 1969 Mr. John Cox E- cutive Dlrectol' Atlanta Chlldr n and Youth Services Council City Hall Atla.nt , Georgia Dear John: Se11er-al we k ago the decision was mad th t ln order to get th Urban Corps Pro rnm established nd functioning this summer it would be necess , y to tie th adminiGtT tion of the Urban Corps to n existing City ag ncy. It was my recommendation that w ue the Atlant ChUdr n and Youth S rvie s CouncU as the dministr tiv v bicle for getting the Atl t Urban Corps under- way. re w much pr S\ll'e from th students d others to pl c administt-atlon oi the Urban CoJ:"p dlJ:tectly in the Mayor' O£fic d th re be n much fe Ung 11 ong th _t this is wh r lt mu t be locat d if it i to g in th etr n th n ce -ry to mak it through it initial organ! tion stage · • T th have beco1ne m.o:t and inore involv d 1n th 1 gal and fin ci ch.anic:• of s bll hlng the Urb Corp Pro a.rn, lt becom mol' pp f _ nt t t w _ sh.o uld v-e gone h d - . d ti ditto the M yot' Ollie UAtU uch time as th non•pi-ofit Urban Corp o anlz tio.n n • d on ita own. A 1J w In vie ot some ot th r quirem-_ nts {or co ctin d fo~ gaining pl'ognm \lppolrt, 1t ls th ecomrn nd tlon of 1 offtc • th City A oney, the Dir cto of Fl nee t we g ad d ti it to th M yorte Olilc at • point �Mr. C ox Page Two May 15 , 1969 This summer ou:t p y~oll will total almost $ 270. 000 which nece sitat s a special payroll ccount in the City ' s Data P:roc ssing and Finance Dep rtment •. Sine ~s account J."equires departm ntal ps;msorshlp. that mean all employe s of that depart?nent wot;ll.d be tallied on the sam 1 dg r and bank account which could confus an already c omplicat d sy tem ii lumped into a small department u.ch as the Youth Council . The Accounting Department is c,:eating a special billing d p :rtment due to th size and number of checks to be issued . This can be done under· no presently existing depatt:ment since we wW b bWlng other City d part:In nts and priv t g ncles .. In dealing with other City · gencies , it is ea ier to influence th lr opinion and p rtleip tlon if they re ize the M yor is sponsoring the p~o ram. Al o~ thi l ps us from ihh titing lnt r-d partmental conflicts that virtually ny dep rtment would have a.ccumulated . tacting college t · levels is much caeier from formal 1 tion point of l w if it is done through th chief ex cutive' o££1c ,., This dv_.,._Ae cans ve us valuable tun in Atl nt on c rt campuses due to polltl.cal probl m • We ill d with six oth r govern nt. unit in Atla:nt t the high t 1 vel; ther for • our b - ee ln Atlanta City G ov nt hould b.e known and r pect d. C nother· point th t ps coming up from th tudents and oth l' in the busin nd c demic community is that 13 out oi the 14 Urb n CoJ'ps pl'ognm. o r tln in t · country .- o r ting db- ctly out o.f the chl f ex. cut1v •s o1£k of ch clty.. The foUJ"t · enth g nc oper ted out of Mod 1 Citi ncy.• S ine you dld not k for th pr placed undeJ' th You.th Co uncil to tart lth d ainc: l hav felt 1 ong that w might h:sv n advant g of yo. · nd your •taff by ahovbi th1 r t · dmtnlatr lv b d qpon you, lt 1 our ln1 ntlon to go h ad d do what w abould ha.v done in th flrat place and pl c th Urban Corps under the yor• Of.flee fo th time b ing.. I! you h · ve y tl"on fe in • about thia lth ~ ay, I ould ppr cl.a you l ua kno i,i ht y .. �Mr . Co:x: Page Three May 15. 1969 Thank you for your cooperation and help. Sincerely you1rs , Dan Sweat DS :fy c:c· Mr. Ch rles Davis Mr. James Pilcher Mr . Sam Williams �ATLANTA VRBAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND STREET , N .E . / PHONE (404] 525 -2662 / ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303 MEMORANDUM TO: FROM: Mr. Dan Sweat DATE: May 14, 1969 Sam Williams, Director Atlanta Urban Corps SUBJECT : "Home 11 for the Urban Corps Pursuant to our discussions about the city department which would sponsor the Urban Corps, I offer the following information as justification for housing the Urban Corps under the Office of the Mayor. Since the program itself must cross into virtually every agency and department, placing its administration at the vortex of the city 1 s structure simplifies considerably the establishment of program guidelines and the enforcement of program policy. Also, students and colleges seem to respond more favorably to a program under the direct aegis of the Chief Executive. from the National Urban Corps Organizational Manual According to the National Urban Corps Office, 13 out of the 14 Urban Corps now operating are under the Office of the Chief Executive of each city. This summer our payroll will total almost $270,000 which necessitates a special payroll account in the city 1 s Data Processing and Finance Department. Since this account r,equires departmental sponsorship, that means all employees of that department would be tallied on the same ledger and bank account which could confuse an already complicated system if lumped into a small department such as the Youth Council. The accounting department is creating a special billing department due to the size and number of checks to be issued. This can be done under no presently ex isting department since we will be billing other city departments and private agencies. In dealing with other city agencies it is easier to influence their opinion and participation if they rEa.ize the Mayor is sponsoring the program . Also , this keeps us from inheriting inter-departmental conflicts that virtually any department would have accumulated . Contacting colleges at all levels is much easier from a formal relations point of view if it is done t hrough the Chief Executive' s office. This advantage can save us valuable time in Atlanta on certain campuses due to political problems . We will deal with six other government units in Atlanta at the highest level; therefore , our base in Atlanta City government should be known and re spected . �ATtANTA VRDAN CORPS 30 C OURT L AND ST REE T. N .E. / PHO NE [ l\04] 524-8094! A TL AN T A , GEORG I A 303 03 Dea,r I ntern Supervisor: I am writ i ng regarding the At l anta Urban Corps Summer Internship Program. Informati on on time cards, payroll procedures, eval uat i on procedures and other spec i fic aspects of the program including a Supervisor ' s Handbook will be presented at the Int ernship Sup ervisor ' s Meeting , Tuesday, June 3, 1969 . The meeting will be held in the Urban Corps Office , 30 Courtland Street , N. E. (Ol d Municipal Audit orium), at 3:30 p .m. Attendance at this meeting is mandatory in order to success fully perform as an Internship Supervisor . Our placement is nearly completed , so you should be contacted soon by your prospect ive Interns for an interview . During your interview, you mu3t ap pr ove the assignment by s igning the Internsh ip Ass i gnment Form which the Intern wi ll bring with him . We are enclosing J b l ank sample form for your information. Some Interns may c ontact you before our meeting on June 3. In such cases you may not be ab le to an swer specific questions c onc erning procedures. The start ing date for your Internships will be J une lte If you have any pr oblems or questions, please call on me or Mr. Sam Williams at the Urban Corps office. Thank you fo our cooperation. Sincer20J r DAVID WHELAN, Coordinat or Internship Development DW:sz �,l INTERNSHIP ATLANTA URBAN CORPS 30 Courtland Street, N.E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 ASSIGNMENT 3 IN TERN NO. 4 INITIAL ASSIGNMENT .. NAME REASSIGNMENT A PART TIME ADDRESS SUMMER e L AGENCY 7 COORDINATOR 0 -' ... 0 ...... : A S $1Gt'lME~T N9, I I I i i I I I 1· 0 NATURE OF' ASSIGN MENT  : :-: I ADDRESS 12 TO BE COMPLETED BY AGENCY COORDINATOR ST UD ENT 13 I MME DIAT E S U PCR VI S O R D A C C E PTED AS S IGNMEN T (NAM E OF CENT E R) 17 ASSIGNMENT HOURS FROM DDECLINED 19 TO MON 1---------------"---------------'---------------------------- -----------------------ASS IGNM E NT ADDA E SS UNACCEP T ABLE R E MAR K S 18 TU E S 16 W!i:D THURS 0 -' FRI ...0 - ------------------- - - - - - - - - -- -- -. . - - + - - - -- - -- -- ST AR TIN G DA T E 20 - - - - - - - - - -- S IGN A T UR E O F' C OOR D INATOR 2 1 - - - - - - - -'-- ~- - ~- - - - -- - -- ·- - - -- - - - - - - - -- - - - - I de cline th is a ss ign men t and wi s h lo be rea ss igned bec au se : _-------_----------.-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------~ D I w 1sh t o w it hd ra w frort;, t he U R BAN C ORPS. (see it e m 5 on reve rse ) WH I T E ,C ANA•R Y I!< GR E EN - URBAN CORPS PIN K - AG ENC Y COO R DINA TO R BLU E - I NTE ~ N S RE C O RD 0 ..-~SAT TO BE COM PLETED BY INTERN IF DECLINING ABOVE POSITION D I S TRIBU TION : -' -~ SUN D 0 AGENCY COORDINATOR FOR M U C- 4 9 / 67 M - 8 22 2 7 8 �INSTRUCTIONS: TO URBAN CORPS INTERN: l. Th is is your intern ass ignment. In accordance with your stated preference, you have been assigned to the position described in Box 11 on reverse ·· side . 2. You MUST contact the COORDINATOR named in Box 8 immediately to arrange for an interview, at which time the exact nature of your assignment will be outlined. 3. Bring all five copies of th i s form with you to the interview. DO NOT SEPARATE THEM . At your interview, the agency coordinator will fill out Boxes 13 through 21 . 4. The agency coordinator will retain the pink copy . You will remove the blue copy for your records. You MUST return the other three copies to THE · ATLANTA URBAN CORPS, 30 Courtland Street, N.E ., Atlanta, Ga. 30303: IMPORTANT--NO PAYROLL WILL . BE PROCESSED UNTIL THES_E FORMS ARE RECEIVED BY THE URBAN CORPS OFFICE. 5. If, before the interview, you decide that you do not want this assignment, check space in Bo,c 22 and state your reasons. If you w i sh to withdraw from the URBAN CORPS, check the space in Box 23 . THEN RETURN ALL COPIES TO THE URBAN CORPS. TO AGENCY COORDINATOR: 1. The intern who br ings this form has been assigned to the specific position whose Ass ignment number appears in Box 10 . 2. If you accept th e intern for the assigned position, complete Boxes 13 throughll.. 3. Reta in the PINK copy for your records . 4. RETURN THE REMAINING FOUR COPIES TO THE INTERN. 5. If the intern is not acceptable or declines the pos ition, check the appropr iate space in Box 13 and return all f ive copies of the form to the intern. NOTE : ( If there are any questions regarding placement procedure, please feel free to call the URBAN CORPS at 524-8091 or write : AT LANT A URBAN CORPS 30 Courtland Street, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 �· ATLANTA VRBAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND STREET , N .E . / PHONE [404] 525 -2662 / ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303 May 20, 1969 Mr. Dan Sweat Government Liais.on Office of the Mayor 68 Mitchell Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Sweat: Enclosed is a copy of the minutes of the first meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Atlanta Urban Corps :· Inc. Please notify Sam Williams of any additions or corrections . Also enclosed is a copy of the By-laws which were unavailable at the meeting. These were accepted as a beginning set until the next meeting I feel it necessary to tell you that in my opinion these By-laws. which I hadn't seen prior to the meeting . are so poorly prepared that the task of revision is rather a task of starting over. I have advised Dr . Bloom . as Chairman of the By- laws Counnittee ~ of my feelings. I am also passing on to him what constructive comments I can. I hope you will do the same , The Urban Corps effort .is continuing under the leadership of Sam Williams and the student s who are giving so much ·of their time to it . A large number of students will be placed in community service positions this summer as a result of their work and an integrated educational program is being prepared . It seems to me that the task of the Board of Trustees is to develop a structure that can represent the various interests in an Urban Corps . assume responsibility for operation of an Urban Corps 1• and assure its continuat i on , In view of the requir~ments of By- laws development an~ the ~ressin~ demanos of irmnediate program operations 1 the May meeting of 'the Board of Trustees is postponed until the By- laws Committee is ready to report and the Staff Director if-J prepared to present a review of program operation. Sincer?;2m-s, ~::=~ Temporary Chairman WRR sz Enclosures �ATLANTA URBAN CORP.3 BOARD OF TRUSTEES :MEETING April 17 :. 1969 The fir st meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Atlant a Urban Corps was hel d. on Thurs day ~, April 17> 1969 ~ at 3 ,30 p .m . in the Wilby Room of the Georgia Tech Library . The f ollowi ng persons were present : Mr . w. IL Adams Mr . Terry Allen Mr. Steve Bi nion Dr . Walter Bloom, Ivtr . Walt er Bloom5 J r . Dr . Vernon Crawford Mr . Marcus Dash Mr . Neil DeTiosa Mr . ,Jame s Dull Dr . B. D. Harrison Mr . John B Haye s Mr Dave Hous er Mi s s Dust ~r Kenyan Ilf. ir. J ame s Mac I'!abb Mr. Bill Rams ay Mr. Johnny Robinson Miss Marlene RoundG Mr. Norman Shavi n Mr. Rich Speer Mi ss Tar a Swart zel Mr Dan Sweat Mr. Denni s J . Webb Mr. David Whelan Mr. Sam Willi ams The meeting was called t o order by Mr . Rams ay , acting as Temporary Cha irman f or t he or ganizational meeting . Some of t he backgr ound and i nterests leading t o t he f ormation of an At lanta Urb ai.1 Corps were out lined by :Mr. Ramsay . It wa s recogni zed. t hat the Atl anta Urban Corps Incor porated woul d not be ready t o as sume oper ating responsibil ities in time t o carry on the development of i nternshi ps placement of student s and r elat ed administ r at i ve t a sks f or a summer 1969 program . The s e responsib i l ities woul d be undert aken by t he Atlanta Children and Youth Servi ces Council. th8 Cit y of Atlanta SREB and student r epresent atives of the various campuses this year until an i nde pendent Urb an Corps coul d be e stab l ished. Proposed By- laws had been drafted by students with the hel p of Mr , Dennis J. Hebb . Copi es werer not avail able for examination . Mr . Webb out lined tha provisions of the By- l aws anG indicated that the Trustees must adopt By- laws t o be effect ively const i tuted a s a corporation for tax exempt i on purposes , He reported that exemption paper s have been filed with IRS It was moved and seconded that the pr oposed By- laws be adoptisd as i nt erim By- laws to get the Urban Corps Corpor ation started . The mot i on stipulated that the By- laws would be made at t he next meet ing scheduled i n May 1969 , The motion passed . �A By-laws Committee was appointed by Mr . Ramsa~r as follows Dr. Halter Bloom - Chairman Mr. Norman Shavin Miss Dusty Kenyon The Trustees a.e;reed by concensus that the present Trustees c1-id not represent all parts of the collllllunity which shoul d be on the Boarr:1 of Trustees and that UJ.'1til a full slate could be nominated and elected at an annual meet ing j_n the fall : t he pra sent group would be an interim Board . It was further a greed that the terms of offi ce of a ll present and prospective Trustees ad0ed prior to the first annual meetinr; would expire on the date of the annual meeting. The ad hoc }:Xecuti ve Board, which has been functioni ng . was recognized and a motion was pass 0d e lecting it to continue until the first annual m0eting as an interim Executive Board. Its membership is as fo llow3 ·,Jlx . Hr . Mr . Mr. . Bill Adams T,h • • Dan 8\~ ,aat tvfr , Dav2 Wh2lan John CO ~.{ ·rar]r. nash Bill Ramn a~: ~/IT • Tiich 8p2e:r Hr. Sam WilLi_arns A ser · 28 I ' i r-2pnrts was 't?X'cS .m t ed c or Jl" i W a~t. ,r t ·i (=S c,f t.11::} Ur ban Cor·;:is ·:!ffor t tr1 clat -J anr:l 0ut l in:i.n7 ,_;,,m.,~cl htt c p l a ns . ·:~nt 2nt i al s ,u ,: c ,"?s f f , nanc ial a .., e,;, I·1e r2 cL s cussed. Plans fp:;_· ac ·,nL:rei1c .-: : P 11 s2:;: v:i c :-·l."?a n 1 i,-. , 5_n Atlant a ,-·. ·2 :r th-2 n ·Jxt n:i.n-~ .il ;:iths w : t·2 ··, nt ,. r:! 1 wa s a d,i r,u ,:·ncd (Atlanta Urban Tvle etin' > CoT~ s> 13ourd of Trust c 2s April l 'T. l.C'G9: 11 �BY - LAWS OF ATLANTA URBAN CORPS , INC . (April 17 J 1969) ARTICLE I PURrosE AND FUNCTIONS A non-profit corporation organized to solicit funds from individu~ls, foundations , businesses and government to provide an internship progr.am to employ university students who will work in various phases of local and municipal government~ thus giving students an opportunity to contribute constructively to the Atlanta area by aiding in the improvement of all phases of urban life . ARTICLE II Membership in the Atlanta Urban Corps , Inc. , shall be composed of all employees , interns and friends of the Atlanta Urban Corps, Inc. ARTICLE III BOARD OF TRUSTEES Section 1. Trustees . (a) Number of Trustees. The control of this corporation shall be vested in a Board of Trustees which shall consist of leading members of the community , local college presidents and student representatives. (b) Duties. The Board of Trustees shall make appointments and decisions necessary to carry out the purpose and functions of the corporation and shall be responsible for the administration of monies held by the corporation. (c) Meetings. The Board of Trustees shall meet with three days notice given by any member of the Board of Trustees or any· member of the Executive Board or any administrative officer of the corporation . Section 2. Term. The term of regular members of the Board of Trustees shall be for one yearbeginning on April 1 of each year . Section 3. Election. Members of the Board Sf .Trustees shall be nominated and elected by the- membership of the corporation , Section 4 , Vacancies. Vacancies shall be filled by the Board of Trustees . Trustees so cho·s ·e n shall hold office for the unexpired portion of the term of their predecessors . �ARTICLE IV EXECUTIVE BOARD S 2r.:·:~ion 1. Members and Duties. The Board of Trustees shall elect an Executive BoR.:rc-:. consisting of not less than six or more than twelve members '\'lhich 3hall e.d:-iinister those funds budgeted e,:.1d appropriated by the Board of Trustees c>.d. s ]n .]. !. f 'uy-~lH?. r handle all administrative tasks normally handled by the Board u1J.le s s ot l:er ,1is~ directed . The Executive Board shall be chosen as follows: There s~18,ll be e.n equ~-.1 number of students r.:.:-.::l non- student representatives ~ wit:i the students being chosen from nominees desig,1ated by the College Relations Board, an organization made up of :representatives of the major participating c~· · , .:_ ':"' .~::, cf the members of the Exe cutive Board shall be the Student Di~e ~ coY vf t ~e corporation and the Staff Director. 0 ~c," ~ - " • Cc cticn;. 2 . Mt: ::t ings. The Executive Board may meet upon one day's notice ~i·.rcm ~>i " nr.y:--i'iP.mb cr cf the Board without formal notice. A majority of the F:x1:rd s l1a ll b e 2. quor u.'ll and a majo:rity o:f those in attendance shall be suffi.; ··.; ::.:.t to ac.:.t . 1 ARTICLE V See: :,J.. un ..i. . _'.·,·-;:i,n.t s or Gifts. The corporation shall be empowered to receive gr3,r,t s ar d. gi ft 2 , hy will or in anyr other manner ~ in any form of property , in t r ,:,a::·'.:- 0 1· nt:1e~· wi se , ~~-11erever s :l.t uated ;, t o carry out any of its purposes. All of .:;'J_ch s ,·'l,nt s ar,d gi :i:ts sha ll be l aithfully administered in accordance with tJ:,_e te:r;--·::, on whi ch th~y are made. SE:;ct io:n 2. :.ra e of ,'\. s s ets . All property and income of the corporation shall be ex i.:. lus r~·:,: e l y fo~ t he purpos es set out in the Charter , and no part thereof s .,111 ~. oe t' sed. f or the b enefit of any person whomsoever except in a manner conr~i::;t c nt w:. ;,11 s1...ch purpo s es. 1.,: 32 cl S ect ~_ or: :i . 08 ' ~c -: 3-l :Oower s, The corpora,tion shall have the power to retain a l l 1; :..· :J.r,tP. r;_,_1 ~: i f",r:~ ir.. t he origina l form in which they were received unless o t ~1e1'.",.;i;;e :..· ~..::~:i.i re1 by tLe -terms thereof : to buy, sell , exchange or otherwi se deal ir.. s +.: r;cks , bcr.ds:, secur i ties ~ r eal estate and any other form of property a t. ri:i1)li.c or Dr ~ ·:;;,tc s o.l e j to inve J t and reinvest a.ny of its funds or pro_r:e rty b2 lon.1_r :.~:.3 ·co .,_ t i::.t .:.ny t i me in such securities and other property , real or r: 01·s ona.l , r. c f;c:'. ::·dlP.s s of ~-::-3t her such inve stments are legal investments for trus t f· . F : .::..s 1.,,r.c: c:::;.· t :1c l a ws of GE',"l:~gia or any other State and to borrow money e.".ld s ec.· re t he :?·'.:'.ymr::n,c thereof by mortgage, pledge ~ deed or other instrument or : . :2,:1 :;;;_:.o n 2·~1 o:.:.· c::r..y- r:,e..rt of the property of the corporation. All of the f o r (-;gc:1.r.g p cw0 !' S me..y b e exe r c ise cJ. :dthout -order of court or other authority . S~ ct i .)n 4 . Stat uto:ry ?ewers. The corpor ation shall be vested with all of tbc r ~. 6 r.t s , :-.--::'.;e:rs, a:i:.d pr i vileges which may be necessary or proper to achieve the purpo:ies i n the charter subject to the provisions he:ceof ; and the corpor a t, i on sha ll ha ve a.11 of the power s and p r ivileges enumerated in #22- 1827 and \ A. U . C . - By- L aws ) - 2 - �22-1828 of the Georgia Code , as amended :, together with such other powers and privileges as may now or hereafter be given to corporations by law . ARTICLE VI MEETlliGS Section 1. Annual Meeting. The corporation may hold meetings at any time with three (3) days ' notice , oral or w1·itten , without any minimum requirement as to number of meetings . Section 2 . Other Meetings. Other meetings shall be called at the discretion of the Board of Trustees , Executive Board or administrative heads. Section 3. Quorum. A quorum at anY,· meeting of the corporation shall consist of a majority of those in attendance. ARTICLE VII LIQUIDATION OR DISSOLUTION On liquidation or dissolution _ the assets of the corporation shall be dedicated to a charitable #501 c (3) organization as designated under the pro visions of the Internal Revenue Code. ARTICLE VIII .AMENDMENT TO BY- LAWS The Board of Trustees s-hall have t he power to amend t hese By- Laws ~y a majorit y vote of t hose in attendance at any proper ly~-ca lled meeting . ARTICLE IX '- · OFFI CERS Section 1 . The Board of Tr ustees and/or t he Executive Board shall have the power to designate any of ficers they deem neces sary . All officers they mi ght choose shall be members in good st anding of the Atlant a Ur ~an Cor ps . Section 2 . The administrative authority of the corporation shall be ve sted in two offi cer s to be chos en by the Execut i ve Boar d wi th t he advice and consent of the Boar d of Tr us tee s , One offi cer shall be t he Student Direct or who s hall have gener a l r e sponsibilities fo r all student interns including t heir recruitment wit hin the program . The other prime administrative offi cer shall be the Staff Director who wi ll be a ru11 ...time profes s i onal in charge of all non- student aspects of t he program inc luding fis cal matters and other administr at i ve duties not dir ectly involved with student participation , Section 3 . Officers shall ser ve for one year and be elected by the Executive Boar d with s tudent officer s be ing chosen f r om nominees des ignated by t he College (A .U. C. By - Laws) - 3 - �RGlations Board . Vacancies will be filled for unexpired terms by the E.,v.:ecutive Board . As mentioned previously , those offices to be filled will b e design:::..t ed by the Board of Trustees . ·~\"I "' -- ~·, li, ..:_ -J ' ~ . 'rh~ s c BJ - La ·.;.3 ;,;e:re tentatively app r oved at the first meeting of the __'r ustces Apr il 17 , 1969 . A Committee was appointed by the Trustees j o thoroughly study these By - Laws andmake recommendations at the next 'Ir 1st.e 0s m-~ t ing . The Co!'lI!littee consisted of Mr . Norm Shavin, Dt. \-T-,lte:- 3 100.,, e.n c.. !~1-:: s Dusty Kenyon. 0 !+ �,.,. ... OFFICE OF THE MAYOR JOHN V. LINDSAY Mayor 250 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, N . Y. 10007 Telephone: 212-566-6719 Director SIGMUND G. GINSBURG TIMOTHY W. COSTELLO Assistant City Administrator Deputy Mayor-City Administrator NE-~v YORK CITY URBAN FELLOWSHIP PROGR.A!\1 GENERAL I. INFORMATION NATIONAL COMPETITION On February 1, 1969, the City of New York, supported by a grant of $189,000 from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, will - launch the nation's first Urban Fellowship Program. Under the conditions of the frogram, the C~ty will conduct a nation-wide competition to select twenty of the · most highly talented -- and motivated -- young men and women from colleges and universities throughout the count ry to serve full-time internships for the academic year, commencing inr, Sepi - tember 1969, at the highest levels of the City government. II. ELIGIBILITY The competition will be open to all students who have 'I ~!- completed at · least their junior year of college, including -'A- Students receiving the Bachelor I s degree in June _will be eli gible onl~ if they have been accepted at a graduate school and the graduate school is willing to have them spend the first year with New York City and in addition will provide~ supplementary grant of at least $500. . ' �-2- graduate students. We , encourage matriculants in all academic disciplines to apply, not only those in areas of study tradjtionally associated with government. New York City offers highly challenging governmental opportunities and responsibilities ·in, ~ for example, the fields of anthropology and the fine arts as well as law and engineering and a hundred others. The selection process will enta ~l first, endorsement by your own school, and will be based on fully-detailed applications, transcripts, personal statements and recommendations, with forty finalists invited, all expenses paid, for interviews at the Office of the Mayor at City Hall, New York City. Of these, twenty will be appointed as New York City's first Urban Fellows. III. ASSIGNMENTS Urban Fellows will work closely and directly with heads of New York City government agencies and with top Mayoral assistants; they will be given commensurate responsibilities in adrninistrative problem-solving, research, policy planning, and related management areas. Assignments will be made according to the Fel- low's field of interest and training, and will be · carefully screened and periodically reviewed to assure continuing chal lenge and professional stimulation. �•. -3- Assignments wili range over such fields as city planning, human rights, housing, recreation and cultural affairs, health and social services, economic and financial administration, traff i c and transportation, police science, public works engineering, budgeting, purchase and procurement, personnel management, youth services, municipal radio and television, and innumerable others. Assignments wi ll also be made within the Offices of the Mayo r a nd Deputy lv:ayors. IV. SEMINARS In addition to their job assignments, Urban Fellows wi ll take part in p e r iodic off-th e-record ~emi n ars with o fficial s within the Ci t y g overnment as we l l as with l e ade r s of t h e a c ade mic , coramunications , bu s i ness, civi c and cultural communiti e s o f the City. These mee tings will e n able the Fel l ows t o assess and compare their own experiences, t o disc u ss the b asi c p r obl ems a nd g o al s of City policy with the i:,olicy-makc<:rs themselv~.s, and to profit from the perspectives of out standing citize n s and profe ssionals outside the government. V. ACADEHIC CREDIT - FELL0:1 1 S REPORT A basic feature of the program is that each Urban Fellow will be granted appropriate academic credit by his college or �-4- university, according to its own rules and requirements. As part of his assignment each Fellow will be asked to prepare a Report summarizing his year's work. The Fellow's Re- port should present an evaluation of his job assignment, a review · of his personal experiences, and an appraisal of the Program itself. Ideally, the Report should include a Fellow's original and personal insights and suggestions for cr :ange and improvemem'; -in a specific phase of government. VI. STIPEND Each of the twenty Urban Fellows selected to partici pate i n t h e City's Program will receive a stipend of $3,500 p l u s roundtrip travel expenses, from funds granted by the Al f r ed P. S l oan Foundation . I n add ition, it is e x pected that e a c h Fell o w wil l re- ceive a s upp l emen tary g r ant of at l east $500 f rom hi s own col lege or u n ive rsity . VI I. TIMETABLE All application s (school - e ndors ed ) must be r e ceived by March 30, 1969. Review of all applicat ions by a Selection Com- mittee will be conclude d by April 15, made to all unsuccessful applicants . and immediate notification Expense-paid interviews for forty finalists are scheduled to be held at City Hall, New York City, the week of April 21, with designation of twenty Urban Fel- lows completed by April 30, 1969 • . ,..---:-- ···. .1· ·:' .• ·~ - - �., -5- CAREERS IN CITY GOVERNMENT VIII. It is our underlying hope that many Urban Fellows will find their experience so rewarding that they will decide to fulfill their professional careers within the City government. For our part, it is highly likely that Fellows who prove outstandingly successful in their one-year assignments could be appointed to rewarding, challenging positions in the City's service. IX. APPLICATION PROCEDURE To apply, please contact the Office of the President of your college or university. ceived information from us If your school has not already reby February 15, please have them con- tact the Director of the Urban Fellowship Program, Office of the Ma yor, 250 Broadway, New York, New York, 10007. 2/1/69 . ~- ' ..:· . �/ CITY INTERl PmANCllm a.s of I~ay 25 , 1969 TOTAL INI'ERNS AGE?TCY IiC !22. 2 2 2 8 8 3 10 3 Church 1 4 l 7 3 7 3 2 l 2 l 2 l 2 l 1 1 7 7 2 2 ~ 3 3+ 2+ 2 l 3+ l l l l l l l ,. 3 l 6 6 l - 2 2 2 .,-10 • 1 2 1 3+ 35. 5 l 2 2 1. 1 Ar ~250 -6 1 6 + l4- �---------------ATLM7TA URBAN CORPS BUDGET Newsletter . . . . Rental & Furnituxe Telephone . . . . . Printing & Supplies . Office Renovation . Postage . . . . . . . $ 500 .00 $ 400 .00 $ 600 . 00 $1,500 .00 $ 600 . 00 150 .00 3,750 . 00 Gross Income Staff 1 l 1 1 4 l l 1 4 Executive Director - 6 mo@ $725 Executive Assistant - 5 mo @$ 525 Special Projects Dir - 6 mo@ $450 Fiscal Director - 5 mo@ $600 Payrol l Auditors - Clerks 14 weeks@ $88 .00 Education Program Director - 3 mo @ $1,000 Education P-rogr am Coord. - 3 mo@ $1,000 Fi eld Evaluation Director 14 weeks@ $100 Field Evaluation Staff - 14 weeks@ $100 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 2 2 1 3 Pub lic Relations - 14 weeks@ $100 Secretaries - 14 weeks @ $88 .00 Clerk- 14 weeks at $88 .oo Service Lear ning Conference Coordinators - 12 wks @ $100 $ $ $ $ (Staff) (Operations) Note: Total . . . . Total . . . . Grand Tot al $ $ 4,350.00 2,625 .00 2,700 .00 3,000 . 00 5,000 .00 *interns 3,000 .00 -- VISTA 3,000 .00 -- VISTA 1,400 .00 *intern 5 ,600 .00 *intern(2 paid by VISTA) 2,800.00 *interns 2,500 .00 * interns 1,250 .00 * intern 3, 600 .00-- SREB 40 ;825 . 00 3,750 .00 44,575 . 00 Actual Cost to AUC $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 4,350 . 00 2,625 . 00 2,700 . 00 3,000 . 00 3,000.00 $ $ $ $ $ 1,700 .00 1,700 . 00 1,500 . 00 750 .00 $ 22, 165 .00 3,750 .00 25,915 . 00 $ 840 .00 Roughl y half of the staff' int ern positions will be fi lled by work- study interns (we pay 20%) . Other intern positions will be paid by us at ful l cost . �.., ' . -..$ ~ OFFICE OF THE MAYOR JOHN V. LINDSAY Mayor 250 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, N. Y. 10007 Telephone: 212-566-6719 Director SIGMUND G. GINSBURG TIMOTHY W. COSTELLO Assistant City Administrator Deputy Mayor-City Administrator NE'd YORK CITY URBAN FELLO\i'ISHIP PROGRAM GENERAL I. INFORMATION NATIONAL COMPETITION On February 1, 1969, the City of New York, suppo reed , by a grant of $189,000 from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation,. wi l1 launch the nation's first Urban Fellowship Program.• Under the conditions of the Frogram, the C~ty will conduct a 1 nation-wide competition· to select twenty of the most hi ghly talented -- and motivated - - young men and women ·· from colleges and universities throughout the country to serve full-time internships for the academic year, commencing in Sep.. tember 1969, at the' highest levels of the City government. II. ELIGIBILITY The competition will be open to all students who have completed at least their junior year of college,* including Students • receiving the Bache lor's degree in June will be eligible only if they have been accepted at a graduate school and the graduate school is willing to have them spend the first year with New York City and in addition will provide a supplementary grant of at least $500. 't ...... ~-+~-::-r.r-:---- . )J ' f-!J< t �-2- graduate students. We encourage matriculants in all academic disciplines to apply, not only those in areas of study traditionally associated with government. New York City offers highly challenging governmental opportunities and responsibilities in, for example, the fields of anthropology and the fine arts as well as law and engineering and a hundred others. The selection process will entail first, endorsement by your own school, and will be based on fully-detailed applications, tra nscripts, personal statements and recommendations, with forty finalists invited, all expenses paid, for interviews at the Office of the Mayor at City Hall, New York City. Of these, twenty will be appointed as New York City's first Urban Fellows. III. ASSIGNr,1ENTS Urban Fellows will work closely and directly with heads of New York City government agencies and with top Mayoral assistants; they will be given commensurate r esponsibilities in admin- istrative problem-solving, research, policy planning, and related management areas. Assignments will be made according to the Fel- low's field of interest and training, and will be carefully scr.eened and periodically reviewed to assure continuing challenge and professional stimulation. �-3- .. , Assignments will range over such fields as city planning, human rights, housing, recreation and cultural affairs, health and social services, economic and financial administration, traffic and transportation, police science, public works engineering, budgeting, purchase and procurement, personnel management, youth services, municipal radio and television, and innumerable others. Assignments will also be made within the Offices of the Mayor and Deputy :rv;ayors. IV. SEMINARS In addition to their job assignments, Urban Fellows will take part in periodic off-the-record seminars with officials within the City government as · well as with leaders of the academic, cor.imunications, business, civic and cultural communities of the City. These meetings will enable the Fellows to assess and compare their own experiences, to discuss the basic problems and goals of City policy with the policy-makers themselves, and to profit from the perspectives of outstanding citizens anj professionals outside the governr.ient. V. ACADEMIC CREDIT - FELLO~l' S REPORT A basic feature of the program is that each Urban Fellow will be granted appropriate academic credit by his college or ·-·---~--2,. L...........ia. ....... .. - ....-.c;;,_.,,; -;:-: j,:J&=,,u. ... "I.I-. ' -~ -,.-. - -'1'"':":' ........ ~ '..1.·~·1.-i ~~- .. ~ .s.,:.,,_.....1, ~H. J 6.., �-4- university, according to its own rules and requirements. As part of his assignment each Fellow will be asked to prepare a Report summarizing his year's work. The Fellow's Re- port should present an evaluation of his job assignment, a review of his personal experiences, and an appraisal of the Program itself. Ideally, the Report should include a Fellow's original and personal insights and suggestions for change and improvement -in a specific phase of government. VI. STIPEND Each of the twenty Urban Fellows selected to participate . in the City 1 s Program will receive a stipend of $3,500 plus roundtrip travel expenses, from funds granted by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. In addition, it is expected that each Fellow will re- ceive a supplementary grant of at least $500 from his own college or university. VII. TIMETABLE All appl ications (school-endorsed) must be received by March JO, 1969. Review of all applications by a Selection Com- mittee will be concluded by April 15, made to all unsuccessful applicants. and immediate notification Expense-paid interviews for forty finalists are schedule d to be held at City Hall, New York City, the week of April 21, with designation of twenty Urban Fel lows completed by April 30, 19690 �-5- VIII. CAREERS IN CITY GOVERNMENT It is our underlying hope that many Urban Fellows will find their experience so rewarding that they will decide to fulfill their professional careers within the City government. For our part, it is highly likely that Fellows who prove outstandingly successful in their one-year assignments could be appointed to rewarding, challenging positions in the City's service. IX. APPLICATION PROCEDURE To apply, please contact the Office of the President of your college or university. If your school has not already re- ceived information from us by February 15, please have them con- tact the Director of the Urban Fellowship Program, Office of the Mayor, 250 Broadway, New York, New York, 10007. · 2/1/69 �SOU THE RN REGION AL EDUCATION BOARD l.SO S :t=TH STR E E T, N . -vv-. • ATL A N TA, 0-EORO-IA aosia • 8'75 -aau April 21, l969 Mr . Sam A. Willi Post Offiee Box 35284 Georgia Institute of ~echllQlogy AtJ. ntc., Georgia 30313 ~ar Mr . WilllalllS t This ill confirm disetU3G1oru; ~~een tbe t tf of our Re our Devel nt Project nd y in r ard to your part:icip tion in our I nt :rnship wish Prt"ia"Y'i!Ultft your t'Vio a under a consuJ.t t arrangement to · siBt in ca,rrytng our internship pl in tbe Atlanta · tr<,poli tan tea . "RED iG coop ,r ting in th· for t1on o.f Atlanta Orb Corp ea le ot dev lopin and adm1nistering l number"' of ervice-leo.rning opportunities for ooU g stum nts . The Atlan Urban corp ill be bous d d servic by th City ~ AtlAnt through it Children nd Youth Servic Counc-il . Und, -r our consult.Ant ro.nge nt you w d be a · i ad to th Y uth Council to c:t s ·f diroctor of the Atltw U:r n Co • Y ur ibUitie ould inel d" l. ration of t Atlo.n Uri> n . , J ohn Cox, Dir .ctor 2. 3. paring proj ct roporte n 1 4. t£ect1Vi r 30 1 1969. Fnr y ,r pet'i �Mr~l&ml A. Williama 2. l)';fo r t.a PQrtion 'flOUld oc, p,ud · on th · mmiber of d111i~ by the nm:lber of work in ~ wm.th u d3teL"......,~... ~ In e.441tion,. v.ould re1m'blntae you for eo t ¢ on progr bu,1111>.. ,_~""- in acccr~ with BRl13 1 . . ta.nd.ax-d. tr. pol.icy. Yo-u;r the c·cenu.n.c caw ot thiS 'HI.Qi • or- th1 lett �l { SOUTHERN REGIONAL EDUCATION BOARD 130 Sixth Street, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia ~30313 MEMORANDUM TO Persons Interested in Education and Community Relations DATE: April 30, 1969 The relationships between education and community service have been the topic of much talk, interest and activity in Atlanta for the past several months. A meeting at Emory University on February 28, bringing together some of the people representing agencies and institutions concerned with stu~ent involvement in community development , expressed the need for a continuing structure to allow coordination and cooperation among those concerned. This need has been explored by a group of those attending the Emory meeting and others and the result is this invitation to a larger meeting to review and act on a proposal for a nine-month confer ence on service - learning. Enclosed a r e a prospectus of the proposed confe r ence and a meeting agenda. The meeting to r eview the proposal and , if acceptable, to initiate the conference is scheduled for April 30, 1969 at Dean Sage Auditorium, Atlanta University, Atlanta Georgia. It will begin with registration at 9:00 A.M. The meeting will commence at 9:30 A.M. and adjour n at 4 :00 P. M. Please r ead the pros pectus and prepare your comments i n advance. We look forward to seeing you at Atlanta University and to a productive session leading to a very exciting year in Atlanta. William R. Famsay, Director Resource Development Pr oject WRR :cm Enclosures �ATLANTA SERVICE LEARNING CONFERENCE Organization and Planning Meeting April 30, 1969 Dean Sage Auditorium, Atlanta University Atlanta, Georgia Objectives 1. 2. 3. 4. To review and act on a proposal for an Atlanta Service learning Conference To establish a Conference agenda and schedule To identify component interests and assign responsibilities To begin the process of information exchange and exploration in service-learning AGENDA Morning Session - Dean Sage Auditorium 9:00 9 :30 10:00 11:00 11:15 12 :30 A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. - . 9:30 10 :OO 11:00 11:15 12:30 P.M. - 1 :30 A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. P.M. P.M. Registration Introductory Remarks Discussion of Conference Proposal Break Component Interests and Work Groups Lunch Afternoon Session - Clements Hall, Room 102 1 :30 P.M. 3 :00 P.M. - 4 :OO P.M. 3 :OO P. M. 4 :00 P.M, Work Group Meetings Reports of Work Groups and · Conference Schedule Adjourn �" THE ATLANTA SERVICE LEARNING EXPERIMENT A Proposal For A Conference prepared by Joe D. Kimmins Office of Public Affairs/South Region Peace Corps Portions of this paper were developed from materials prepared by William R. Ramsay of the Southern Regional Education Board , by Dr. Edward Holmes of Emory University, by Sam Williams of the Atlanta Urban Corps, and others. Atlanta , Georgia April 23 , 1969 �What we have to learn to do, we learn by doing. ARISTOTLE �THE ATLANTA SERVICE LEARNING EXPERIMENT A Proposal For A Conference The Atlanta area today is alive with the activities of many agencies , institutions, and individuals concerned with the full development of the area's human and economic resources. These activities cut across tradi- tional academic and bureaucratic categories and across traditional social and political organizations and are marked by new alliances including black and white, young and old, powerful and powerless. One of the new allian€es with great potential is the combining of community experience with education. "Service-learning" implies an involvement of students , faculty and practitioner in an arrangement which results in both service to the community and learning by all participants. Recognizing that such an arrangement requires this c ooperative action , and raises difficult questions that pertain t o both education and community devel opment, i t is felt by many that some agent should exist t o serve as a link between the various people and organizations concerned, and as a reposit ory of new experiences. But such an agent does not now exist, which merely reflects the fac t that the activities mentioned cut across traditional organizations of men and thought. Therefore, it is proposed to convene a Conference of interested individuals who represent the agencies, institutions, and other organizations that are affected by or involved in the development of both community and human resources. �The Confer ence will focus on the concept of service-learning for five basic reasons , simply stated: 1. Programs of all kinds are proliferating in response to pressing societal and human needs; 2. Existing development agencies need additional manpower; 3. Students have expressed a desire for more "relevant" educati onal experiences , and are a large pool of well-trained, of t-unused manpower; 4. Educational institutions are reaching out into the community for ways to become more vitally involved in its affairs; and 5. The human and institutional resources exist side-by-side in Atlanta with progressive attitudes which , properly coordinated , can achieve a broad pr ogr am of student intern involvement in service-learning opportunities existing in this metropolitan area. The Conference shall be convened for a nine-month period , extending from April t hrough December, 1969 . I ts purpose shall be: to c ombine the resour ces of institutions and agencies concerned wit h t he rel at ionships bet ween service experi.e nce and higher educat ion in an exploration and development of a conceptual f ramework and pract ical model f or service l ea rning programs for universities and communities. The Conference will provide a s tructure for reflection and exchange among participant s in various community and educat ional programs over the nine-months period. Careful study combined with actual i nvolvement in programs will result in a comprehensive picture and plan for servicelearning in community and on campus. �Participation in the Conference will be extended to any agency or organization whose activities have a bearing on the component concerns of service-learning, or which has a vested interest in the successful outcome of an experimental program in service-learning. In the Atlanta area, where the Conference will have its focus, it is envisioned that the following groups or institutions will be wellrepresented in the body of Conference participants: Students There are more than 30 ,000 college or university students in Atlanta area institutions Educational Institutions Agnes Scott College, Clark College, Emory University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia State College, Morehouse University, Morri s Brown College, Spelman College, Oglethorpe College, and the University of Georgia Governments The City of Atlanta, Fulton and DeKalb Counties , the State of Georgia, and the Federal Government as represented by regional headquarters of HEW, HUD, CSC , OEO Peace Corps , VISTA , and others · Other Institutions and Organizations The Atlanta Urban Corps , the Georgia Mmicipal Association, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools , the Southern Education Foundation , the Ford Foundation , the Southern Consortium on International Education , the YWCA, the Concerned Citizens of Atlanta , and many others from the public and private sector Operation and Function of the Conference on Service-I.earning Any experiment , and especially one dealing with an indistinct , newly-conceived project such as the Atlanta Service-I.earning Experiment, comprises many component concerns. The concept of service- learning �involves many functions which are not easily compartmentalized. However , the following are seen as fairly distinct components of the service-learning idea: 1. the service dimension of service-learning 2. the learning dimension of service-learning 3. curriculum design 4. inter-institutional relationships 5. institutional and agency structure , or re-structure , for service-learning 6. financial resources and needs 7. research , of university, community , and agency resources 8. models and programs, existing and foreseen 9. a guiding philosophy for service-learning programs For the working study of these concerns , it is proposed that the Confe r ence create wor k groups , each undertaking to ex plore in depth and produce a report on their assigned area. The collected reports f r om the work groups would be presented in December 1969 at the summary meeting of the Confe r ence . To a ssist t he work groups and the confe r ee s in thei r study, t wo methods would be employed in additi on to work group meetings . I. ~ Practical Laborat ory: t he At l ant a Urban Corps An on-going practi ca l implementation of t he se rvi ce-learni ng concept on as wide a basis as possible in t he Atlanta area during the summe r of 1969 i s al ready begun, unde r the spons orshi p of several groups (joining to form an Atlanta Urban Corps). This operation shall serve as a practical laboratory , whereby the �Conference, through observation and conclusions, shall work towards a continuing service-learning program for the Atlanta area. Furthermore, the Conference will serve as the repository of information gained through experience with Atlanta area service-learning experiments. Similarly, the Conference , because of the collective expertise of its participants , will be a major resource to service-learning groups throughout the summer of 1969. The participants pledge to commit as much of their creativity, time, and resources as possible to the successful completion of a summer of experimentation in servicelearning. II. M:>nthly Conventions of the Conference Monthly sessions of the entire Conference will be convened , at each of which one or more of the component concerns will be the topic of study. Each work group will have an opportunity to "chair" a session of the Conference , and guide the discussion as it sees fit to focus the attention of the entire Conference on its particular component of service-learning . Each work group will organi ze its assigned session , calling in whatever additional r esource people needed to explo r e the topic of concern. ~~ Groups The Conference will f unction pri marily th r ough i t s work groups. membership will be drawn from the body of Confe r enc e participants. Their Work groups will marshall the available re sources , implement the ideas and concepts , guide the progress of the Experiment , coordinate its operations , �study its component concerns , and make recorrnnendations based upon their experiences towards the creation of a comprehensive model and a continuing operation in Atlanta. Individuals , appointed from the Conference participants , will be designated Chairmen of the work groups. The Chairmen will see his work group's assignment is successfully studied and reported to the Conference. Chair- men will have as co-workers other participants in the Conference who agree to serve on his work group. It is proposed that the following work groups be formed: 1. A Service Work Group 2. A Learning Work Group 3. A Curriculum and Inter-Institutional Work Group 4. A Research Work Group 5. A Financial Work Group 6. A Models and Programs Work Group 7. A Guidance Work Group (a steering committee) The membe r ship of the Guidance Work Group shall consist of the Chai rmen of the othe r six work groups , and the Director of the Confe r ence. The membe r ship of the other work groups will be r esolved at the Apr il 30, 1969, Confe r ence Convention. Although t he Chai rman of a par ti cular work gr oup wi ll i nevi t abl y repres ent one of the part i cipating agenci es or instituti ons of the Confe rence, this does not imply domination of that work group's study by the vi ewpoint or vested interests of the Chairman's agency or institution. It is assumed that the membership of any particular work group will consist of individuals from several participating agencies or groups, as their interests and manpower resources allow. �A Timetable It is ervisioned that the Conference be convened on a monthly basis, beginning in April 1969. Following is a suggested timetable for Conference consideration of the components of service-learning: April 1969: first Conference Convention; orientation, general discussion of the Conference proposal and the agenda; and assignment of work group chairs and membership May 1969: a general meeting on Service-learning and the Atla~Experiment; a national meeting of concerned people with the Atlanta participants , to generate national and community interest and to publicly initiate the Conference June 1969: a discussion of service and learning July 1969: a discussion of financial needs and resources ·August 1969: a discussion of curricula, and inter-institutional relationships September 1969: October 1969: a discussion of research considerations a discussion of models and programs November 1969: a discussion of the philosophy of servicelearning, and preparation for final reports December 1969: a summary meeting �Conclusion Although admittedly imperfect, as is the nature of foresightful programs, it is believed that the structure outlined in this paper will at least get the Atlanta Service-Learning Experiment under way in a reasonably workable fashion. It is intended that the reader view all the above as designed for flexibility. Needs will undoubtedly be met on an ad hoc basis as we learn of them. But this is a start. We commit ourselves as individual and group participants in a large-scale , serious approach to meeting important and immediate needs of society. We, like the students who undertake service- learning, must learn by doing. �The following information is provided as background to this proposal: I. II. III. The February 1969 Emory Conference on Service-I.earning The Atlanta Urban Corps Developments in Curriculum Design at Emory University • '-. / �The Emory Conference On February 28, 1969, more than two dozen men and one woman, representing educational institutions, government, and other agencies, met together for one afternoon at Emory University. Under the leadership of William Ramsay of the Southern Regional Education Board, they initiated a discussion of several aspects of service performed by individuals in the public interest , and of the educational dimensions of that service. Models for the service concept were as varied as the SREB intern and the volunteer in Peace Corps or VISTA. Participants in the Emory Conference agreed that such service both contributes to the community , welfare and the students' education , and that it should be encouraged on a large and institutional scale. Indeed , many participants felt that it is not only in the gene r al interest to encourage such commitment , but i mperative to do so. They agr eed further that programs could and should be created by colleges and universiti e s to encourage the student population to commit itself in greater pe r centage s to national or international se r vice with st rong educational support. It was suggested that the agencies and insti tuti ons r epresented a the Emory Conf erence had the necessary powe r and r esource s to create such pr ogr ams in At l anta. As the day's di s cussion pr ogres sed , it became cl ear that the concerns of the participants we re far broader than service - l earni ng alone . According to their individual viewpoint, diffe rent participants felt that the concept of service-learning carried the seeds of solution to many modern problems. �stated, some of them are: student demands for more "relevant" educational experiences during the college years (a concern for the active student) society's needs for large numbers of concerned people who are willing to give of themselves to solve great problems ••• and the lack of such numbers (a concern for the passive student) polarization of the attitudes of racial, ethnic, economic, and national groups, demanding increased inter-cultural, or cross-cultural, experiences both within and between nations (the issue of peace) the insensitivity of established institutions to pressing needs for change; and the slow pace of institutional change versus the accelerating rate of social change and needs (the "Establishment") disagreement, especially by the young, with current social ordering of priorities in America (the crisis of values) It is noteworthy , too, that many modern spokesmen have eloquently addressed themselves to the same concerns. Four significant recent statements follow: Governor Daniel Evans, in his Keynote Address to the 1968 Republican Convention: The voice of youth has served notice that satisfaction can't be measured alone in dollars; that there is a need for service and contribution beyond the attainment of material success. If these goals require an investment in patience, then let us invest ; if they require money , then let us spend. �Eberly, Executive Director of ••• organizations should offer young people opportunities to perform needed tasks contributing to the welfare of others; to communicate across racial , social, and economic barriers; to develop a sense of self-worth and civic pride; to get involved; and to learn while serving. President Richard Nixon , in a radio address on October 17, 1968, during his campaign for the presidency: ••• school administrators (must) wake up to the healthy new needs of student participation and incorporate that activity into the learning process. Mark R. Killingsworth, a Rhodes scholar in economics at Oxford , in the NEW YORK TIMES of February 15 , 1969: ••• the National Commission on Technology , Automation and Economic Progress has estimated that the country needs some 5.3 million extra workers to bring public services -- medical care , education, welfare and home care , public protection , urban renewal and sanitation -- up to ' acceptable' levels. The energy and moral commitment of a gene r ation which ha s alre ady won civil r ights victor i es , gotten l ongoverdue educ ational reforms and blown a closed political pr ocess wide open is still available. When will we decide we want it ? The Emory Conference participants, and othe rs who will join the At l anta Experiment as i t evolves , t ake heart in the nat ionwide movement of thought that supports our sense of dedicati on and commitment. This sense of dedication and commitment to action was the overriding result of the Emory Conference. The participants called upon Bill Ramsay of SREB to work with an ad hoc committee toward the creation of some �framework that would marshall the resources in Atlanta to the They also felt that the City of Atlanta should be the focus and limit of experimentation at this time , with the idea that what is attempted here will be done in an atmosphere of open experimentation , searching for ideas of value for other cities, states, or regions. We should seek to learn not only what can be done here, but what can be done anywhere. Practicality demands an initial attempt of experimentally manageable scope. Also, it was felt that necessary resources exist in Atlanta, obviating the necessity to search far and wide for distant resources and support. � ' The Atlanta Urban Corps ,., I • \ ., (From THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION, Saturday, November 30, 1968:) "Atlanta city government hopes to have an Urban Corps of up to college interns working for and with it by the spring semester. "Dan Sweat, governmental liaison director at City Hall , said Friday that the city is seeking to employ 100 under the federal College Work Study Program, and already is negotiating with college officials. "Sam Williams , president of the Georgia Tech student body last brought the attention of Sweat and Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., to the of the New York intern program last spring." In the five-month interim since the publication of this article , an Atlanta Urban Corps has come into being . It is under the directorship of Mr. Williams , through a cooperative arrangement between the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council of the City and the Souther n Regional Educat i on Board. Currently, the Urban Corps , with a strong student partici pation element , i s engaged in t he following operations: 1. Recruitment of st udent i nterns f or summer, 1969, f rom Atl anta campuses through a s tudent member Col lege Rel ations Board. 2. D=velopment of int ernship positions to meet agency manpower needs in the Atlanta a rea. Interviews a r e being conducted by students wit h department and agency heads t o es t abli sh valid intern posit i ons t o be f i lled this summer. It is expected that up to thr ee hundr ed pos i t i ons will be avai l able f or placement. 3. A search is underway to locat e individuals to fill approximately thirty-three permanent and temporary staff positions needed to manage and operate the Urban Corps. �Of the "Our young people and our cities can no longer afford to be The Urban Corps offers to students a chance to be in the mainstream of Atlanta's problems and potentials. " Descriptive and publicity materials, and the charter of the Urban Corps will be available at the April 30, 1969, convention of the Conference for examination by the participants. �Developments in Curriculum Design~ Emory University Dr. Edward Holmes, Assistant Dean of the General College, Emory University; and Phillip Rlopp , Director of Institutional Relations, Peace Corps, on April 9, 1969, met with department chairmen and faculty members in social sciences and romance languages to survey existing resources at Emory for developing service-learning programs. Beyond the single concern of university resources, they explored the possibility of creating a ·program of subjects in domestic and international affairs that would encourage and prepare the student for service in Peace Corps , VISTA, or Teacher Corps, or in other related voluntary service. Conversations on that day between Holmes, Rlopp, and Bill Ramsay of SREB led to a decision to pursue the question of Atlanta area resources relevant to such a program, and to a proposal for a resource survey. Accordingly, on April 15 , 1969, Holmes met with Robert C. Nelson , Director of the Southern Regional Office of Public Affairs , Peace Corps , to discuss in detail what such a survey would involve in terms of personnel for a contract between Peace Corps and the Southern Consortium for Internationa l Education , for Peace Corps to pr ovi de funds for such a survey. The fol lowing members of the Cons orti um read and agreed unanimously to the proposed contract: Dean Charles I.ester , Emory University ; Dr . George Part hemos of t he Uni ve rsity of Georgi a ; Dr . Robe r t St emke , Georgi a Institut e of Technology; Dean Richard Barksdale, Atlant a Universi ty ; and Dr. Ernest Ogrum, Georgia State College. On Apr i l 18, 1969, Dr. c. C. Mlrray, Act ing Di r ector of the Consortium, signed t he proposal and sent it to Peace Corps in Washingt on, D. c. Dr. Sanford Atwood, President of Emory Univer s i ty, has agr eed to provide office s pace for the survey i n the Cente r for Social Research. �Atlanta area educators are presently being contacted for references for a qualified individual to undertake the survey ; Peace Corps approval of the contract is expected soon. Dr. Holmes expresses his hope for the survey in these terms: "If this proposal is successful, a constellation of interests and resources will converge to make an outstanding improvement in the Consortium schools through the internship program with national and local agencies. By pooling all these resources, we can have a major impact on the awareness of problems and the pursuit of the solution to these problems, and on the discovery and application of manpower resources. "The human problems of our time must be treated in a serious way with all available resources in order to point toward a future devoid of destructive elements standing in the way of human development." �r April 18, 1969 Ar. Joseph E. Birnie President The National Bank of Georgia Post Office Box 1234 Atlan t a 1 Georgia 30301 Dear r . Birnie: We would like to bring to your attention what we consider to be one of the most worthwhile student-oriented projects we have seen in some time . It is called the Atlanta Urban Corps , and its goal is to use the great constructive energy and innovative spirit of college students in helping to solve the problems of our city. The students plan to do this by working within the frameworks of established metropolitan area governments . They will develop Urban Internships within these governments des igned to be challenging and sti ulating to the student. We recommend this project to you as being most worthwhile, both from the point of view of the governments involved and from the value of the education 1 experiences that each student in the Atlanta Urban Corps will have. We urge you to attend a breakfast on Tuesday, Apri l 29, at 9:00 a . rn ., at Rich ' s Tea Room on the Sixth Floor. The store may be entered through the Store for Homes or the Street Floor entrance. This breakfast will not last more than one hour, and that hour will be well spent . Sincerely yours, Edwin D. Harrison Ivan Allen, Jr. rh �URBAN CORPS BREAKFAST LIST April 29, 1969 Mr. Joseph E. Birnie President The National Bank of Georgia Post Office Box 1234 Atlanta, Georgia 30301 Mr. J. Paul Austin President The Coca-Cola Company Post Office Drawer 1734 Atlanta, ~orgia 30301 Mr. J. Leonard Reinsch President Cox Broadcasting Corporation 1601 West ·Peachtree St., N.E. Atlanta, Georgia 30309 Mr. Ernest F: Boyce Presiderit Colonial St ores Pqst Office Box 4358 Atlanta, Georgia 30302 Mr. Edwin I. Hatch President O Georgia Power Company ~ Post Office Box 4545 Atlanta, Georgia 30302 Mr, Mills B. Lane, Jr o President Citizens & Southern National Bank Atlanta, Georgia 30302 Mr. Gordon Jones President Fulton National Bank Atlanta, Georgia 30302 Mr. Boisfeuillet Jones Woodruff Foundation Peachtree Center Atlanta 1 Georgia Mr . Edward Smith Mr. James Aldredge Fulton County Commissioner Fulton County Court House Atlanta , Georgia 30303 \ .f President ~ Mr. Augus t us St e rne President Tr ust Company of Georgia At lanta , Geor gia 30302 Mr . Ivan Al l en , III Presiden t I van Alle n Company Post Of f ice Box 1712 Atlant a, Georgia 30301 Mro Dillard Munford Chairman of the Board The Atlantic Company 106 Washington Street, Viaduct Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Mre Arthur L. Montgomery Chairman of the Board & President The Atlanta Coca-Cola Bottling Coo 864 Spring Street, N. w. Atlanta, Georgia 30308 ·,,. ~ ' I First National Bank of Atlanta Atlanta, Geor gia 30302 Mr. Frank Mal one President Southe rn Be ll Telephone Company Hurt Build ing Atlanta, Georgia 3030 3 The Ho norable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of Atlanta \)\ City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 \~f �URBAN CORPS LIST - CON'T. Mr. Bill Wainwright, President Atlanta Federal Savings & Loan Association 20 Marietta Street, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia JJ.tz/ -zMr. Carl Re ~ President Ox ford Industries 222 Piedmont Avenu~ Atlanta, Georgia Mr. W. L. Lee President Atlanta Gas Light Company 235 Peachtree, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia Mr. Rolland Mazyell Manager Davison ' s 180 Peachtree, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia Mr. Hollis Morris President Fulton County Federal Savings 21 Edgewood Avenue , N. E. Atlanta, Geor gia Mr . Milton Weinstein Pres i dent National Service Industries, Inc . 1180 Peachtree, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia Mr. Arthur Harri s President Scripto , I ncorporated 423 Hous t on Street, N. E. Atlanta, Geor gia Mr. Charles H. Dolson Pre sident De lta Air Lines At l anta, Georgia Mr. L. G. Dewberry President Atlantic St ee l Company 1300 Meca sl i n , N. W. Atlan ta, Geor gia Mr . Wilton Looney President Genuine Par t s Company 299 Piedmont Avenue , N. E. Atlanta, Georgia Mr. Sc ot t Aker s Akers Mot or Line s 723 For r e s t Road, N. E. Atlanta , Georgia Mr. Har.old Brackey; President Rich ' s , Incorporated 45 Broad Stree t At l an t a :, Georgia /1,; ~' Mr. Albert J . Bows Partner-In-Charge Arthur Anders en & Company 34 Peachtree, N. W. Atlanta, Geor gia Mr . Tom R. May Vice Pr esiden t Lockh eed- Georgia Company Sout h Cobb Drive Marietta, Geor gia Mr . Rawson Haverty ...._\ O President ~ Hav erty Furniture Company 22 Edgewood Avenue, N. E. At l anta, Geor gia Mr. Jack Tarver Pres ident Atlanta News papers, Incorporated 10 Forsyth Str eet Bu i lding Atlan ta, Georgia Mr. Charles Collins President Rhodes, Incorporated 10 North Rhodes Center, N. Wo Atlanta, Georgia Mr. R. Howard Dobbs, Jr. Pres ident Life Insurance Company of Georgia 573 West Peachtree Street, N. Eo Atlanta, Georgia 30308 --~ , / • �URBAN CORPS LIST - CON'T. ' )Mr. Lee Burge j( President J c} Mr. R. A. Cunningham Retail Credit Company 1600 Peachtree, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30309 General Motors Mr. Tho~ou;ins President Cousins Properties, Incorporated Suite 111 , 1700 Connnerce Drive, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30318 Mr. S. K. Cannon Plant Manager Ford Motor Company Mr. John O. McCarty John & Mary Franklin Foundation Post Office Box 13526 Station K Atlanta, Georgi a 30324 Atlanta, Georgia Mr. Alvin W. Vogtle Southern Services Inc. Lenox Towers Peachtree Road, N. E. Atlantaj Georgia Mr. William Stubbs Campbell Foundation Trust Company of Georgi a Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Mr. Claude Grizzard , Jr. Grizzard Advert i sing, I ncorpora ted 1144 Mailing Avenue , S. E. Atlanta , Geor gia Mr . Phillip Al s t on Vasser-Woolley Found a tion 748 Rice Street , N. W. Atl~nta , Geor gia Mr. A. Dean Swi f t Vice Pres i den t Sear s Roebuck Company 675 Ponce de Leon Avenue Atlan t a , Geor gia Mr. A. B. Padge tt Tru s t Of fic er Trust Company of Georgia Foundations Pos t Office Box 4655 Atlanta, Georgia 30302 Mr. George Smith President J.M. Tull Metals Company, Incorporated 285 Marietta Street Atlanta, Georgia ... ('· I • �C ITY OF.AT~ T .A CITY HALL April 8, 1969 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative As si stant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secret ary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison MEMORANDUM To: Concerned Parties From: Sam Williams, Staff Director, Atlanta Urban Corps Subject: Urban Corps Status Tuesday, . April 1, Sam Williams assumed position of Urban Corps staff director, salaried ~y Southe rn Regional Education Board and "loane d " to the Atlanta Youth Council. I Most of the first week was spent in taking inventory of various phases of the Urban Corps. The most immediate problem is financ e . A small ad1ministrative fun d wa s donated by SREB and Dan S we at, A s sistant t·o I the Mayor. Pres e nt inventory of work study funds a v a ilable this s umme r for Urban Corps is 138 student positions at 80% cost. All of these are not firm commitments. VIS TA wilf finance 25 interns at full cost. Mr. ·Bill Ramsay a n d Charles S w eet are visiting financial aid offices of Atlan ta colle ge s i n an effort to " squeez e 11 mor e off-campus work study fund s fr ee . Fund raising from priva t e sources is und e r w ay w ith no r es ults as y et. A bus i nessmen' s lunc h e on is s che dule d fo r A pril 29 i n an effort to get fund commitments. A fund raising group has been established under the leadership of Bill Adams of Georgia Tech. 1 D e finition of job ope n in g s is und e r way . It appe ars tha t the c i ty can acce pt at l east 100 s tudent s. D efinite job s lots will b e d efined the week of April 11 in city de p ar t ments. City financing and administrat ion w ill be expla i ne d in a meeting of d e partme nt h e ad s April 8., A city irtern developing 'team will v i s it ea ch de partmen t d u ring the w e ek. Inte rnship development of non-federal n o n - city agencies w ill begin April 8. Initial contacts and r e que s ts for 158 interns from the s e a g e ncies h a s b een handle d by T e rry Allen. Student t e ams will m o r e clearly d efine each inte rn re q uest durin g t h e next t w o weeks and h opefully make new con ta cts i n other age ncies. �Page Two April 8, 1969 Federal agencies have agreed to participate as much as possible. One hundred of their summer interns will attend Urban Corps orientation meetings and our development teams will visit federal agencies to help them in choosing certain intern slots. Federal interns will be chosen and placed by federal agencies by merit of their civil service examination scores. Cooperation this year is hopefully aimed at some placement system of Urban Corps interns in future years. Joe Kimmins has been loaned part-time r.rom the ?eace Corps Regional Office and will be assisting on intern development. Diane Wilson, a Spelman graduate, has been hired fulltime to assist in internship development. Russ Caldw ell will work part-time in program development and I is on loan £!om the Georgia Municipal League. Fulltime secretaries are badly needed. . ' Urban Corps offices·will open the week of April 11. The address w ill be 30 Courtland Street, Atlanta, Georgia 30303. The telephone number is 525-2662. We hope to have someone manning the phones by Monday, April 14. Calls are presently being handled through the Youth Council at 522-446 3, E x t. 437. Student recruitment will begin thro_ugh financial aid offices in each college the week of April 18. Mayor Allen will make a formal announcement of the city's participation April 9 in a press release. Brochures describing the Urban Corps and student application forms will be printed the w eek of April 11. The Board of Trustees w ill meet April 18 to elect 8 people to the E x ecutive Board and to pass resolution s and .approve minutes so the IRS w ill grant us a tax e x empt status for donations. E x act estimates on pum°f?er of interns is imposs ~ble at this time. No work beginning date has been set. The most important fact is that the U r ban Co r ps i s alive and struggling to get on its feet . · L a r ge t h a nks to : B ill Ram say, SREB Dan S weat , City Hall Ri ch S pee r ., Geo r g ia T e ch The A t lanta Con sti tuti on and a n endless li st This me m o i s n ot for publicatio n. SW:fy �u () ATLANTA VRDAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND STREET , N .E . / PHONE [404] 525-2662 / ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30303 MEMORANDU M TO: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. FROM: DATE: May 8, 1969 It( Sam Will:iams, Director~ -Atlanta Urban Corps Q C,f/v SlJB.JECT : Atlanta Urban Fellowship Program Recently, New York City received a grant for $189,000 from the Sloan Foundation to institute an Urban Fellowship Program to select twenty highly talented young men and women from universities throughout the country to serve full-time internships for a twelve month period. All of these young people are Master 's Degree candidates in their r espective fields. New York Fellows are assigned to agency heads and Mayoral assistants and given commensurate responsibilities . This program is a di rect parallel to the White House Fellows started by John Gardner under President Kennedy , Atlanta deserves such a program. In my opinion, these interns should be handled separately from the Atlant a Urban Corps since they will be year-round and will r equire special counseling and guidance only available f rom a source such as your of f'i ce . I would be glad to submit a detailed proposal for an Atlanta Urban Fellows Program and also pursue Foundation funding if you are interested. Enclosure cc: Mr. Dan Sweat Mr. Charles Davis ' / J/ // �CIIJ.'Y..-~- G of 25, 1~)69 ~ t or 9 17 4 14 2 15 2 5 Vl 3 2 15 2 16 12 12 15 10 3 3 3 5 12 3 ~ Sub Total -- 144 ~ $6 5 2 l2 3 3 4 Po 14. 6 2 / I. I ? l 4 2 2 17 17 16 / 6 11 0 �I ,/, TO: 8, l ~ �April 17, 1969 Mr . S . Cantey G ordon.. Direetot Atlanta Employment Evaluation and Service Cente1." 1599 Memori 1 Dr-ive , S . E . Atlanta. Georgia na- r Mr. Gordon: Thi is to uthorize ,:-ele e of the following furniture to th City of Atlant fo-r use in the Urban Co rps Progi,am loc ted t the Municipal A uditotium. 4 Executive De ks with Chairs Z Seer t 1 1 Desk wlth Ch.a.it 10 Side Ch ir Cordially youre, Dan E. Sw t, Jr. Dii- cto of Govei-mn ntal Li Ison DESJr:fy �CITY OF .ATLANT.A CITY HALL April 3, 1969 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison MEMORANDUM To: Department/ Agency Heads From: Dan Sweat Director of Governmental Liaison Sam Williams Director of Urban Corps Subject: Urban Corps Meeting The Urban Corps is now organizing for the placement of college students for summer intern positions in City departments. Financial details of the program and th e criteria for placement in your department of the interns will be discussed in a meeting of City department heads on Tuesday, April 8, 1969 , at 2: 00 p. m. in Committee R o om 2 in City Hall. Mr. E. H. Under wo od will explain financial details and Sam Williams w ill explain the working procedure of the Urban C o rps. If you are unable to attend, please send one person from your department whom you designate as your permanent department liaison with Urban C o rps throughout the summer of 1969. This meeting is essential to · explain information critical to intern job development. Problems unique to ea·c h department will be worked out individually at a later time. Attached is a sheet to briefly explain the Urban C or ps program for your information. Thank you for your cooperation. /fy �ATLANTA URBAN CORPS The Atlanta Urban C o rps is a college student intern program jointly sponsored by Atlanta 1 s colleges and students, the City Government of Atlanta, private agencies, Atlanta businesses, and the Federal Govern- mento The bulk of intern salaries will be furnished 80% by the Office of Education through college financial aid offices and 20% by the City of Atlantao The program will be administered by a professional and student staff directed by a Board representing participating agencies and students. The intern I s job experience should not only be beneficial to the City but it must be an e ducationally relevant experience for the student. This is not a "make-work 11 program. His service -l earning e x p e rience should give him an overall view of the role this department plays in solving Atlanta I s problems. It should be i ntellectually challengi ng. D e partme ntal inte rn r e que sts should b e specific not only on exp ect e d education but on detail ed job d e scriptions so ade quate tal e nt may be r e cruite d. A by - product of this program will be to attract into urban gove rnment the youn g car ee r tal e nt it so ur gently nee ds and fo c u s the capabilities of the academi c community on problems of our c ity. �C ITY OF A.TLANT.A CITY HALL April 8, 1969 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison ME MORAND.UM To: Concerned Parties From: Sam Williams, Staff Director, Atlanta Urban Corps Subject: Urban Corps Status Tuesday, April 1, Sam Williams assumed position of Urban Corps staff director, salaried by Southern Regional Education Board and "loaned" to the Atlanta Youth Council. Most of the first week was spent in taking inventory of various phases of the Urban Corps. The most immediate problem is finance. A small administrative fund was donated by SREB and Dan Sweat, Assistant to the Mayor. Present inventory of work study funds available this summer for Urban Corps is 138 student positions at 80% cost. All of these are not firm commitments. VISTA wili" finance 25 interns at full cost. Mr. ·Bill Ramsay and Charles Sweet are visiting financial aid offic3s of Atlanta colleges in an effort to "squeeze" more off-ca!llpus work study funds free. Fund raising from private sources is under way with no results as y~t. A businessmen's luncheon is scheduled for April 29 in an effort to get fund commitments. A fund raising group has been established under the leadership of Bill Adams of Georgia Tech. Definition of job openings is under way. It appears that the city can accept at least 100 students. Definite job slots will be defined" the week of April 11 in city departments. City financing and administration will be explained in a meeting of department heads April 8. A city irtern developing team will visit each department during the week. Internship development of non-federal non-city agencies will begin April 8·. Initial contacts and requests for 158 interns from these agencies has been handled by Terry Allen. Student teams will more clearly define each intern request during the next two weeks and hopefully make new c ontacts in other agencies. �\ Page Two April 8, 1969 \ I Federal agencies have agreed to participate as much as possible. One hundred of their summer interns will attend Urban Corps orientation meetings and our development teams will visit federal agencies to help them in choosing certain intern slots. Federal interns will be chosen and placed by federal agencies by merit of their civil service examination scores. Cooperation this year is hopefully aimed at some placement . system of Urban Corps interns in future years. Joe Kimmir.s has been loaned part-time from the Peace Corps Regional Office and will be assisting on intern development. Diane Wilson, a Spelman graduate, has been hired fulltime to assist in internship development. Russ Caldwell will work part-time in program development and is on loan from the Georgia Municipal League. Fulltime secretaries are badly needed. Urban Corps offices· will open the week of April 11. The address will be I • 30 Courtland Street, Atlanta, Georgia 30303. The telephone number is 525-2662. We hope to have someone manning the phones by Monday, I April 14. Calls are presently being handled through the Youth Council at ~22-4463, Ext. 437. · · I . . ' Student recruitment will begin thro_ugh financial aid offices in each college the week of April 18. Mayor Allen will make a formal announcement of the city's participation April 9 in a press release. Brochures describing the Urban Corps and student application forms will be printed the week of April 11. The Board of Trustees will meet April 18 to elect 8 people to the E x ecutive Board and to pass resolutions and approve minutes so the IRS will grant us a tax e x empt status for donations. Exact estimates on number of interns is impossible at this time . No work beginning date has been set. The most important fact is that the Urban Corps is alive and struggling to get on its feet. Large thanks to : Bill Ramsay, SREB Dan S w eat, City Hall Rich Speer, Georgia Tech The Atlanta Constitution an d an endless list Thi s m emo 1s not fo r publication. S W :fy �April 4 , 1969 MEMORANDUM To : Conc erned Partie s From: Sam William, Project Di re cto r , Atla n t a U:rban Corp s Subject: Urban Corps St tua Tuesday, April 1, Sam Willi ams assumed p o sition of Urban Corps staff director , salaried by Southern Reg i onal Educ ti.on Board and "loaned" to the Atl anta Youth Council. Most of the first week was pent in taking inv ntory of vari ous phases of the Urban Co:rps . The most immedi ate problem is £inane • A sm 1 dministrative fund was don ted by SREB and D n Sweat, A sist nt to the Mayor . Pr sent inv ntory 0£ work study funds vailable this summer for Urban Corps is 138 tudent positions t 80% cost. All of th s are not firm commitments . VIS T will finance 25 interns at full co t . Ml' . Bill R msay nd Ch rl s Sw et are vi iting fin nci 1 id offic s of Atl.a.nt colleg s in an effort to "squeeze" mote ofi .. campus work study funds free . Fund r ising from private soui-ees i und r w y with no results as yet. A busw. sm n ' s lunch on i scheduled for Apt'il Z4 in an effort to g t fund commitments . A !Uhd :r lsing group ha be n establish d under the le d r hip of Bill Adams of G Ol'gia T ch. r w y. It a.pp_ ar that the city c cc pt t le t 100 tud nt . D finit job lots will b defined the w k of April 11 in city dep rtrn nt • City flnanc:tng nd dminl tr tion will be xplain d in m~ ting of d p rtm.ent h · d April 8. A city int rn dev loping t m will vi it each department during the w k. Definition of job op nings i und Internship d velopment of non .. f d r l non-city g ncies will b April 8. lniti 1 contacts and r quests fo~ 158 int tl'ns born th ha• b en handled by Terry Allen. Student t ms will mowe cl rly d fln each int•rn r quest dur~g th next o w ek nd hop · fully m k n _w contacts in oth r ag nci r �Page Two April 4 , 1969 F deral agencies have agreed to participate as much as possible. One hundred of their summer interns will attend Urban Corps otient tion meetings and ou:r development teams will visit fede:ra.l agencies to help them in choosing certain intern slots. Feder 1 interns will be chosen and placed by federal agencies by merit of their civil service examination scores. Coopet tion this ye r is hopefully aimed at some placement system of Urban Corps interns in future years . Joe Kimmins h s been loaned part-time from the Pea c e Corps Regional Office and will be assisting on intern development. Diane Wilson, a Spelman gradu te, ha.s been hired full time to assist in internship develop .. ment. Russ Caldwell work work part-time in program dev lopment and is on loan from the Geotgia Municipal League. Full time secretaries re badly need d. Urb n Corp offic s will open the week of April 11. The add!'es will be 30 Courtland Str et, Atlanta, Georgia 30303. No phones re install d yet but c Us may b ref :rred to the Atlanta Youth Council Office. Student recruitm.ent will b gin throu.gh financial aid offices in ach coll g the week of Ap:ril 18. Mayor Allen will mak a formal announc ment of the city's particip tion Api-U 9. Brochures d cribing the Urb n Corp will b prix>.t d the we k of April 11. The Bo rd of Tru t e will me t April 18 and th Bo rd of Director will s re olutlo.n. and pprov minutes so th IRS will gi- nt u t x exempt t tue for don tions. me t April 17 to p Exact e timate on numb :r of int rns is impossibl t thi time. No work be.g inning d t h b n t. Th most 1mpottant f ct is th t th Urban Cotps i live nd struggling to get on its l g . L rg thanks to: Bill R ms y, SREB Dan Sweat, City Hall JHch Speer~ Geof 1 T c:h Th Atl nta Con tttution and a.n endle U t Thls memo la not fo'l' publication. SW :ly �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 23, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_023.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 23, Complete Folder
  • Text: - OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION 1!03 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA 30303 Mayor Iva n Allen, Jr. City Hall �REPRINTED FROM THE LOS ANGELES TIMES, SUNDAY, JUtY 24, 1966 THE POOR'S ANGRY VOICESA WARNING AND A THERAPY JACK JONES / ) PROTEST-"Shouting at a public official . . . is a demonstration that the poor and minorities have ... power to challenge the 'big chief.'" Times drawing "The Negro built this nation; let's burn it to the ground!" thundered a delegate to a recent convention of the poor in Fontana. "We have found the only way to move the power structure," cried another, "is to tell them what will Times staff writer ] ones' s principal assignments are in the civil rights, welfare and poverty fields. happen if they don't meet our demands. The truth was proved in Watts." These cries of outrage, heard time and time again whenever the rebellious poor or less privileged gather, certa inly are discomfiting to members of an affluent society. They expose the latent distrust and hatred of the so-called "power structure"; they ring with undertones of terror and possible anarchy. But viewed with an awareness of other protest movements of history, they reflect the not abnormal outcry of a people suddenly offered a chance to vent their frustrations . Some of th e very people who have been the recent targets of vi tuperative attacks by the unsophisticated and uned ucated regard those outbursts as healthy. The Shriver Incident Sargent Shriver, who directs th e antipoverty war that has had much to do with releas ing th e angrv �place for gang leaders; and the WSO newspaper may fairly be called inflammatory in its constant and exaggerated preaching against the police for alleged brutality. In the SCLC offices, many of the staff members wear buttons bearing the legend "Anybody But Daley," and many of the local rights leaders joining hands with Dr. King are people who spend their lives trying to undermine the Daley machine politically. In these surroundings, Dr. King's non-violence becomes, at the best, confusing-to the white community and to the Negroes. Dr. King came into the city and took over a rights movement in which many of the activists had carelessly talked bruta lity and violence for too long. That talk had its effect and is still having it. Thus the riot clarified the argument over black power. The rioters knew that riot is the negation of civil order, but they have now found it is also the dissolution of all power, political, moral and economic. The trophy of r iot is destruction; but, when Dr. King rightly tells the residents of the ghetto that they have little stake in this society, he cannot easily convince them they should not destroy it. That is the logic of events, and it has caught Dr. King out, along w ith the rest of Chicago. Riot's triumph is death. Almost miraculously, there was little death in the riot here. Two-or three persons-died, killed by stray bu llets. One was a man from Mississippi and the other was a 14-yearold girl whose baby was stillborn as t he mother died. Considering the amount of shooting for three days, this toll is small. There were snipers everywhere. Wednesday night there was random shooting from the windows of a high rise city housing project, some of it aimed by neighbors at neighbors. Thursday night there was a spectacular gun battle between the residents of another high rise and the police. There were gun battles up and down streets. The mere number of weapons being u sed on both sides seemed incredible. Has the white community started now to arm itself against such another battle? No one will guess. Police officials keep a tight lip on the subject, saying they do not want to indu lge in psychological warfare. The youth gangs, both Negro and white, are superbly armed, but there is no evidence that they were conducting the gun battles. One is left with the uncomfortable notion that the citizens in general are well supplied with the instruments of death, and that the temperature of violence has r isen sharply a ll over the city as a result of the riot. It is certa in that the riot has frightened both Negroes and whites. The wide publicity given locally to the youth gangs-most of it enormously exaggerated-has terrified the old Negro leadership and many of the Negro church and community leaders. The same publicity, and the violence of the riot, have produced a noticeable rise of hostility among w hites against the Negroes and against the civil rights drive. The politicians, even if they had decided to make some concessions t6 Dr . King toward racial integration, are now severely constricted by t heir constituencies. Innuendo and Rumor In th e search for causes of the riot, meanwhile, everyone seems to be trying to ignore the solution to the great problems. They contin ue to rely on accusation, innuendo and even rumor as an excuse for not doing what must be done. The youth gangs ar e blam ed, and there is talk of subversive groups, without any reflection that in a well-ordered society a subversive group has not much of a chan ce, but that in a riotous situation it has every advantage. The politicans are blaming Dr. King fo r stirring u p trouble, but they know he is voicing real grievances; they just cannot believe there is not some kind of conspiracy at work, but they have little ev idence for one. It may be said fairly that they despise the man who has troubled their consciences. Dr. King blames the politicians for raising Negro hopes and then not ful filling them, but he himself has been singularly maladroit in finding ways to cooperate with them while allowing them to save face. He has deliberately ignored the fact that the politicians are elected by the white majority as well as by Negroes, and that the majority ranges ·from timid ly liberal to solidly r eactionary, that it can be led, bu t not pushed. Hard as Marshmallows Perhaps the only people who found their views and themselves justified in the riot were the teenage gang leaders who w ill tell you bluntly that all the adult leaders on both sides are empty, greedy and dev ious, and about as hard as marshmallows. If the people of the ghetto are looking for a purpose a nd the youths are looking for a hero-as one suspects they are-an honest man would have to tell them to look elsewhere; for the rocks and bullets and clubs that destroyed windows and buildings also demolish ed a whole structure of plaster saints, black and white. Without the saints, we are left with human beings to deal with the gut issues. The heroes remain to be made ou t of the violence and chaos. �OTIS CHANDLER PUB Ll ~ HE.R no ackno w l edgment necessary �REPRINTED FROM THE LOS ANGELES TIMES, SUNDAY, JULY 24, 1966 THE CHICAGO RIOTS \ llOLENCE WITI-IOUT A PLOT D. J. R. BRUCKNER Then, not that man do more, or stop pity; but that he be u;ider in living; that all his cities fly a clean flag . . . Poet Kenneth Patchen However, if a riot has any benefit, it lies in this, that it brilliantly illumi nates, for a moment, the logic of events: extreme violence tends to force the hands of people, and suddenly theoretical positions a nd legal principles all look quite different. What happened in Chicago is not very mysterious if one looks simply at it. Search for a Plot CHICAGO The worst aspect of a riot is that it causes an over-reaction in the community; the people panic. Revolutionaries have understood this since the ancient world and have sometimes used it to their own advantage. There are signs of serious over-reaction in Chicago to the riots that ripped up the W est Side from July 12 to July 15. Part of the panic is purely self-protective, of course. Political, economic and religious leaders of the community discovered in the midst of violence that they ha\·e less control than they would like, or indeed than they should have; and they found D. ]. R. Bruckner is chief of The Times news bureau in Chicago . they haYe less information than they need, to act. Civil rights leaders on the whole discovered much the same thing. A number of city officials and police officers, however, are responding to the demands of the white majority in the city, and are looking for a plot or conspiracy, whether it be one concocted by youth gangs or Communist-inspired groups, or by political hotheads. A lot of investigators are scurry ing around looking for this alleged plot, and, God help us, they may even find one. Any little old mangy plot, however crazy or ineffectual, will serve very well to salve the. conscience of the city. The fact is that the riot was aimless. There is an instructive comparison available to this city. Last month there was a considerable riot in the city's Puerto Rican community. Compared with the violence on the Negro West Side, the Puerto Ricans' riot was a model of order and purpose. Theirs was a violent demonstration against a breakdown of communication. There was a certain happiness about it at times, as when the crowds lifted a man who had been bitten by a police dog to their shoulders and paraded him through the streets as a hero. The Puerto Ricans are at least a community among themselves. After their riot their leaders attended public hearings and aired their grievances, and these were the same grievances one could hear any P uerto Rican on the streets talking about. Total U nhappiness What struck one about the riot among the Negroes was the total dissolution of a neighborhood of perhaps 350,000 people; the hatred not only against the white power structure, but against one another; the factions that battled against one another; the total unhappiness of it. This was not a happy riot, a nd even some of the boasting leaders of the teenage gangs admitted they were afraid. Afterwards, no one could fully define the grievances of the community. The riot was started by an altercation over the turning off of a fire hydrant. One's white neighbors who live out on the lakefront do not accept this explanation at all, but it is true. In the West Side ghetto a major riot can be caused by the turning of a wrench; no plot is n eeded and no reign of terror by gangs. Field workers from two city commissions working in the slums, others working for the YMCA, crusad- �ing pastors and some police all know that riots have almost broken out several times in recent weeks over mere rumors, the transfer of a fa vorite priest from his parish, or an arrest. This is not to minimize the organized aspect of the riot. There are gangs and they are a serious problem, and there are some revolutiona ry groups in the ghetto. But life in the ghetto is normally violent and brutal; it does not take much to set off a riot. The white man outside the ghetto can scarcely realize the power of a rumor on the West Side, for instance; his mind cannot take it in. He really does not know the life of the poor, Negro or white, or how suspicious that life is. At 3 a.m. July 14, in the mid st of the riot, a reporter was attacked by a large rat on a West Side street corner. Two teen-age Negro boys, returning, they said, from a riot fora y, beat off this beast with a baseball bat and a board, explaining they were happy enough to fight rats which are, on the whole, worse than w hite newsmen. Filled With Rats The slums are filled with rats ; rats are the manife st evidence of the inhumanity out there. They are eve ry wh ere, a long with the debris of demolished buildings, the dirt in the streets, the cheap bars. People grow up among the rats and li ve with them. Th e West Side is mostly the home of the Negro poor. In this it differs vastly from the South Side where perhaps 450,000 Negroes live ; many of them li\·e \\·ell , some live magnificently. On the West Side e\·en childhood has degenerated into gang warfare, extortion, intimidation, physical punishment a nd even occasional murder. Adult life is merely a n ex tens ion of thi s violen ce. In such conditions on e does not h a ve to explain riots by plots. May or Ri cha rd J . Daley, during th e riot, said there we re "outs iders" promoting the riot. Perhaps there w ere. But a ll those a r rested lived on the West Side a nd police di d not find the outs iders. Angry with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the mayor demanded to know from him "w hether other cities have no problems." P erhap s they ha ve, and Dr. King is indeed an outs id er. But last summ er th e mayor was face d with th e probl em of nuns staging a sit-in on the world 's bu siest intersection to protest the slum s, a nd they were not outs id ers. The may or's pouting is not dignified; it is childi sh. But it refl ects th e attitude of the white majority whi ch still elec ts him and w hi ch resents being jostl ed. In ra ce rela tions in thi s city, the bulk of the white peopl e treats th e mayor like a ser vant who is hired to br ibe th e minoriti es into civ ic order. Thus a riot produ ces a sudd en munificence from city hall, of hyd rant sprinklers a nd swimming pools a nd hou s ing projects. P e rvas ive Con ception Th is con ception of the may or's offi ce is so per\·asi \·e that even many Negroes h ave come to beli eve it, a n d t he lead in g Negro politicians, w ho a re pa rt of Da ley's De mocratic Pa rty machi ne , act ua lly enfo rce it . But the g ifts of city h all hide th e bas ic p ro blem about the l'\egro ghetto. The pr oblem is th a t most of th e peop le in t he gh etto simp ly do not sh are in any \\·ay in the life of t h e ci ty . Their ali en a tion is an eno r mous spir itu al wa ll built u p of uncountable and ancient indignities; it is the wall of the city. The problem is to break down the wall. Dr. King, when he opened his civil rights drive here two days before hell broke loose, thought he had at least part of the machinery to break down the wall. But the riot, which illuminated society's flaws, also illuminated some serious weaknesses in Dr. King and his approach. The first thing that became evident was that in Chicago Dr. King, the patron saint of non-violence, was leading a collection of local civil rights groups whose leaders include a few pretty violent people. This problem results from a structural weakness in the King method. Dr. King's Southern Christian Leadership Conference suffers from a lack of troops and thus it is plagued by indiscriminate recruitment when it enters a city. In a big city like Chicago, where there are 900,000 Negroes and only a percentage of these favor Dr. King, the flaw can be fatal. Little Influence Dr. King very quickly discovered he had little influ ence in the West Side community. When he walked the streets on the first night of riot pleading for non-violence some young Negroes laughed at him . When his aides showed films this past spring of the Watts riots to illustrate the danger of violence, some youths applauded. Youth gang leaders who met with Dr. King as the riots subsided on the night of July 15 said they might turn to nonviolence and again they might not. Some of these gang leaders told a reporter they had met several times with SCLC officials long before the riots, but Dr. King had no program for them , so the youths gave up on him. One of them called him a "hit-and-run m essiah. " His prestige suffered enormously in the Chicago riots. The Sunday before the uproar started, he had stood in Soldier Field and debated non-violence as against "black power " with none other than Floy d McKissick of the Congress of Racial Equality, the preach er oi black power. The riot cooled that philosophical a rgument permanently, on e gathers. For th e riot has turned not onl y the whites aga inst Dr. King, but the Negro power structure as well; and his ci vil rights movement he re is in immedi a te dan ger of passing into th e hands of the old-time politicians. Dr. King finds himself in the position of either becoming the high priest of all the poor and only the poor, or getting out, quickly. In either case, he has been pus hed-violently if y ou will-in the direction of the McKissick position, th a t Negro rights must inv olve Negro political power. Further, no matte r how much Dr. King protests that hi s Chicago drive is not partisan a nd not v iolent, the riot exposed clearly tha t many of the people around him are ve ry pa rti sa n a nd a few a re v iol ent. Violen t and Non-Violent One of his top ai des, t he Rev. J a mes Bevel, told alm ost 50,000 people at the J u ly 10 ra lly tha t "we wa n t the violent and the n on-violent to join w ith us." Tha t seems pretty straigh tforward . Among the pe rsons a tten d ing a con fere n ce with the mayor th e clay before the r iots started was Ch ester Rob inson of th e West Side Organi zati on , · a loca l civ il r ights grou p. R obi nson is n ot person ally a v iolent man, but hi s h ead qu a rters h as becom e a con venient gath ering �voices by financing community action programs seeking to involve the poor in the solution of their own difficulties, was shouted down in April w h en he attempted to address a conference called by the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty . At the time, he said a ha ndful of "professional demonstrators" were tryin g to make trouble. His attitude now, at least for publication, is that su ch confrontations are a positive thing. "It's time," h e says, "that the poor speak up for their n eeds." · Joe P . Maldonado, executive director of th e county's antipoverty vehicle, the Economic and Youth Opportunities Agen cy, who also has been subjected to insulting personal abuse, shares this opinion in essence. Governmental Confusion Infuriated by governmental confusion a n d political machinations which seem to dull the promise of antipoverty programs, the poor s trike out at anybody w ho represents the "powe r structure." Their more vocal m embers appear dete rmined to take over and make changes th emselves. Speaki ng of certain manifestations of the so-called revolt of the poor, J ames E. Ludlam, president of the Welfare Planni ng Council, a trad itional agency, told anti poverty board m embers that a vocal minority "grounded in militancy a nd confl ict" was trying to capture control of antipoverty programs. He said t h ese militan t elements are given to threats of violence, disru ption of meetin gs and " infiltration a nd subversion of staff decisions." Bu t the Rev. Wi lliam Hervey, director of the Department of Metropolitan Mi ssion for the Los Angeles Presbytery, responds th a t militancy is n ecessary in the fight aga inst "man 's mos t dehuma nizin g enemy-poverty." Old weapons cannot be used to fight a n ew war, argues Mr. Hervey, referring to the traditional welfare agencies. He agrees that many of those castigated by Ludlam are "grounded in militancy and involved in conflict ," but h e could not agree that their actions were totally n egat ive. One of the intriguing prospects in all this is that some of today's revolutionists, like others of history, w ill become part of the " power structure" themselves once they gain control. Then, presumably, they will regard t h emselves as " responsible" a nd will find themselves facing the fury of n ew revolutionaries. One man w ho believes the often-irresponsible accusations by the poor a re a n ecessary part of progress is Dr. J. A lfred Cannon , a UCL A neuropsychiatrist who works w ith a group ca lled P eople in Community Action. Dr. Cannon, a Negro, says, "Anytime you h ave a group of people who are relative strangers, on e way they have of testing each other might be through initial demands or angry confrontations. It's a way of finding out how genuine the other person is. "Often this kind of confrontation . . . paves th e way for more constructive, gentle exchanges. "Shouting at a public official ... is a demonstration that the poor a n d minorities have the strength and power to be able to challenge th e 'big chief.' This is very important, because they can see their effectiveness in some kind of action. It leads to a sense of worthwhileness and adequacy ... and a potency which the poor generally don't h ave." 'Feeling of Participation' This is the beginning, says Dr. Cannon, "of the poor man's _feeling of participation in his own destiny, a very importa nt strut in his h ealth." Bitterness over the fa ilure of the war on poverty to deliver immediate results, a nd disillusionment over the administration of welfare programs have ti:iggered a statewide-even a nationwide-effort by th e poor to organize. With the backing of the Univers ity of California Extension , the Sears Foundation, and two privately organized advisory agencies-the California Foundation for Economic Opportunity a nd the California Center for Community Development-a first California Convention of the Poor was held in Oakland in F ebruary. This led to the June con vention in Fonta na, attended by representati ves of slum tenant councils, welfa re recipien t groups and community action movements around the state. Out of t he Fontana con vention , Dr. Jacobus tenBroeck, a UC pol itical science professor and former chairma n of the State Social Welfa re Board, emerged w ith the task of g iving some organi zational sophistica tion to the more tha n 20 W elfare Rights Organizations w hich a re loosely joined in thi s movement. A convention is planned this fall to develop a legislati ve program, clearly aimed at mounting a lobby for cha nges in welfare and other laws affectin g the poor. Welfare Recipients Rema rkably, in view of widespread conviction among the gene ra l pu blic that most w elfare recipients wou ldn't work if th ey cou ld, some of the loudes t protests in recent W elfare R ights Organiza tion de monstrations were that the present system " makes it imposs ible for us to work our way off we lfare." " If you don't h ave poor people in on the soluti ons," says Dr. TenBroeck, "you misgauge w ha t the problems a nd their attitudes are. "They flai l, they shout, they a re quite unreason a b le," con cedes Dr. Ten Broeck. "Thi s is therapy a nd steam-valving. Unless you prov ide some way to let off their futility, we're s itting on a lid we ought not to s it on- as y ou see in W a tts. "It's not a matter of wh ether we enjoy it-bu t w h e the r we're going to make it possible for those wh o a re deprived t o cease to be dep r ived. "They want the rest of us to slide into the back ground as t hey get on their feet a nd get organ ized . And t hat's th e way it sh ould be." �June 19, 196 8 Mr . Frank Ro ug hton In titute of Communi cativ of the Methodist Chur c h 1279 Oxford Road, N . E . Atlanta, Georgia 30366 Arts Dear Mr . Roughton : I have received from Mayor Ivan Allen your letter addressed to him of June 17th reg rding your suggestion for a ymphonic drama on the truggle of the Ne gnn in America, with con tructio n for . ame of an amphitheatre, a a memorial to Dr. Martin Luther King , Jr. Thi ha been brought to my atte ntion in my capacity a chairman of our Aldermanic King Memori 1 Committee . At the out et, I would like to xpress ppreciation foi- your intere t in tbi matt r and to tell you th t I feel your ide ia mo t appropri te a.nd would be xtrem ly me nlngful. Actually, one of Mra . King'• auggeationa for incorpor tion ln th memorial w ar planning was long thi line. Ae you have probably le rned f:rom the v rioue new m dia, our committe - and •ub equ ntly th Board of Aldermen - h t k n a po ltion supporting living, productive m morial as in contr at to •omething like statue or a str et naming: and we have call d On the federal government to a• tat in the dev lopment of nation 1 memorial with ver 1 working facilitie in th rea of Dr. King's birthpl ce and mother church round Auburn Avenu -.nd Boul va.rd. We al o h ve n ordlnanc befor our Zoning Committ e ref rred to it by the Board of Alderm n at ita meeting Monday which would c 11 for design tion of thi are • an 11 hietoric district" , which is our fir t at p in order to pre• rve the ch r cter of some of the n ighborhood nd to protect it from other d velopmentt until we ar in a poeltion to make aetu 1 acqwaition. It i8 my opinion that in the near futur we will probably work �.Mr . Frank Roughton June 19, 1968 -2- toward the e tablishment of a prestige national bo rd o{ trustees, a suggested by Mrs . King, which bo rd would probably have the responsibility o( d eciding on pecific facilities to be incorporated in the development . At the next meeting of our committee I will bring your communication to their attention and will k ep you advised a to our progress . Sincerely, ~~ Sam Ma svell, SMJr:nd cc: Mr . Martin Luther King, Jr . The Hon . Ivan Allen, Jr . (Attn: Mr . Dan Sweat) -Ji} �e ~ ,: - . . . r . • ~t --- PREF A·C E . . i·; , ~ ,. . . • - _1 ' .. .. ,I .:., · ' ,I; tt;} i ~.r:·:. t. , . i ·. ~1 .... In attemptin17 to anal v~e wl1ere the movement· is go:i ng, cer tain - i {f ' c.23 :. questions have arisen as to the P,, t,,re roles nlaved by white . :,. I • i .. . personnel. In or.d·e r to make th1 s iss11e clearer, we have wr j tten ) · :fi ·I t ·> .' ;-\• .: ._, i a .few paragraphs, atemminC? from our observ~ions and experiences , lfL,_< .•if ->} . -i o1 ,4.. • i,'.:, I • • •• • • ·: : l-t;,:r.:. : Some of the reasons are as follows: -~ ;·:!L-· ·.- :\ The imi~j lj ty 'i tt-. ) :-::i·:(:--:·.:· '" ~ ~ . .. ~· .,r- ·- .J :wf~ :.- ~ ; ~-- . <} J'L · · ·· ~ The answers to. these · q1.1estions lead us to believe that the form of white participation, as practiced in the past, is now obsolete. j ;.;.·:. ::: )i[: ' '., .., which trerve as a pr·e view to a broader st11dy on the subject. .\ or ._ whites to relate ' to the cultural aspe ct s of I ..: Black soc 1 etv; att! t11aee that whi tea, conscionsl-v ·or unconscious- · ·' . "i · · · ~1·;·1·.· ·__., ... ·.: ~ . #', j·.' ly, brin~ to Blacl-r. com·"luni ties abont themselve s · (wes te rn s uperior- .~ I. . . _;'?: ,.· ·'._.,".. :/' -. ·. i ty) and about Black neon le (paternalism); i n a bili tv t o s ha t ter -~ ft(~~:-:~·\{:-.:~~ '. ·: 'r;:1-.': ·, · (; ·, <} --:. ·.· ·. ~: whi ta-sponsored comm11ni t v m~rths of Black - j_nferj or i tv a nd self, \ . ne.liation; ina., i li ty to combat the v i ews ·of t he Bl ack .commnni ty ... .. >:i .. ::a:u:::::;o::::::::;:i::i:::::: c:o:::o:h:::c:o:::::i::::rds' ~- , 1! • t : :: \ · t~J:i. :_ '. _: . -.. • .• - t, ; \.- ~ /• '.:; ··{ ' ,j l • I ·., I . .. ,·r .. • r u ..... t hrelationships" ( s ex ); the unwillin~n~ss of whit~s to deal with _ . :- i i • the ho s t i l i ty of the _Black, community on the i ssll e of interra cial the roots of racism which lie within the white community; whites, though individua~ ••11benal", are symbols of o~pression _to the · •' ·f 1 . . :r ~·1 I Black community -- due to the collective power that whi~es 'have I r I ., . .• . , over Black lives.· .. Because of' these rea11J,.,ns, which f'o:rce us to view America thr~ugh ..' ~ ~~ ! ~: ,. ' ,' ~ 'I i .. the eyes · or victims, we advocate a conscio,1e chanr,-e .in the role of t ) ·,.:·.:~;'-' .,:· .whites, . ,.,h~ch . . ir , .- . . ,.- .r.;:r ·': /: _.: ·, will be in t •me with the develoning self~ c on s ci ous . . . . - ' .. ness . and :_self-ass~~\ion :o:.. ·_~h~ -~froi..arn.~rican people. ' �~ ~ ~J -- - ------------------... =~ ---,.,., . -- ---·-. ... ... -·- -·-- - - -ffl•'l'~~J -... ! ..:!·.~-143.215.248.55 ~ - ., -~ - -... ,.- ... . ~. ,., --· . .' , .j ,· , .'t" • 1'• ( , ,; ., I:. ~ -I . ... •". ---· ~. ... ~,-.. ,,. .~ ... • ' ,... l ... ,..: ", . ·-.... ... ·.• .~- ff .. ' ·.1j·_ V,ai ' ... ,.- .• . . ! ..... ' : .. ' ...... ' • ....· ~ . ,., l"·." ... 1 .. -:. .J" In conttl,uding. we cstatG ' thet our posjtion ~oes "}. . ~ steili from &gainst white ~~opl~, but from a conscien- ha.trea." or tious effprt ~o develop the best methods of solving our national ' . problem_. I ,> "!' ·',, 'i 1· < ·) ' ., . f "r .: .i ••. -· . \ l • ,' Ii. '··· j ·-'~ ·. ~ . :· ~-.: ,.!.:~: ... ~. , • I ·,· ...~- , ,.: ":\:. ' '· ·.: - i r. ., . '. I .. ,. , 1~· i t. 4 ·1 .· . -:.·· . . . . . ... ·, .. . ! '· '. ~ ' > •· ' , . ,~· . ~ . ,. ' .. ' •,j .. , !:;·,. •\ - ~ • ! l l ,i i ,_ ·, 'I ·..{   . l .' ! i ~. . '· •\ . -,: ! ~ . ·.[ ~ ., -~ .,·1 )· ~- ,._. ·,; ' (" \ ·.· ,/ , ~- - .. . ·_.; ,: ' , •II' ·~ ..... •• I ~ I ·, ' i •:"' I- . '·-; I I 'I ._..,i . .,,.:I ,- ., •-;...· • ,.. LT • h,_.. ~ \ , '.'i -- ~ -- .~ - '.!.::::i . • ... :: . .! . . ~ '.}(F,~ . ,>. ~ . •·: ' - I •• ., '• - - - ,• • • • ~l, • _ _.. • I ~;.. , r~ ,• .,.'.!••• _,__. • , .. ·-. .I \ ' '· �~ {,&,rat:;;~:-;;.,e;.-;:., -~~ --::t··•- .....-• •j I .:_? -? .. .• :l . - - • "'"': ~ - ~!': ·: • , •": - : - " ' . - : " . ' :.. ~. -:. - ."'.' . ":" . •'.""..~ . - : - - ' . ' . • "• .":' . '."." .. ~ _ . --- -••- . '.'"' _ -:'."' ,. _ __ ; ,_ • -. p_.....,., . ~., , ·.·.- · ~- , , .. .,._._ ., .f .., . 1\ ~ _ .t,, --~ ... . _,_ ," : . : ·.. / . 1. •, •, ,• • ··- ~ .... • ... , P • "'\~ • '#; '· ' '- - .!.-=----=:-== -·= =;-=-:-:======= .= . . Ne'g ro ;i;i so·nJehow incapable of liberating ouL of the • __ ,,,.: -- A111erican experience. / In the books that children read, whites are always "good" ( good symbols . "I I · ' · .are white ), Bla~ks '. t ... r -~. .:., -- - - -_-__..; _ . I: . ... i . - . .t hi ms elf, is lazy, etc. can1e ·. ·1 ~ .,, • • •• ~=--=-=-=----------\ 'rhe u,yH, t.he.4- ~he . , t °'::--.. - -- - - -- - •• --. ~ --~ "- -.,. ,.- ~ . =_ _ _ ____._ _ I •••- . -- - • : - .: ·:- ·-- · :. _- -- : :· .. ~---:·--'. ; '"•. -:!-~ .:,~~.:; •,:-;::_-p;_-":"..,. ' ' - ~ _,_..,.......,,.....,,=--,:,::;e,;:==:=-=:~ ..-,_::,, ._,-;._._., _ _,.., __ _ - ,- •• -• • - , .. language is ref~rred to as a "dialect", and Black people in this country ' ·.·. ... '.'• are "evil" are seen as "savages" in movies , their a.re supposedly descended from savages. , •• • I Any white pe~son . . . . . who comes. into the Mov~ent has these concepts .. in his mind about Black people, if ·only subconsciously. I He cannot escape them because the whole society has geared his subconscious in I .. i" -~-~ :· : that direction. !)._·: Miss ~merica coming from Mississippi has a chance to represent I··· I '· . -... ,, ' ; .t' . \I .. < It~ • J.• · f ! . ~ ' .': • ~ 1: ·1t ,. .. ,-. {· _, . I • I ~- ·. j-_.· ' l• ~-~ all of America·, but a Black person from neiflre r Mississippi or New ' . . ' • York will ev_e r represent Arr.erica. So that white people coming int o the • I , '. : .• , • • • • • • -we>rd "black", cannot relate to the "Nitt'y Gritty", canno t r elate t o the experience that brought such a word into b e ing, cannot relate to . .! .. _1. ~ , Mov~rnen~ canno_t relate to the Black experience, cannot relat e t o t he • ,} . '·. .... .'~ . - 0 \, ;(; . ;. . I • • • chitte.rlings, hog's head cheese, pig feet, ham hocks , and ca nnot • ! . . . . . . . relate to slavery, because these things are not a part of their experience • ' rced that Blacks cannot organize t h e m s elv es. T he white psych~logy that Blacks have to be watc h e d, als o reinforces ' I t his s t ereotype , Blacks, in fact, fee l in t imidated ~y the presence of whit e s, because of their k nowledge of the p ower that whites have over ., their lives. ,One whit e pers·on can' come into a meeting of Black people . _. . ,.·. ....· . . . _·: _ ·..• _:t ..-~ (. .I ' i. ' ' ·and.. cha~ge the complexion of tha.t ...meeting, whereas one Black person .. . . . . . . . . ' . . . w9_u ld not change the complexion_of that meeting unless he was an , .. . . ·. . )' . .. . . f. ·. ,. . ' : . :_ ' ... ~ . ~ ~ j �;q ·Dilt.t;i r~ I ~,.;Jt:'!, ~ii______________________ ,,.__ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______~ ~- 4 .. .. .. , ... ' ·. ~- 1~ 4':1'··~ - 't !! .. . .. • ·- ·- - ... ,,..._ -- - ,- . - - _....-·-- .: . .. _.__j._....;......._,,..,.,.;,,=""~~-.,.~-,-,~-~-.....,_..,,.. _,..,, ___,,.,._.,..,. __ =,:; _ · . :i " • - . •t .....,... _ ..- . - .: . .... ·, . I • '. r • r• - ~ :-,:,.._T__,,~:_r. r ~ obvious Uncle Tom. 't ·-,,-~, . - . .- • - • • ' ,. 4 • •, ' ~ r ., . . • =--·.:.;...c.;.• • =-~·~~ - -·- . ------ ---------.-----========-======= .People would immediately start talking about "brotherhood", "love".; etc.; race would not be discussed. l If people must express themselves freely, there has to be a climate I . I I , l:; .' . . : ' · are not liable to vent the rage that they feel about whites in the presence .. ' . •. · : ·. ' in which they can do this. If Blacks feel intimidated by whites, then they ,. ' ' _i... I' • '! , ••: . organize, i.e., the broad masses of Black people. . i I ~ _; of whites---especially not the Black people whom we are trying to ·: . .., be created whereby Blacks can express themselves. . . .. ~ A climate has to The reason that ~ . :~ .. . ., whites must be _e xcluded is not that one is anti-white, but because . the efforts that one is trying to achieve cannot succeed because whites r. '._have an intimidating . . . effect. Oft times the intimidating effect is in direct proportion to the amount of degradation that Black people have ·' ,' ':. { . '! • • suffered at the hands of white people. It must be offered that white people who desire change in this country .- ' .·:,. . .. ;" .. . should go. where that problem (of racism) is most manifest. That ·! i: \' p;-oblem is not in the Black community. The white people should go into whi~e communities where the whites have created power f or the •• 1• i:. express of denying Blacks hlllman dignity and self-determination. Whites who come into the Black community with ideas of change seem '··'-.~ to want to absolve the power structure of its r~sponsiblity of what it j> .tji ,: · ., t ji ; .r.- !· a., .~! I is doing, and saying that change can only come through Black unity, I· t ' I j ,, j '/ 1 /_ .,~ I I .. which is only the worst kind of paternalism. This is not to say that whites have not had an important role in the-Movement. In the case , · ' 1. of Mississippi, their role was very key in that they helped give Blacks ,, : . I the right to organize, but that rcle is now over, and it should be. 1. People now have the right to picket, the right to give out l eaflets, ,. the right to vote, the right to demonstrate, the right to print• . i,. . I . Il These things which revolv·e around the right to organize have been •I• . accomplished mainly because oftthe entrance of white ·people· into ., Mississippi• - i~ :the ·aummer of '6~. i Since these goals have now been , ... : I _, �-:..~ k.··~ ~-:.:.:_.:'.;"-~~.,.;,_,.,,_:_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _:;_;. ·.(~ ..;,,tv......<. - ·· - •• • ;., .• - . <~; ~- · ·~-· -- - •• • • •• .. . ,:_ ·- -· ·-· ·· i :r:·· . . -.,.,~-143.215.248.55-~:':- ~~ ~-. ... ·· ·· · • - · - • •• • .. • - . - ·· · - • - -· · - --- -- - · · ·· - - - - - --. ·.·•· .· . • -- • - --~ 143.215.248.55·-_- -~--~--- - ' ·"=---~ ,-~-~-~-~ .. · ·· --· . j - ·: · · ,. -.. ~ - - - -_ ~- - __ .. .._. ~ ·--.-- · accomplished, the.ir (whites) role in the Movement has now ended. ,. ' • :· What does it mean if Black people, once having the right to organize, •i are not allowed to organize themseives? It means that Black's ideas .. I ., . ' . ·, .• I ' wnites are the '~b~·ichls" behind the Movement .and Blacks cannot . IE ;, • . . .:. .· . . :. .. : .. '• i-'t .. . i: i function without whites. This only serves to perpetuate existing a tti t ude s within the existing society, i.e., Blacks a.re "du~b", "unable to . .·,· , . '. s .' Further (white participation) means in. the eyes of the Black community that I, ~ Shouldn1 t people be able t o organiz_e . themse,l ves? Blacks should be . given this right. ,.  :·~~: about inferiority are being reinforced. .• take care of business", etc. Whites are iN.na.rt", the "brains" behind everything. ~ i How do Bla cks rela te to other Blacks as su ch? ' How do we react I 'i ' I . ;, . ·to Willie Mays as against Mickey Mantle? ~ . .; I· .. . . ... ,, 1 i· What is our response to Mays hitting a home-run against Mantle performing t he same deed? Is our interest in baseball ordered by our appreciation of t he ar tis try of the game, or is it ordered by .the participation of Neg roes in · ,,. · · Baseball? One has to come to the conclusion t hat it is be caus e of ·· . ..1 .... ·i.,, - . -~ • .., _; i .... .. . Black pc3;rticipatiori in baseball. .. .,. , , ' .; : : Negroes still i de ntify with the Dodger.s . because of Jackie Robinson 1 s efforts with the Dodge r s. Negro es ~ "J ... .... would i n s tinctively champion all- Black t e.:im s if t h ey opposed all- .. white o r p r edom i nate_ly white t e a ms. The same p rinciple operates 'I for the Move ~ e 11t as it does fo r baseb all: a mystique must be created whereby Negroes can identify with the Movement. Thus an all-Black project is needed in order for the people • themselves. ,. •' ' I I I , This has to exist from the beginning. what can be called "coalition politics". ' ~ i I to h:.a·e • ' This relates to ' There is no doubt in our · minds that sane whites a;i:e just as disgusted with this system as .. ·J we are. • But it is meaningless to talk 'about coalition if the r e is no . one to align ou'rs ·e lves• ·with, because of the lack o! organi:i.a~ion i n • t · \. the white communities. there can be no ·talk -of "hookingcoupj' unless I �~ · ~ ~ ~ ~ : ;':-143.215.248.55 15:44, 29 December 2017 (EST)J.-.-,l~ ·'1' .. \' ....... r . •.. .. ' ,. ·.~ '.. ··" l - .---, ·· ' ' -"'1"1 . 1f • - ~- . ... -- -·, ,- ~ ~ ..~-~~ :.:...~- .:- -- Black people organize Blacks and white people organize whites. ·i -I .l: .:l1 :. are going in the same direction- talks about exchange of personnel, · 1. J 1'·~ coalition, and other m .eaningful alliances can be discussed. ., 'i-J . .i: ·· ·f. ! whereby we thought that our problems revolved around the right to I . ' In the beginning of the Move·m ent; ~e had fallen into a trap . ' '· ·1· eat at certain lunch counters or the right to vote, dr to organize . '· ':t. t \ ·-·'· 1•·. I•. .- If these conditions are met, then perhaps at some later date- and ii we · J: . ' r .i• ,~ ) ,· , . - - ------ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -..-.'""."'1..._- - - "' ..- - - - - - ---- --.----.-.. -....'-~~- communities. . . deeper. ... ' ; .... ct.ir.: have seen, however, that the problem is much The probietn of this country, as we had seeh it, concerned i \ . I j' ,· :·· , I . : ., ) w~ ollr ' old Blacks and old whi~es (and therefore) if decisions were left . to 't~~ young people, theh solutions would be arrived at. negates the history of Black people and whites. . j But this We have dealt I stringently with the proble ili of "Uncle Tom·", but we have not yet . 'gotten ~round to .Simon Legree. . f ?- real vil~ian? ' We ·must ask ourslves who is the ,.- . ·, .. 1 . • ~ Uncle Tom or Si~on Legree? Everybody knows Uncle T6m, but who knows Simon Legree? I 1 So \k.rhat we have now (in SNCC) is i i ~ closed so~iety. A clique. . · Black people cannot relate t,.:, SNCC, because of its unrealis tic, non racial atmosphere; denying their experiences of America as a racist society. In contrast, SCLC has a staff that at least maintains a Black facade. The front office is virtually all-Black, but nobody accuses SCLC of being 'racist". ...,~' . If we are to procee d towards t r ue liberation, we must cut ourselves off from white people ••• We must form our own institutions, credit 1,.. •• . -~. unions, co-ops, political parties,· write our ,own histories. Dne illustrating·.· example, is the SNOC "Freedom Primer". Blacks cannot relate to that book psychologi.,,ally~ because white people wrote it and, therefore it pre~ents a white viewpoint. _ · To proceed f~rther, let us make some comparisons_ be tween the .,/ l !.' �, ... . --· · ~! -~. . _ : -·-= ' ,... . ...- -~ .• ··~ ·-:,, - .. --r - - .. - . ., ·- ·- • •.. I : -~• •, .. ... -. ,..-.,,. ... -.. ,.., n,•.-: ·~,'";"r,,"W1':•~~•-~ • ..-,1~• ~ - - - -.............=-:c!!=~-- ·· ··:--..:.-:-:- ~ • ) -:..:. -, ' i " -- •• - .- ..: -,·.·· . ····- ·---. - - . - I =··-·- ·= ===== _..- :_:_- -::. :~: : - ~:..-=.. . Black Movement of the ( early) 1900 1 s and the Movement of the 1960 1 s --- the NAACP with SNCC. Whites subverted the Niagra . I -~ Movement whichr at the outset, was an all-Black Movement. i . The • I' 1·.. . t :-: -. . name of the new organization was also very revealing, in that it il;.. 4 .__ - ,1:•,..-~ : presupposed that Blacks have to be advanced to the level of whites. We are now aware that the NAACp has grown reactionary, is controlled by the power-structure itself, and stands as one of the •.main roadblocks to black freedom. .,. SNCC, by allowing the whites to remain i in the organizati~n, can have its ·efforts subverted in the same manner; I· . [ i.e., through having '·them play important roles such as community . ! I~_;~· .. .; I ' I · organizers, etc., · Indigenous leadership cannot be built with whites in O • i . .... ' · i ·..-; it ·:, .. . .J/· _:: ' ·.. the positions ·they now hold. These £acts do not mean that whites cannot help. ....;J,. . . ,i::) icipate on a voluntary basis. .i They can part- We can contract work out to them, but [ ( : ( "', . :, in no way can they participate on-a policy-making level • The cha_rge may be made that we are "racists", · but whites who ~ ' •1 . ·.', -r•. I'. ... ' . -, !. t • '.. . . our own destiny. J If persons insist on remaining because of their ..;·' ,,:r .. longevity, or because they have feelings that we are indebted to them. } -~-. ~, are sensitive to our problems will realize that we must determine • 4 ' r We, as Black people, must re-cv:aluate our history, our ideas of I ., self, the world, Africa and her contributions to mankind. We must take the credit for our contributions to this society _and to the ·, • '<' world. Credit will be given to white people where it is due, but · surely our contributions must .be given credit. I These. myths ( of inferiority and "savager~ ) must be broken by,' Black people, so . . . ' that no mistake can be. made about who is accomplishing what for whom. This is one way to ·break the myths. ' As to the charge of "Black racism", as against white supremacy: . ·; we can say .that the racial makeup of any organization does .not a:nake_ it racist, i.e., , supreme court makeup of all white judges, Black �• ... ., ~ '.; ~~·· ---·..... ... -; . ~- .. . .. : ..:: -, Et-: . - ......,..,-:- -.-..~~- . - - ;: . ·" -- .. ·. :··· · · ... ~ l _ _,;, --,.;-~ ... .,. T -~- .:.. ) .· .,i churches and Black businesses being all Black. The naming of the n_ewapaper, "Nitty-Gi-itty", which ae_rvcd to polarize the feel- ' l, . ings of race, illustrated in a very graphic manner the attitudes that whites have towards cultural aspects of our society. •, The whites were opposed to the name and Blac-ks were affirmative on the issue. ... .; The alternative was the 11 surely such a name could not speak to the needs of grass-roots Black peopl e • Black people can say to the "Nitty-Gritty": I can see mrself there. Can .say to Mays hitting a home run: I see _m yself there. ; Can say t~ the Atlanta Proj ect: . ,, ~. I see myself there f "i .. · , ~ ·: • ' .·r . . l ' i ·, • '· .I ' • • I-~ J . . ··. cl ' ....,.. A tla'xita Voi c e" ".., , • • . . •,' l . ~ ~ i it . -: .. J.~;. i ~ . ~ '. ' · i . f ·, • . .~ ., f. ' ,\ i ' ."" I .' ! 'l , ., • :· I .. . . ,, . . ... . ' ·,, ·'\ ·_ : . . , , •, ,.,·· . ·'·' F\:tc:·.·•. ::.·-. . . < .: ' ,· .- i• • t . ... ( . :f . . , • ~ ... . .. . l·,, . .. ! ': ~ I , . •"J. •. i.- .. ·.i . I·,,_ , ., . .'•I ....·· .. : . .· ,. ·. I. . / I 1 ·'I ,.! ' ' .; '! .: ,: • •\ I• I ..,,..·. /' . . . ..... . :_n ' . .~ ....'·[" ... i ' . .• •. \ I . ~ I .! ,., l • f I, •. .. ~ .., . . i: ,· I ,• ·t /I . ::; .. . 1 I I l . ~ . .··:_.; . ~ ,' • • .• ' .1. I • I ,,, \ ••·• ~ .· .. �....11 ... ... ~ •• ,:_. • .. .. - -.: -· • ··- • 1 ... .. j ·--~~,- .:·:·: ·· ........ ·-:-- --::-: . ,· . ~-.. . • - .· -:- - • - . - -~ --~ • • • • - - --- - • t' ' ~ . • •. .;. • - .·,-,. - .. .... ' , . --; ,_- -:· . .. '.~ · - - - ~ --;. - . ~h_............. ~------"=·-~,...._..,,--:===-e-'..;,,.·,;.,-·~ - -~·,-======~-:-."'·--lki= =.'·r---e---·:.!..!:L- ~~-:::.---·.:=·=-~:~-~  :::: ' =====:::==:::========-=========l One point I would lik~ to f:'r.'it,:1.::.;:.l s is the failure on the .. part o-.f conscious whites ancl Rlae, 1;;., :~n cleRling with the j ... J ' 'J American reality in terms of differences. J 'i _1 ·•' ; .~ ~ to emphasize t~e analysis of the differences bet~een Black and .. . 1 / : 1 .. , ' •: ., < We are beginning white people. There has been an escap~st attitude on the pa~t of SNCC .j T , ,· ; of )143.215.248.55ing at the problem as if race did not matter. --~~,.. -:,..,~ This negates the special history of Black people in this country, 1·. . ·. .':.. .-_mainly the slavery period and the inhumRn forms of segregat- · · ion we have been forced to su~fer. ~nether important point is that most Blacks and whites tend to view ~lacks in the light of _the my-th e that the power s true ture has ore a ted and perpetrated in this country. Black people are considered as "citizens" along the same lines as white people in this count- ry, when in reality, Black people are a semi-colonialized people, victims ·o r a domestic colonialism. .. ,. •. .,, Our introduction· into this country occured during the same time as the partition of Africa and Asia by the European powers, so that the American ins.t i tut ion of · slav.ery was, too , _ a form of , I, I ·-1· . Western Colonialism. . ,,'1· ~~1 ;'!- ·', ' i": \ Therefore Black people in this country ., ,( .•I . l afift in the same way as ao other colonial p~i;:.ples to their environment and experience, but the myths of America labels . _· j ,j n ', them citizens which is an unreal attitude. Also, one of the main blocks in terms of Black self- / recognition antl self-identification in this c9untry has been I interference f~om the dominant white society. '. . From the 1900's to the priesent time Afro-Amer-ican writers and thinlcers have had to contend with the encroachment . of white intellectuals upon 'l:;heil" culture arid . upon ·~;heir thou 6 hts. t·ot ·o·nly cH:d the white inte11ectua1s .·encroaoh upon their thought and culture �:~: . . ! .,, . ·...... _ · .. _ . . . ··-~ r-i:- -..:· . ·- - t~; .... .,._ ~ . .;:a--_-7:"-::·: --<- . ·, . . . - ·- -: - · . - , - -· · ·· - ·. - · r.,:~""' ~ -· ;~- - -· ..,• ·- - _ b-ub· they- l>rought . -· ., - bacl_-cground . .. - .:· -· . ' . • '., If • :"· ....._.,. ' . .. . ~""'-. ·- .!:'. . .~t. - --. • • - ,,,.. .... - ·- · .--.-,..,..'.:.icc:..::"..:==.: ·..:.: ,::;~--.ll ~ · ·.. ·=: - ============::;;;;:: ==·= to it t-heir -whole American ~ of racism and paternalism so that Black culture was potrayed as something being base, second-r~te or below the culture of the United States, which was consi<'lered ."serious" ' or "real 11 • music. ' / -~~· . :- This music which is rooted in the whole experience of .our people in this country was not even named by Black ... •' ( One grap_hic example of this is modern Afro_;, American .. r ·p eople. Modern Afro-American music is named II jazz", which .,. ;- . ;i . ; .. ._ I  :f _. ; : . ' ,r 't I (r. ~ is a term that is derived from white · American society. It is w~{te ~iang to~ sexual intercourse; so that otir musid ~hich ,, j mo.y- be called the maii1stram of our culture ·was l<'.lolced upon ~-) i' .? ! • ·I . " as being :base and second~r at a or dirty and containing aen- .1 sousness, sexuality a nd other exoticisms. II : ! l: .j .' . i.; -. •' J'. 1J :./ ,: -: . .., ~ ~~ '• j • .' ., r This however says mo~e about the white American psyche than it does about aspects of Afro - American culture. • One of the c~!ticisms of wh i t e mili t a nts and radicals is that when we ~iew the masses of white people we view the ov~rall reali ty of Americ a , we view the racis~, the b i gotry , a.nd the dis tortion of pe r s onal i t y, we view .man's inhumanity t o man; we view in reality 180 million r ac is t s. white int ol~c tual and rad i c al The sepsit i ve who is figh t ing to bring · about change is c onscious . of t his f act, but does no t have ,_:i ... _; t he courage to admit this. Whe n. he admi ts this reality, t he n he must also admit his invol veme nt bec aµse -he is a par.t / of the colle c t1ve white Amer ic a. ,, I t is onl,Y t o t he extent that he recognizes this that he will be able to change this _reality. Another concern is how does· the white radical view the Black Community and .how does he view the_ poor white community in terms of' organizing. So far, we have found that most white r-ad-lcals have sought · to escape· the horrible reality of' America by going ===~1 �-··~t~~,: 1Wf: :r:.:.•~~i,•,l~,,.f~ - - -----------------------------"""""'.'~: ~; 1:j .· .:. ;_ ·- ; . . ·-->--··' ' .-r.::-~ ~ ~ =====-=====-=====1 '::• I~ .;4 ,- ~--. · · 0!, - . .. . . _ , _ _ ., ... - ·. ... ,.,.. :: ' ., 7'?:>'·- . . -- ~ : ~-... _ ; . ~:-. , -l . • - ,, . .. .. .- - :-- .. . . ..• .. . ···· ····- - .• . , ,- ·-- 7 - · , , . ·-: - - - - .. ·- - _ _ ____ .. ., ~ ._ ·- - · - - ~ " " ' ~ , • . , , - - --- \· ,.. .· ·. ·--- ·.--- ·-·· · •"'.°'. -·~. . " . , . -~-l. f.., . . . ·· ··-·· ·· · · ' • . - ·into the Black Com~unity and attempting to organize Black .people while neglecting the o~g~nlzation of their pwn ..' • . •: . ' , people's racist communities. '. ·r . , •·· • - :-- r 1 Eaving to move aside and letting this natural process of growth and development ta~:Cing ~ '. place must l:>e faced. These views should not be equated with outside influence or outside agitation hut should be -view~d · as the natural process of growth and . development within a ·movement; so that the move by the Black militants iri iSNCC in this direction should be viewed as a turn towards s elf-dete rmina t i on. I t i s very ironic and curiouE how ~·ar e whi t e s in this c ount_ry c an champion anti - coloni ali sm in othe r countries in _. Af rica, As i a , a nd Lat in Ame r i c a , but when Black people move • t J V r .i' ., ·, f :I f towards simila r goals of s elf- det e_rmina tion ;1n thi~ country ,, they are viewed· as· racists a nd anti-white by these same pro1 gressive whites. In proceeding further, · i~ can be said that this attitude - de~ives from-the overall point of view of the white .psyche · as 'it ; concerna the black people~ · This attitude ·· ·stems · 'troni- the EH'~ of the slave ·revolts· ·when every- white ·: man y • ' I , 1•, \ •' ' • ~ \ ,: •., / ' / t , -., ~ • t~ ,. I . ·, , ~ . . ~ ', '. • i , •:',I ' I • �·. ... ..._. ,_ .. . l~..gi.}_'"'.""-_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _l.) ·,~--~ ~~ i .-:.m£\1~~. . ! 't-,j•, . ~ .. ~ . •. • ' - ~ i:; ., ,;! •. ~ .... ··- -:. - - .,:: . · ·, -~ , .. . , ... - ..... .. : - :;: J .. ~ • • t . ' ': •' I-~·' • • i- ~ !: ·-.-~ • . . - - ~: -- .·;·, .. ___ ._.,....._-- ·ir_•• '!""t,. •, ..: - ~~..,..,..~ - ..~·""'==-""'-~-.',-, ...,..., . _,.,.,.___,.....,,,,,=·.,,,;·====·= - ~.........::--~-:...t_....· ~ . ·. ·,,·, 1. . · .- -...... ·;- -.. -~.... ~ _•,:_...:.:., ....._~~·- ..-:. .. ,...,,..,_ ~ ========== ============-! = · = ) -~ was a potential deputy o~ sheriff or guArdian of the State ~ ..-.. .. ·, t . .. ': ; .:. . . ~ i . .. Because wh~n Black people ~ot toget her among themselves to work • out the~r problems, it be6ame a threat to white pe~ple, becau~e . such meetings were _potentiat slave revolts~ . 'l .. .l .: ·,.·· -: ..' • • l • ,, i -,:.: ' ·-· :.', · . .!F ~. -~ I 1.1 ~ . 1 • . ~ •• " ~~ ed that this attitude or way 'of thinkirtg has 'perpetuated itself· to this current pe~iod and that it is part of the psyche of . ~- . white people in this country whatever their political per- I -~ . It uan be maintain- . . . . ' :, suasion might be. ~ .. It is part 6~ the white fear-gui~t com- -~. . plex -.1·esult-ing from the slave revolts. There have be'en -: { . i . .. . examples of whiteR who stated that they can oeal with black 1 ,· ,· ,! . - . J j l I I, , . . ~ I fellows on an individual b~sis but become threatened· or . '. • ,: • , < , . men·a oed by the presence of groups of Blacks.. . 1. ' , , . i}' . . I t can be main- te.1.ned that this attitude is held by the majority of progress- I ive ~bites in this country. It is a very grave error to mis t ake Blac!t se1.f'-asse r t :ic::o. £or racism or Black supremacy. Black people in th i s count r y .· more so than th~ colonial people~ .of the world know wha~ it ,J, means to be ~ictims of racism, bigotry, and s lave ry. ..•: Real- '· i zing our predictame nt f rom these inhuman a tt itud es i t would be r idiculous for us to turn around and perpet~ate the same reacti onary outlook on other people. We mor e than anyone else realize the i mportanc e of achie ving the type of society, . the type of world whereby people can be viewed as human be·ings. The means of reaching these goals must be, h9wever, from the .! point of view of respecting the differences~etween peoples a I and cultures and not pretending that everyone· is the s ame and the refusal to respect differences is one of the reasons that · ·,1 .I : . ,.I t he w9rld is exploding today~ Also expa nding upon t he ni ffer- .. �:._: rt . · · I r-;-- ._. i • ~~ .; ..~?.!'-:~·t·~-~-·"-'· ·-·. '·,:!"!.- ... i' l ;;_'{, '.,~f :-:":--:"··,,;:~· "I . .:..,.) - • .. . r;;;,,e- - ••• - ' ., ·· i~_,,, .....,, . ·· -~.;:i •. ·- ' ' - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -. --.--. ___.... ___ - --~ - -~ -~---~ --~ .-~... ' ,.-~ - . ... .... ··- :_ .•- . .... .. .. • ...... . ' .; . " ; . ~...... ........ .... . . - . . •• • _ .. ~;2;,,.:.. ::;- ...U - ·- · · ' - ·- ·t . . perpetuating the myth of white ·supremacy. "' . "i;," .. ~ -......-·' '-:=":'=~~ .,.; .. ~,··.~ .. . · -.::::·~~...~ ': ;.. r.::::, ~· .;.. .. "intcgt-atic,n 1!._.0d .pr-ogress then one is really •. ..-- - ·-if one·· 'i~~\u,~- ~ b, - - ·- - One is s:3-ying that Blacks have nothing to contribute, and should be willing . . ! to assimilate into the mainstream of Great white civilization, ., I j . . ~ . \ · f .;1 ·. ·-· ., '• I 1 ' ~ ·, ! ii••! I ., !•. I ·' A through re•examination must be made by hladk people concerning the ' contributions that we have made in shaping If this re•examination and re-evalttation is not this .country. { i•l i.e. the west. made, and Black people are not given their proper due and -;.. r i . respect, then the antagbnisms and contradictions a~e going to become more and more glaring, more and more intense until a ·:: national explosion may resu~t. ~ '..; ·1r . .,l When people attempt to move from these conclusions it ' l .,:·!. ·t f . , would be faulty reasoning to say they are · ordered by racism, ';: i: l r, C .· .•.: • • ·.·..: \'· : .. l: ··~ . j !. \j; ~·?: I ,. i ·. ( , 1 . ' , I i • •. ~ ' We all know the ha.voe that this has created through - The r~ fore any re-evaluation that we must make will, for . ; i people. this country. L ' · ·. ioned as a type of white nationalism whe n dealing with Black out the world and particularly among non-white people i n ! . ,' because, in this country and in the west, Racism has· funct • . .. ·I the mos t part, deal with identifica tion. Who a r e Black people; wha t are Black pe ople; what is their relationship ., r - •. r . to America and the World? ·.1 ' i ·. , It must be repe a t ed that t he whole myth . of "Negro CitizenI ship"~ perpetuated by the Hhite Power Elite, ,has confused the j ' ·t ' , • • t .. ... l l I 1 1 thinking of radical and progressive blacks and whites in this country. The broad masses of Black people react to American Society in the same manner as colonial peoples react to t he . v west in Africa, and Latin American, and have the same r elationship - ·that or . the oolonized towards.· the colonizer. ·, - -·- . ... . -~- .. ...:.. ,: . .. .. . ; . .- .- �rr:,. •t,!lli$,Z -~ t y;f.af " •.,.:·i~~4,_______________________________~o::- ••.. ,•• ~.- - :" ':' ·:,; ·,::1 ": . - .. . . ~ ... ·-· -·· ····-.... . ... i .,. , ? i ·! ,.. , ,• .. . -.. - - - - - · t:""" ·..-;: ... --")J·."'P"r'-• -. .'....,;=~----...;,....-, '.. :.· _.··.·.··.·.::. .~,.,,;.,,,,,,,..,,i= -:: -·· ·___·':,,>:-;. . ·_'-.- -·.·,. . ~ ,!!!:!C - ' l ·· _ - • . .. . .. ...... . . , - - .,.-. - ... , - _:.,... : · ±"== . -::=-c~~=·::--, • .,;-.-,: _ . •,.---:;'.:.~ .~ in . .....~ . , ,1. ,, ·· : --: - · -: . " i: -· .,. . · ·~=--:===~=----··- =-===========:::::: '.-:.!;,! ,:'...:::..:;:_·.;: ;.:, ,- . ,_._ _ - - - ---- - - •- · - an attempt tb resolve an internal crises that it' now .c onf~ ·~tin~ SNCC, the B1A.ck-nhi ta issue ( which is .· ; •~ i ~ t caui;inc: eruptions that e.rr: S'3riously hamp0rinr our strur;p:le ' · . for self- dotorm.ination) MUst now be dealt with. In an analysis of our history in . this country, we have ·..,. been forced to come to the conclusion that 400 years of .. · oppression and slavery suffered in this country by our Black forebears parallels in a very r,raphic way tho opprossion and colonization suffered by the African people. 'lhe questions can be rightfully asked, v,hat part did tho white colonizers ! ·. '- 4' ·j· . . play .in the liberation· of independent .'\.frican Nations; who . ' I • were the . ar;i-tators for .'\.frican independence? . /mswers . · to those . , .. · questions c.o mpel us to believe that our strurGle for .liberat- i• . • . ·j . 1' . ,. . ion ~nd self- determknation cen o~lr be c~rried out effect- .. ively by Black people. ' ' 'Ibo necessity o} dealinr, with the question of identity • 1 'I : is of prime importance in our own strn ~r:le. •J destruction of our links to Afric'a, the cultu ral cut-off of I The . systematic ' . ·~;• J Blacks in this country from Blacks in Africa are not situat-.. ·! . ions that conscious Black people in this country are willing to accept. , Nor are conscious Black people in this country ,. •, ·, 1 !· ,. I wil~inG to accept an ~ducational system· that teaches all ~ _, ~ · aspec ts of western civilization and dismisses our Afro- ! \·. I i ~ . • ' ,. ·.. ·e • ' ./ I ' American contribution with one week of inadequate information. (Necro History Week) and deals with _nfrica not at all. Black I people are net willini to align themselves with a western culture ·that daily emasculates our beauty, our pride and our _ ' .i I manhood.. It follows that white people boin~ part of western i ! .· civicization in a way .that Black people ~ould never be are I • 1 ·: .~· ! totally indequate ,to . deal with Black identity which is' key '! .v ~ ·:=· I. ·!. ~ • ' ,, . ... :_ ~.-:::·T . .-'. ~- ~ ~ ~~ .· I . l" l : ~ .. �~........J.::~.-t: ..-:.:. .'j ,~ ,.,, i,~~.-~._1,;ii!-i, _ _;.,__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ •_ _ _ _ __, , . . . . , _ ~ ~ - -- - - - - - -.......~-~ 143.215.248.55- .. .. ·-.. -~.-:-: ~ . i..' . :,.· - . .. .... j • · .. ... . J . ·~ ~ \ .r · - - · ~· - . ,. · ~ -.i-::-:,,_._. __ _.z" · - ·: -. ; · : - - - _· ,·,_r,_ __, ··· ..., .. . . .. - - -· - -~ - ~ ! . ., ": - · ·• . :.::~ ~ "; ~ ---r--·--· ...... "===-==============-== - -.'.-= .. '--'-'" - ' =- :_,.-!;-_-: .:.... to our strur~le for s~lf-deternination. ' . ~ · ··-- ·-· . \'lhen it _c omes to the question of or:-anizing Black people., · 1 · 'L .., . J, _; i ,; / . ... ·; we nrust insist that the people wl10 come in cpntact with the . 11lack masses .,re not white people who, no matter what their - . .. • '.. . . liberal leaninr.;s ere, are not equipped to dispel the myths of western superiority,. ·. ~ ~-.. ' i .. I · . !; . .. .; . I . • j .:: ~ ..: ·. V/hite people only serve to perpetuate ~ .· '. these myths; rather, orranizing must he done by Black people •I\ ~- : . . ·_are able to see the beauty of themselves, are able to see the . · :. important cultural contributions of 11.fro-.~ mericans, are able ' I' , • . to s~e that this country was built upon the blood and backs of a ~ ., ,, ' '•- ; . our Black anc'.ls tors. "-· -~ L. .. .~. ~ .. -'· ·: that our or":aniza tion · ( SNCC) should he BlacJ staffed, Black ·r : . ..:·: ;i· controlled l< e/ , ·-;:), ,. · :· j :;( ,· ·. f ' . ·, .: :f :·._·.. :. ! '•' ,...,. . . "i • - . -:, ;1 ' :.~ • 's ._JI: . In an attempt to find a .solution to ou~~ilema, we propose . --~ . •• ' • .: ' · end Biack financed. We do not want to fall into a similar dilema that other Civil Ri.ri:h ts or .r:,aniza tions. have fallen .. . · If we continue ta r3ly·upon ~hi to financinl support we will · find ourselves wntviined in the tentacles of the \~1hite power complex that controls this country. It . is also important that a Black or~a~ization '( devoid of cultis~ · ) be projected to our I: _1 ,,  !f people so that it cen be demonstrated that srich orranizations .' J are viable. More and more we see Black people in this country being used as a. tool of the white liberal establishment. ii .. I.; I Liberal whit es have not bep.:un to address themselves to the real problems I '.· of Bleck people .in this co .. ntry; witness th eir bewilderment, 1 fear and anxiety Wh'3n Nationalism_ is mentioned concerning Black people. An analysis of th~ir (white liberal) reaction to the · word alone (Nationalism) re~eals a very meanin~ful attitude of whites or any ideolorical persuasion towards ~lacks in this ~- ,. .: ,· ..~ ' t' : ..:· .- ::; .:. ' country •. . · i _t me~ns, t _h at previous so11.• tions to ;Black :problems • • •.: ., •· ·.-...!.- · ..:..:...: . ·: . ' ·f .·. __ . ..... _; .. -.;_~ .. I �.... of those whites ) not in the best interest's of .: dealin(", with t;hooo problems · : Black peopla in this · country hnve beon made in the interests of ·: . .. . ;;' . ,:: ·.;' : '._ those whites dealinr; with those problems and not in the. best · inter~stof Black people in this coPntry. i . ., .. -~ '"/hi tes can only sub- .. .:. vert our true search and strur:rle for self-determination, self- f :. :. l i : ', ·: · r .:· identification, and liberation in this country. R0_-evaluation of the white and Black roles nrust NOW take place so that whites ' no longer designate roles that Black people play but rather BlAck people define white people's roles. . ·•·' To ionr, have we allowed white people to interprr.tt the importance and meaniri~ of the cultural aspects of_ .our society, . ' ' I . 1 ·: '., . : :'. . . I have allowed. them to tell us what was p:obd a'bou t our .\ fro- · -: · ~·ie '. ·~<.- .- ; . ' l::,·. : .,· ·. ·. · ,'.: American nrusic·, art and literature. . :i, : ... . ·:· ~-.. . ·. . ~ ' ,:~,,,! . 1. . , I ~ • .. we have on the , ·J :;,,·, ~-! I _'\ '. . . ! ..\ of the Black psyche ( except in the oppressor's role) ·. . . interpret the meaning of the Blues to ' · ·. ! .• < us who are manifestations of the son,:;s themse1V'3s? I . ', _., How can a white person who is not jazz" sc!'lne? It nrust also be pointed out that on wha.tever level of con- ,, ~. ' 1 tact that "1lacks and v1hites .come to r,ethor, that meetinG .or•r--,n- > I,!. . I ,I li ·:;:_:. ·..  :,•• ' I :-' L ,. i. .~ I '.: ! :. .1l . l ~ . I '\ whites is a reinforcoment of the myth of vrhite supremacy • .Vlhite~ nre · th,:i ones who must try to raise themselves to oµr humanistic I , ne are not, after all, the ones wh9 are responsible . for a ~enoci da l war in Vietnam; we are not the ones who are ' l I; ' ,. I responsible for Neo-Colonialism in Africa and Latin ~merica; 'it• '• This only means that our everyday contac t with / ., '. level of whites. level. ·i ' frontation in not on the level of the Blacks but always on the ,., t ;. I .' • .• . we are not the ones who held a people in animalistic bonda~e . . · over 400 years • . ,_, we raj ect , t~~ A~eric_an Dz,ean as d_efined : by whi ta people • - ~ • • I J /. I a part • ,· 1··· II How many Black critics do _.,._ . '" •• ~ .-1 .' , ... "·-=-·· ,. _ •, :: • . :. _ ~J ·~:: ~ I • ·i '_ ~ .. : • �.. r.:. .·- l ••'i .....,, ' ·~ .S:_ :·~~-·-· ·:. ,. ) , - ,, ') ,. and must work to construct. , .u ~;, 111orican real1 ty· de.fined ·,. / by A.fro-A:".l'ler.j .~~l:".'.s(I • ' .') ' - ' ·• ' • •• • ,: I . . ···-- . ... ., .. ·:· , ': ·. .. ~ , · ·' i .. ·: ' •.,1. : '.: - ... j· ... .. •: .·. ': .. . '.~ ·. '•, , .' ... ,. ·- ·.,. 1• . . • 1· .· . .·. , ' ','- · ' ..; ., I. !' t .. ,, ': ·.\" •' . .:·~~ . • • \· .. f ~ \. . f. ,. ' .' , ...; f -:, .. , ./,• .- t"' ~'. {, _, ((: ·· .; .... . ' . . ;· .. ., -~- .. .~. .: t ·' .' I' ... ) '•< ' .' ..... '•, .l _. ,,, '• ·' ' ;. .'l ... _. , \. - t ... ..:.!'"·· . ·.,\, ' ,; .; . ~- :: .r ' f .i -1q l ., , •• . ,, t •' .. ~ l i: ' 1 l •i )r :• j t l ... ' I • • \. . ~ ~ ·: ' ... I.  ; ,· ;.; . .: • , ~ J ..),i . r ·'! ,r,: ,:ri .: .. [Ii: • I ~.,.•.·, ..... f· ~ , :'.: -. . , ,i I l ' . ,{'\• '! " I ' I I I, \' I I / ...... ., r- 1 ..' . .J. j{ .·, l [ ' ... ' .. . . •·' ' .- . • ,•:· . . ~ ~ i ·\ ., .·"..i-' .· .~ ~ ., . ~ :~ .~.. : -...... . i l. '-~: u ~ i l .' It �A STATEMENT OF PURPOSE AND A PLAN OF ACTION FOR ATLANTANS CONCERNED ABOUT RIOTS, THEIR CAUSES AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES We, the undersigned Atlantans, are deeply concerned about the riots which have occurred in our nation with increasing frequency and with mounting violence! We are concerned about the consequences of continued rioting and believe that the deterioration of human relations could do greater damage than the loss of mater ial things if we fail to bring an end to the riots and. the conditions which spawn them. We commend to every thoughtful citizen who believes in law and order and in human progress the recently released Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders. Whether one would agree absolutely with its methodology or the conclusions of the commission, we believe the report contains food for thought and suggestions for action which merit consideration. The report is a good point of reference and basis for discussion and action. We are convinced that neither studies nor resolutions nor good intentions alone will suffice. We believe that all of the religious leaders of metropolitan Atlanta should act now to bring an end to conditions in our midst which create despair, contribute to human degradation and fuel violence. We, therefore, commit ourselves to assist in the task of transforming our urban area that, insofar as our abilities and resources permit, we shall endeavor to respond . to this urban crisis and help create a city where there is personal safety for all persons and property and where there is reason for hope and opportunity for individual growth and dignity for every citizen. To do this, there are many things which we believe must be done. There must be a pooling of all resources - a coordinated effort by rich and poor, by affluent and depressed citizens, by leaders in religion and education, in business and the professions, in industry and labor, in government, and in all walks of life to meet our citizens needs in the following areas: Police Protection Every citizen is entitled to· be secure in his person and property and to fair treatment by law enforcement officials; and, in turn, eGCh citizen has a duty to obey the law and support and cooperate with police officials. �Education Every citizen must have the opportunity for equal educational opportunity - lmowledge of one's rights and duties, education for employment, and for living - the essentials to a society of law and order and human progress. Housing Every citizen must have access to decent housing. This goal adopted long ago has not been achieved, and there is yet to be obtained a climate in which every person will have equal opportunity for housing that he can afford. Employment There must be training for new jobs and retaining for other jobs in our changing technology, and there must be an end to discrimination against qualified persons based on sex, race, age or handicap. As we see it, we must create new attitudes even more than we need to create new programs, but both are needed! To establish new attitudes we must begin with ourselves, our families, our churches and synagogues. Therefore, we commit ourselves to an effort to: 1. Carry on mutual interchanges in our churches with ministers and layman of all races discussing these critical areas of concern. 2. Preach and give courses within our own churches dealing with these areas. 3. Adopt and carry out special projects which contribute to the betterment of conditions in each of the foregoing areas, and encourage such things as positive support for day care centers, low cost housing corporations, health clinics, and training employment programs. In order to develop wide acceptance of our stated purpose and our plan of action, we respectfully urge Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. to issue invitations to Atlanta's political, economic and religious leaders, and to citizens representative of all areas of our urban community to attend a meeting sponsored by the undersigned with the Mayor serving as host. The purpose of the meeting will be to achieve in the Atlanta u rbru1 - - - - -- - - - - �area an agreement on our stated purpose, and to arrange for a coordinated use of all possible resources. We seek a true and new commitment and to develop a simple connectional structure to carry out this commitment. We, by signing this resolution, do declare ourselves to be an inter-faith . committee, and authorize our designated representatives to visit the Mayor of the City of Atlanta and other local leaders of this area for the following purposes: 1. To offer the full support of ourselves as representatives of the religious community of the urban area for coordinated effort in meeting the needs of every individual. 2. To fund a luncheon for leaders and representatives of both races at which time we could hear from Mayor Allen his suggestions as to how all availab}e resources might be coordinated to achieve our objectives. 3. To support a call for broader ministerial and lay leadership in subsequent meetings and projects. 4 . And to offer ourselves for service on any Council or Committee dealing with these critical areas. Finally, we invite all citizens to join with us in a commitment to our statement of purpo se and our plan of action, and we ask the help of Almighty God in this endeavor to transform and redeem our entire urban area. Signed on This Day, Tuesday 2nd of April , 1968 ' �LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE ON CIVIL RIGHTS ))--8 J ROY WILKINS, Chairman ARNOLD ARONSON, Secretary JOSEPH L. RAUH, JR., Counsel CLARENCE M. MITCHELL, Legislative Chairman MARVIN CAPLAN , Di rector Wash i ngtoh Office ' 2027 Mass. Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20036 phone 667-1780 J. FRANCIS POHLHAUS, Special Consultant YVONNE PRICE, Executive Assistant • New York address: 20 West 40th St., 'New York 10018, phone BRyant 9·1400 November 3, 1967 Hon. I van Allen, Jr. Mayor of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: I think the most recent MEMO of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights may be of inte rest to you, so I enc lose a copy. As you may know, the Conference is a coalition of 112 national organizations. Since these include many of the civil rights, religious , labor, and fraternal organizations that participate in the Urban Coalition, it occurred to me that you might like to be kept informed of the activities our gr oups enga g e in, and of the kind of l egislat iv e issues they support in advancing our goal of full "civil rights for all Americans through government action a t the national l e vel. 11 Accordingly, we are adding your name to our mailing list. Sinc erely your s . Arnold Aronson, Secr etary Enclosures "Cooperation in t he Common Cause of Civi l Rights for All " �PARTICIPATING ORGANIZATIONS AFR ICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH NATIONAL BEAUTY CULTURISTS' LEAGUE, INC. AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL ZION CHURCH NATIONAL CATHOLIC CONFERENCE FOR INTERRACIAL JUSTICE ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA SORORITY, INC. NATIONAL CATHOLIC SOCIAL ACTION CONFERENCE NAT IONAL COMMUNITY RELATIONS ADVISORY COUNCIL ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY, INC. NATIONAL COUNCIL OF CATHOLIC MEN AMALGAMATED CLOTHING WORKERS OF AMERICA NATIONAL COUNCIL OF CATHOLIC WOMEN AMALGAMATED MEAT CUTTERS & BUTCHER WORKMEN NATIONAL COUNCIL OF CHURCHES RELIGION & RACE AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION AMERICAN ETHICAL UNION COMMISSION ON NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR ORGANIZATIONS CONGRESS OF INDUSTRIAL NATIONAL COUNCIL OF NEGRO WOMEN NATIONAL COUNCIL OF PUERTO RICAN VOLUNTEERS, INC. AMERICAN FEDERATION OF STATE COUNTY & MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES NATIONAL COUNCIL OF SENIOR CITIZENS, INC. AMERICAN FE_DERATION OF TeACHERS NATIONAL DENTAL ASSOCIATION AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE NATIONAL FARMERS UNION AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS NATIONAL FEDERATION OF CATHOLIC COLLEGE STUDENTS AMERICAN NEWSPAPER GUILD NATIONAL FEDERATION OF SETTLEMENTS & NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS AMERICAN VETERANS COMMITTEE NATIONAL FEDERATION OF TEMPLE SISTERHOODS AMERICANS FOR DEMOCRATIC ACTION NATIONAL JEWl'SH WELFARE BOARD-\ ANTI-DEFAMATION LEAGUE OF B'NAI B'RITH NATIONAL MEDICAL ASSOCIA'TION A. PHILIP RANDOLPH INSTITUTE NATIONAL NEWMAN STUDENT FEDERATION ' BISHOP'S COMMITTEE FOR THE SPANISH SPEAKING NATIONAL NEWSPAPER- PUBLISHERS ASSOCIATION B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR MEXICAN-AMERICAN SERVICES BROTHERHOOD OF SLEEPING CAR PORTERS NATIONAL ORGANl2'ATION FOR WOMEN CHRISTIAN METH_DDIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH NATIONAL SHARECROPPERS FUND .' CHURCH OF THE ,BRETHREN - BRETHREN SERVICE COMMiSSION ,.. ..... ' ... CHURCH WOMEN UNITED NATIONAL UREi°AN LEAGUE CITIZENS LOBBY FOR FREEDOM & FAIR PLAY OMEGA PSI PHI FR'.°'TERNITY, INC. PHI BETA slGMA FRATifRNITY, tN'c. DEL•TA SIGMA THETA EPISCOPAL CHU .~ CH - - •\ " ~ SORORITY • NEGRO AMERICAN LABOR COUNCIL COLLEGE YCS NATIONAL STAFF ot • t ~ CONGRESS-OF RACIAL EQUALITY L ~ PHI DEL TA KAPPA SORORl1"Y -: , 1 DIV{SIOJ'i OF CHRISTIAN CITiZENSHIP P_IONEER WOMEN , AMERICAN AFFAIRS l:'RESBYTERIAN INTERRACIAL COUNCIL EPISCOPAL_SOCIETY FOR CULTURAL AND RACIAL UWJ:.Y RETAIL WHOLESALE & DEPARTMENT S°tORE UNION FRANCISCAN JURISDICTION OF THE THIRD O~DER, OF _ST. FRANCIS sournERf'.'I FRONTIERS INTERNATIONAL SOtJTHERN CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE • • BEAurl coNGR~ss. 1Nc. HADASSAH TEXTILE WORKERS UNION OF AMERICA HOTEL AND RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES AND BARTENDERS INTERNATIONAL UNION TRANSPORT WORKERS UNION OF AMERICA IMPROVED BENEVOLENT & PROTECTIVE ORDER OF ELKS OF THE WORLD INDUSTRIAL UNION DEPARTMENT-AFL-CIO UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST ASSOCIATION & RACE INTERNATIONAL LADIES GARMENT WORKERS' UNION OF AMERICA UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST WOMEN'S FEDERATION INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ELECTRICAL RADIO & MACHINE WORKERS UNITED AUTOMOBILE WORKERS OF AMERICA IOTA PHI LAMBDA SORORITY, INC. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST- COMMITTEE FOR RACIAL JUSTICE NOW UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW CONGREGATIONS COMMISSION ON RELIGION JAPANESE AMERICAN CITIZENS LEAGUE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST- COUNCIL FOR CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ACTION JEWISH LABOR COMMITTEE UNITED HEBREW TRADES JEWISH WAR VETERANS UNITED PACKINGHOUSE, FOOD & ALLIED WORKERS LABOR ZIONIST ORGANIZATION OF AMERICA UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH - COMMISSION ON RELIGION & RACE LEAGUE FOR INDUSTRIAL DEMOCRACY UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH - OFFICE OF CHURCH & SOCIETY LUTHERAN CHURCH IN AMERICA- BOARD OF SOCIAL MINISTRY UNITED RUBBER WORKERS MEDICAL COMMITTEE FOR HUMAN RIGHTS UNITED STATES NATIONAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION NATIONAL ALLIANCE OF POSTAL & FEDERAL EMPLOYEES UNITED STATES YOUTH COUNCIL NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE UNITED STEELWORKERS OF AMERICA NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGE WOMEN UNITED SYNAGOGUE OF AMERICA NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF COLORED WOMEN'S CLUBS, INC. UNITED TRANSPORT SERVICE EMPLOYEES NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF NEGRO BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WOMEN 'S CLUBS , INC. UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT WOMEN ' S INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE FOR PEACE & FREEDOM NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REAL ESTATE BROKERS, INC. WORKERS DEFENSE LEAGUE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SOCIAL WORKERS WORKMEN 'S CIRCLE NATIONAL BAPTIST CONVENTION . U . S. A. YOUNG WOMEN 'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF THE USA NATIONAL BAR ASSOCIATION ZETA PHI BETA SORORITY �j LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE ON CIVIL RIGHTS ROY WILKINS, Chairman ARNOLD ARONSON, Secretary JOSEPH L. RAUH, JR., Counsel CLARENCE M. MITCHELL, Legislative Cha irman MARVIN CAPLAN , Director Wash i ngton Office J. FRANCIS POHLHAUS, Speci al Consultant .' ' YVONNE PRICE, Executive Assistant 2027 Mass. Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20036 phone 667-1780 THE LEADERSHIP New York address: 20 West 40th St. , New York 10018, phone BRyant 9-1400 CONFERE N CE · ON WHAT I t S p e a ks F o r • IT IS AND CIVIL RIGHTS: DOES M i 11 i o .n s In the las t 17 ye ars th e on Civil Rights has becom e a L eade .rship C o n fere nce u n iq ue s pok es ma n : voice for 112 nation a l o rganiz a tio n s gether to urge ne w c i v i l when they pres s f o r t he when they jo i n t o - ri g hts laws upon Con gre s s and s tr o ng erifo:rcement of exi sti ng l a ws . Th e Co nference is a coalition of ma j or civi l rights, labor, religi ou s , w ho se s t r eng t h lies in it s civ i c and fraterna l groups unity o Wh e n the Conf e ren c e c omes ou t in support of a p e n di ng bi l l or urges a of act i on up on t h e gover n m rant ll co urse it spea ks o n beh alf of mil l ions of A mericans of all ra c e s 9 creeds, re ligions, and ethnic grou ps and from all walks of life o It s P urpose In it s statement of pur pose ll clares itself as ~'a v oluntary ll the C onf eren ce de- nonpartisan ass ociation of autonomous national organizati o ns see king to advance "Cooperat ion in the Common Cause of Civil Rights for All" �PARTICIPATING ORGAI\JIZATIONS AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH l~ l\T ONAL E c.AU TY CULTURISTS' LEAGUE, INC. AFRICAN METHODIST EP ISCOPAL ZIO N CHURCH ~,AT O~",L CA I HOLIC CONFEREN CE FOR INT ERRACIAL JUSTICE NI, T ld~;'IL Ch T1 1 J LIC SOCIAL ACTION CONFERENCE ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA SORORITY, INC. ••;:,[ ,n ALPHA PH I ALPHA FRATERNITY, INC. N AMALGAMATED CLOTHING WORKERS OF AMERICA TIO',Al C~l'· V L OF CATHOLIC WOMEN /\MALGA MATED M EAT CUTTERS & BUTCHER WORKMEN ,, AMER l.,AN CIVI L LIBERTIES UNION , ~-'1/.l ~01, •~ IL OF CH URCHES-COMMISSION ON Fi E.LI, ION e. R4CE N ,TIONAl. COuNCI L OF JEWISH WOMEN /\Ml:. RICAN ETHICAL UN ION ' AM ERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR ORGAN IZATIONS c,NITY RELATIONS ADVISORY COUNCIL 10·,;,L C ,L'l'CIL OF CATHOLIC MEN CONGRESS OF INDUSTRIAL i-lAflO~ ,L COLJ NCIL OF NEGRO WOMEN NA1 IONi\l..COUNCIL OF PUERTO RICAN VOLUNTEERS, INC. Al\1EfllCAN FEDERATION OF STATE COUNTY & MUNICIPAL EM PL OYEES 1 AMERICAN FEDERATION OF TEACHERS N Ai .CN , L DENTAL ASSOCI ATION AMERICAN JEWIS H COMM ITTEE NA:!ONAl FA'lfo,lERS UN ION AM ERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS NATIO~ AL FEDERATION OF CATHOLIC COLLEGE STUDENTS ATlvl\ \L CC U ', CI L OF SENIOR CITIZENS, INC. A M ERICAN NEWSPAPER GUI LD NATIQ;-.; ' '- H JtRAT ION OF SETTLEMENTS & NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS AMF.R ICAN VETERAN S COMMITTEE I\AT1C'N"'L I- -DE RATION OF TEMPLE SISTERHOODS AMER ICANS FOR DEMOCRATIC ACTION NA 110'\AI .l [ V' ISH WELFARE BOARD AN1I DEFAMATION LEAGUE OF B 'NAI B'RITH N ,l1C•NAL 1i1 EUiCAL ASSOCIATION N/,11r~,AL NEWMAN STU DENT FEDERATION A . rHILIP RANDOLPH INSTITUTE NA1 If NAL Nf:.VSPAPER PUBLISHERS ASSOCIATION l3 1SHOP'S COMM ITTEE FOR T HE SPANISH SPEAKING NA rit, t, AL ORGANIZATION FOR MEXICAN-AMERICAN SERVICES B 'NAI B'RITH WOMEN NI\T 10N L ORGAN IZATION FOR WOMEN BROTHERHOOD OF SLEEPING CAR PORTERS II/Al ICNAL SHARECROPPERS FUND CHRI STIAN METHODIST EP ISCOPAL CHURCH ChL,RCH OF THE BRETHREN - BRETHREN SERVICE COMMI SS ION Cf•URC H WOMEN UNITED O:V.EGA I- SI PHI FRATERNITY, INC. C TIZENS LOBBY FOR FREEDOM & FAIR PLAY l'h B l:.TA SIGMA FRATERNITY, INC. COLLEGE YCS NATIONAL STAFF PH I DEL TA KAPPA SORORITY CONGRESS OF RAC IAL EQUALITY PIOla EER WOMEN, AMERICAN AFFAIRS r LL TA SIGMA THETA SOROR ITY EP ISC OPAL CHURCH - DIVISION OF CHRISTIAN CITIZENSHIP PRE.SBYTERIAN INTERRACIAL COUNCIL RE1A IL WHOLESALE & DEPARTMENT STORE UNION EPISCOPAL SOCIETY FOR CULTURAL AND RACIAL UNITY FRANCISCAN JURISDICTI ON OF THE THIRD ORDER OF ST. l"RANCIS SOUTHERN BEAUTY CONGRESS, INC. SOUTHERN CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE FRONTIERS INTERNATIONAL · TEXTILE WORKERS UNION OF AMER ICA HADASSAH TRANSPORT WORKERS UNION OF AMERICA HOTEL AND RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES AND BARTENDER S INTERNATIONAL UNION UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW CONGREGATIONS IM PROVED BENEVOLENT & PROTECTIVE ORDER OF ELKS OF TH E YVOR LD INDUSTRIAL UNION OEPARTMENT-AFL-CIO INTERNATIONAL LADIES GARMENT WORKERS' UNION Of- AMER ICA INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ELECTRICAL RADIO & MAChlNF vv'OR K ERS UNITAR IAN UNIVERSALIST ASSOCIATION -COMMISSION ON RELIGION & RACE U NITARIAN UNIVERSALIST WOMEN'S FEDERATION U N ITED AUTOMOBILE WORKERS OF AMERICA UNITCD CHURCH OF CH HIST- COMM ITTEE FOR RACIAL JUSTICE NOW IOTA PHI LAMBDA SORORITY, INC. UN ITED CHURCH OF CHRIST-COUNCIL FOR CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ACTION JAPANESE AM ERICAN CITIZENS LEAGUE U N 1TED HEBREW TRADES JEWISH LABOR COMMITTEE U NIT ED PACKINGHOUSE, FOOD & ALLIED WORKERS JEWISH WAR VETERANS LABOR ZI ONI ST ORGANIZATION OF AMERICA L EAG UE FOR INDUSTRIAL DEMOCRACY LUTHERAN CHURCH IN AMERICA- BOARD OF SOCIAL M l ~; ISTRY U NI TED PRESBYfERIAN CHURCH - COMMISSION ON RELIGION & RACE UNI TED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH - OFFICE OF CHURCH & SOCIETY UNITED RUBBER WORKERS UNITED STATES NATIONAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION MEDICAL COMMITTEE FOR HUMAN RIGHTS NATIONAL ALLIANCE OF POSTAL & FEDERAL EMPLOYEES A TIONAL URBAN LEAGUE Nf. GRO AMERICAN LABOR COUNCIL · NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORl:.[.J PEOPLE NATI ONAL ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGE WOMEN NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF COLORED WOMEN'S Cl. UBS, INC NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF NEGRO BUSINESS & PROFESS IONAL WOMEN 'S CLUBS, INC. UNITED STATES YOUTH COUNCIL UNITED STEELWORKERS OF AM ERICA UNITED SYNAGOGUE OF AM ERICA UNITED TRANSPORT SERVICE EMPLOYEES UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT WOMEN' S INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE FOR PEACE & FREEDOM NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REAL ESTATE BROKERS, INC. WORKERS DEFENSE LEAGUE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SOCIAL WORKERS WORKMEN 'S CIRCLI:. NATIONAL BAPTIST CONVENTION, U. S. A. YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF THE USA NATIONAL BAR ASSOCIATION ZETA PHI BETA SORORITY �- 2- civil rights for a,11 Americ ans through government action at the national levelo the establishment and By civil rights we mean not only en :£orc e ment of rights in law, f but also the realization social and economic con- ditions in which alone the £ul£illment of thes ·e is possibleo rights 11 How the . Conference Beg an ( The Leadersh ip C o n£ex enc e was formed in 1950 by national organiz ations whose l e aders felt that while they often spoke and acted se parately, occasions when they coul d make a there we r e many greater impact upon official Washing t on a nd t h e genera l public if they joined together in suppoI't of spe cif i c i ss ue s o The Co n fer ence m ex ge d two existin g groups: the National Counci l fo r by A. Ph ili p R andolph, a Permanent FEPC, headed and the National Em er g enc y Civil Rights Mob ilization headed by Roy Wilk ins and Arnold Aron son . A ll three men c on tinue to play imp o r .. tant r ol es in th G Co nfezence : Mr.I_ Randolph is a and Mro M r . member of the W ilkins is Chair ma n, Ex e c utive Commi ttee , Aronson is Secretary . How the Conferenc e Grew From the first , the Conference undertook to �-3- unite its groups behind sp e cific civil rights bills .. it grew in numbers i t g r ew in influenceo The Conference has coordinated all th e na ti onal campaigns fo r civil rights billso It s series of civil ri ght s 19570 major g r eate st s ucc e sses wer e the l aw s pass ed by Congr e ss The mos t no t abl e la ws in t h i s Rights _ Act of 196 4 a nd th e s i n ce g r oup w ere t he Civil Vo ting Ri--g hts Act of 1965. But the C o n f eren c e does not wo r k laws to statute b oo ks .. As I t s org ani zati on s ju st t o ad d know la ws are worth li t tle unless th e y are adequately en f orced. It campaigns u n t ir in g ly f o r existing prog r am s a de qu a te fund s to k e ep goin g a n d for a dequ a te e n forc e m e nt. How the Co n f eren c e O perates T he C on fe ren ce functio ns thr ou gh three main Commi t te e s: for t h e the Executive Com m ittee which se t s policy o rga n i zation ; the Legislative Co mmi ttee, the C ha i rm a n ship of Cl aren ce Mitchell, s t r a teg y f o r u nder which plans pendi ng bills; and the Com mittee on C o m- pliance and E n f orcement » under James Hamilton o f the Nation a l Council of Chur c hes , which wo r ks to see that the laws are ad mini stered str o ngly and effectively. How the Conf erence Keeps Its Groups I n f o rme d The Co n ference tries to keep in constant touch �-4- with its organizationso It sends them regular MEMOs that set forth the immediate legislative situation and suggest what groups can do to help mobilize support for a bill or a of bills, course of action. pamphlets, It publishes analyses papers on what still needs to be done to achieve full equalityo Not Civil Rights Alone Over the years the Confe re nce has b ro adened its concernso It realizes that the fight for full equality and the War on Poverty are interconnected. In ad - dition to campaigning for civil rig hts bills it has also worked for passage of an adequate minimum wage law· ; for reapportioned state legislatures so that they represent more truly all the peo p l e in a educational oppo rtun ity; for adequate food di stribution to the country's poor; for h om e of Columbi a ; for state; for broad rule fo r the Dist ri ct s chool desegregation. These are only a few of its campaign s . The Confere n ce remains t od ay f i rm in its belief that progress in civil rights is the co n cern of everyAmerican, not the int erest of an y on e groupo It believes, in Roy �-5- Wilkins• words, that "we are all tied together that the fut u ·r e f o r A m er ic a mu s t b e 11 and an int e g r at e d fut u r e ; a nation in which all men and women share equally in its burdens and its benefitso Its motto is still: "Cooperation in the Common Cause of Civil Rights for All" �LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE DN CIVIL RIGHTS I ROY WILKINS , Chairman ARNOLD ARONSON, Secretary JOSEPH L. RAUH, JR ., Counsel CLARENCE M. MITCHELL, Legislative Chairman MARVIN CAPLAN, Di rector Wa shington Office . ' J. FRANCIS POHLHAUS , Special Con su ltant ' 2027 Mass. Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20036 phone 667-1780 TO: Participating Organizations FROM·: Arnold Aronson, Secretary YVONNE PRICE, Executive As sistant • New York address : 20 West 40th St ., New York 10018, phon e BRyant 9-1400 MEMO NO. 21-67 Oc tober 2 7, 1967 A SOCIAL SECURITY BILL THAT PUNISHES THE POOR What began as an attempt by Congress to modernize t he Social Security Act has, in the bill the House approved, resulted in several proposa l s that seem both backward and punitive. Some of the House proposals come close t o taking the long di s c re dite d view that the proper way to handle welfare is to insult the people who nee d it and try to push or scare them off the rolls. When Newburgh, New York, in 1962, proposed to cut off a ssis t ance t o recipients who refuse to take any jobs offered to them, it was exco r iate d t hroughout the nation for its medieval attitude. Yet the House-passed bill (H. R. 12080) has a provision that would authorize much that sort of treatm ent to depende nt . mothers and their children. When Louisiana sought to cut off-aid to mothers who gave birth to illegitimate children after going on r elief , the Department of Hea lt h, Edu ca t ion and Welfare ruled the plan invalid, Yet the House, by placing a cei li ng on aid to needy chil dren see ms to be t ryi ng, indirectly, to put i ts o wn limits on birt hs. The social security a mend m ents are now before the S enate and ii is h ere that we must concent rate our efforts for improvement s i n the 3 2-year-ol d s t a t ute that will make it responsive to the present needs of American society. A Loophole for Hos pitals In one o f our re ce n t MEMOs (No. 19 - 67 ~ Octob e r 9) , we s o un d e d th e a larm in regard to an a m endment that was not in the House - passed measure but was to be proposed as an addition to the bill during cu rrent conside r a tion of it by the Senat e "Cooperation in the Common Cause of Civ il Rights for All" �PARTICIPATING ORGANIZATIONS AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH NATIONAL CATHOLIC CONFERENCE FOR INTERRACIAL JUSTICE AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL ZION CHURCH NATIONAL CATHOLIC SOCIA L ACT ION CON FEREN CE NATIONAL COMMUNITY RE LAT IONS ADV ISORY CO U NC IL ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA SORORITY, INC. NATIONAL COUNCIL OF CATHOLIC MEN ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY, INC. NATIONAL COUNC IL OF CATHOLIC WOMEN AMALGAMATED CLOTH ING WORKERS OF AMERICA AMALGAMATED MEAT CUTTERS & BUTCHER WORKMEN AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION NATIONAL COUNCIL OF CHURCHES-DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL JUSTICE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN NATIONAL COUNCIL OF NEGRO WOMEN AMERICAN ETHICAL UNION AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR ORGANIZATIONS CONGRESS OF INDUSTRIAL NATIONAL COUNCIL OF PUERTO RICAN VOLUNTEERS, INC. NATIONAL COUNCIL OF SENIOR CITIZENS, INC. AMERICAN FEDERATION OF STATE COUNTY & MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES NATIONAL DENTAL ASSOCIATION NATIONAL FARMERS UNION AMERICAN FEDERATION OF TEACHERS NATIONAL FEDERATION OF CATHOLIC COLLEGE STUDENTS AMERICA'\l JEWISH COMMITTEE NATIONAL FEDERATION OF SETTLEMENTS & NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS AMERICAN JE#ISH CONGRESS NATIONAL FEDERATION OF TEMPLE SISTERHOODS AMERICAN NEWSPAPER GUILD NATIONAL JEWISH WELFARE BOARD AMERICAN VETERANS COMMITTEE NATIONAL MEDICAL ASSOCIATION AMERICANS FOR DEMOCRATIC ACTION NATIONAL NEWMAN STUDENT FEDERATION ANTI-DEFAMATION LEAGUE OF B'NAI B'R TH NATIONAL NEWSPAPER PUBLISHERS ASSOCIATION A. PHILIP RANDOLPH l"lSTITUTE NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR MEXICAN-AMERICAN SERVICES BISHOP'S COMMITTEE FOR THE SPANISH SPEAKING NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR WOMEN NATIONAL SHARECROPPERS FUND B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN NATIONAL URBAN LEAGUE BROTHERHOOD OF SLEEPING CAR PCRTERS NEGRO AMERICAN LABOR COUNCIL CHRISTIAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN - BRETHREN SERVICE COMMISSION PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH-DIVISION OF CHRISTIAN OMEGA PSI PHI FRATERNITY, INC. CHURCH WOMEN UN TED PHI BETA SIGMA FRATERNITY, INC. FAIR PLAY CITIZENS LOBBY FOR FF PHI DELTA KAPPA SORORITY COLL EGL YCS NAT ONA PIONEER WOMEN, AMERICAN AFFAIRS CONGRESS OF RACIAL EQ PRESBYTERIAN INTERRACIAL COUNCIL DEL TA Sl(";MA THETA SORC11'TY EPISCOPAL SOCIETY FOR CV TURAL AND RAC Al FRANCS AN JIJRl<;D1CrlON O "l TV THE THIRD ORDE:R u• , T. FRANCIS C11L CHEMICAL & ATOMIC WORKERS INTERNATIONAL UNION CITIZENSHIP RETAIL WHOLESALE & DEPARTMENT STORE UNION FRO"HIERS INTERNATIONAL SOI., THERN BE.Au rv COl'..SRESS, INC 1-i DASSAH SOUTHERN ~HR ST Ml LEADERSHIP CO'ffrnEt.CE HOTEL ANO RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES ANO BAR~E DE.R; INTERNATIONAL U'IION TEXTILE WORKERS vN'ON OF AMERICA IM ROVED AfNEVOLENT & PROTECTIVE ORDER OF ELKS OF THE WORLD UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW CONGREGATIONS INDUSTRI L UNIC'II DEPARTMEN r AFL CIO l'lTE "lAT'ONAL LAD[;:, GAR"'1EW WORKERc UNI N OF AMER CA l"ITE'R lAT ONAL U"ll0N OF ELECTRICAL RAC! IOTA l'H LAMBDA SORORITY, JAPA & MACHINE WORKERS TRANSPORT WORKERS UNION OF AMERICA UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST ASSOCIATION -COMMISS & RACE NON RELIGIJN UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST WOMEN'S FEDERATION UNITED AUTOMOBILE WORKERS OF AMERICA NC UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST- COMMITTEE FOR RACIAL JUSTICE NOW AMERICAN CITIZENS LEAGUE UN'TED CHURCH OF CHRIST- COUNCIL FOR CHR 1 T A"l SOCIAL .I\CTION JEV., • H LAB R CC\o1MITTEE UNITED HEBREW TRADES JEWISH WAR VETERANS LABOR ZIONIST OR ,A'l1ZAT 10N OF A UNITED PACKINGHOUSE, FOOD & ALLIED WuRKERS ER CA LEA ,UL F-OR NDUSTRIAL DEMOCRACY UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH -COMMISSION ON RELIGIONS. RAU LUTf-!ERAN CHURCH 'N AMERICA--BOARD OF SOCIAL MINISTRY UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH - MED CAL C M'vilTTEE FOR HUMAN RIGHTS UNITED RUBBER WORKERS NATIO"lAL ALLIANCE OF POSTAL & FEDERAL EMPLOY ES UNITED STATES NATIONAL STUDENT ASSOCIA llON NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE UNITED STATES Y UTH COUNC L OFF 1CE. OF CHURCH & SOCIETY NATIO"lAL ASSOC AT ON OF COLLEGE WOMEN UNITED STf"LWORKERS OF AMERICA NATI "lAL ASSOC AT ON OF COLORED WOMEN'S CLUBS INC. UNITED SYNAGOGUE OF AMERICA NATIONAL Ac;SOCIAT ON OF NEGRO BUSINESS & P'lOFESSIONAL /OMEN'S CLUBS, INC UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT NATIONAL A SOCIA TIC. N OF RFAL ESTATE BROKERS, I OF SOCIAL IC'Rl •l ·,•, LEl SON .' 11 0 1 ' ·C' 1:01'. Jc V, M LLER ,.rm, r•. A F C.J.P B f I. OP. Y ~- PARRI SH , 1, 'r St ,le Hw y Planning Enp,in,,,., T1 :lMt,, H ROBER TS f', •nnin 1 O,r . A R M.P.C I ( 1 0 1 T,
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 23, Folder topic: Civil Rights | 1966-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 14

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_014.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 14
  • Text: JULY 1967 LAW ENFORCEMENT BULLETIN r7 therefore believe it is my duty to my country to love it, to support its constitution, to obey its laws, to respect its flag, and to defend it against all enemies. • JJ WILLIAM TYLER PAGE FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION JD EDGAR HOOVER, DIRECTOR UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE �JULY 1967 VOL. 36 NO. 7 ..,_ ...... . __ ·-· ·----·-* " ... ._ ,__,...,,....,, , ,__,, _CTGO ,_ -·- THE COV ER- Patriotism and respect /o r the fi ag. S ee Mr. Hoove r's message on page 1. -- LAW ENFORCEMENT BULLETIN CONTENTS Message From Director]. Edgar Hoover . 1 An American Policeman in England, by Lt. R obert C. Mitchell, Multnomah County Department of Public Safety, Portland, Oreg. 2 Search of Motor Vehicles (Part V) 7 Seeing More While Looking Less, by C. Alex Pantaleoni, Coordinator of Police Science, Rio Hondo Junior College, Santa Fe Springs, Calif. . 9 A Public Safety Cruiser, by Warren Dodson, Chief of Police, Abilene, Tex. 12 The Silent Witness 17 FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION Wanted by the FBI 24 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Tribute to Peace Officers Published by the Washington, D.C. 20535 ( inside back cover) �CAN THERE BE ANY ACT more sickening and revolting than a crowd of so-called citizens desecrating and burning their country's flag? Those who resort to such moronic behavior are surely lost in the depths of depravity. Obviously, their first loyalty is not to the United States. emphasized and excluded from several phases of our life. Many educators and other leaders seem to feel it is no longer necessary for boys and girls to be concerned with how our country came into being, what it stands for, and the courageous and noble deeds of our forefathers to preserve it. True, our Nation is founded on concepts and principles which encourage dissent and opposition. These are traditions we must always defend and support. But touching a torch to the flag far exceeds reasonable protest. It is a shameful act which serves no purpose but to encourage those who want our country to erupt in violence and destruction. Conditions are now such in some circles that an individual who professes love of his country, reverence for its flag, and belief in the principles which make our Nation great is considered a yokel. Open aversion to patriotism of any form is increasing. Even some news media take a "tongue-in-cheek" approach to persons and groups which promote and pa1iicipate in patriotic endeavors. Love of one's country is treated as some kind of social disease to be tolerated, if not stamped out. Protests are made that too much patriotism leads to international conflict. I submit that the United States will never have anything to fear from its ardent and genuinely patriotic citizens. On this 191st anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, we might ask what causes unpatriotic outbursts and irrational protests. Why do people turn against their native land and openly support totalitarian forces whose goal is to enslave the world- forces which do not even allow token opposition from their subjects ? Why do some individuals refuse to serve and defend their country? Why do they burn their draft cards and their flag? There may be many reasons for such action, but I am fully convinced that dying patriotism is one major cause. Love of country is being de- JULY 1, 1967 American history proves that freedom and liberty come at high prices and that their upkeep is costly and time-consuming. As Daniel Webster so aptly put it, " God grants libe1iy only to those who love it and are always ready to guard and defend it. Let our object be our country . . . "-not our country the object of desecration and abuse. �An American Policeman • 1n England Lt. ROBERT C. MITCHELL Multnomah County Departmen t of Public Safety, Portland, Oreg. Lightweight motorcycles are used to patrol extensive rural beats. An American police officer, for a period of 6 months, exchanged home, car, and job with his English counterpart in an experiment in the observation of police work in a foreign country. �Law Enforcement Foreign Exchange Experiment 0 n April 1, 1966, I began a 6month tour of duty with the Lancashire Constabulary, England's second largest police force. At the same time, Chief Insp. John P. Kennard, of the Lancashire force, was assigned to the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office, Portland, Oreg., to study our organization and methods. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first direct exchange of police personnel between an American and a foreign police agency. I t should not be the last. The exchange was total in that we traded houses and a utomobiles as well as jobs during this period . Personal problems arose almost immediately, b ut none were beyond solution. For example, both of our insurance companies had to be contacted and their feelings determined as to continued insurance coverage on the automobiles. Chief Inspector Kennard I fo und that the fir ms with which we dealt were fascinated by the idea of the exchange and were more than glad to give us their full cooperation. My own children are grown, but Chief Inspector and Mrs. Kennard were bringing their two daughters, Paula, age 3, and Alison, age 9, to the United States. Our local elementary school was delighted with the idea of enrolling Alison for the balance of the school term. House payments and the forwarding of pay were left in the competent hands . of the assistant cashier of our bank. Advantages of Venture There are tremendous advantages, both personal and professional, for the police officer chosen to participate in such a venture. The exposure to different concepts, tools, techniques, and training methods is bound to create a thirst for further knowledge. The exchange certainly changed any_preconceived ideas of ours about the " typical" Englishman. We had prnbably seen too many motion pie- tures depicting stereotyped roles of the English and heard too many jokes about their lack of a sense of humor. We found a warmhearted, generous, and hospitable people with a sense of humor as keen as our own. There are differences in living conditions, monetary systems, and many of the things which we take for granted in -t he United States. We found no real difficulty in adapting to these differences. Housing, or a housing allowance, is provided for the British policeman by his force. Thus we found ourselves housed in one of a row of nine police houses. They were more or less identical, of standard brick construction, and heated by coal fireplaces. Our neighbors were policemen and their families. Some of the friendships formed with our neighbors will last a lifetime. I believe that living under these conditions proved the necessity of a n Chief Supt. William Little (right), uN" Division (Ashton-Unde r-Lyne ), and Lie ute nant Mitche ll. a'~a July 1967 3 �and as a result we both found ourselves being invited to speak to various civic organizations. It is our hope that we left a good impression of Americans with those organizations. The Unarmed Police Lieutena nt Mitchell chats with offi cers in the communications section, a vita l public service in all police departments. officer involved in such an exchange being accompanied by his wife a nd famil y. It would have been difficult, if not impossible, fo r a single man to have fitted in with the fa mily atmosphere of this police community. Scope o f the Exchange Inasmuch as this was to be a new experience, neither my sheriff nor I was in a position to know just what we should consider as the scope of the experiment. I was given specific a reas to study : The penal system, the use of the summons as opposed to physical arrest, and the relationship of the British police with the public they serve. Beyond these three points, I was given a free hand to delve into anything I felt would be of value to us. Chief Constable Col. T. Eric St. Johnston was on a world tour at the time of my arrival, but he had left instructions that I was not to be " desk bound" but was to be left ver y much as a free agent to come and go as I 4 saw fit. Visits had been scheduled for me with police fo rces in England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, and the Isle of Man. Although b ased at Lancashire Constabular y Headquarters, I visited each of its 18 divisions as well as 15 other police forces, In every case I was given any information I requested, shown anything I wished to see, and given free access to anything I fo und of interest. Each fo rce visited had ar ranged both professional and social engagements which they felt would be of value and interest to both Mrs. Mitchell and me. As a result, we h ad access to ma ny places and activities that no tourist would ever have. Thro ugh these programs we were able to broaden our outlook far beyond the confines of the police service. Being cast in the role of an ambassador of good will came as something of a surprise, but both my wife and I fo und ourselves placed in this position. P ress and television coverage of the exchange was quite extensive, After 22 years of close association with a sidearm, it was both pleasant and disconcerting to find myself work ing with policemen who neither use firearms nor care to use them. This, of course, was the first difference to be encountered in our two police systems and was the one on which I was most often questioned. The arming of the British police became the subj ect of a great deal of public controversy when Detective Sgt. Chris Head and P olice Constables Geoffrey F ox and David W ombwell were slain in London on August 12, 1966. Oddly enough, the police were not nearly as enthusiastic about being armed as the public was about a rming them. In my opinion the answer to this problem may lie in stiffer prison sentences for those criminals wh o use a gun against an unarmed society and unarmed police fo rces. The British policeman has spent nearly 150 years in building the tradition of keeping the peace without the use of firearms. This is a tradition which should be kept as long as it is possible to do so. I t would be h ighly improper if I were to create the impression that the police are completely inept in the use of firearms. Every force has a num ber of men trained in the use of weapons, and the equipment i available for issue when it is needed . Standard ization The British police enjoy a standardization of many elements of the police service that may not be attainable in the United States. P a y scales are the same in all E ngli h forces, with the exception of London, which FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin �allows a cost-of-living adjustment. Entrance requirements may vary slightly from force to force, but conditions of service are the same in all forces. This standardization is also found in training, uniforms, and retirement benefits. It would appear that the key to standardization is the 50 percent grant from the national treasury of the annual budget of each police force. Every force is inspected annually by one of Her Majesty's Inspectors of Constabulary. His report, indicating that the force is up to standards, determines whether the grant will be allo wed. Although placin g chief constables in a ver y advantageous position when presenting the p olice budget to their local authority, this system does place the national government squarely in the local police picture. Any suggestions presented to the chief constables by the Home Secretary will usually be implemented. Without a doubt, this is the major factor in achieving the uniformity which I found so impressive. Training Program The value of standardization is most apparent in the training program. England is divided into eight geographic police districts, each with a district training center. Recruits from every force in the district train together and take the same 13-week basic training course. This concept of training is possible where criminal law is national in scope rather than regional, as in our own State statutes. Women police constables in patrol cars undertake the same duties as the men but especially concern themselves with cases involving women and children. The police car is white so that it can be readily identified as a police vehicle. Training does not stop at the recruit level. Inservice training is carried out within the forces, · and refresher courses are offered at the district trammg center. Specialized courses are frequently given in the larger forces with vacancies in the class held open for officers from surrounding forces. One of the more interesting inservice training courses is the refresher course for sergeants of the Lancashire Constabulary. It is based on a concept of three R's: 1. Relax-by virtu e of short hours, no pres- sure, and long weekends. 2. Refre sh- the officer's kn owl edge of th e latest laws and court decisions. 3. Ren ew- the officer's enthusiasm for his job, the department, and th e future. Supt. Walter Butterworth, now retired, assured me that the relaxed atmosphere, the roundtable conference approach to teaching, a nd the complete lack of pressure do send the men back to their posts with a far better outlook on their job. The Police College at Bramshill is the seat of higher education for the whole of the English police service. The 6-month Senior Staff Course trains officers of the rank of inspector and above to assume the highest posts in the police service. The Intermediate Command Course, lasting 3 months, is designed to train inspectors and chief inspectors in the responsibilities of posts held by superintendents and chief superintendents. Sergeants and newly promoted inspectors attend the 6-m onth " A" Course to prepare them for the duties of inspector and chi ef inspector. The Special Course impressed me with the potenti al of hav in g tremendous impact on the British police service of the future. Young offi cers of outstanding pro mise, wh o have passed hi gh ) n pro motio nal examinations, are assig ned to this 1-year course under a q uota system. They are given the temporar y ra nk of sergeant 5 �for the duration of the course, the rank being made permanent after the successful conclusion of their studies. There are a number of scholarships available for the outstanding officers in the class to continue on to university studies. I would hope that the P olice College program could be expanded to accommodate far more students. The coll~ge graduated 448* men and women in 1965 from a total authorized police strength of about 95,000. Crime prevention and public relations are sometimes treated as sepa- On the day I inspected this installation, police were keeping a parking lot and a city street with a high crime rate under surveillance. Any suspicious activity was reported to plainclothes officers on the ground who immediately investigated !he situation. In addition to setting up many good arrests, this system appears to keep many of the thieves · off balance, as they are never quite sure where the television will be installed next. With the cooperation of BBC and the independent television stations, the police sponsor regional programs Officer and police dog patrol a children's playground at Kirkby near Liverpool . rate fun ctions, but to me they appear to interlock to such an extent that it is difficult to tell where one stops and the other begins. Most of the forces I visited had assigned offi cers to the crime prevention detail on a full-tim e basis, and these men were very devoted to the program. In addition to the expected posters, pamphlets, and personal contacts with business people, I found two techniques th at were of great interest. The Liverpool City P olice have mounted mo vable television cameras atop one of the do wntown buildings. R eport o f H er i\ laj cs ty·s Ch ief Ins pec tor o f Co n stnbu lnry for th e Year, ] 965 (Lond on: Her Majes ty' s Sta ti onery Office, 1966), p. 33 . 6 with such titles as " P olice File" and " P olice Five." These programs are on the air during prime time in the evening, and public reception and reaction are excellent. The usual fo rmat might show a photograph of a wanted man, a certain type of vehicle the police are looking fo r , a list of stolen items, and a missing person . " Police File" is aired at 7 p.m. on Frida y over Granada TV. The ro ugh scri pt is written by the Manchester City P olice public relations offi cer and is then poli shed by television script writers under his supervision. T his is not an attempt at censorship or co ntrol by the television people, but is designed to convert the script from police language to television language. Forty-eight police forces in the Granada viewing area contribute to the program through the Manchester Police. Displays Also of particular interest and value are large assortments of locks and security devices displayed by most crime prevention officers and · provided through the courtesy of the manufacturers of such hardware. Many officers pointed out that the businessman should be invited to the police station to view these displays privately. There was a strong suspicion that the local burglars would enjoy attending any public display of such security devices. During my tour in England, I had the pleasure of visiting the following police departments: Lancashire Constabulary, P reston Borough P olice, Ro yal Ulster Constabulary, Liverpool City P olice, Isle of Man Con stabular y, Manchester City Police, Birmingham City P olice, Coventry City P olice, Stockport Borough Po lice, Blackpool Boro ugh Police, City of London P olice, London Metrop olitan Police, Southport Boro ugh P olice, Edinb urgh City P olice, Glasgow City Police, and Durham Constabulary. The British Police m an I have touched briefl y on a few of the many facets of the British police service. I should like to generalize a bit and attempt to describe the Br itish policeman . He is a first-rate police officer by the standar ds of any p olice agency known to me. He is gro3sly underpaid when one weighs his respo~sibilities against those of men employed by British industry. He perfo rms the deeds of valor which a re expected of policemen everywhere. The 1965 report of Her Majesty's ( Continued on page 16) FBI Law Enforcement Bull eti n �Search of Motor Vehicles This is the fifth of a series of articles discussing the Fecleral law on search of motor vehicles. VI. Consent Searches The constitutional p r o t e ct i o n against unreasonable searches and seizures provided by the fourth amendment can be waived by the express consent of the person whose· property is to be searched. On Lee v. U.S., 343 U.S. 74-7 (1952 ) . Because of the obvious advantages it offers over the search by warrant or incidental to arrest, the consent search has become a popular method of sec uring evidence from suspected offenders. Where properly obtained from the party in interest, it _avoids the requirements of probable cause and particularity of description necessary to a valid warrant. And since it need not be tied to an arrest, the contemporaneo us factors of time and place associated with the incidental search are also inapplicable. But it is precisely because thi s technique circumvents these traditi onal safeguards of privacy that consent searches are looked upon with disfavor by the courts. When one consents to a search of his automobile, it is said that he waives any constitutional right of privacy he might otherwise en joy over the vehicle or any property contained therein. And as in all situations involving a waiver of fundamental constitutional rights, it can be expected that the pr,osccution will have to meet a hi gh standard of proof. Johnson v. Zerbst, 304 U.S. 458 ( 1938) . In general, the limitations set on consent searches are the same considerations that have been employed in the past in determining the voluntariness of confessions. Thus the courts have held that consent must be given in circum263-817 0 - 67- - 2 stances free of "d uress or coercion," that it be " knowingly and intelligently:' given, and that it be stated in a "clear and unequivocal" manner. Because these determinations generally involve inquiries into the subjective state of mind of the suspect, the officer, or both, they present practical difficulties in judicial supervision which more often than not are resolved in favor of the criminally accused. A. Duress or Coercion Applicability of the fourth amendment guaranty of immunity from unreasonable searches or seizures is not dependent upon any affirmative assertion by the private citizen. U.S. v. Rembert, 284. F. 996, 998 (1922); Dacle v. State, 188 Okla. 677, 112 P. 2d 1102 (1941) . To hold otherwise would require the individual to make the difficult choice either of challengin g the officer's authority, perhaps by force, or waiving his constitutional rights through inaction. I bicl. Thus, in many cases where a consensual situation is in issue, there is no overt indication that the person voiced objection or otherwise contested the search. The courts must therefore look to the surrounding circumstances to determine whether or not the purported consent was induced by pressure or coercion. Peaceful submission under such circumstances is not consent but simply acquiescence to higher authority and cannot lawfully support a search without a warrant. U.S. v. Rembert, supra; Johnson v. U.S., 333 U.S. 10 (194-8) ; Amos v. U.S. , 255 U.S. 313 (1921). There is, of course, no easy yardstick by which to measure the degree 7 �of coercion or duress necessary to vitiate an expressed consent, for this must depend upon the characteristic facts of each case. Nonetheless, it is possible to identify several factors which generally influence the courts in making this determination. It has been held, for example, that the attitude and conduct of the advising officer are an important consideration, particularly where they might indicate that he had intended to search in any event. If he states peremptorily, "Open the glove compartment," or "I want to look in the trunk of your car," it is likely that this will be viewed as coercive. The courts have also pointed to such factors as undue emphasis on authority and even an aggressive manner as being sufficient to invalidate consent. U.S. v. Kelih, 272 Fed. 484 (1922). Similarly, the time of night, U.S. v. Roberts, 179 F. Supp. 478 (1959), number of officers seeking consent, U.S. v. Alberti, 120 F. Supp. 171 ( 1954,) , display of weapons or other symbols of authority, U.S. v. Marquette, 271 Fed. 120 (1920), or presence of the suspect's family during questioning, Catalanotte v. U.S., 208 F. 2d 264, (1953) , all tend to create a strong implication of CO· ercion. It is important therefore that the police avoid use of demanding words or gestures or any comment which might be construed to mean that the subj ect has no ch oice but to allow a search. This issue often arises when an officer threatens to procure a search war rant if consent is not given. It has been held by some courts that permission given under these circumstances is a mere submission to a uthority and that the individual yields his rights only because he feels there is no reasonable alternative but to consent. U.S. v. Baldacci, 42 F. 2d 567 (1930); U.S . v. Dix on, 117 F. Supp. 925 (194-9) ; see also, Weecl v. U.S., 340 F. 2d 827 (1965 ). On the other hand, it is arguable 8 that knowledge that one cannot lawfully prevent a search indefinitely may enable him to make a more intelligent decision as to whether and how much he will cooperate. It is not required, of course, that the individual desire a search be made of his property, but only that he make a free and voluntary choice on the matter. Accordingly, some cases hold that where the officer in good faith informs a party of the likelihood that a ~varrant will be issued, he does no more than advise the _suspect of the legal alternatives confronting him, and, i"n the absence of any aggravating circumstances, this factor alone will not invalidate the consent. Simmons v. Bomar, 230 F. Supp. 226 (1964) . This line of reasoning is implicit in Hamilton v. State of North Carolina, 290 F. Supp. 632 (1966 ) , wh ere po· lice, alerted to a recent safe robber y, arrested the defendant near his automobile. The arresting officer asked for permission to search the car, stating that he did not have a warrant with him but could get one if necessar y. The defendant replied, "There is no need of that. You can search the car ." He then handed the keys to the officer who searched the vehicle and found a pistol. In denying a petition for habeas corpus, the Federal district court ruled, " The fact that the officer told [the defendant] that he did not have a search warrant but that he could get one is immaterial." Citing an earlier appellate decision, the court stated, " a defendant cannot assert the illegality of a search made with his consent, though given in response to a threat to procure a search warrant." !cl. at 635. See, Gatterdam v. U.S. , 5 F. 2d 673 ( 1925 ); K ershner v. Boles, 212 F. Supp. 9 ( 1963 ), modified and aff'd, Boles v. Kershner, 320 F. 2d 284, ( 1963) . There is common agreement, however, that if the consent is obtained through fra ud, deception, or misrepresentation regard- mg either the officer's authority or intention to secure a formal warrant, the search will be invalid. Bolger v. U.S., 189 F. Supp. 237 (1960 ) , a:ff'd 293 F. 2d 368, rev'd on other grounds, 371 U.S. 392 ( 1963 ) ; Pekar v. U.S., 315 F. 2d 319 (1965 ) ;U.S. v. Wallace, 160 F. Supp. 859 (1958) . One of the more troublesome issues of consent arises when permission to conduct a warrantless search is obtained from one who is under arrest or otherwise subj ected to official restraint. Since intimidation and duress are necessarily implicit in such situations, it is especially difficult for the prosecution to convince the court that the waiver was given free from negating pressure or ·c oercion. U.S. v. Wallace, 160 F. Supp. 859 (1958 ) . But while some courts consistently view consent given b y one in police custody as invalid, Judd v. U.S., 190 F . 2d 649 (D.C. Cir . 1951 ), most Federal courts will inquire into the total circumstances of the case. Burke v. U.S. 328 F. 2d 399 (1st Cir.) , cert. denied, 379 U.S. 84.9 ( 1964); U.S . v. Paradise, 253 F . 2d 319 (2d Cir. ) (1958 ) ; U.S. v. Perez, 242 F . 2d 867 (2d Cir. ), cert. denied, 354, U .S. 941 ( 1957 ) ; Gendron v. U.S ., 227 F. Supp. 182 (1964,) ; Kershner v. Boles, supra; Hamilton v. State of No rth Carolina, supra. On the other hand, where condi tions of the restraint indicate a high probability of intimidation, consent by the person in custody will usually be invalid. This is often the result when a display of firea rms or other open show of force is made during the course of the arrest. Thus, in one case police officers, exhibiting drawn pistols and riot gun, stopped the defendant's veh icle an d placed the occupants under arrest fo r vagrancy a nd auto theft. One of the offi cers asked the defendan t, Weed, about a vehicle parked approximately one and onehalf blocks a way from the scene of ( Continued on page 20) FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin �A New Application of an Established Technique- Less [seeing I Looking More While Law enforcement officials are constantly seeking new and productive means to solve old and persistent problems. Rapid technological advances mark the pattern of growth of today's police forces, but sometimes a new and modified application of an old method proves highly effective. Such is the case with the proposal presented in 1964 to the California Peace Officer's Training Division by the California Optometric Association. In charge of the research proposal was Dr. Arthur Heinsen of San Jose. In 1964 vision science as applied to law enforcement was a new application of an already known and established training technique. During World War II many courses were developed for aircraft spotters and other military personnel receiving tachistoscopic training. Such a course conJuly 1967 sisted of Hashing silhouettes of various aircraft, naval vessels, and other military equipment on a screen for a fraction of a second. With speedy identification as their ultimate goal, the military was very successful with this type of training. However, after the war, the consequent reduction of a constant need created obsolescence for the tachistoscopic training. With an official of the California State Department of Education, Dr. Heinsen and I explored the feasibility of a pifot research study to present a new application of the tachistoscopic tramm g. Our final project involved the development of an optometric program applicable to law enforcement personnel and suitable for possible incorporation by the department of education into a teaching manual. The manual would then be available to local law enforcement agencies C. ALEX PANTALEON!* Coordinator of Polic-e S·cience, Rio Hondo Junior College, Santa Fe Springs, Calif. M r. P an taleoni recei ced his Bachelo r of A rts t11l d Maste r of S ci ence degrees from California Sta t e College and has done additional gradu at e work nt U.C .L.A. and the Unive rsity of Washington. 9 �which would be able to conduct their own local program. The necessary funds for the pr oj ect were made possible by a contract grant from the department of education to the California Optometric Association to develop and prepare a teaching syllabus that included equipment, supplies, and training aids. Early in the development of the program, it became increasingly evident that at least one complete course would have to be offered prior to completion of a syllabus worthy of distribution. Accordingly, the Rio Hondo Junior College participated in a National Defense Education Act grant which provided matching funds for the cost of initiating this type of pilot program. Three-Part Program The theor y of vision was the first a rea wherein the optometrist could apply already established and known training procedures. Already in use and available for application to this program was a basic slide series prepared by Dr. Ralph Schrock of Chula Vista. This excellent slide series was used in the beginning phases of train. ing with the tach istoscope. The use of symbols, such as numbers, letters, and geometric configurations, applies training techniques similar to those currently used in speedreading. This method begins by h aving the students view one digit for a fraction of a second and thereafter three, four, five, and more digits. This allows the students to develop their perception and " after-image recall" so that they perceive more in a given time period. As a second step, the motivation fo r police officer personnel required the use of numerous law enforcement "s~enes," which were prepared in cooperation with the Los Angeles P olice Department and the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. As a one-man patrol unit, an officer remains extremely busy while driving 25 miles an h our on routine patrol, operating his radio, and referring to a list of stolen cars. When he passes an alley, he has but a fraction of a second to glance down it and determine whether any police action is needed. Frequently, he is already past the alley at the time of his mental reconstruction of the perceptual "after image." T his was only one of the many areas that were developed to orient the program toward law enforcement. Students in the program use p eriph e ral s timulators to increase more accurate fi xa tions. The initial phase of letters and numbers rendered itself very naturally to the speedy identification and recognition of license plate numbers. After the initial slide series, numerous license plates were flashed on the screen and, thereafter, pictures of autom obiles were placed on the screen to simulate various driving conditions which might be encountered by the patrol officer. The third phase involved actual eye training, using specialized equipment developed by Dr . Schrock in cooperation with the Keystone View Co. The first pilot program was ready and offered on a test basis in the spring semester of 1965 at Rio Hondo Junior College. The course was designed to cover 30 h ours on the basis of a 2-hour class twice a week. However , the initial pilot course was for 34, h ours, with the additional h ours at the beginning a nd end devoted completely to testing. T his comprehensive testing si:rved to properly evaluate the total project and was not merely a part of the traihing program. T esting With a Control Group Twenty-six students from 14 different law enforcement agencies started the program. A group of 25 officers from the Los Angeles P olice Department's cadet class was chosen as the control group. Accordingly, both groups were tested with tachistoscopic slides and a series of timed tests developed by the Califo rnia Test Bureau. The parts of the multiple aptitude tests that were used were : ( 1 ) Factor II: P erceptual Speed: Test 3-Language Usage. Test 4--Routine Clerical Facility. (2) F actor IV : Spatial Visualization. Test 8-Spatial Relations, two dimension. Test 9- Spatial Relations, three dimension. FBI Law Enforcemen t Bulleti n �The group scheduled to undergo the training was further tested for peripheral vision and possible vision deficiencies. Two of the students needed glasses, but they were allowed to continue the program and their improvement was measured accordingly. Because of its initial testing and its research problems, the pilot course was conducted by local optometrists, Dr. Homer Hendrickson and Dr. Luprelle Williams. These two optometrists studied , reevaluated, and rewrote the course as it progressed. In short, the course consisted of three basic phases for each session. The first phase involved vision theory, which explained the functions of vision memory and the various structures which permit vision . The second phase of instruction revolved around tachistoscopic training, using the basic law enforcement slide series. The third pha3e involved actual exercise and development of vision skills throu gh use of optometric equipment developed by Keystone Co. The vision science kits included stereoscopes, plus and minus lenses, peripheral stimulators, and chiro-3copic drawings as well as manuals on their use. Two students used a kit on a "coach-buddy" system. It should be noted that the kits cost $125 each and refill consumable supplies for each kit cost $25. At the completion of the course, both gro ups we re again tested. Comparison of the two sets of tests provided an evaluative basis inasmuch as the Los Angeles P olice Department cadets had been given no specialized visual training. The results were evalu ated by Dr. Melvin H. Dunn , an analytical psychologist and chairman of special services education at the University of Nevada, Reno, Nev. His complete report confirms that there was a high degree of improvement on the part of the trainin g program g ro up. Definite improvement was achieved in speed and adjustment of July 1967 <· .s; .t. .r. ·> ¢:- ~ ¢ -~ !,~ h','I ' S \tf!tJ&. \\'t.S!tOS ., Students improve the visual ability of their eyes to converge accurately and quickly at various distances. fo cus, span of perception, and "afterimage recall." In addition , Dr. Dunn's report indicates the training was more beneficial for yo unger students than it was for older students. There also appeared to be a correlation between I.Q. and vision ability. The self-evaluation reports prepared by the sudents indicated certain unexpected benefits. One student stated he was an avid golfer and that the course had taken five or six strokes off hi s handicap because he was able to judge distances more accurately. Another student who played in a semiprofessional softball league indicated his batting average had improved over 20 percent. Additional Studies Followup 3tudies made 6 months later indicated a reduction in proficiency. The optometrists felt that this loss could be reduced to a negligible percentage if the trained officers were assigned to patrol functions exclusively after their training. This procedure might help the officers maintain their acuity through prac- tice. The expected net result of the officer's maintenance of his improved visual acuity is the reality of a "foureyed" one-man patrol unit. The coune, taught by Dr. Williams, was again offered by the college in the spring of 1966, at which time several preservice police science students were also enrolled. The improvement noted after the course was very similar to that in the pilot pro gram; however, the improvement was much greater in the younger students between the ages of 19 and 22, thereby suggesting that this training be conducted for recruits rather than for older officers. The college is offering the course again this year. The California State Department ·o f Education is proceedin g with the production of the teaching syllabus as well as conducting programs throughout the State. Dr. Williams is most satisfied with the results of the program and feels very strongly that this course can be presented throughout the country if it is taught by an optometrist who is familiar with the program. Rio Hondo Junior College has added this course to its vast police curriculum. 11 �A Public Safety Cruiser l WARREN DODSON Th e A bilene sa fety cruisers have the necessary equipment for any emergency. Chief of Police, Abilene, Tex. Abilene to the public safety cruiser which was inaugurated in February of 1963. Since then its sound in emergency situations has become a source of comfort and solace to many of Abilene's citizens. Purpose of Cruiser "D ogs were once content to howl at train whistles, fire trucks, and Civil Defense sirens. Now they have another electronic tormentor. It's the 'yelper' on the Abilene Police Department's new public safety cruiser. Every time the powerful wagon roars off to the scene of a bad wreck or other emergency, the dogs join in the chorus." This excerpt from an article which appeared in the Abilene Reporter News shows the immediate reaction of 12 FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin Capable of performing a multitude of tasks relating to public welfare and safety, our public safety cruiser is a multipurpose police unit designed and equipped to render service and protection for citizens while aiding in the enforcement of laws. As a police unit, public safety officers are responsible for the enforcement of all laws of the State of Texas and the city of Abilene. They respond to all calls of the police dispatcher just as any other police unit. The safety cruiser is assigned to a district to patrol with due regard for the enforcement of all laws including those pertaining specifically to traffic. However, as a specialty unit, it is not assigned to investigate traffic accidents, handle domestic problems, or transport prisoners. Likewise, it July 1967 is not required to respond to calls involving misdemeanors~ unless the call is an emergency. As a public safety unit, it responds to all major accidents where persons are injured for the purposes of rendering first aid, releasing trapped persons, and preventing fire. The cruiser responds to all calls of an emergency nature, such as drowning cases in which they use scuba diving equipment to dive, locate, and recover the victims and render what first aid is possible. When the fire department arrives on the scene with its equipment for dragging, etc., the public safety officers assist as directed by commanding officers of the fire or police department. The unit also responds to any call concerning unconscious or seriously injured people, _ like those suffering from heat exhaustion, strokes, poisoning, asphyxiation, electrical shock, or heart attack. The unit frees trapped persons and removes and destroys the explosive in cases involving an explosion or explosive material. Under normal circumstances, this unit does not respond to calls involving gunshot or knife wounds unless so directed and then op.ly to render what first aid is needed at the scene or to act as a backup unit. As a fire patrol unit, the . public safety cruiser responds to all fire alarms and upon arrival extinguishes all small fires that can be controlled with a hand extinguisher, if the fire department unit has not arrived. At all major fires, the public safety officers are under the immediate control of the fire department supervisors and carry out their orders immediately to the best of their abilities. While on patrol, our officers always watch for fire hazards and notify the fire department of any encountered. The public safety cruiser never, under any circumstances, operates as an ambulance. However, in many cases the assistance of the public safety officers is needed by the ambulance attendant. In such cases, one of our officers ( the cruiser is a two-man unit) will accompany the victim in the ambulance to the hospital and will render aid and assistance if necessary. The public safety cruiser is not a rescue unit per se, nor is it an ambulance, but it is basically a police 13 �unit fully equipped to handle all types of emergencies. Services Rendered "Send the safety cruiser" has become the most common request at the Abilene Police Department. In ali emergencies, both large and small, our citizens have come to rely on the se.rvices rendered by the cruiser. Many of the calls are humorous (such as, " My cat is caught in the air conditioner"), but others are tragic and often fraught with danger for our safety officers. Recently, on an attempted suicide -call, the person threatenino- suicide was located in a garage, . o H holding a razor to his wrist. . e refused to lay the razor down. One of the safety officers calmly talked to the disturbed person and grabbed the razor away from his wrist while the other officers assisted in restraining the individual. During the first 14 months, the cruiser made 740 emergency calls. Out of this total number of calls, emergency oxygen was administered to 83 people. Man y of these first calls involved life- or-death situations. \ Record of Service In the 3½ years that the cruiser has been in existence, we have a record of first aid bein g administered 983 times. The resuscitator has been used 294 times, the scuba diving equipment 9 times, and the fire extinguishers 79 times. The safety officers have administered a rtificial respiration 18 times and assisted in sav ing 20 persons wh o had attempted suicide. Th ey also performed ma ny min or services, such as in cases involvin g citizens who had locked themselves out of their cars or homes, fin gers ca uo-ht in a utomati c electri cal kitchen 0 appli ances, ca rs with dead batteri es, etc. 14 One phase of training given by our local physicians has come in handy a number of times-how to deliver a baby. Incidentally, the first baby delivered by our public safety officers was 1 year to the day from the time they began their duties. Since that time a number of Abilene's "young o-eneration" has arrived with the aso sistance of the safety officers. In one case the parents honored the officers by naming the new arrival after them. Last year, during the national scare that dolls shipped home to loved ones by servicemen in Vietnam might be booby trapped, these officers, who are thoroughly trained in the handling of explosives, checked more than 500 of these dolls. However, they found none containing explosives. SCUBA Gear The SCUBA diving gear ha.:5 been a real asset to our police department as well as to the public. In some cases, the public safety officers have retrieved discarded evidence from one of the three large lakes nea r Abilene. In cases involving a possible drownin O' rr one officer begins dressing for divinoen route to the scene and is 0 ready to don the underwater breathing apparatus when he arrives. In one such incident where a double drowning was reported at Lake For:t Phantom Hill, both bodies were recovered within 5 minutes after our cruiser arrived at the scene of the emergency. While the diver goes into the water, his partner maintains the safety line and has the resuscitator read y to administer oxygen when th e victims are located. The most co mmon treatment given by the offi cers is to apply a medical swab to a cut or laceration a nd an anti septic bandage while awaitin g the ambulance at the scene. They apply an air splint to broken limbs q uite often also. Thi s p rocedure is of grea t assistan ce to the hospital because it allows them to make an X-ray without removing the splint. Emergency Procedure Since it stays in-service at all times, the cruiser seldom is preceded to the scene of an emergency by an ambulance. Because it is on call for emergencies, both officers are never out of the cruiser at once except at the scene of an emergency. This policy is also true in cases where the public safety officer is writing a traffic citation. If, in an y case, the officers have to be out of the car at the same time, they are able to switch their radio to a public address system which enables them to hear all calls from the dispatcher. After making an emergency run , they call the station and are switched onto a dictating machine to record a report of their run. This is then typed by a clerk typist and placed in a file. Conception of th e Unit We conceived the idea for a public safety unit after the drowning of two youths in a creek which flows th ro ugh Abilene's city limits. We were the first called to the scene of this tragic occurrence, but when the drownings were established, the fire department with their boats and rescue equipment had to be called because we did not have the necessary training or prope r eq ui pment to retrieve the victims. A short time a fter this, on a dark rainy night, an a utomobile crashed into a utility pole causing a high voltage line to come p recariously close to the vehicle. There was some diffi culty getting the occupa nts of the car to remain in the car until the utility co mpany co uld be summoned to remove the live wire. The many spectators who were attracted to this incident were in jeopardy of coming in FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin �The unit' s portable oxygen kit has b een used to save several lives. contact with the high voltage wire which hung close to the gro und . Some of these individuals stooped t o go under this wire before ou r officers at the scene could move them back to a safe distance. After this tragic incident and near catastrophic occurrence, we began to plan and resea rch for a police unit which wo uld be trained to cope with all types of emergency and rescue work. After discussing our ideas abo ut the safe ty unit, we assigned senior staff officer Capt. L. A. Martin to head the planning a nd research. We contacted the director of civil defense and obtained hi s opinion as to what type of emergency gear would be needed to eq uip the unit. Next, we called the fi re chi ef for con sultation and considered his recommendations. Then we invited the local chapter of the Ameri can Red Cross to assist in the train ing of each officer assigned to the safety unit in advanced first aid co urses. We contacted the local medical society, and they agreed to appoint a committee to serve in an advisory July 1967 capacity as well as. to assist m the training of the officer s. After months of a rdent research , the plans were fin ally fo rmulated and presented to the city governmen t. They were hesistant at fi rst to approve such a project mainl y beca use of the expense of such a unit. However, when they were presented all the fac ts of the value of its services, they gave us the authority to proceed wi th our plans. After m uch consideration , we chose a fo ur -doo r stati on wagon as the vehicle for th is unit. I ts equipment included spotlights, large revolving red lights, a nd an electronic siren and public address system to iden tify it as an emergency vehicle. Selection and Training of P e rsonnel The men operating and maintaining the public safe ty cruiser are all vo lunteers carefull y screened on the basis of their experience, aptitu de, a nd mental and ph ysical abilities. A committee comp osed of train ing office rs fr om both the fi re and police departments, plus the city's personnel director and assistant city manager, screens the volunteers before they receive joint approval by the chiefs ·of both departments. The fire department conducted the initial training of the pu'blic safety officers over a 3-week period. This training covered such basic firefi ghting techniques and subj ects as: small structure fires, ladder and aerial work, elements and causes of fires the duties of fire hosemen, fire re: sponse and attack, rescue and carries, safety techniques, the use of a gas mask, ventilation of a fire, and fire hazards. Experienced fire department training officers personally conducted or supervised these training sessions and exercises. The second phase of training included a 1-week session in high-risk rescue work at Texas A. & M. College. Thi s second step included " hotwire" handling and first aid through the advanced level, along with instructions in the use of such life-saving appa ratuses as resuscitators, oxygen equipment, cutting torches, etc. Additional trainin g included defen sive d riving, scuba di ving, explosives handling, and radiological monito ring. The Taylor-Jones Count y Medical Society fu rn ished the physicians who trained our officers in such techniq ues as how t o deliver a baby during emergency conditions and other emergency aid that could be rende red at the accide nt scene. Thi s extensive emergency tra ining, plus the past experience and training that normally is retained by vetera n poli ce officers, full y prepared our p ublic safety offi cers to cope with any emergency that might arise. · Ve hicle and Equipment As mentioned above, the p ublic safe ty cruiser is a n up-to-da te station wago n eq uipped with radi os on both 15 �police and fire department frequen- has run approximately $30 per month cies, emergency lights and sirens, res- in keeping it equipped. cue and first aid equipment, and firefighting extinguishers and tools. Evaluation A partial list of the cruiser equipment includes: fire extinguishers, There seemed to be some skepticism ( dry, CO 2 , and water) , fireman boots, at the start as to the true value of such helmets, bunker coats, gloves, safe- a unit as the public safety cruiser. It ty goggles, gas masks, completely had only been in service a few days equipped toolbox, axe, sledge ham- when the public began to recognize its mer, disposable blankets, army blan- worth. One lady wrote our department and kets, ropes, _block and tackle, large, co~pletely equipped first aid kit (in- the Abilene Reporter News the followcluding splints, medicold compresses, ing letter after her husband had been etc.), Porto-Power kit, frogman suit aided by our public safety officers : and scuba equipment, lanterns, hot " He is alive today due to the excellent stick (for handling high voltage service rendered by your safety wire), stretcher, Scott resuscitator, cruiser and its men. My husband Scott air pack (for use in building had an acute attack o-f allergy, to the filled with smoke, etc.) , battery jump point of death. He collapsed from cables, tools for entering locked ve- lack of oxygen and at one time comhicles, various types of saws, and pletelr: stopped breathing. Officer other tools to cover any type of emer- Bill Paul, our neighbor, rendered first gency situation. When the unit aid and called the cruiser. makes an emergency run and the offi"We are grateful to the Abilene Pocers have no tool to cover the particu- lice Department and its men for the lar type of situation, they immediately service rendered. Words seem inadeadd that tool. The initial total cost quate when you are trying to thank for equipping the cruiser ran close to someone for saving your mate's life." $3,000. The average cost of supplies We have received numerous similar letters of thanks and appreciation from citizens. Public acceptance of the safety cruiser grew until it was necessary for us to add a second unit in July of 1965. Even physicians now tell their heart patients and others who may need emergency aid to call the safety cruiser prior to calling them. Not only do our public safety officers feel a keen sense of pride in being able to serve humanity in this capacity, but the citizens of Abilene are very proud of our cruiser and the men who operate it. We feel that it has done more for the benefit of public relations than any other thing that the department has ever undertaken. One of the big selling points that we used in getting our cruiser approved was, " If one life is saved, it will he well worth all the expense." Well, the public safety cruiser has more than proved its worth. This is attested to by many local physicians, families who have been assisted, and three Red Cross Life Saving Awards earned by the men who operate Abilene's public safety cruiser. AMERICAN POLICEMAN Chief Inspector of Constabulary lists 58 awards for gallantry to British policemen ranging in rank from constable to inspector. Two of them are posthumous. Five civilians who assisted the police are also on the list. Armed with a whistle, a wooden truncheon, a pair of handcuffs, and, if available, a personal radio, the British policeman performs the same duties as his American counterpart. I formed the impression that, although he may be as young as 19, a great deal of his success is based on his almost amazing personal dignity when on duty. Most of the policemen I came in contact with were more than deserving of the English term of ap. "He,s a proper Copper." pro bat10n, 1 ( Continued from page 6) A police employee explains lo Lieutenant Mitchell her department's records and flling system . FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin �Let the bank robber b eware! More and more his criminal acts are b e ing w atched by a sile nt witness-the hidden cameraw hich re cords the infallible truth. Washington area. These identifications supported prior investigation by FBI Agents who had developed the man as a suspect. He was arrested and charged with bank robbery. The value of a strategically placed camera and resulting publicity of suspects ia illustrated by another incident in which a subject was caught on camera in the act of committing a bank robbery. In this incident a youth entered the National Savings & Trust Co. in the District of Columbia on January 4-, 1967, at which time he took an estimated $6,000. The picture taken by a hidden camera during the robbery showed a man wearing glasses, with his hand partially covering a pistol, at a teller's window. The suspect in the photograph released to newspapers by the FBI was recognized by a local police officer. He notified police investigators who arrested the youth . Just in Time I n identifying bank robbers, many times a picture . is worth a th o usand descriptio ns-espec ia ll y if th e ph otograph catches the bandi t com mittin g the robbery. Abo ut 6 :45 p.m. , December 6, 1966, three armed men, all wearin g sun glasses, ente red a branch of the So uth ern Maryland Bank and Trust Co. a t Oxo n Hill, Md. , a nd ordered two ma le tellers to th e rear of th e bank. One of the robbers ha nded a la undry-t ype bag lo the fema le tell er and ordered her to J)UL al/ the money from the cash drawer into th e ba~. Then the robbers fled. Total amount of mone y taken was $1,659. The bank is equipped with a co ncealed camera whi ch runs continu ously during bankin g hours a nd takes photographs at r eg ular inter vals. T he July 1967 film in th e camera was processed by the FBI. Three frames contained photogra p hs of the per so ns in volved in the r obber y, one of which was a good clear picture of the fa ce of one of the ro bber s. He was wearing a special police offi cer 's uniform, including a b adge a nd cap. Th e ph otograph and p ertinent information co ncerning the robber y were pr epar ed by the FBI and r eleased to all maj or newspapers in th e Washin gton, D.C. area for p ublication in t he hope o f sec ur in g a n ide 11Lification . Several calls were recei ved fr om citizens who sa id they could p ositively id entify the s ub ject of the ph oto g raph. He was s ub sequen tl y identi fied by th ree people as a n ind ividu al who had pr evio usly worked in th e In one instance, a camera had been installed only the day before the robbery, when shortl y before noon a masked bandit, accompanied by a teenage female, entered a banking institution in Cleveland , Ohio. Brandishing a small h and weapon, the masked man warned bank employees that this wa.;; a stickup and to stand back. Stationing himself in front of a teller's window, he waited while his accomplice calml y proceeded to empt y the money fr om the teller's cash dra we r into a b row n paper bag . One of the b ank tellers had observed Lhe m a sked bandit e nle r the bunk and had immediately tripped a silent alarm which also set a hidden movie camera into motion. T wo minutes after the bandits had fled wi th $2 ,,372, detecti ves fro m th e Cleveland Police Department arri ved at the b an k and rushed the film for 17 �immediate processin g. FBI Agents dispatched to the scene commenced immediate investigation. Still prints of the film taken during the robbery were distributed to police officers, FBI Agents, surrounding police dep·a rtments, and to newspapers. The film was rushed to TV stations and given nationwide coverage. The youthful b ank robber turned himself in to police the foll owing day. He told police he h ad gone to Indiana by bu:, after the robbery, but when he realized the robbery film was being shown on TV, he had decided to return to Cleveland and surrender. "Where can you go when you're on TV all the time !" was the remark he made to detectives and FBI Agents. The girl was arrested the following day when her whereabouts was made known to police by an anonymous telephone call. The man was sentenced to a term of 10 to 25 years in the State penitentiary. The girl was. placed on probation fo r 2 years. Joe Meador, caught by a hidden camera , wa s convicted on charges of robbing a bank of more than $30,000. Ne rv ous Robbe r Another bank robber, an 18-yearold youth, robbed the Citizens & Southern Emory Bank, Decatur, Ga. Holding a sawed-off shotgun, he herded 18 persons into the open space of the bank lobby, then ordered the tellers to put the money in a green paper bag he was carrying. , He showed extreme nervo usness and at one time was heard to remark, " I swear to God, I'm scared to death ." He obtained $19,475 and escaped in a stolen car. The bank manager in an office ad joining the lobby, seeing this acti on, set off the silent bank ala rm which also activated the bank's two hidden cameras. Ten clear photographs of the robber were taken during the course of the robbery. These were released to all available news media and dis18 ' . Jo e Meador photographed following h is arrest. pl ayed thro ughout the Nation. The robber was identified as Stephen P atrick Wilkie by a tenant of a home where the robber had been livin g for several months; but he, in the meantime, was traveling all over the co untr y living a life of luxur y on th e money he had stolen. When a phone call to his hometown revealed that he was wa nted by the FBI fo r b ank ro bber y, he surrendered to Specia l Agents in San Francisco. He was sentenced to 10 yea rs fr1 the custody of the Attorney General. In another ro bbery two bro th ers armed with h andguns entered an Indiana bank and forced the manager to fi ll a cloth bag with money fro m the vault and the tellers' cashboxes. After obtaining $30,845, one of the brothers r ipped two sequence cameras from the wall of the bank and took them along when they fled from the scene. Apparently they had no objections to being photographed during the robbery, but they made sure the film co uld not be developed after they left. During the ensuing investigation, one of the bank tellers told FBI FBI Law EnforcelT! ent Bull etin �Agents that she recognized one of the robbers as having b een in the bank some 6 weeks previously to cash a check. With the cooperation of the bank officials, FBI Agents assisted the teller in the task that lay before her in effecting an identification. Sequence camera films for the preceding 6 weeks were developed and shown to the teller. F or several h ours each day fo r 11 days, she sat with FBI Agents reviewing the frames, until one day, after having viewed some 20,000 frames, she picked up the frame identifying the robber- the man who h ad entered the bank almost 6 weeks before the robbery. N umerous prints of this photograph were made and circulated iby the FBI to various sources. T hree days after the photograph was first obtained, a trusty of a local county jail identified the bank robber as Joe Wayne Meador. With h is identification, the brother , Ratline Meador, was fo und to answer the description of the other robber. Green Thuml1 Both men denied guilt of the rob bery, stating they had been planting tobacco on the far m of a relative at the time. T his in fo rmation was checked out, but apparently tobacco was not the only thing they had planted. After many hours of backbreaking digging, FBI Agents unearthed a 25-pound la rd can which had been b uried some 15 inches under a stable. Inside the lard can was a plastic container ; inside the plastic container was a styr ofoa m ice bucket ; and inside the bucket was $ 11,000 completely saturated with talcum powder. Confronted with the buried treasure, the brothers accompanied FBI Agents to another location where a simi lar lard can was buried containing a nother bucket a nd $11,487 comJuly 1967 pletely saturated with talcum powder. The brothers explained that the talcum powder served as a dehydrating agent for the preservation of the buried money. FBI Agents and SCUBA divers located the cameras in a deep creek running through a heavily wooded area in the geileral vicinity of the bank. Although t he cameras had been completely submerged for almost a month, it was possible t o develop 1½ frames on the exp osed film which clearly showed one of the victim tellers with hands upraised a nd one of the brothers standing nearby. The two brothers were each sentenced to 10 years' imprisonment. pictures or show them on television which requires pictures of good quality if results are to be achieved from such investigative procedures. Experience in the FBI with pictures provided by numerous bank camera installations have led to the following conclusions with respect to these installations: 1. Cameras of 35 mm. or larger negative size will produce better results than cameras of smaller negative size. 2. A sequence camera is preferable to · a movie camera. This kind of camera will produce a series of still photographs tha t will ordinarily be of higher quality for identification purposes and will also record the action. 3. Camera (s) (more than one if necessary) ( Continued on page 24) Camera Scores Again Another y
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 30, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_030.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 12, Folder 30, Complete Folder
  • Text: CITY OF A T LANTA DEPARTMENT of POLICE Atlanta 3, Georgia September 2 5, 1967 HERBERT T. JENKINS Ch i ef MEMORANDUM To: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. From: The Atlanta Police Department (Gertrude Pasley) September 18, 1967 to September 24, 1967 inclui;ive 1 patrolman vacancy -- widow has received a year's salary 1 patrolman resigned -- GreenAir Compressor Co. 3 patrolmen employed Total vacancies: 12 Total guards: 3 E . 0. A. employees - paid by Federal Government: 2 �September 22. 1967 Parent of Warren Jac kson S c hool c / o Mrs . B . Pollock 43ZZ Conway Valley Court. N . W. Atlauta, Georgia Dear Mrs . Pollock: Thi will acknowledge receipt of the petitio frmn the parents of the children in the Warren J ckson School hich you recently forw rded me . I am ttacbing a report from both the Traffic Engwer amt the Police De rtment d I hope that thi additional action ta n will be s ti factory . Please express my appreciation for the petition. Sincerely your , Ivan Aile • Jr. Mayor lAJr/br E closur • �CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of POLICE Atlanta 3, Georgia Se p t e ber 21 , 196 7 HERBERT T . JENKINS Ch ief Mr . Geo r g e Roy a l Ma y or ' s Of f ice Ci ty Ha ll 68 Mi tc he ll S tr ee t, S . W. At labt a , Geor 6 i a 3030 3 Dea r Lr . R:::>ya l: / I n r ega rds to t he petitiJ n from t h e mo t hers a t the Wa r re n JacksJ n Sc hoo l f or a ~ chJo l Tr aff ic Pol i c e Woma n, we are now attempti ng t o fil l t is position . Bef o1·e t he s c h ool y e~ r be~an I ne t wi t h Mrs . arie Smor t, pr: ncipa l, a nd at t ha t time we d id no t a nt i ci pate a need f:::> r a pol ice woma n . Aft er lear nin 6 of t his petitio n a nc a c a l l from hr::; . Smart , we made a no th vr sur vey and t8 l ked t o se v era l parents . Some in di c . ted they woul d l et their c hi l dren wa l k if there was a Traffi c Poli c e Woma n o n duty . There are about 25 to 30 students wsl~i ng or ridin 6 oicycles to schoo l, usinJ or c r o s s i n6 "It • Pa r a n 1-{ J b d • l t . Pa r a n R J a d i n the s ch o J 1 are a is a ve ry narrow ro.sid i-Ji. th tnany Stlarp curv e s . There are no sidew a lks in this area . I ha ve re ceived permissi:::>n from my sup erior off i cers and the cJmptroller ' s offic e to hire a Tr ~ff i c Police Wowan at this school . The s c hoo l a nd the Pa r e nt Teacher ' s Associatio n are now assisti ng me i n findi nb a n applicant for this posit~on ~ .Respectfully, (1// ~ ~ Lt. C. V. Forrest e r �C TY OF ATLANTA TRAFFIC ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT Atla nta , G e orgia 30303 September 19, 1967 K A RL A. BE V I NS Traffic En gin ee r The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta 206 City Hal 1 Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: In answer to your request for information concerning our proposed activities in the area of the Warren Jackson School, we should like to give you the following report. During the past three weeks, members of our staff have discussed this situation with Mrs. Smart, Principal of the School; Mr. J. Lewis Cook , Safety Director of the Board of Education; and Lieutenant Forrester, of the Atlanta Police Department. As a result of these discussions, we have done a substantial amount of signing in the vicinity of the school. Since the school is located approximately 1000 feet north of Mount Paran Road , we did not feel that it was necessary or desirable to reduce the speed limit to 25 MPH from the presently existing 30 MPH. We have, however , installed signs on Mount Paran Road on each approach to the school driveway which warn drivers with the message SCHOOL CHILDREN IN ROADWAY. A recent count of the children walking on Mount Paran Road and entering the Wa rren Jackson School at the Mount Pa ran Road driveway indicates that a relatively small number of 20 to 30 students are entering the school property at this point . Although the letter and petitions which accompanied your memorandum to this depa rtment r e f e rre d only to a request tha t a police office r be assigned to this location , we felt that you would like to know what actions we have taken on r e ques t s which have been ma de directly to us . At the present time , we do not have plans for additional work in the vicinity of this school . I f you de s i re any additional informat i on conc erning this matte r, pl eas e f ee l f re e t o call on us . ERSJr/fd �Sept e ber 18, 1967 Mayor Ivan Allen City Hall Atl~ t a i Geor~ia Dear Mayor All n~ We a r e deeply conc erned about the f a ct that a polic offic er hae not b e n a33i~ned to ass i~t th e children in crossin~ Mto Paran Road in front of Warren J a ck 3on Schoolo W have conta ct ed Lto Pender~ra3tp who i~ i n char~ of th School Police Divi!ion of the Atlanta Polic D part ent, r ~ardin~ thi! tt er o He does not fe 1 th e nee 3~ity of placin~ a police wo an at Warren J a ck! on Schoolo We, a3 parent3, feel th at th 3af ty of our childrsn is beint ne~l e ctedo We can not wait until a child i3 injured or killed to prove th e nee fo r a police wo ano Altho~h Mt o Para Road is ot a ain thorou~hfa r P it is ah avily travel9d road, an b cau3e it le a n~rrow, win di ~ roa with no 3i walk 3, it 13 very hapraous for youn~ chil r to cro 3s without !Upervi~iono May par nts have expre33ed a d93ir to hav walk to and fro ~chool but thy h ave not a llow bec au! of thi! l ack of supervi!io o their chil r n the to walk As r~3i nts of the hi~hest tax payin~ district in the City» w feel ju3tified in askin~ th polic depart e t to act o our r quest Q · W eed your 3upp:ort in this att r and any help you can ~iv e u~ will be eeply appr ciate o Enclose a r (300) thr -hundr 3i~ne petitions~ copi s of which a r bein~ ~ent to th police d p~ rt entQ Very truly your~~ Pare t ~j Wa r r~ J ack5o School �'- 334 Auburn Ave., N.E. 'Atlanta-;' Georgia 30303 Telephone 522-1420 Southern Christian Leadersh ip Co11feren ce Martin Luther Kin~.. Jr., Prt. ..... tident· .. Ralph Abernathy, Trtasurtr Andrew J. Young, E:ucutivt Dirtcto, September 19, 1967 Chief Herbert T. Jenkins Chief of Police City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia '- Dear Chief Jenkins: Last week I ·requested a parade or "march" permit from your office, and was informed that the request must ·be made 5 days .·prior to day of parade. · . · I, 11 1' I I am .h~reby requesting par~de permit~ as follows: l. Monday ,' September 25th (PM) 2. Tuesday, September 26th (PM) 3. Wednesday, September 27th (PM) 4• . Thursday, September 28~h (PM) 5. Friday, September 29th (PM) .I . Please send permit and any other correspondence to the following address: ' ·· Rev. Howard W. Creecy, Sr., President . · Atlanta Chapter Southern Christian Leadership Conference Mount Moriah Baptist Church · 200 Ashby Street, S. W. · Atlanta, Geo r.gia 37;::::zfw ;:, .~ Rev. Howard W. Cr ee c ~ Pr eside nt, Atlanta Cbapter Sout hern Christian Leadership Conference CC: Mayor Ivan All en, Jr Dr. A. M. Davis, President NAACP Jesse Hillp Jf pp Co - Chairman 9 · Atlanta Summit Leadership co·nf erence �' CITY OF ATLANTA~ ~ ~ ~ DEPARTMENT OF POLICE ATLANTA, GA. 9-1 8-67 Mass Meeting : Mt. Moriah Baptist Church We atte n ded a ma s s me e ting at t he Mt. Moriah Ba p tist Chu r ch , corne r of As h b y and Fair St. a t 8PM t h i s d a t e. The follo wing was s tat e d b y Rev Boone as being nec es s a r y for the Bo a rd of Edu c a tion : 1 . That the r e i s not enou gh Ne g ro me mber s in the Te chnic a l Schools 2 . Th a t there a r e n ot enou gh t ext b oo k s J. That schedule s must b e r e a d y b y t h e f i r s t day of sch o ol and 3 and t ha t n ot t o o many b e enrol l e d 4. That a r e-s tudy of a l l te x t bo oks b e mad e , wi t h n o pr oper respect on rac e . 5. That n o ru l e be i ss.ed d e ny i ng freed om of speech 6. That a Negr o Pr i n c ipal b e p u t i nto the s ch ool and n ot onl y in Ne g ro s c hoo l s 7. That by Jan 1 , 1968, a Negro superintendant is placed in c harge of the scho ols 8. That departments be directed by Negroes 9. That children be removed from the double sessions Rev. Boone spoke on the lack of decent housing , in the Negro sections, poverty and the fa :ili.Jre on the part of power s truct u re. A Mrs . Dorothy Bolton came forward, speaking for the parents bring ing back to mind that in 1964, the first march to Central Hi gh School. She spoke on how the parents must join to ge ther in order to take a stand for their children. She further stated that she herself had g one down to Dr. Letson's off ice and tri e d to ap p eal to him but that he only put her off saying that she had to wait until he had time to se e her. Mr. Thomas Harper , representing Youth Town, spoke on how his organization was designed to keep teens in line, meaning that they were trying to keep them from be coming juvenile delinquentsa He too talk ed ofthe double sessions in the schools and on how he thought the Ne gr oes were being cheated out of an education. Thr e e points that were brought out were as follows: Slums must go Dro Letson must go Double sessions in the schools must go Mro Hosea Williams came to th~ platform at this time speaking on the subj e ct of proving ones manhood. He stated that this could.onlyfbehnroven. when wen come together in an organ1~ea as 10n oe1ng on thB one blagk ~c ~ra 0 �CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT OF POLICE ATLANTA, GA. 9-18-67 Dr. Martin Luther King s p oke l a st stat ing that we are eithe r to g ether or divided but that there was no division in NAACP. He stated that dop e victi ms and alcoholics are only caused b y the lack of unemployment. He stated that Atlanta bo a st of having jobs for eve ryone but that wa en the Ne g ro p eop le g o down to the city h a ll a n n e x , they ar e turned away wi t h the p retense of not b e ing we ll en ou g h q u a lif ie d . He ende d by saying that the job of t h e Neg ro de manded tni ty and that we might b e separated among ourselves but tog et h er a g a ins t the whi t e pe ople. At t his t i me it was st a t ed that e a c h p e r son p r es e nt would ma rc h wit h the l eade r s do wn t o the Wa shing ton Hi g h School . Dr. King a dvi se d the g r ou p to h ave n ume r ou s demonstrations, non- violen t l y. He reminde d them of t he de st ru ction of t h e pr evious r io ts and i ndi c a t ed b y h i s spe ec h t hat we di d n ot nae d a r e o cc ur ance. Oth er g ues t s were a s f o l l ows : Dr. M. L. King Jr . A. M. Davis Ral ph Ab ernat hy Sa m Wi lli ams J oseph Boone Ho sea Williams Leroy J ohnson Julian Bond Respectful l y ~~ Sgt. L. Goss Det J P Arnol d Mrs. Lind a Tucker P.S. Dr. King stated that h e h a d planned to makea :. speech., and had a l ready written it out at this time, b ut that since e v eryb ody e lse had made such goo d remarks he would not speak , but that he would bring out points on thei r remarks. These are listed above. �CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT OF POLICE ATLANTA, GA. 9-18-67 I n Re g ard s to the Mas s Mee tin g: T oni ght upon co mp l e ti on of t h e meet i ng a t t h e Mt. Moriah Baptist Chur ch, Ho s e a Willi ams asked t he enti re gr oup to a c c ompany him i n a ma r ch t o Was h i ngt on Hi gh Sc h o ol . He came to t he outside at the front step s and aga i n app e a l ed to t he gr ou p to march with him. He succeeded in ge t t ing appr ox i mat e l y 300. They mar c he d n orth on Ashby Street t o Hunter St. Du r i ng t h e ma rch , app r oxi mat e l y on e hal f of these pe ople dr opped ou t a long t h e wa y. The remain der c ont i n ued t o the fr ont s t ep s of Wash i ngton Hi gh Scho ol , wh ere they sang tw o songs . Hosea Wi l l iams greeted the group. He tol d them that we mu s t demonstrate unt i l s uper i n t endent Le t son knows th a t we are not p l ay ing. We should turn thi s ci ty upside down, I mean we sho uld fil l al l the jails with adults and not send our c hildren. He stated we must show the p ower struct u re of the school and of the pol ic e de partment t hat we mean bus i ness. He further stat ed t hat Chie f J enkins had sent his good guys out to be with them toni ght, h e kne w that there wouldn't be any trouble. This group remained on the steps of Washington Hi gh Sc hoo l f or about 30 minutes. They then dispersed and went in different direct ionso This g roup at the ch urch consisted of app roxima t ely eleven hundred. Respectfully 75-~ Sgt. L. Goss De t . JP Arnold lt �Corrie See And 1T..fe ar A GIZEAT AIVlERICAN DR~ }\AAR'fl I LUTH=:R17 l(ING, JR~ President, Southern Christian Leadership Conference ~v1onday r1ight, September 181 1967 s~oo p~m~ Sharp ~Aot1nt Moriah Bapti§t Cht1rch Corner YNest Fair and A§hby Street DOU BU: SESS~Ou JS AN D f'OOR SCHOOtS MUST GO! Did you get a decent education? Are your children on double sessions? Are your children in overcrowded classes? Help protect your children's future. You may have a job, you rn ay be making a good salary, but what about the 15 black me·n out of every hundred without a job, while only 2 white men out of every ·hundred has no job. ATlA ~rA POUCE BRUTAUTY. Maybe policemen have not be_aten you y et. /v\aybe policemen hav e not b eai·en your husband, your wi.fe · '--~-, or your children. We must stop po lice brutality. '·,--.,; \. ~ ,. - m  : s s ~ re,1:n,,o \ Sponsored by Ai'lanta - Chapter-·- Nation n l Association for the Advanceme nt of Colored People Dr. Albert M. 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V "f:\'J':; .... 4° - - 7 "- -. ~--I,, .. _., -1S 7 7.CJ 34 41 ... - 4 __ -v...,.~ ...... .,_...,...,. --------'"' ? '" , _ .) _ ______ 7 ·-·-· --.. .................-_.. - . . ···--"""'-·-, ~ ' ...,- 41 27 68 4 10 '7 ,/... ,) �/\1] nolicc 11:,:rsonncl on 12 hours a d· y , 7 cl ,1ys a 1.1 cc k. Tot.al ;'OJ ice ~er'.,onnc l ,wailnh _k ----------- ·-Ovcrt :i. 11:.: for c:ich 1 .an ~er 1.rcc l:--- ·-- ··-- --·· -- 8'15 t1- 4 hour s Ov rUi ·e for :, 11 11:)rsonn"'i n·.n we:cl,-----·----- 37, 130 h ou.'s Ov cr t-i.1. i: for 2 11 ,1JJ··soiFwl :icr cl ::;y- --- ---- - 3,3 R0 hours �October 25, 1967 Chief H. T. Jenkins Atlanta Police Department .E: Disorders on ~gnolia Street Sunday - October 22, 1967 donday - 0 tober 23, 1967 Dear Sir: On Sunday night, October 22, 1967, at about 9:30 p.m., Captain • c. Bryant called me and stated that a explosive situation was about to develop at Vine and t1agnolia but that he thought everything was under control . I got re dy to go to the area nd just as I was leaving, I heard on th r help call and fire call in this area so proceeded to Vine and tagnolia . I found that Officer J . B. Phillips and oth r offic re h d arre ted several person t th t location and had · d conoidcroble trouble with the s bjects and after the orre t nd the person had be n transported to j iL, a consid rable crowd of di orderly r:er ons gathered on 1ognolia Str t between . faple and Vine ond set sever l fires . The Fire Depart nt w s call d evernl ti~ but th fir w re put out ostly bcfor th Fire D partment arriv d . Lt. C. J. Perry and Copt·in ry nt w re on the cen and had Car LO-, 12-B and a wagon patrolling th are . All of thes w r nn Plea se send permit and ·any oth e r corr esponden c e to the following addr e ss: Re v. Howard W. Cr ee cy, Sr., Pr e sid e nt Atlant a Ch a pt er Sout he r n Chri s ti a n Le ade rship Conf e r e nc e Mount Mori a h Bap ti s t Church 200 As hby Str e et, S. W. Atlanta, ~ e orgia ~incl.r e ly you r s, j. J Re v.1~~ ¼) W LU/4q, , WV Howard W. Cr ee c y, S~ Pr e sid e nt, Atl a nt a Ch ap t e r South e rn Christ i an Lead e rs hip Conf er e nc e CC: Ma yo r I v a n All e n, .Jr Dr . A. M. Da vi s , Pres i d e nt Ni-rACP J es se Hill, J r ~, Co- Cha i r ma n , Atl a nta S ummi t Le ad e rs hi p Conf e r e nc e �- September 21, 1967 Mr. A . l . Gaulden, Jr . LeMa Apartment 2515 Northeast Expressway Apartment G - 7 Atlanta, Georgia Dear r . Gaulden: I m ure you are a are that it is rare to receive a letter of special commendation as your • 1 am mo t grateful for your comm.ent about Officer Adams a d l am ure be will ppreci te bat you plan to do. 1 am for ardin this letter to Chief Jenkins ·th my ppreciati • Sincerely your , Aile , Jr. lAJr/ r CC: Chief Jenkins long ---, �September Zl, 1967 Mr. W . M . Teem, Sr. '5 66 Martina Drive, N . E . Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. I Teem: Thank you £or your letter of September 20th. l will be happy to ask the Police Depa.rtmellt to have this truck removed. Sincerely yours , Iv n Allen, .Jr. Mayor IA.Jr/hr �S ptember 19, 1967 y • Jo 1 Tr • . �TRAFFIC FA.TALITI:SS TO DATE 1/57. 5:50 A.H. August 21.i, 1967 N.W. Freeway and Howe ll Mill Rdo VictiTJ1., drive1• of vehicle; which was struck by vehicle //2, which crossed median and overturnedo W.M. ?? 58. 8:00P.H. September 1, 1967 N.W.Fre eway and Mt Paran Rd. W.F. 23. Victim, passenger in vehicle which was struck by vehicle cha_nging lanes. 1159. 10 :25A.M. September · 9, 1967 2544 Peachtree Rd.,N.W. W.M. LB. Victim, driver of vehicle which struck power pole. �TUITION GRANTS ATU.NTA POLICE OFFICERS COST OF COURSE PER QUARTER $35.00 Per Subject P er Qua:tter $10.,00 Per Subject Per Quarter for Books $ 6.,00 Per Quarter for Students Ac tivity Fee 1. All Officers will be allowed to take up two subjects Per Quarter. 2. Tuition will be paid to all participating Officers up to, but not to e x ceed $100.00 Per Quarter. 3. The tuition will be paid to the Of f icer af~er he has successfully completed each quarter. 4. Reimbursement will be paid only to those Officers participating in Police Admi nistration Course. METHOD OF SELECTI ON FOR REI MB URSEMENT 1~ En trace Examinat i o n Scores. 2. Length o f service with the Dep artment. 3. The Police Officers performance rating and up on app roval of Chief o f Pol i ce . �V September 196 1967 V Mr. B . M . Doster 1414 Boulevard Lorraine, S . W. Atlanta, Georgia Pear Don: Thank you very much for sending me a copy of your letter to Chief Jenkin • It would be needles for me to say that we regret th incident to which you refer, and t hat every effort ill be made by the Police D pa.dment to determine ho the per ons ere nd prevent any other incident of thi type in the future. A to ·whether you may wi h to obtain permit to carry a protective e pon; thi i a deci ion you ill have to ma e. Perso Uy, I thi k the Police Deparbn nt is dequate for the protection of all c i tizens . Sincerely, l IA.Jr:am Alie , Jr. �B. McDONALD DOSTER 1414 BOULEVARD LORRAINE, 5. W. ATLANTA 11. GA. September 14, 1967 Chief Herbert Jenkins Atlanta Police Department 175 Decatur Street, S. E. Atlanta~ Georgia Dear Mr. Jenkins: I want to report an incident that happened Wednesday night about 9:00 p.m., September 13, which occurred on Gordon Road at the railroad underpass just west of the intersection of Lynhurst in the event you wish to alert your patrolmen to events of this kind. My wife and I and friends had dinner at the Plantation Restauran t in Marietta .and were proceeding homeward through Access Highway , Bolton Road by Fulton County Airport, Gordon Road, Lynhurst, and Sewell to Cascade Heights. When we approached the underpass west of Lynhurst, but still some di st_a nce away , I saw five or so young Negroes sixteen to eighteen years old, or thereabou ts, standing on the right hand side of the street at the abutment to the railroad b ridge. They were doing nothing that appeared to be out of the ordinary, but were apparently were t a lking and having fun. Just as I became even with them, we were startled by a terrific report which sounded as though a gun had been fired inside the car. I ha d seen no one make any move and no flash from an e xp losion was seen so assumed that the boys had thrown a giant firecracker under the car where it exploded. There appearing nothing more serious a t that time, I did not stop but proceeded on homeward. After visiting with our friends for an hour or two,l!!Y wife and I went on home where we then examined the car because someone had e xpre ssed an opinion that something struck the car, which we did not immediately confirm. Upon e xamination under · light it is c lear now that the e xplosion was the dischar ge of a gun, and the car was actual ly struck by the bullet and that from the trajectory th e bulle t ca me �,-- B. McDONALD DOSTER 1414 BOULEVARD LORRAINE, 5 . W. ATLANTA 11, GA. from overhead on the railroad bridge, from which someone must have fired the gun. The bullet, from directly overhead, was fired at about a 40 degree angle, and it struck the left rear door window just above the center. Being struck from overhead, the bullet merely glanced off the glass and struck a curved portion of the metal door at the base of the glass where the curve caused the bullet to riccochet outward. The glass was not broken, but was scarred by the impact·and the metal was not pierced, but was scored by the riccochet. It is obvious that someone was making an attempt on the life of some unsuspecting person who would drive under the bridge. That person could have been me if the gun had been fired a split second sooner and six inches to my right, where it would have pierced the windshield directly in front of my face. I saw no one on the bridge above, and having proceeded as far forward as I had, I saw no flash, but the circumstances wer~ easy to read. Very truly yours, B. M. Doster cc: Mayor .Ivan. Allen, Jr. City Hall . Atlanta, Georgia �Beptcmber . 2~ 19 ·17 S pt 0 C 0 Chafin Capto Oo Jordan Lt J 0 R Shattles Sirs : Th i s date ~t 4z30 pm I took a photog:c .pher to the Bo~.:rd o :f Edu.ca;t i m1 0 2 24, Central Ave,., He made p i ctu~es of individmi.J.s o c cupy i n £; Supt a i:1:-:.n T-et~ ons of£icc:JJ I retun,eu to 22.(~ Central Ave 9 and remained u n til ll : 45 pmll at vrhich time t he:;~ persons were told t o l e~ve the buil 'ing 'y De t 0 ~r ,.D Hudso n 0 11. orc'k·r s f :rom Lt 0 N.-t,c·:!:1 0 They refused 9 and v·ere a:>:rested f or violat i ng ci i:y o-c1ina.,ce 20=27@ (Loit e ring ) 0 Ca-e et 2~30 pm 0 Se:ptQ 13-th o A r:r.ested sub j e cts we:t:e as :follm-'7Se- J <::?ss i cm Holl nd 0 ,,;rf20 , 3 34 A burn Ave o J a:mes Gibso:..,~ \' m.21 11 334 Auburn Ave., I rma J ean J acksc:-:nr; cf2 '1. 0 334 Aubu:rn o Marge Mnndcrson 0 f'39 9 7 ~1 Wilson Rd o No 1·lo Rev o J oseph Eo Boonep c m44 9 4 520 CJ.axmont Dr o S0W0 Rcv 0 Howard W., Creecy 11 c ra39 9 192 Ashby Sto S oW Rev 0 J cC 1vard 9 cm3 :i 14 7J. Eason Sta NoWo Wi1 scn Bro m i, cm3--1ll 360 Nelson Sto S.,W 0 Albert Henry 9 \'JT.141$ 3 42 Gth o NoEo W' lli.am Lo ckett, c m35 9 2-116 Ua t h i e 1rs on P l a S oWo Supt 0 Letson h ad r -,fu e el "co meet t h :i.s g r.ore. ea:rliezs 1:n.:i. t did ' ' O ':\t 6 1~30 p ·o i n b:i.s offic e o He want ed t o mee t this group in ·' he la:.:go r1K:~ting i:oomp but thi s group refused to d o soe They b o ugh t up t v;0lv e point s :foz: di.·cussion hu t fi n~ J.ly de cidGd on o ne:;i that b e ing Dr., Let.son c al J. a,.n emei:gency meeting o f. the boa:ed , f ol.' no l a t er than tomorrowo not rea ch himo D:c ., Letson made an a t t empt to c a l l D:::: ., Cook~ but could Dr o L etson left th2 b'uiJ.ding at l Q:"2-.5 p m 9 and :ce tuxncd a ·i.. 1 1~ 30 ::\t t his time he told the g J:oup they woul d h ave t o leave .. over to L t., He t hen t u.rnr~d ·the matter Nash and l eft G The a r re st was o:cder ly and wa,s c ar. ied out by the echooI d e tect:i.vc:s:i Lt o Copeland , Lto Sheppard ., 1"he:.re was sev e ra l o ther o ffi c ers on t h t~ scr--,ne ,., Wnen asked to 1 ;:\w~ a .o l o:red f emv. J.12 and col 2eci ma le P ohn Boorie ) l e fto Charles A., Webster X'ema i ned on the scenG 11 b ut was a l lov·ed t o go~ when h e stated he · ould b e glad to g oo He c ame on to the sta tion .and wi t nessed the booking of the p:dscnerso He l ate:r. c ame to the De t., Offj c-.e and q uest ioned Capt 0 Duncan on the xd:.--b,~ i n a Jice.ns e 0 to h 0 at pea!)Je, bec !)use of ti-.,.,;r vot- e , on--1.a.s t ni ght". · the Detroit, C':Jica ;:;o and MiJ •,ra ] kee riots, ~.nd..~ ne eroe s in tho se communitie s , h a d I!e then----i-mr:,~ized !'lds of t h-e-- to bo r esoJvAd. "I hope th at: •l t] nnta wouJd not have to go through wh a t De troit an.d other citi e s did, b:; t if this the way it mu st be done , it mus t be done", . Mr. '-J illimn s continues to l ash a wa y a t she 'PcJ i ca _Camm i ttee , C' 1 i e f ,Tenkins ., a...'11-....,d- - Hay or Allen . I~ c rit i c ise d t he Mayor , fo r not h av in g c ontra) of tbo -department s , und0 r hi--s- G - ~ - ~-g rre groas in r espons ible jobs, withi n the wat e r depar tment, board of- educa t i on and etc •• l1ext speaker Rev . J. D. ',lard: THIS OFFENS E 15 D EC LA RED: UNFOU N D ED . • • • •• CL EAR E D BY ARRES T • • • 0· D EXCEPT I O N ALLY CL E ARED 0 I NACT IV E ( NOT C L EARED ) . 0 SIGNED _ _ _ _ __ _ _ __ INV ES TI GAT I NG _ _ _ _ _ D A TE - - - -- -- - OFF I CE R S I G N ED - - - - -- -- ~ ~ ~ ~ - - OA T E - - - -- - - CH I E F OR CO MMAN D IN G OFF ! CER T HI S FORM IS U SE D B Y OF FI CER A SSIG NED T O A CASE TO REPORT P RO GRE SS A FT ER TH REE AN O SE V E N DA YS A N O_ WE E K L Y T H ERE· A F TER ALSO T O REP OR T SI G N IFICAN T D E V E L OPME N T S. �._ 1,.._ ' __ _ e page 3 FORM 32·0· 101 0 FF E N SE - -...,I-j ·.,... a~::~;s~f""1~ e-c.....,t;....,i~l~lg-- SER I AL NO. SUPPLEMENTARY OFFENSE REPORT -~9,_..-.._,7,__5....,7,,_. COMPLAIN ANT _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ ATLANTA POLICE D E PARTM E NT 175 DECATUR ST . , S. E. ADD RE ss ATLANTA, GA. --F-:uf+n - t-e-r,~~.-a....n .....d,_.C,~-h...,e-s-t--r-.l-u-t---------- ADDITIONAL DETAILS OF OFFENSE, PROGRESS OF INVESTIGATION, ETC. Rev. :.rard stated t hat h1'3 wo . .tld at~a.::k the boa..!.'d of educ a tion, Dr~ letson and others, aJon g tr,,o 1:2ajn l:i nes • . One through demonstrations, on:l-41w-o, through the ballot box ~ He told the rne0ting · t~.at the Alilan t;a 13oard of Education and Dr. Ietson, had aareed to meet with a cam:mjttee on ~I~ ·In~D~'3.....P....,Y,--n......_.j ..g.,,..h.....t.,.__... a ....t~ · . . .,·,'.:'. ,J.....,x,.,.._...,.n....,J1....,_· -~ ~0 U ,£; 0~1*' , Y' ', T,-,,,.s O~~.----<.f- 'h.... ~ ~ ,,., l-,.,.,. ..... U v ~ - a wuvr -- o uu s ± -~ ~v ~ u 1 v a CK l-,. • • inno vneir .J.., . • -G-Gm~ i - - go t e v e ryone po s3ible, to dtt e nd t Le m~e t;.i. ng. ::::t u te .:.ng that "~.J0 wil 1 07errnn the ro eti ng on Mond;;,y nigh t and if 1.rn d on't get 0 4*-at wo wa nt t he r e, we will-fill ever.y--Be-ard-H,:nnbers office on Tue sday mornjng . I--will par s ona lly be i n t ::e :~ayer' s eff iee, on Tue s das, i f we don't get wha t we want." After about one hundred peonl e arrived , it wa fi put to a vo1-e , t bo.t a pronos a l be submi ttP.d to,Pr0 s id PDt Jobn con, in t he-form of a tele gram , n ski ng b j ~h i e f Je n'!.dns fro m his appoi .... ....~ t. LJ.1,/l..Ut;;u t t· l%:t. i .t;~l d i u ! e ~t t a~ t time t ,.___e;i a~Ke ' d the y vot0.d unani mou s l y to send t he t e l ogram . aLWil that news papeP-Pcportcrs and poli c e to l ea \fe . -le t hen l eft. THI S O FFEN SE IS D EC L A R E D : UNF O U ND E D, • , • C L EAR::: D BY ARRES T , • , •• EXCEPT I ONALLY C L EARED I NACT I V E (NOT CL E ARED) . o. D 0 0 SIGNED E.A . - -~~ ~ J s+, G w ~ Yrt-PcE,l\rnold DA TE .-· ' ·. ,...: ..· // ~ S I G N ED - C -H I_E_F _O_R_C_O_M_M_A_ N _D_ I N_G_ O_ F_F~ ! C~ER T HI S FORM IS U SED BY OFFIC E R ASSIGNED TO A CASE TO REPORT P R OGRESS AF T ER T H REE AND SEVEN D AYS AND WEEK L Y THEREAFTER ALSO T O R EPORT SIGN I F I CA NT D E V E L OF'ME N TS . 9-7-6? - - - - - - -- �I , FORM32•O•10I 9-7-67 Press Conference •,· OFFENSE---- SUPPLEMENTARY OFFENSE - - - - - - - - - SERIAL N O . - - - - - - - Baptist Church · _ _ _ _ _ _ __ COMPLAIN ANT _ Ebeneza ______ _____ ____ REPORT ATLANTA POLICE DEPARTMENT 175 DECATUR ST., 5. E. ATLANTA, GA. Auburn Avenue at_Jackson ADDRESS _ _ ____ _____ _ _ _ _ _Street _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ ADDITIONAL DETAILS OF OFFENSE, PROGRESS OF INVESTIGATION, ETC. 1. or 2. Mr. Jessie Hill - 3. Rev. J. D. Ward - Spokesma n Operation Bread Ba_s_k_e_t_.________________ 4. Rev. Clyde i·Jilliams - l\!e tr :Y?oli tan Grass Root's Councilo Albert Davis - ?resident !Local Ch;:mter NAAO'. Coordinator Atlanta Summit Council. Dr. Dcwis o pened the ne,·Js conference at 2:35 P.M. with a sta ·~ ernent, 11 '.ve the v~riou s organi zation leaders since the Labor Day neekend have been in clos e conference a mong ourselves and with Dr. Martin Luther King, concerning the problems in Atlanta. We have urg e d Dr. King in view of these problems to corae to Atlanta and assist us in non-violent actio ns to alleviate them." Dr. Davis cited in series th e probless t hat he felt wa s facina .negro comn~nities: l. ~ie stated that the Atlanta Board of Education is naw holding double sessions in five negro schools and none in white schools. Furt he r that office e ~ ploy- ment in the c e ntr a l office for neg ro s in supe rvi so r y positions lag ged. 2. Une mployraent: pl o yed. Neg ros still r e main in the l ~rger p 2 rcentile among t he unem- According to Dr. 0a vis of the ten p2 rc~nt une moloyed in a given group only two percent were white. ? Je llou s ing: The Atlanta Housing Au ~horiti es ~ r e s till oracticing se g rega tion and also rnai11tainin~ se p arate o ff ice operation according to Dr. ~a vis. Ju stic e a nd the Police: Dr. ~~vis sta t e d he feels sure t ha t there was evi den c e of police brut al it y in the Dixie fli l ls area and a laxit y of cit y o ffici als in Tt-etienc in this .: field c n be brought to bear on th national crisi _ . It i our inc r mi ion nd ny b of th forth by the Co.l.LIIWi..a.:;,..ion Atl nt. Siner ly, t .T, t: E.T. Pr 1\l 21 fl+cio co; lv n All n, n Ricbud Jr. / c. ~ hr r ide.nt B'TK: j o Co - ndation pu1; ent d by you in n �July 30 , 1967 Offlce ot the ayor City of tlan City H 11 tlanta , Georgi De r Mr • ose : Attach d re so e ref ences which I would pr ct te your h ring 1th ayor 1 en nd Chi f J nkin 1 support of our telephone conv Uon of t other day. �T.RAFFIC FATALITIES TO DATE //32. 7: 56 A . M. May 21..i, 1967 Merr ill Ave . and Oakland Dro C. F. 11 . Victim, pedestr ~an was struck by vehicle t raveling s outh on Oakland Dro June ?.> 1967 33,JLi,35 2: 55 P.M. Fa irburn Rd. and Sewe ll Rd. C. M. 17, J.l1, C. M. 18. C.M. Victims , passengers in vehicle Hhich l eft roadway and struck tree . Victims thrown from vehicle. IIJ6Ml 37 J: 55 P.H. N.E.Freeway and Rail Hoad Bdge. W.M.16, W. F. 15. Victims, dr iver and passe nge r of vehicle which crossed fr om one side of road to other , the n str uck bi·idge abutment. 1138 z !/L o. 11: 07 P.M. 899 ~ . Rock Spr i ngs Road. W. M .J O. W. F. 81. Victim, driv er of vehicle #1 which str uck vehicle #2, hea d on o Vi cti m, passenre r i n vehicle #2 D.O.A . //39 June 2:;;, 1967 2 : 58P. M. 2176 Bankhea d Hvry . W. F. 72. Victim, dr iver of vehicle , cr ossed ce nter line and struc k vehicle #2 hea d on o II l, J.. 11 : OOP •~-1. June 20, 1967 1145 Pea cht r ee St . N.E. W. M. 5J. Victim, pedes t ria n, Peachtree St . Has struck b y vehicl e t rave ling north on �r //L2. 7 :J0 A. H. July 7, 1967 500 Ponce de Leon Ave. W. F. 66. Victim, pede str ian, walking on sidewa lk wa s struck by vehicle whick l ef t r oadway. //LJ. 5 :30 P .M. July 9, 1967 3200 block Collier Dr ~~ N.W., C. M.6. Victim, passe ne;e r in ve hi cle trave l ing by vehicle tr ave ling east on Colli er Dro i1es L which wa s struck LL. 12:15P.H. 1532 McPherson Ave .,S.E. W.F. # . Vict im, pedestri an, wh o ran in fron t of vehic l e tra ve ling eas t on McPherson Ave . IIL5. 6 : J OA . H. J uly 19, 1967 76 Whitel1 al l St. S.W. W.M.??? Victim, pcde strai n who fe ll from cu rb in to s ide of Bus whi ch was passing . �SIDNEY T. SCHELL ATTORNEY 1726 FULTON AT LAW NATIONAL BANK BUILDING ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303 523-6001 July 14, 1967 Honorable Ivan Allen Mayor, City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Mayor: I enclose herewith a copy of a letter that I have written on behalf of the Executive Board of the Joel Chandler Harris Memorial Association to Eliza K. Paschall. One of the salient reasons for the enclosed reply to the letter of Mrs. Paschall has been the receipt of threats by several members of the staff at the Wren's Nest that it would be stoned or burned unless its visitation policies were changed. I think it rather disgraceful that these dedicated ladies, who are attempting to maintain a memorial to one of the South's outstanding literary figures, should be subjected to such threats and abuse. Acts and conduct of this kind and character do more to promote friction between the races in Southwest Atlanta than can be counteracted by various organizations that are attempting to peacefully integrate the area. On behalf of these good ladies, I call on you, as Mayor of the City of Atlanta, for such police protection as may be necessary to maintain the dignity of their person and property. I am taking the liberty of sending a copy of this letter to Honorable Herbert Jenkins, Chief of Police. Kindest personal regards. Very truly yo? STS : ebV cc: Hon. Herbert Jenkins ~~ . Sidney T. Schell ,J~ �SIDNEY T. SCHELL ATTORNEY AT LAW 1726 FULTON NATIONAL BANK BU I LDING ATLAN TA, GEORGIA 30303 52 3- 6 001 Jul 14, 1 7 {rs . El a K. P SC 11 ecutiv Director CotDnlmity tious .u..t.L.0~1011 1203 Ci y l Atl nt, G or 30303 tter of June 28, 1967, C n 1 r Harri . W. , Atlanta, , lead that om110sed o ter ·• •• l l . I.ala ; r t nt of 1050 Gordo t for rt.al thtl rl••· �r/ · - -· ·----- - ., I I HARV ARD UNIV ERSITY Augu s t 1, 19 6 7 THE POLICE CHALLENGES AND CHANGES IN AT LANT A by H. T. J enkins I, II II Sinc e the beginning of modern day local gove rnment, as we know it, th e polic e powe r ha s be en the v e hicl e that e nforces the w i shes of local officials. The p olic e powe r i s a t w o ~e dge sword and when it is misuse d , it c ause s local governments to fail to furnish th e service th at it wa s d es i gne d t o furnish a ll o f its citi zens. I O riginally p olic e services we r e furnish ed b y volunteers and local citize ns und e r th e supe rvi s io n of a J u s tic e of th e P eace. This was known as th e "hue and cry 11 systerr1 th a t d epend e d u pon th e fr i ends and re l atives of t he v i ctims of crime, to apprehend and p rosecut e th e perp e trators. ' �- 2 "" In 1829 Sir Robert Peal e org anized the Metropolitan London Police D e p artment and l a id the foundation on what is based all metropolitan police systern.s of the free w orld today. ( This was the first tin.1. e that a local govermnent en1.ploye d a full tiine uniform polic e forc e and accepte d all of the responsibility to pre vent cri1ne and to arrest and prosecute all law violators. Thi s system provide d · for a division of uniform officers, or constab l es as th ey were call e d at that ti1ne, to patrol and to furnish a day watch and a night watch , also a plain cloth e s or detective division; The duti es and responsibilities of th e police has ch a n ge d very littl e sinc e th a t time and are d e signed t o maint a in th e p eace and good ord e r, to pr eve n t c rime , to prot e ct l ife and prop e rty, to . enfo r c e th e l aw and t o g u ar antee the £re e do1n of th e indi v idua l. �- 3 u The A1ne rican cop that you see working his b eat today 3 gets his nickname from the abbreviationof "Constable of Police ' 'c This system has be e n ch ange d and expande d continuously by adding specialized s e ction s , such as police training, traffic control, fing erpr i nting , crime l ab or ator ies, community relations , cri1ne comn,issions and n,any othe rs. The great est deterent to crime and the 1nost effective crime p revention program re1nains the Night Watch and the Day Watch by qualifie d unifor m police officers. The mos t important funct i o n of a police d epar tment to successfully 1ne e t chang ing condition s tod a y 3 are polic e r e cruihn e nt a nd police trainingc The odor e Roo s e v e lt r e c o g ni z e d thi s rn 1895 w h e n h e was Police Corrun i ss ion e r of N ew Yor k City a nd o rgani z e d the fi rs t polic e a c ade m y, o r the fi r s t p olic e t rai ning p rogram for a l ocal c it y poli ce d e part m e nt. \ �i - 4 - The police d e partn1ent that has b een mo s t succ e ssful in.me eting the challeng e of today, ar e those d e parhne nts that have the ~best tr a ining progran 1, and a r c best pr e pared to meet ( I changing conditions from. day to dayo The Atlanta Polic e Departme nt h a s not b ee n up to full authoriz e d strength for many years, for th e siinple reason that a young r:nan, who 1s qualifie d to m eet the high standards of the police d e p a rhne nt i s not willing to subj e ct him s e lf to th e dan ge rs and th e h azar d s of th e job, or subj e cting hi1-nse lf and hi s family constantly to i nv es tig a tion s, ridicul e and critici sm. H e c an ear n a b e tt e r liv i ng fo r h e and hi s f a1-nily a n d e njoy a b ett e r a n d mor e pl e a sant life by follo w ing some othe r v o c ation. ( To fill t h e s e v a c a n c i es an d t o p rovi d e th e n e cessary cov e r ag e a n d p a t ro l , th e Atl a nt a Poli c e D e p a rt me nt h as a dopt e d one - m a n p a tr o l ca r s • ~.. . I �- - - - --------- ---------- - ----------·- -·- -·-- - 5 - This is a highly controvers i a l subject and has brought great criticisrn to th e chie f of policeo This is a subject th at is quit e oft e n n1isunder stood and often e1notio.n ally i f I contro lled. I 1° I I When a polic e offic er is injured or killed in line of duty, it gets lots of publicity and there are those who sincerely beli e ve th e I II i I I incident would have been prevented by t wo ~man patrol I~ cars, but the facts do not support this belief 0 We adopt e d th e on e- m a n patrol cars for th e follo w ing reasons: lo The records , both loc a lly and nationally, w ill show that mor e polic e I o ffic e r s ar e kill e d in t w o - n1. a n p a trol cars than i n one - m an patrol car s . 2. A 1na j ority of the call s an swere d by th e polic e , d o not r e quir e any action by th e p o lic e , only r e qui re counc ili ng a n d g i ving o f adv ice. �----- ---~------- - - ------- -------- - - -- - -------- - - ----- -------- ·- - -- ·- - - - - 6 3. N When a police offic e r needs to call for assistance, he has twice the numb er of u n it s to call on, and h e can get n1.ore help quic ker th a n h e could otherwise. 4. It is good sound polic e 1na.nage1nent that requires an officer to do his f. o wn thinking, to use his iniative and imagination, and to d evelop a hi g h e r d egree of performance 5. 0 For the Atlanta Polic e D e parhnent to arbitrarily adopt the h v o-m an patrol, would cause the nUJnb e r of patrol unit s and th e police service to b e cut ·. 1 h a lf, or it v-rnuld require a ll police p e r sonne 1 to w ork seven d ays p er week, in stead of five days. To ove rcome t hes e and other handicaps, the city i s c on stantly striving t o inc r ea se pol ic e com p e n s a tion and fring e b e n e fit s , ( . which 1nak e p o lice s e rvic e s extr e m e ly e x p e n s ive fo r the t axp a y e r . �- 7 - This requires complete coope ration and understanding behveen the business c01n1nunity and the city officials. The needs and increased demands for additional city services has confronted I. i our city with a l a rg e financial proble1n 0 This is cornplicate d by the r e fusal of the state government to allow the city to broade n its t a x bas e . Th e main source of income for the city is from ad valore1n taxe s. It i s b e lieve d by mos t t a x exp e rts that r e a l est a t e a nd p e r s o n al propert y is alr e ady b e ing tax e d to its li1n it. A r ecent s u rve y by th e N a tion a l L e agu e of Cit i es p re dict e d that Ame r ic a n citie s w ill e x p e rie 1}ce a r e v e nue d e fici enc y of 262 billion doll a r s i n t h e n e x t t e n y ear s . C r i m e agai ns t p rope rty and c r i m e a g ain s t th e p e rs on continu e s to i ncr ease y ear by y e ar ~ w hi l e the p rot e c ti o n of l i fe and p r o pert y b e co1ne s m o r e complicate d a n d e x p e n s i v e . �·------- ··- ------------- -··--· - ·· ----·--- -- -~--- -I ·- - - - - - 8 - There is no corrunon cause for crime , the refore there is no con~mon cure, but a con1bination of 1nany things. The records will show that n~ost crim.e s are com1nitte d by repeaters, ( persons who hav e already been tried and convicted of a similar crime. They have escap e d or they are out on bond, or the y are on probation or parole. I had an opportunity r e c e ntly to t e sti fy befor e a Cbngr e ssional Committe e that was holdin g h earing s on "The Safe Str eet and Crime Control Act. The City of Atl ant a support e d this act 100%, but I we nt eve n furth e r 0 I look e d for w a rd to th e d a y w h e n the U. S. Ju s tic e D e partme nt and th e U. S. Cong r e s s w ill say to eve ry city polic e d e p ar t m e n t , r egardl e ss of i ts si z e - �I If your departnlent meets all the p r ofessional standards in police recruibne nt~ police pay, poli~e tr a ining, and polic e supervision, the F ederal Governnlent w ill contribute a p e rcentag e of your annual budget .. - it should b e about 50%. The . greatest obj e ctions to this is the fear of c entral or fed eral control. I was aske d reeently in Washington if I was adv ocating a national police forc e. Well, I am not a d vocating a national police forc e, but th e thought of it do es not fri ghten me any 1nore. I Th e Atlanta Polic e D e partment devot e s most of its tim e and effort in enfor cing state and fed e ral l a w s, rathe r than city ordina nc e s. I To enfor ce f e d e ral l aws , it i s n e c e s sary to a cc e pt a cert a i n a m ou nt of fed er al co nt r ol and to foll ow f e d er al pro ce du res. �( - 10 - We have no choic e in these rn.att e rs now , and personally. I have no obj e ction s o Th e time h a s come wh e n th e b es t e ffort s and r esourc e s of the fed e ral, state a nd loc a l go ve rnrn.e nt a r e required to m eet th e high cost of law enforc e ment and to che c k and r everse th e tr e nd of i n crea s ing crime that we have b ee n exp er i e ncing 111 r e c e nt y ea r s . W e r e ad and h ear a l o t of c ritic i s rn dir e c t e d t o th e courts, esp e ci a lly to the U. S . Sup r e rn.e Cour t. I am not o n e of tho s e w ho join in this critici sm.• P e r son a lly I h a v e no criticism of th e c our t s o r any of th e ir d ec i s i ons , . ( I fo r t h e s i m pl e rea so n th a t t he ob j e c tive s and t h e ultimat e go a l s of the c ourt s, and th e p o lic e , a re id e n tical -- which i s - �-. 11 - To rn.aintain the peace and good .order _ .., To preve nt crime - - To protect life a nd prope rty -(_ To enforc e the l aw-- And, to guarante e the fr e edom. of th e individual. Thi s w e c a n a ll agre e on. The n, the only dis ag r ee 1ne nt b e t wee n th e c ourts and the polic e are - - h ow w e ac h i eve these go a l s. Wh e n th e c ourt s and the polic e di sagree , t his i s a n indicati on to m e , t hat the polic e ar e i n e rror and m u s t change the ir actions ac cor d i n g ly. ( I t i s not, however , p o ss ibl e t o fur n i sh 100 % se c u rity and 10 0 % fr ee d om t o a ll c iti zens of t hi s n a tio n a t th e same time . Judge Thurgood M ar shall r ecently r e pli ed to a 1 questi on fro1n S e nat or J oh n 'McC l e llan t hat t h e c r i n 1e rate i n t his nation was cr i tical , �( - 12 - but it 1nust b e fought within the fr a m ework of the Constitution, and it 1nust not b e reduc e d at the exp ense of the freedo1n of the individual 0 It app ears to 1ne that the courts in s01ne ca ses might have given fre edo1n of the i n dividual regardless of hi s conduct, top p ri o r ity over all oth er rights and considerations. I would r es pectfully sugg e st th at we might t ake another l ook at this proposition. The cas e s that are most frequently di scusse d are - The Mallory case The Escobedo cas e The Mapp case and, th e Mir a nda case. There h ave b een many documents and articles wr itte n on these cas es '-- - - - - - - - c ~- - and a gre at many s p ee c h es made , both pro and con, but fri e fly this is w h a t h appene d i n these cases. �l r I - 13 - MALLORY VERSUS UNITED STATES Mallory w as arrested in Washington, D. C. on April 7, 1954. He was detained i n Washington jail and charg e d w ith rape 0 Afte r consid e rabl e ques tioning , h e adrnitted the charg e. H e was l ate r tried and convicte do In 1957, the U. S. Supreme Court r eversed the conv iction and state d that 11 11 A suspect must be taken b e fore a Magistrate w ithout An y unn e ces sary d e lay w ill i nvalidate a confession obtained from the accu se d p er son p r ior to his appE;a r ance b e for e a Magistrate. 11 ESCOBEDO VERSUS ILLINOIS Escob e do was arreste d in Chic ago, Illinois, on J anuary 19, 1960, and wa s charged with rnurder . �. ~ 14 - He asked for an attorney and his attorney asked to see him. Both were denied 0 I I I ~ Later h e co11£e ss e d and was trie d and convicte d. In 1964, the U. S. Supr eme Court r eversed the conviction and state d 11 A p e rson has a right to an attorney and the right to rema in silent. 11 MAPP VERSUS OHIO Mr s . :tvfapp was arres t e d in Cleveland, Ohio, on M a y 23, 1957, after officers forc e d th e i r way into h er home without a _. warrant, and found obscene mater ial. The officers d enied h er attorne y entry during the search, nor would they p e rmit Mrs. Mapp to see him. She was l ater tried and c onvicted. �1 - 15 - I n 1961, the U. S. Supr eme Court rever se d th e conviction and stated that evidence c anno t b e used u 1 any court if collecte d in a search a nd se i zure that is unr eas onable or ill egaL MIRANDA VERSUS ARIZONA Miranda was arrested i n Phoeni x , Arizona, on March 3, 1963. He wa s d e tain e d in th e Phoeni x j a il and charge d w ith k idnappin g and rap e . After co ns id erab l e qu e stioning , h e ad1nitte d the ch arge. H e was t r i e d and convicted. In 19 66, the U. S. Suprern.e Cou rt r eversed the conviction on th e gr ou nds that h e was not advis e d of his right to counse l, and the right to remain silent. I c anno t agree that th ese cases have l egally hand icapp ed th e polic e i n any way . But, I b e l ie ve we can agr ee th a t t he ch ange s that th e se ca ses required · in police pro ce dur e ha s mad e polic e w ork more comp li cat ed and much mor e exp e nsive, b e c ause they put s evere r es t rictions on cust odial in te r rogation. �- 16 - To cornpletely inv e sti gat e a cas e and d etermine all of the facts prior to th e arrest of the su s p e ct, requires n1ore investigators and a gr eat d eal 1nore ti1ne and effort, but this is legal and n e c essary to protect the rights of the individua l, and in th e s e ca ses the p er p e tr ator is the individual. Th e ques tion th at dis t urb s 1ne , and ha s not been answered up to this point, is, 11 w h at a bout the rights of the v icti1n? 11 They a l so a r e entitle d to protection u nd e r the l aw. It i s very ea s y t o forget a victi1n aft e r the first 11 spl ash 11 of publicity, an d after the p e rp e trator h a s been i dentified and t aken i nto cu stody. All of these ar e routin e police pr obl e ms that address the1nselves to good police n1 an a ge1ne nt. �/ - 17 - The greatest challenge that has fac e d a c i ty or a police dep a rtment esp eci ally in th e S outh, h as b een th e socia l and r a cial .. r evolution th at we h ave expe rienc e d in the l ast t wenty y ears • •••• where custo1n and t radition versus the l aw, and i n most c as es w her e the fed e ral law and the state l aw were 1n conflict or contradicte d each othe r. For many y ears th e American Negro was segregate d and di s criminated agains t b e c a u se of th e color o f h is skin, and kept i n a po s i _tion of second a ry c itize ns hip . S eg r egation was neve r d es i g n e d t o s e p a r a t e the rac es , but to k ee p the N egr o in his infe r i or pl ac e . It was wr itte n i n t h e l aw , and it w as th e l aw. During th ese y ears th e p r i ncip l e fu nc tio n of t he police was t o k ee p the N egro i n h is pl ace. �- - - --- -- - - - --- - - - - · · - --- - - 18 - Th e Presid ent of the Unite d St a t es, the Mayor of the City of Atl anta, Ralph McGill, Editor of the Atlanta Constitution, and many oth e rs saicl this was w rong and 1nust be chan ged. Th e U. S. Sup rerr1e Court h e ld in m a ny ca ses that this \vas uncon stitutional and th e Am e rican N e gro was entitle d to all the rights and privile ges th a t goes with first cl ass citizenship. In 19 4 5 th e court s gave the N eg ro es the b a llo t. Thi s was th e first ti1ne that th e Arner ican N e gro could a ctua lly p articip ate in th e 1nanage1n e nt of his government . I n 1954 th e cou rts h e ld s eg r egat e d schools t o b e unl awful and u nc o nstituti onal. P erhap s these t wo d e c isi ons effecte d more p e op l e, brou g ht ibout a greater ch ange i n attitude , habits , customs and action, than any other d e c i s i ons. ' I I f B e t wee n th e y ears of 19 5 8 a nd 19 63 the City of Atl ant a rece i ve d c our t I · ord e rs t o d esegre gate _ .,, �19 ~ bus es golf courses scho o ls air t e r n1.i na ls s w i1nn1.ing p o ol s and o t h er public f a ciliti e s Th e Ciiy of Atl ant a n e ver h e s itat e d or d iscontinued a ny p ubli c f ac ility in an effort to avoid t h ese c h a nges. Fo rmer Mayor Willi a1n B. Hartsfie ld a nd Mayor I v an A ll en, J r. p rovi ded superior l eadershi p w i th fin e cooper a t i on and assi stance fro 1n both th e w hit e com1nunity l eaders and the Negro co1n1nunity l eaders. All of th ese changes were accomp li shed w i th a mini mum of di sturbances. The Ciiy of Atlanta began e1np l oying Negro p olice i n 1948 and today 14% of our tot a l personi1e l i s N egro. �\ .. 20 = During th e des eg r e g a tion of public faciliti e s~ public officials were und e r great pr e s s ure to d ese greg 2.tc p r i vate prope rty and private facilities, o ve r which the y had no control. On e of th e n,o s t e ffe ctive civ il rig hts or gani zations i n th e s e activitie s was the Stud e nt Non=vio l ent Coordinating Connnittee know n as S N CC. O r i gin a lly SNCC w a s co1nposed of r es p ect a ble and d ecen t l aw abiding stud e n t s fr o1n the u n i versiti es , tha t was committe d to and pr ac tice d non~ vi o l ence . W e enj oye d f i ne con,n,unications and coop erat i on fro1n t hem. The y we r e just agai nst se gr egati on, othe r wise the y were go od l aw ab iding citizens . By 1964 SNCC had fall en int o the h and s of i rresponsib l e l eaders , and t heir fo llowers includ e d crimin a l s of a ll k i nd. �-- - - ----- - - - - - .• 21 -~ Aft e r our experience w ith SNCC i s and around son1.e Atlanta restaurants I I I I I in 196 4, I 1nade the st a ten1.ent: that SNCC had b e con1.e a Non-student Violent C01nrni1..-te e and time has proven i! i I th a t s t atement to b e true. ! I Th e U. S. Congr ess h a d been extre1ne ly slow in accepting changes and in h e lping th e col.uts and th e cities ,v ith th e ir probl en1s . But the U. S . Con gress gave the Civil Rights Move1nent its greate st I as s ist ance I- 111 adopting the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and 1965. Th ese Acts in my opinion, s a ti sfy a ll th e l egiti1nate complaints of th e Civil Rights Moveme nt in th e fie ld of publfo accomod a t ions and voting rights. Th ere w e r e 1na11y oth e r things th at n e e d e d att e ntion, li ke ern.ployme nt, housin g , r e c re ation and l a w enforc e ment. And, again th e City of A tl a nt a n eve r h e sitate d. \ �- --··- -- - --- ·------- - ----- ·-----··--·--- - -··--- - - ---· --- ~ - - - - - --- ---· 22 - They 1noved r ight into these activities w ith all the vigor and resourc es avail a b l eo I n 1965 Mayor I van A lle n, Jro a ppointe d th e Atlanta C o1n1ni ssion on C r irn e and Juve nile Delinqu e ncy. U. So Judg e Griffin B e ll was appointed Chairrnan~ a l ong w ith 26 othe r very distingui shed and able citize ns. Jud ge Bell appoint ed a ve ry ab l e attorney,· Fr an cis Shack l ef ord, a ,l. general counse l, and eig ht other young attorn e ys, to act as staff for th e Con1.m.ission. Judge Be ll th e n di v ided th e C om1nission into six sub-~co1nmittees - Juveni l e D e l inque'.ncy Rehab ilit ati on Crirne and H e a lth C r i m e and Pove rty Law and Ord er Org anized C r imea �--------- --- T he co1T11-r1ittee 1ne n1.b e r s were s e l e ct e d and a p pointe d on the b asis of t h e ir inte r est and a bilit i e s i n the i r spe cia li ze d field. Th e C on.1.miss i.on 1nad e an i n - d epth study of a ll the c aus e s and c ur e s of c r i n.1.e rn Atl anta. Jud ge B e ll h e l d w eek l y n 1.eetings w i t h the Corn.1n i ss i o n and pr e p a r e d the i r r e p ort u nder the Titl e o f 11 0 p p ortunity for U rb an E xce llence 11 • An1.ong oth e r things t h e C on1.1ni ssion fou nd tha t c rin1.e and pove rty were t w i ns that c ould not b e s e p a rate
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 30, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 8, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 8, Complete Folder
  • Text: Department of Planning MEMO FROM: _ _----'~=---:-~-----'----'=--=-:=--·· _ TO: _ _ _ _ _ DA TE: _,G"""'t-~=~=-- -- --- -- ~ ~ For your information O Please make necessary reply D Ad v ise status of the attached FORM 30- 13 _ TIME : _ _a_cJ,__·-~ _ _ _ __ �ATLANTA,GEORGIA ROUTE SLIP FROM: Dan E. Sweat, ~ your Jr. information 0 Please refer to the attached correspondence and -make the necessary reply. D Advise me the status of the attached. FOR M 25-4-S �FROM: Dan E. Sweat, Jr. [B"'For your information D Please refer to the attached correspondence and -make the necessary reply . D Advise me the status of the attached. F ORM 25·4-S �I Box 2 62 - Barksdale ATLANTA UNIVERSITY \ \ ' . ~ ~ - ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30314 . ~~L '·jj -_. ', -·--=-·_!__·~ , ~ -.- ·., '-- ;,: -~ ' '-......___/ - I / ·"""" >e:K -j ., , . "~ , ! · \ :_ :\: i . :._ ..._!_d Jil_  _ \ : ' _ - -- ,.1; rFJJ)l r\ Slll~Nj9" ..... E-< E-- • 1 I ~ v, c::, "' !:: z , The Honorable Ivan AllenP Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Ai.tlanta, Georgia 30303 I �-- ~- . --· · : iflJ r-:- ·-I Ul 0 0 A , ~ I j .. -ll,/ ' -"\ �I e eri AssociatWnef rms f9! .Afurseries ATLANTA, GEORGIA 1e2ort-196s - 1966 �lI ! 13oard of'7Jirectors L. SPRING, JR. President MRS. HARRY MRS. H UGH NUNNALLY, JR. President-E lect M RS. JAMES H . CRAWFORD MRS. THOS. C. SHELTON 1st Vice-President 2nd Vice-President MR. GEORGE E . SMITH MRS. JOHN L. TUROFF Treasurer Recording S ecretary MRS. JOHN R . MADDOX MRS. GRIGGS SHAEFER Corres. Secretary Dues Treasurer MRS. HAROLD McKENZIE, JR. MRS. HAROLD J. HERTENSTEIN O.S. Nursery Chmn. D .A . Nursery Chmn. MRS. W. S. OBENSHAIN, JR. Historian MR. E . C . BARR MR. FRANK L. BLOCK MR. HARVEY BOOTH MRS. ELYEA D . CARSWELL, JR. MR. ELYEA D . CARSWELL, JR. MR. ALVIN B. CATES, JR. MRS. L. NEIL CONRAD, JR. MRS. IRA FERGUSON, JR. MR. MR. Jos. E. J. MRS. J AMES S. D UDLEY, JR. MR. THOS. T. FLAGLER, JR. FORIO DR. DIXON FOWLER w. HAMILTON, JR. DR. ELLEN KISER DR. WM. H . KISER MRS. WM. C. LEA MRS. CHAS. M . McCULLOUGH MR. FRANK MAIER MRS. JOHN O'NEILL, JR. MRS. ROBERT SHELLEY MR. WILLIAM SIMS MRS. T. WELLER SMITH, JR. MR. HAL TRIMBLE MR. ROBERT WIGGINS MR. H. DILLON WINSHIP, JR. �1965 Operating- Ixpendimres -1, 10, 26G.1G Sheltering Arms provides facilities for protective care, guidance and training during the day for children-primarily of working mothers of low income. These may be extended following investigation to those having special needs. Sheltering Arms is open Mondays through Fridays 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Nursery provides care for boys 2½ to 10 years of age and for girls 2 ½ to 12 years of age. The fee for day care at Sheltering Arms is based on individual family income. Each family pays according to a fee attainable within financial limits. Most choose to be as self-sustaining as possible. The Social Worker assists the family in determining whether we are the appropriate agency to meet their child care needs and in setting a realistic fee for service. �Sheltering Arms operates year round with a staff of director, social worker, educational consultant, two center supervisors, sixteen teachers and assistants, a secretary-bookkeeper, two part-time pediatricians and five maintenance personnel. D uring the summer supply teachers are added to st aff. M ISS MARGARET L . COLBERT . . . . . . . . . . Executive MRS. LOIS HANCOCK .. . ... ...... . Educati onal Consultant MRS. WILLIE MORROW .. . . . . ....... .. .... Social MRS. RITA M . TUCKER .. .. . . .. Su pervisor, MRS. LYLITH JOHNSON . . . . . S u pervisor, MRS. EVELYN Director Worker Osgood Sanders Dorothy A rkwright s. GREEN . . .. . .... . . . Secretary-Bookkeeper �Presidents 1?..eporf- -19G5-1966 Dear Members: How could a year be so short and yet so full of problems and pleasures for Sheltering Arms Association . If it were not for t he interest and support of each of you my job would have been an ard uous one. This you recall was the year in which we faced an operating defici t . However, friends came to our assistance and we will be able to maintain our services of the highest quality because of t heir generosity. We have 6,500 hours of volunteer service from yout h groups, garden clubs, civic clubs and our own members. They provided an enriched program for our boys and girls throughout the year. The committees all did their jobs as assigned and I am indeed grateful to each chairman for the work which you did to keep t he agency operating at top efficiency. It would seem appropriate to mention a few highlights even though each committee could not be included in my brief report. The Personnel Committee had a particularly busy year in assisting the Executive Director in replacing eight key positions. In each case we felt that we secured very well qualified persons to fill the vacancies. The salary scales have been improved each time t he budget has been presented to the Chest. �The Building and Grounds Committee has spent time, talent and funds on repairs and redecoration of Osgood Sanders Center and Play Equipment needs were met at Dorothy Arkwright Center. The Wayside Garden Club, Magnolia Garden Club and the Atlanta Junior League have made substantial contributions for capital expenditures. Social Work Advisory Committee assisted our new Social Worker in orientation to the agency. They set up procedures for an annual review of each client to set fees for service. We are most careful to adhere to health and sanitation regulat ions and to serve adequate, well balanced meals which our Nutrition Committee r.ecommends. Our clinics are operated by qualified Pediatricians and the Medical Committee carries out their suggestions. The Finance Committee built and structured the operating budget for providing service to the 350 different children in our care last year . This was done at a cost of $2.40 per day per child. We are justly proud of our economical operation of our two facilities. The United Appeal is our chief source of income and we are indeed grateful for their understanding and support of our high quality of day care services in t he community. To serve as your President has been a source of great pleasure to me and I do wish t o thank everyone who has made my year a happy experience. I particularly enjoyed the privilege of working with our fine Executive Director, Miss Margaret Colbert. Sheltering Arms had a richer program because of the active interest of our Board of Directors and the splendid service of our entire staff. Sincerely, Mrs. Harry L. Spring, Jr., President �Paa- Presidcn,ts Shdter~Arms Associat~ Mrs. A. B. Patterson . . 1888-1 908 Mrs. Preston S. Arkwright, Sr . . . 189C-1 900-1 916 Mrs. T homas Martin . . . 1895-1 896 Mrs. George Howard . . 1905 Mrs. P orter King ... . . ..... 1906 Mrs. Robert Alst on . . . . . .. 1907 Mrs. William Kiser .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1909-1 915 Mrs. W. S. Elkin . . .. . 1910-1911-1 914 Mrs. Gilbert T. Fraser .... . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1912-1 913 Mrs. Bolling H . J ones . . . . 1917 Mrs. E . E . Dallis . . . . . . . . .. . .. 1918 Mrs. James E . Dickey ... .. ....... . .. ... .. ...... . ... ... . ... 1919 Mrs. W. D . Ellis, Jr. . ....... ............. . 1920 Mrs. Prince Webster. . . . . . .. 192 1 Mrs. H . Frank West . . . . .. . .... 1922 . ........ . ...... 1923-1 924 Mrs. Mari on Harper . . . .... 1925 Mrs. Preston Arkwright, Sr . . . .... . .. . .. 1926 Mrs. J oel Hurt, Jr . . . . 1927 Mrs. Glen ville Giddings .. . . 1928 Mrs. Prince Webst er . . . . . 1929 M rs. Victor Smith . . . . M rs. Campbell Krenson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1930 Mrs. Edgar N eely, Sr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 193 1-1932 Mrs. Cam D orsey ._. ..... ..... . .. . . . ... . 1933 Mrs. Philip Alst on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1934 Mrs. William Akers. ...... .. . ...... . ... 1934-1936 M rs. E dward Hi t t . . ... . 1937 Mrs. Griggs Shaefer . . . . .. . . . .. ....... 1938-1939 Mrs. I rwi n Stolz . . . . . .. 1940-194 1 Mrs. Ra lph Paris. . .... . . .. . . . . . .... .. . ... .. . .. ... 1941-1 942 Mrs. R ussell W. Michael . . .... 1943 Mrs. Don Cathcart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ . 1944-1946 Mrs. Wm . G. Grant . . . . . .......... . 1946-1 947 Mrs. Jasper Highsmith... . .. ..... . .. . .. . . 1947-1949 Mrs. Claude Griffi n ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1949-1951 Mrs. Geo. Fred Olsen .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1951-1953 Mrs. Asa W. Candler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1953-1 954 Mrs. Lewis H awkins . .. .. .... ......... .. . . 1954-1 956 M rs. Geo. Fred Olsen .. ... ...... ... . ... . . . . .. . . . . . . ... 1956-1 957 Mrs. Wm. C. Lea. . . . . ... . . .. . .. . . . ........ 1957-1 958 Mrs. Earl Metzger. . . ....... ... . . ...... 1958-1 959 Mrs. E . S. Candler .. . ... . . ... . .. ... . .. . . .. . . . . . . .. ... 1959-1960 Mrs. Paul Burt. . . .... ...... . . . ..... . .. . 1960-1961 Mrs. Samuel W. Hart, Sr.. . . . .... ... ............ . ... 1961-1963 Mrs. Frank Gaither . . . . . ... . . . ... .... . .. . ....... 1963-1964 M rs. E lyea Carswell, Jr.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1964-1965 Deceased �.. Licensea, by the StatlDepartmenb qf F""mily ~ ChvUrens Services f,, Ji ser-vice efyo1,1,r United, :Appeal, . (The publication of this report is a contribution of friends) �ATLANTA, GEORGIA P HON E JA . 2•4463 R . Earl Lander s 7i~ 2,;f/~' o/ M tt ~..., ......., , .. /.I ~,{,,.., ~ /-c,,,c_ /1'/H"- / p 7%.,,,_ / , .I&- /; £_/e d' /;, ~;,-/~/~ c:-7 ,/,- ~~e' /%e- i1J, C?P/4 fo~/4//21/,..,,e f,, ~ ~if ~ee./. , ,?e,z J1C- ,I{,~ ,i e;_,,#, /f ,L , ft >// e r °&>;L c:;h_L 7 ~ 17 , - ~ ~ e.-,h; '// 11/'7 ~ ,/h/. e1 4# ~ I W / c.-/ · /JJ1 /, ~,~,,~ ... ~ ~ clt:5!- /4 -K- ,,_, / k ~ s, '1//1,,..s , e- �Department of Planning MEMO FROM: __E_r_i_c_H_a_r_k_n_e_s_s_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ DATE: __2_-_2_2_-6_7_ __ TO: Mr. Earl Landers ~ For your information D Please make necessary reply D Advise status of the attached TIME: _ _ _ _ _ _ __ Attached is a copy of a letter which was sent in answer to each of the enclosed letters. �' December 26 , 1967 Mr . Alex W . Smith , Pre!; dent c~ntral Atlanta Pro gress , nc . 2 Peachtree 5treet, N . W., Suite 27 40 Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Alex: V/e have rev i£wed the report "Stvdy 0csi~n for tho Central Atlanta Planning Process" whic was prepared by Alon M . Voorhe es & As:;ociotes, Inc . for Central Atlanta Progress, Inc . and the City Planning Department . Our foeling is t1ot the approach sugges d by ' is report is much too exi'c nsive for th is sf'og~ of the gc:-ne a d has one g laring weak , ess in tha t it proposes o form out a rea t por ion of the re:;eorch to private c on:u ltiny firms . Our exper ience has been that it is ..uch more so isfactory to op2roach th is type of proje ct slowly, uti lizing the rc~urccs of those who ore the most v itally c oncerned . We propose tha~ the tech nical work b D htrict . We think thot the mambers of this committee, as well as tile staff members , should hove a dGfinite and clear-cut k!Ga of just what is to be accomplished by such p s~uc!y . We think it is at this point that we con decide how much outside technical support will be necessary to enable us - �2. Dc cc ,nbcr 26 , 19l7 to occo.-np i::;: r' e o b jcc ·ives w '1 ic h ' .ave bee n set-, ho ,ever, I 1c..ve oreo t confi de ce in sta) o·f th e City Pla nni •D De? 'l"ii e nt, a :; wc il as C AP, e nd fee l that a n: ·ori ·y of i'h\; . tac hnicc l work con a nd wo uld best be don~ by these t-. 10 sro ps . I hope thcr this oltern tivc p oooso l vvill meet wi ·h your a pproval o nd owoit you r ·c ci sion in f is r;;igcrcl . $ ·nee e ly , yours , Jr . lAJr/· cc •• Mr . Joe Tarve r Mr . obert M . Wo od �cember 26 ., 1967 Mr . Howard B. Connell , President Continental Investment Corperation 426 Decatur Feder 1 Building Decatur, GeQrgia RE: Contract for th of 7 . 6 Acres on tJieuoa Road Robert L. Wright - Purch a r Contin ·ntal Inv stment Corpor tion - S ller ar Howard: c mb · r 21, 1967 to are to unfo tun t pplicaUon on te of th r -zonin be an rty , Pl se advi _d th t th zoning application w s rson -11y deli\t red to, by my s or t r y Mr. • Pruitt, nd cc pt d by Mr. Thom Shuttl worth and Mt . Jo h McC nnon at ppro~i t ly 3:30 P.M. on Friday, c b r 15, 1967, In order ti£ Ction of veryone to -e t Ple sa ratandtng to th mutu augg ation for rli t conv n nc. d\Ji e . ..,.-,· TMH:jp CI Mr. C. ~ ef1 ld Mr. cott Candl r 1 r. Ho rabl• My r f the Ctty f At1 nta t~ ar f Alde n f the City An f Atl nt 1 �CITY OF, .ATLANT.A CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Cod e 404 DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING COL LI ER B. GLAD I N, Dir ec tor December 20, 1967 Mr . Rodney Cook 34 10th Street, N . E. Atlanta, Georgia 30309 Dear Rodney: This letter is in response to one sent by Senator Dan McIntyre to Mayor Allen about the traffic: problem in Buckhead . His major concern is the proposed implementation of the Buckhead loop by Fulton County. As you may remember the Buckh ad loop was conceived by this department and totally rejected by Buckheod . However, In passing the 163 Bond Issue, th people in Buckh ad convinced the County to include some prefects that, in ff ct, do begin creation of portions of the loop at a low r level of rvice, i.e., collectors rather than limited ace $S freeways, As th present time Bill McGeorge. of Fulton County Public Works is actively pushing for completion of the loop up to a point (Se I on Figure I) . He ha be n working with us on it and has a ked for our support which we are now pr par d to giv with som r servations and conditions. One r s rvotion is that the propos d north t rminus ot Wieuca Road will probably create more problems that it will solve. The loop shou Id be brought back into ochtr e Road or at I t to P achtr e Dunwoody (Se 2 on Figure 2) . The cond r aervation cone rns proposed widths which vary from two to thr e to four Ian s. Th rood should be a coll ctor with a uniform four Ian s · from beginning to nd. Th bridging of f-()56 north (North Fulton Expr ssway) should reflect this width. Last, but not least, our support is condltlonol on a full und rstanding of our complete position. This loop may h Ip Buckh ad•s interval circulatlon problem but that is about all. It is not soluti n to the Peachtr Road corrldot traffic pr I m which begins fn D Kalb County and ends south of ookwood St tion. (Se attach d r on Buckhead traffic probl m nd Figure 2, e clally No. 2). I y this to �Mr . Rodney Cook 2. December 20, 1967 attempt to establish priorities . The overall benefit to the total community is Iimited . Since capital improvement funds are in very short supply, they should be spent on pr iorities which are more urgent in nature and w ii I resu It in greater overall benefit . I am su re that you are aware the City is actively participating in and receiving data from the Atlanta Area Transportation Study . Up to now, this has been conducted\ \ mostly by technicians with little involvement by pol icy makers . Recently, a polrcy committee was formed of which the Mayor i a member . I sent you a short paper on this'for your consideration . The nature ~f the Buckhead problem, in fac t many of the traffic problems throughout the City, such as Campbellton Road , and the patchwork manner in which they a re being handled leads me to soy that some more log ical, comprehensive approach must be adopted by pol icy makers for considerfog our transportation problems. \I ,\ ,, . ,\' Sincerely, \ Collier B. Gladin Planning Di rector CBG/ip Enclosures �DAN I, MACINTYRE Ill MEMBER F"ORTiETH ..D I !trRICT 11 P.£ACHTREE ST,, N,E, A,'{_ANTA, C3EORDA 3D309 i.:z COMMITTEES: APPROPRIATIO N S COUNTY & MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT EDUCATIONAL MATTERS INDUSTRY & LABOR RETIREMENT COMMITTEE IDlre g,tatr ~ruatr ~ttratt (l!quiuhtr Atlttuttt November 22, 1967 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor, City of Atlanta, City Hall, Atlanta, Georgia Dear Ivan: There is concern in the Buckhead area about the growing traffic problem on Peachtree . Several people have inquired about the proposed Buckhead Loop which would relieve the traffic on Peachtree north of the Roswell Road-Peachtree intersection. This loop was i ntended to connect the Lenox Square area with the Buckhead area without crowding the Peachtree road itself. With the new Phipps Center on the old Alexander property, the problem will be impossible unless something i s done. It is my understanding that the County has reconnnended a plan, but when your Planning Department was consulted no one could tell me of any definite progress in this area. I talked to Rodney Cook this morning and he was very opposed to the County plan, but in order to relieve the condition the city will have to come up with some counter plan. This problem is tooaccute t o remain unresolved. I have tried to talk to Collier Glad~en several times but have been unable to contact him, but it does appear to me that the City Planning Department should immediately tackle this problem and come up with a constructive workabl~ solution to the traffic problem in the Buckhead area. If I can do anything to help, please let me know. Sincerely, ~~ DaHf MacIntyre, III., Senator, 40th Distr i ct. DIM:ms V ~ , t.7~ ,/'>" ~ · (7() rr~ I (_,.,..,/'. (""G.~7 lr 9 ,___.l / ( /2< ,..,_,"'(;:;!' ~ /7?'---,,..- P'----z. >" ~ /I ,,,._,,,,,.--"(( . c--.~ .... ' ,.. , " �December 12, 1967 MEMORANDUM Collier Gladin nd Karl Bevin TO FROM Ivan All n , Jr. The attached corr pondence from Se tor D n M clntyr r g rclina the rowing tr ffic probl m in ckh ad i Uexpl natory. I would like for the two of you to get to ether with Se M clntyre nd pur1u tht matter immedi t ly. IAJr :am Attachments tor �December 12, 1967 Honorable Dan I. clntyre, Ill The S te Senate lll2 Peachtree Street, N. E . Atlanta, Georgia 30309 Dear Dan: gree with you completely regardin the t-raffic problem in the a.ck.head r • I rowin masking Collier Ciladin, the City Planner, and rl Bevin , th Traffic Engineer, to get to ether with you immediately d aee t can be done. I If 1 may furnish you any additio.nal iniormatio pl ae dviee. Sincedtly, I IA.Jr: cc: C 111 r Gladi rl Beri nAll 111 Jr. 1 �December 6. 1967 Mr . Marble J . Hensley. Sr . Hensley-Schmidt. Inc. 222 Chattanooga Bank Bnilding C ttanooga, Tennessee 27402 De r Mr. Hensley: Thank you very much for your letter of December 5th telling me of your firm 's experience in pr paring nnexation tudie • May I a sure you that we will keep this inform tioD. in mind hen our plans develop. Sincerely your , lv n Allen, Jr. Mayor lAJr/br CC: Collier Gladi n �CITY OF ATLANTA OFF ICE OF COM PT ROLL ER CITY HALL Atlanta, Georgia 30303 CHARLES L. DAVIS COMPTROLLER EDGAR A. VAUGHN, JR. DEPUTY COMPTROLLER .,.p Mr. Colllk Gl Ju,-,uni r. C City of tluta tlant , or i ar Colli r: l cloaf.u id1 I , I . , aanitary amt •to of cornapond nee I • • reeei - d f _ Black, CT for a f deral d natratiOtl a~ t cm,ar:tna u.n,ax• •• the federal Water 11 ~ti · Bluk1 Ct: tO • 6 Ii. . . .•• l - . n.t11:a.Y....lllllt'. f �lfr. Colli r G1*lin Page 2 r 1, 1967 that it ould • woncle1:ful v tut'• for: th · Cit y to Ullden tht.a . ~ogr , partieul•rly tn rev1 in th b• ite tb t would accur to th UIIIIRVll~tratic,sa Citiee u a. t you .i t like to bn thil info tio pric,r to f iuU.af.l\g your a r·e•aenta with th re•••ch 1:0UP and with tbe orgia institute of T ,. uology. lt "' ld tao · h lpful if 1 cout· n • t · your c nt · to the al of thU progr ad how it ould r · lat to OIUltr ation Cttl. • ., an on a crltlc 1 t ~h*«hal; y Dec . r S, an ..l'lY decision Your• wry truly, tt/4~~,,..__ Charles L. c CLD:dhf 1 eun a. larl t.anel•r• V Mr . / tro11er vt et t•in tbi �,, ,, ,· ?1. ..- / , ... c PA'tNCtPA L 0Fr1cc: 100 / RCG IONAL sou111 cAST r11 I RD Trn. cr. c1\ I Nc::.v I LLC, o,-nc c ,;: ATLA NTA , G [ORGIA / OOCA RATON.FLO RI DA / ,~.-;...:_I' ru FL0rt1D A CL CAR WATC R ' FLOr<1DA NA P LES, FLORIDA /SA N JO SE,COSTA RICA CADLE ,\DDRi:SS'. BCEGNVFLA T'I//. O i0/75 1- :,~7 $ Nove::rnbc:r 2.9) l'-Jb? }.;1r. Robert H . Morriss Ass i s t a nt C h ief of Cons t ruction D epar tn1ent of Con struc tion C ity o f Atlanta 301 City Hall Atl ant a ) G e or gia 30303 Re: . Aerial Mapping Di stricts I) II) III) IV) V) VI) and VIII Dear Mr . Morriss : In a ccorda nce with our rece nt d i s cussions and as reque s .. ec , we he r eb y submit this proposal to provide aer i al photo g r ammetry se rvic es in accordanc e with our agreement dated Augu s t 7, 196 7. T he wo r,< set forth in this pro p o sal includes the referenced Dr ainage D ist ric ts within the city limits) an d is more specif ically outlined as follows : 1. H orizontal coordinate s will be established for at le2.s t one po i nt in each land lo t in the City . Coo rdinates to be established by computerized control. Elevated benchmarks w ill be established within eac h land l ot of the C ity . There will be app ro ximate ly two benc hmarks establi shed per lanci lot . Elevations will be established by the use of computer and field methods . 2. The Engineers shall furnish the C ity .ae rial photo graphic plan vi e w maps o f t he r efe r enc ed Dr ainage Districts, within the city limits to be studied , on reproducible cronaflex having a scale of one inch equals two he.ndre c. feet ( 1 1 1 m 200 1 ) . These maps shall b e co mplete w ith · identification) City of Atlanta title blocks, border, etc . T he h orizontal contr~l will be devel o ped from the work i n c luded under the previous paragraph o f this proposal. The maps will be complete wi th an index aerial cover sheet . �' . M r . Robe r t I-I. Morris s 3. Nov e: rnoe r 2 9 ) 1967 -2 - E 11g i11cers sha ll f ur 11i s l1 tl1 c City \ ;vi t 11 a e r i a l co nt o ur 1naps o f the refe r enced D r a in ag e D istricts w i t hin t h e: ci ty lim.it s t o b e stu d i ed ) o n rep ro ducible: crun <-1.f e::;.: ) havin g a sc a l e o f on e inc h equal s tw o h undred feet ( " = 20 0 ' ) . T he co nto u r s shall be d e v e l oped a t 2-foot i nterv als anci i n a ccor danc e with natio n a lly a cc epted sta nd a r cis f o r utili z<-1.t ion i n p l annin g and d r ainage w o rk . I n a ddition t o c o n tour s ) th e 1naps will s h o w r o adways , r ai lro ad s, lak es , riv ers , c r e e::ks , and othe r o utstandi ng feat u res . 1"'11e T he engi nee ring fe e for the abov e d escribe d se rvic es will be F i ve Hundr ed Ei ghty Thou sand Fiv e H u n dr ed Do ilars ($ 5 8 0,50 0) , p a y a ble a s out lin e d under our co nt r a ct dat ed A u gust 7 , i 96 7. · Th e flyi n g for t his t y pe w o rk m u st be a c c o mplished d u ring the wi n ter s ea s o n . V e r y trul y yours, }3 LACK , C R O W AND EIDSNE SS, 0 ~~,--· /------0 /; / ~~ F . A . Eidsne s s FA:::::: :r bs cc : Mr . C har l es D a vi s , Co mp:.. ll1.: r I -c . I /; lL .::--~ / 6 �I ... I ]3LACJ(, C1-:o,v &. E1DSNESS, INc . CONSULT I XG ]3 :i",;"GI NEJ::H.S PLEA:;£ R EP L Y PRIN CIPA L OFF/CC: 700 SOUTH CAST THI RD STRE ET, G Ai N ES VI LLE, FLO R IDA RCGIONAL OFFICCS: ATLANTA, GEORGIA / CLEARWATER, FLORIDA BOCA RATON,FLORIDA / NAPLES, FLORID A/SAN JOSE,COSTA RICA C AB L E ADDRESS : BCEGNVF LA ro · ATLAIITA,GE OR GIA 30309 17 20 PEACHT R EE ROAD , N. W. 404 / 8 73-21 5 1 TW X 8 10/75 1-3 575 November 28 , 1967 Mr . Ro be rt H . Morriss Ass i stant Chi e f of Con st ruc t ion D ep a rtm e nt o f Co nst r u c ti on C ity of Atl an ta 301 Ci ty H a ll Atlanta, G e orgia 30303 Re: Aerial Mapping South River & Intrenchment C reek D rainage Districts Master S t orm Drainage S tudy D ear Mr . Morriss : In accordance with our recent discussions and as request ed , we hereby submit this propos al to provide aerial photo g rammetry s e r v ic es in accordance with our agr eement dated August 7, 1967 . The w or k set forth in this proposal includes Sout h Riv e r and Intrenchm ent Cr eek D rainage Districts within the city limits, and is more specifically outlin ed as follo ws : 1. Hori z ontal coordinate s w ill be establis hed for at l east one point in each land lot ,in th e City . Coordi nates t o be established b y computerized control. Elevated benchmarks w ill be established with in each l and lot o f the City. There w ill be approximately two benchmarks establishe d per l and lot. El evation s '\vill be established by the use of comput e r and field methods . 2. The Engineers s hall f ur n i sh the City aeria l photo g r ap hic plan view maps of the South River a nd Intr e nchment C r e ek Drainage Di st ric ts , with i n the city limit s to b e s tu d i e d, on reproducible cronaflex having a scale of one i n ch equ als two hundr e d feet {l" = 200'). These maps sha ll b e co m plete with ide ntification, City of Atlant a title blocks, border, etc. The horizontal control will be d e v e lo pe d from the work includ e d un der the previous p a r agraph o f this propos a l. The maps will be compl e te wit h a n index aerial cover sheet. �. Mr. Rob e rt H. Morriss 3. -2- Nov ember 28 , 196 7 Th e Engin e er s sh a ll f ur nish the Ci t y with ae r i a l co ntou r m ap s of th e Sout h Riv e r an d Intr e nch ment Cr eek D r a in ag e Districts, withi n t h e city limits to b e studi ed , o n r cpro ducibl e cronafl ex , h a vin g a s cale of on e inch equal s two hu n dred f ee t (l" = 200 1 ) . Th e contours sha ll b e d e ve l oped at 2-foo t i n t e rv a l s a nd in a ccord a nce with nation a ll y a c c c pt e d s tan d a rd s for ut ili zation in plan n ing a nd dra i nag e work. In add i ti on to co n tour s , t he m aps will show r o ad ways, railroads, l a kes, rivers, cr e eks, and oth e r outstandi ng f ea t ures. The eng ine e ring fee for the above described services will b e T w o Hundred N in e teen Thousand Five Hundr e d Dollars ($219,500), p ayabl e as outlined u n der our contract dated August 7, 1967. It is the recommendation of our firm tha t we be authori z ed to proceed with this work. Very truly yours, FAE : rbs cc : Mr. C har l e s Davis, Co mpt roll e r City o f A tl a n ta �.. CONSULTI NG t-:NG TNE J~HS fJLC/,~C IIC P LI' TO : PRINCIPAL 01--FIC C : 700 SO UT H CAST THIRD JT r(C£T , GAINCSVILLC., FLO R I DA RL" G I ONAL OFF/CCS: ATLANT/, , GCOf1G IA / BOCA RATON,FLOAIDA /N A P LE S , F LO RIDA / CABLE ADDRESS: C LEARWATC R , F LORIDA SAN .JOS C,COSTA RI CA BCEGNVFLA TV//. 01U/7 S".1 -:; s75 Novemoer 28 , 1967 M:t. Robert H . Morriss Ass istant Chief of Construction De partm.ent of Co nstruction C ity of Atlanta 301 City Hall Atlanta, G e or gia 30303 Re: Attached Propos a l for Aeria l Survey and Mapping of Dis t rict 7 and District 9 Maste r Storm D rainage S tudies De a r Mr . Morriss : Th e completion of the work outlined unde r the attached p ro p o sal is required prior t o finalizing the Master Storm Drainage Studi es for t h e South River a nd Intrenchment Cr eek Dr a inage District, whic h is includ ed in the gra nt reques t to the Federal W ate r Pollution Control Administr a tion o f the Department of Interior. The co mpl etio n o f thi s w ork will provide the City with curr ent aer i a l photographic and contour maps of the ent ire Model City Neighbo r ho od Area presentl y under study . These maps will be of beneficial use in the Model City study and other planning or study undertakings by the various de partments of the City of Atlanta. We fee l that the contribution by the C i ty of thi s aerial work w i ll e nhanc e obta inanc e o f the demonstration gr a nt f o r s torm d r a inage pollution study of South Riv e r and Intr enchment Cr eek Dr a inage District s . This work s hould be authorized a s soon a s possibl e so t hat aer ial photogr aphy m a y be completed by March 1, 1968 . This p hoto graph y m u st b e a ccomplished dur i n g the winter s e ason s o th a t pho tographs w i ll cl ea rly expose phy s ic a l features and be us a ble for d e v e lopme nt of contour s. If you have any questions iri re g ard to the proposal, kindly advis e . FAE:r b s cc: Mr. C harl es D a v is, �November 28, 1967 MEMORANDUM To: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. From : R . Earl Landers Collier Gladin i electing a small rea that meets the r quir m nts for nnexation under th 1951 Annexation L w. When th area ha b en lected and property identi!i d, we will meet with Henry Bowden to proc ed with the deafting of th resolution nd nece ry petition to the court. REL :lp �November 28, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO Collier Gladin FROM Ivan Allen, Jr . Please a.ave someone in the Z.oning Department prepare for me a listing of all tracts of land of five acres or more within the city which is already zoned for apartments. IAJr:am �CITY OF A.TLANTA CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING COLLIER B. GLADIN, Direcror November 27, 1967 • Ray Nixon,. Chief of Public Works Mr. Kori Bevins, Traffic Engln r City of Atlanta Atlanta, G orgia Gentl men: Atlanta Iv a Transportation Study h nC7tV mow.d Into Phos II of ita transportation network testing . This consists of th• reconstruction and wld nlng of xlsting str b tom et the of 1983 traffic volum s . Improvements to the thoroudlfare system will consist of four claue, of streets: six•I ne arterials, four-lane at tals, four•lo coll ctcrs and two•lane llectors. T In conJunctlon with any lmprov m nts recomm ded by th Atlanta Alea Tr sportatlon ..,tudy, th City of Atlanta should s:tabllsh o t of str t crousectlons to ~" spond to th various classes. Th present standards u d by th City do not meet the minim II uirements for otlons and safety r Ir by the Gd rol Governrn nt. If Atlanta Is to recefv F r I or Stat aid for future thorou f improv menb, th se standar s must I>. Improved. The proposed cross- ctl pr nted here point for dlscuulon . Y01Jr com nts and suggesti pefully, through Inter-de~ entol cooper tlon, th be n tabIlshed. Yours very truly, ~ Ill r • GI In I nlng Dir t r /t C •• ncl �' - "T..-t<-- -~ -1--- '>I- -- - 3 0_1 _ Borde..- I"'· ~- ,t ' ~ , _ ___ so' -- -· - -- If.._}!>orde,.. ., I f"-"' k 1n ~ ~.}~ ~-"'o_" ....::...':f_h _ I _J..1- ,; _..-_a._ff'_, c:- _av_lc_,.,_,~_B_o _r-d_er_ 1~P. = - - - ~--.t.tt------i L-L t----- - - -~-!1-.....,0=-'- - -- ~--,.i>I ~- --- - - -- - ~p' - -- - - - - --6, ~ LOCAL STRE~Ts \N \-\\ 6\-\ DE.NS \1Y AR \=:..A~ - - - - · �'corder I-< Po..-/c111s, ~ Pa.~k.,n'J t. Rv.sh /<.oJ,s>, tiO"r Hov>'" T r4 -ff,<. Tro.:ff,.,. Border -=---------"+- - -~'>k,--- - - ,;,. 'T'h Y-o 11gh Tra.f-frG >-I'<- >-I... , 11- - ·>l ,~- - - - - - --4-~_,_ - -- -- -~ '4.----- - - - - - - - - __ ,o' ___ ______ _____ FouR LANE. ."'1 CoLL'E:c.ToRs . I . - - - - -- - -·-- ·------ ' I 2.' I . >+-.- - - - - -::,f- - '~ - - ·+-I I "L-_,,, I~· - ~-.p1If- - ,,....t--~ ---'--~"+'--- _ __ z +~·- - -~ --- - · • ' I ' ' ,---...j _______ ... __, �I; f-<; 'oord e I- f<:.= ,,~ f"'\ed,a.., > I -. k:. ~ I<- 12 ' ~ \ z.' >t<-- I '2... I ">i<: l G;' ...j<. I -Z. . I ~ I z... 3 G. 36 \}O' LAN t;. - *- \-Z.. . ,..j<-. 11' -""I �: I' ,.· C C ITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 DEPARTMENT OF PLAI\NI '.'/G COLLIER B. GLADIN, Director Se ptemb er 7, 19 67 M EMO RAN DU M FROM: Collier Gl adin SUBJECT: Tree Ordinance (i~~ '(}µ J Atta c hed is the late st draft of the Tree Ordina nc e for your rev i ew wh ich represents th e work o f the Planning a nd Law Departments to re draft the ordinance a ccording t o the instruc tions of t h e Planning a nd De velo pment Committee . 1-Je believe t his to be a reaso nab le and workab le ordi nanc e in whi c h mo st o f the stated obj ecti ons have been · worked out . Please a ttend the Planning and Development Committ ee Meet i ng o n September 13, 1967, at 10:00 A. M. in Committee Ro om #1 or address comments to Rodney Cook , Cha i rman, Planning and Devel opment Committee Planning Department; City Hall, not later than September 11 . CG/ml c �October 18, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO Collier Gladin FROM Ivan Allen, Jr. After reviewing your plans and those of the Atlant Hou ing Authority, please advise me if there is any contemplated urban renewal action or city acqui ition of the property at 501 Auburn Avenue. IAJr:am �October 10, 1967 Mr. Robert W . Haver Co- Chairman SWAP 430 Lynhur t Drive Atlanta, Georgia 30311 D ar Mr . Haver: May I acknowledge receipt of your letter d the petition on behalf of SWAP reaarding the future houa site • 1 am fCd'Wardin this information to th Planning D partment of the City for official recording. S rely y lv Alleu, Jr . yor IA3r/br CC: Mr. Collier Gladin �CANDEUB., fLEiSSIG A D ASS OC!A ES Planning & Community Development Consu ltants DO DJ September 27, 1967 Mr. Collier Gladin Planning Engineer Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Gladin: We are happy to announce that Mr . . E. Bruce Wedge, former long-time southeastern regional director of urban renewal for the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, joined our organization on September 3, 1967. Mr. Wedge will serve as Special Advisor to the pr'incipals and staff of our organization on urban renewal, community planning a~d related programs. Sincerely, ~A - ~ John A. Brown, AIP Vice President and Regional Director JAB:me SUITE 341, 1365 PEACHTREE STR EET, ATLAN TA, G EORG IA 30309 TE L. AR EA COD E 404/875-0721/2 �September 28 , 1967 Mr. Robert L . Schwind 1078 Canter Ro d , N . E . Atl nta, Georgia 30324 Dear Mr . Schwind: This will acknowledge receipt of your letter of September 27th containin several sug estions reg rdin our city. I am forw rdin thi information to the Plannin Department a I am ure they will apprec · te reviewin your recmnmendation • Sincerely your , Iva Allen, Jr. ayor IA3r/ r CC: Mr . Collier Gladin �September 27 , 1967 MEMORANDUM To: Mr. Collier Gladin From: R . Earl L nd rs Pardon my del y in · nswering your memor ndurn of Septemb r 13th. I think that recent statement by the Mayor, will nswer your question a to a possible bond is u in 1968 . As to the matter of seeking State legi · lation enabling us to is•u g neral obligation bonds without a ref io ndUJll, l offe,: th following confidential opinion: 1 think it would b mistake for such leghlation to be approved as Con titutional am ndment fol" Fulton County for the rea on that thi would put Fulton County in position to is ue g n r · 1 oblig tion bond contrary to our wi he and to the detriment of the citiz na inside the City of Atl nta, without those citizen · h ving n opportunity to approve auch n b w .• l refer p cific:ally to po . •ible 11ewer i ue, by Fulton County. W have diecuaaed many tim • th ct tit would b xtr m ly unfah:· for Fulton County to finance its portion of n ded c pital improv m nt in th f of ter pollution control by the i auanc of g · r 1 obligation bonda, 80% of which would b td by ·t he citi• ene of Atlanta, wh.U tho• me tlant& citi payln ~w .r s -:rvtc• chars; to pay th. City' for 1uch capital impi-ovem nt · • Under th · p.r ••nt aetup. Atl n cltiz-• n . would at l t hav th oppo~tunity to dbapprove th• l•s~nc of auc:h bonds. l think we ahow.d m ke very effort to def at W• Con Ututional amendm nt £or Fulton County, a-n if we asewn · tbi tton, uld hardly ·a t th• -.irn" aak f r such l• ialad.v approval for Ctty. EL:lp �CITY OF .ATLANT.A CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 DE PART MEN T O F PL ANNI N G CO LLI ER B. GLA DI N, Di recto r September 13, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO: Earl Landers FROM: Collier SUBJECT: City Bond Referendum (') 0...Y"\ "'-J JJ J This is, more or less, a follow-up of our brief conservation of a few days ago concerning this subject. I feel that some serious consideration should be given to the question of when would be the most advantageous time for Atlan ta to consider another general obli gation bond referendum? The funds from the last two bond issues are nearly exhausted, and the City ' s Capital Improvement Program reflects over $400 million dollars in unfunded capital improvement projects. The Planning Department can continue to prepare survey and planning applications, applications for code enforcement programs and updating of the Community Facilities Plan, however, we need some firm guide as to future financing of the se projects and facilities, plus we would like to make the Capital Improvements Program functional. There are several events that .we know will occur and others which are being considered, for example, the national elections in the fall of '68 and the city election in the fall of '69. The Transit Authority is considering, as I understand, a bond issue for financing a transit system in the fall of '68 (along with general election); the Atlanta School Board is considering another school bond issue in the Spring of '68. I am concerned that if consideration is not given soon that the right time may not be before 1970 - can we afford to wait that long? Your thought s on this matter would be e x tremely helpful. Also, I would like your opinion concerning the desirability of state legislation enabling the Mayor and Board of Aldermen to issue General Obligation Bonds without referendum, amount to be limited by State Legislature. Similar legislation has been passed for Fulton County which is awaiting approval by the voters as a constitutional amendment. jp �September 20, 1967 MEMORANDUM To: Mr. Collier Gladin From: R . E d Landers Aft r you hav looked ov r the attach d, plea we can di1c:u s . REL:lp Attachment contact m so �CITY OF .ATLANT.A CITY HALL September 20, 1967 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS , Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Governme ntal Li aison MEMORANDUM To: Mr. Earl Landers From: Subject: Dan Sweat ~ Housing Resources Clerical Personnel The correspondenc e from Cecil Ale x ander , Chairman of the Housing Resources Committee, to Mayor Allen requesting an additional clerical p e rsonnel be made available to the Housing Resources Committee for the purpose of bringing the CIP data and statistics on low and moderate income housing up-to-date points up the need for a fulltime City research and information capability. I do not argue with the HRC request. However , I believe that this function should be part of the on-going responsibility of the Planning Department. It would be a shame for us to have spent $ 750 , 000 on a Community Improvement Program and not have the capability of maintaining current data in a use able form after th e CIP project is finished . I think all of us are aware of the tremendous value of the various CIP reports. For the first time we have had information on housin~ including individual computerized information on each structure as well as projected requirements for the future. This information made it possible for us to launch the critically neede d housing program almost a .year before the complete report was finished . �Mr. Landers Page Two September 20, 1967 I am sure that we are going to find that we will be able to use the information and recommendations in other reports to implement timely action in other areas. However, unless we are able to record and document what action has been taking place and complete at least an annual review of progress with updating of our facts and figures, I am afraid the CIP will have missed its mark. I think that we also should give careful consideration as to exactly what we want the Housing Resources Committee to do - how big an operation you want to make out of it. I think the same thing holds true for every other quasi-governmental authority or agency that has been set up in the City, particularly the Atlanta Youth Council and the Community Relations Commission. It might be wise for a special committee of the Board of Aldermen to take a good look at these agencies before the budget is finalized this year. I do not mean to imply that they should be cut out or cut back. It might be decided that they are woefully underfinanced. My concern is that we all know exactly what the purpose of these agencies is and more importantly that those people who run these agencies know what the City expects of them and if we are going to continue the operation they should be given the tools with which to operate according to the wishes of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen . DS:fy �CITY OF .ATLANT.A CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 DE PARTMENT OF PLANNING CO LLIER B . G L A DI N, Dir e ctor September 26, 1967 Kr . Charles Davis, City of Atl nt Atlanta, Georgia Co troller Dear Charles: Re: Visit of Toronto nd Montre 1 Transit Systems. • In my efforts to seek involvement on the part of many of the ldermen as it relates to rapid transit planning, 1 m continu lly confronted with the feelin that rapid transit is even to ten y ara • ay and th re is no need for 1mD diate cone rn . While this ayst ha• been in various stags of pl nning since 1962 th planning ph a will soon b ov r nd th citizen of Atlanta will be fac d with a d cision to pprov or disapprove bond issue for construction. By Sp~ing of 1968, lllOSt of th planning will be complete, at lea t the detail alt nt and st tion loc tlons. By that t uny of our policy k re 1hould bav seriously evaluated the yat and the 1 ct on th corridor throu h which it passes . Atl nt has the et to gain or loa through the prop r pl nning of a total tr neportation ayste • The policy kers of this city will shoulder large p rt of th re ponaibUity to insure the pa11ag of a bond is ue to pay the city'• sbar for tranait which ta to be held th1rtee nths from now, in Jfov r 1968. 1.be · lanning and D v lop nt Co itte haa be n rev1 th pro re•• of 4Ull~'-A nd their con ultanta. Thy have ridd n the ntir ali nt and discussed the poaaible act on adjac nt prop rtiee, 1tatto locations and their acceaalbility. lde n Cook baa attended tranait · etin I in 1bington and Visit d the eat c eat ayatem, hlch brio• to the point of thia re ueat. Alderman Cook, aft r dlacus,tn the Toronto and ntr al transit ayat a with conaultant1 a other• bav vtait d the1e ay1t , haa ask d t t 1 request f nds for h ad I to vialt both of these citie in order to have • first ncl kno ledge of eir la nt progr cd transit 17et deal t of the cltiea tra ait pro r ar unique ln deal n and r res nta • oft e st �Mr . Charles vie Sept'1!11lber 26, 1967 -2- ex 1 sin the world of the tremendous develppment ttr cted to transit corridor and the controls that have been used to uid this development . For these re son, 1 would like to reque t that funds be made avail ble in the amount of 665 . 00 to visit th se two Pl n with th Mayor concerning thi ion with th yor nd etin with yo~ and J)o rat CAP. of c:o ree, dov to • t • r with t • Cit:,. All tbt e1:1pu1::ut or int i-eet of ce • maat "' uai••tl •• the '-IMAll'l-. t •llov the.-e thr e �Mr . Robert Bivens -2- July 26, 1967 data nd talent of th s organizations . it out t wholeh . rt support of each of th se bodies, there i question in my mind wh t 'h er the pl n q«m be uccessfully implem ted. CAP r present the 1 aders of th busines co ity wbose pt"ope:rty end bu i ss intere ts re involv .d and ho e political support 111 be nece s ry to carry out the plan. Most of th fund tQ c rry out the pl n will, no doubt> co from bond funds p id for by th City of Atlant and will r quir the support and approval of the Mayor and Bo rd of Ald rm n. Ao.y Pd ral funds, oth r th n urban renewal, u ed in the· pl nning pba e ust b chann 1 d through ABHPC TA, th · gency r ponsible for the gre test st.ngl · future development of th CJD. or through i et on th B sed on. the Coo . the foll 1. 2. 3. 4. bove, I b ve reco end d to the y.or 1.nfh which both feel th. y could upport. nd Alde n �Kt- . Jul y 26, 1967 - ·.3- ppro 1 of p,:oJ ct staff t .s. yo r /J C •• �CITY OF .ATLANTA CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING COLLIER B. GLADIN, Direccor July 27 , 1967 Kr . Ch rle D vis Co troller City of Atl nt Atl t , G orgi De r Ch rles : Att ched is copy of a dep rt ntel r que ted cone rning n ov r 11 review of nt d t proce ing ctivitt e nd to describ th v riou probl m which ust be corr cted in order to wr pup rel ting to ClP dat nd its updat nd to de dli of J nuary l, 1968. Thi 1 the d t t t hr Ind x must be c l t d for us by th Bur pilot run prep r tio~ for the 1970 C nsus Aft r you h bad ti to review theo probl m, I lik tog t with you to discuss this furth r . ould Sine rely, ~ l~ lannin C /J cc . . rl Lander• loaur• . Gladill Dir ctor �CITY OF .ATLAI'JTA. CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING COLLIER B. GLADIN, Director July 12, 1967 Mr . E. M. Laws 137 Griffin Street, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30314 Dear Mr. Laws: We are pleased that progress is being made in the organization of a coordinating committee for the Nash-Bans are a . In order to keep the Mayor and Aldermen fully informed, I would like to request the following: Information concerning the organization you referred to in your letter of July 6, and a list of committee chairmen and something about the makeup of the committee and also information about how you have approached the task of establishing this organization. Based on this information, Alderman Cook and myself will be glad to work with you in s etting up a meeting date. Sincerely, .~~]~~ Planni ng Director CBG/ mlc cc: Mr. Rodney Cook Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr .- �v· 7 July 1967 Ur. Thompson H. Shuttleworth. Chief Land•Use Control Division Departnent of Planning City of Atlanta Atlanta. Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Shuttle orth; This is to acknowle dge your letter of 27 June 1967. I have communicated its oontents to members of the Boulder Park Association of' Civic and Community ~ llied with us in our efforts to effeot the Clubs and other groups who best pos ible land•use control in the Adamsville community. The membership will make every effort to comply with t he wishes of the Ald rmanio Zoning Committee by the September l deadline. e are being temporarily delayed in our attaok on the zoning problem beoause of the oommunity•s pr ocoupation with Projeot 00S Ope,rationa Cool Summer) hioh involves a major total are commitment to eue neighborhood tenaiol'l.8, particularly in the shopping oenter area, nd avert the threat of m1d•eummer violence. Our p rtioul r ooncern is with unemployed teen• era and t hose rchants who a.re not in complete sympathy with n: ighbor• hood improvement programs. Significantly. our big handic pis a laak of recreational facilities in th area -- no awi i ng pools, no oommunity club houses, no CA nor YWCA, no library, no supervised reore tional tao111tiea. hope, t hrough Project 00S, h~ ver, to adv rtise our needs nd enoour e a little more effective oooper tion from City H 11. Admittedly, the D partment of Pl nn1ng is not 1 dia.tely oonoerned with an area's teenager problems, but wi e urb n planning does involve £uhioni for the eff otiv abeorption ot burgeoni area populationa. So this probl does at le t lie on the periph ry of your depart nt•a are of cono rn. As for the specif1o re tionaa tter of th (1) first, Io r zoni petitions , l haff hree per on l ot pera onally oonour with the vi wt t v ry n 1 hborhood · st have ulti•family units in order to be considered · ll•b lanced• community. A 11..._bal d oommunity, it 1e to , 1s one th t ha1 1utti len vi•• to oo od t t n of it• oitiz nry. po,e ulti•fa.mily unit on a.n are 1 oki the erTioe1 bri & pr oarioua imb l oe to �{ 2) Seoondly11 it seems to me that, by giving the oommunity a de dline, the Zoning Committee hu rolieve4 the petitioner of the burden of the proof and pl oed it on thG oitizenry. Inatead of the petitioner bav6ng to prove- g zone change should be granted, the oom• m.unity l bei~ aaked to oonoede that the petition hu ve.lidity and recommend reaa for multi-tamily ellinga. In other ords, e are being subtly inveigled to cooper• ate ag inst our beat interests. { 3) Finally, l think th t all petitions for zon cbang e for building multl•fa.m.1l y units s hould inolud "bard" pl ns for build1?lt; &djaoent sohools and reore tional fa.cilitie , s • 11 as a. tr ftio tudy of the a.r i n wnioh the unita are to be oonstruoted. In oth r ord, tho petitioner should provide tne ioni ~ Committee th a "pa.ck e 0 plan, a.e t illng the inst lle.tion of seFVioea to ooommod te the oitiiens who will 11"9 1n the multi-family unit• I haaten to - d that oh of the abov represents my pr on point or view. In the ks to follow. l plan to oonter with so of fri n.da in HUD and ted r 1 and publio hous ing in order to become more informed. In th antime, aa our pl ns to cooper 1:e with tlt Zoning Committee, • will pl'ob bly o 11 on you tor uid o and bt e. Richard K. Be.rksd le, Chairman Boulder Park Aaaooi tion ot Cb·1o and Oo o a Th Honorabl 8v ror, City or Atl Jr-. unity Oluba �July 3, 1967 \ Mr . Collier Gladin ~Planning Dir4ctor City Hall Atla.nta, Georgia Dear Collier : 1 am ttaching h reto letter r ceived from Malcolm Jone reg rding th city-owned trip of land in the West End r a . I hav heard om ny different stori • reg rding the use of thi land until l really don't know ju t what i proposed. Is there ome w y w and for ll,I> could g t them tter 4i posed of one Sincerely yours, R. E rl Lander .Admini traUv• A al tant REL:lp Attachm nt �AN ORDINANCE BY PLANNI NG AND DEVELOPME NT COMMITTEE BE IT ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND BOARD OF ALDE RMEN of the City of Atl anta as f ollows: SECTION 1. Purp os e and I nt e nt . The purpos e of t hi s ordinanc.e is to est ablish prote ctive r e gul atio ns for trees in the City o f Atlanta in order to b e tt er contro l problems of fl ocding , so il conservation, a ir pollution, and noise in the City of Atlanta and t o make the City of Atlanta a more attractiv e , he al t h ier and sa f er pl ace in which to live . SECTION 2 . Tree : D~finit ions . Any woody plant ex cept Do3wood that has a sin3 le trunk wi th a caliper of f i ve inches or more at six inches abov e the ground. A Dogwood with a cal iper of t wo inche s or more six inches above the eround i s de fi ned as a tree. Street: Any officially rec.o gnized public right-o f -way in the City o f Atlanta. Bu ildable Area: That part of any lot exclusive of the front, side and rear yards as established by the Zo ning Ordinance. Par !< Any publicly owned land set aside for park and r ecreat i on purposes . Public Places: ·All lands located in the c ity of Atlanta which a r e ow ned by t he c i ty of Atlanta or any publi c corporation or authority c re a ted by Ge org ia law benefitins residents of the city of At lanta. Tree Prot e ct i ve Zone: That portion of a ny lot covered by the f ront, side and rear yard requirements as establishe d by the City of At l a nta Zoning Ord i nanc e. General Manager: The Ge neral Mana ger o f the De pa r tme nt of Parks and Re cre a tio n or his author i ze d represe nt ativ~. Annual Tree Permit: That written cons ent g iven by the City Arborist to pers on , pub l ic or pr i vate firm or agency to prune , tre at or remove any tre es in the Ci ty of Atl ant a . �SECTION 3 . Ci t y Arbo ri s t . The po s it ion o f City Arb or i s t shall be cre at e d wit hin the Ci t y Parks Depart ment . The Ci t y Arbo ri st, a s the agen t of t he City Park s De pa r tment, shall dire ct , re gulate, a nd c on t rol the care of a nd neces sary removal of all tre es growing now or he re a fter in t he City of Atl ant a. SECTION 4. Off icial Tr ee of Atlant a. The Dogwo od (Co rnu s f lorid a ) sha ll be the offici al tre e of Atlanta . SECTION 5. Tree Planting and Ma intena nce Re gu l atio ns . The Gene r a l Manager s ha ll pre pare _Tree Planting and Ma int e nance Re gul ations s ubje ct to t he app roval of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen to implement t his or dinance. SECT ION 6. Tr ee Proc t e ct i on Pri or to Development To pr event the unne ce ss a ry destruction of tre e s on land wher e a bu i lding pe r mi t or s ubd i v i sion app roval ha s not been issued,the destruction of mo re t han 25 per cent of t he t re e s on any one parcel of rea l pr ope rty wi th i n t~e City-' without prior a pproval of the City Aborist shall be prohibit ed. SECTION 7. Tr e e Prot e ctive Zo ne . The Tr ee Protective Zone shall correspond with that portion of the l ot cove red by the fro nt, side and rear yard requirements a s establish ed v by the Zoning Or dinance . Tb prevent the unne ce s sary destruction o f trees d uri ng develop me nt or redeve lo pme nt of any t ract or lot wit hin t he City of Atl ant a , t r ees sh al l not be cut , othe rw i se damae e d or de s troyed within the Tr e e Pr ot e ct ive Zone except in a cc or d ance with the Tre e Planting and Ma i ntenance Re gulat io ns and ~ he pr ovisio ns of t his -ord i nance . SECTION 8 . Submission of Site Pl ans f or Develo pment t o Ci ty Arborist . A s ite plan for the deve l opment or imp roveme nt of any tra ct of land l ocat e d in t he City o f Atl a nt a shal l be s~bmit te d t o t he City a l ong with the applicat ion f or a building pe rmit . No buildi ng permit shal l be issued until the s it e plan has be en r ev iewe.d and a pprov ed, in writ in:3 , by t he C:i,ty Arborist and a permit as pr ovide d in Se ct ion 10 has been iss ued . -2- �-. Such plans shall be rev i ewed and either a pproved or denied a nd a le r mit as pr vided in Section 10 issued or denied within fourteen (14) days of suh mittal otherwise such plans shall be cons i dered a;lproved and such pe rmit considered issued by the City Arborist. In the event such plans are denied t he reasons therefore shall he reported, in writing, t o th~ a ppl icant . s i te plan shall show, in addition to the usual requirements t he The ollowin~ information. A. All exis ting trees wit hin t he Tree Pr ote ctive Zone whi ch a re at least 5 inch cal i per at 6 inche s above t he ground and all Dozwood trees wh ich are at least 2 inch caliper at 6 inches above the ~round. B. Trees to he removed and trees to be ma i ntai ned . C. Sne cifications for the remova l of existing trees and protection of existing trees during construction . D. Grade changes or other work adjacent to a tree which would affect it adversely wi t h specifications on how the g rade, d.,.a ...,, inage and aeration will be maintained around the tree . The function o f the City Arborist in the review of sit e llans wili be to see that trees are retained in lawn or paved a re as wit hir, the Tree Protective Zo~e without making demands on the owner which would de~y him the reasonable use o f his land. SECTION 9 . Tree ·protection Durin5 Development . During any building , renovating or razing o erations , the b11ilde r shall e~ect suit ab le pro t ective barriers fifteen feet f rom the trun~ of t he tree around al l trees specified to be ma int a ined and shall not allow storaze of equi pment , mate r ials , debris or fill to be placed in th is a rea except as may be necessary fo r a r easonab le time if no other storage space is available . SECTION 10. A. Permit s . None of the f ollowing acts to any tree shall be c0mmi tted without the proper permit of the Cit y Arb or ist, exce,t as pr vidcd in Secti n 1 1. Cutting , pruning, damag in~, r emovin~ or killin~ a t~ee by any means . 2. Cutting, disturhin~ or j ntc~ferin3 in any way with any root of a tree by e~cavatinz soil, e "ther f0 r irading , irenchin~, ditching , or tun 1elin~ within fif teen fee t of the trunk of a tree . - 3- �3. l3 . Pavin;; with concrete , asph al t or other im:,~rv·i_ous mat~rial within 5 fe et oft e outside diame ter of tree . A ,vritter a)plic< tion for a permit is req1:.'.red fc-. r any wo rk on or affectin~ trees as listed in s~ ction A above . 1. Such ap~l ic a t i on for a permit must be made to t he City Ar orist a reasonable length of time in advanc ~ of.the t i me the work is to be done . 2. The City Arbo rist shall spe ci fy the work t o be d o~e, acco r epartmanta. . ·.' . The .Joint Atlanta•Pulto11 County lo1ld Proaraa~ vhich vaa approved_ by the people May 15 1 1963 1 provUed tbe fwada to be1i11 tbia connector road which vaa firat pl~cl 4uriag or prioi- to tba aecoad vorld var. During tbia time, tbe devalopaeDt of a lara• auaber of apartment• 111 tba I vicinity of Simpao11 load, tba 1Dterchang• vttla the V.at &xpraaavay, and the underpaaa with Weatviev Drive, which 1a DOW unclar coutructicna, have limited the poaaibilitiea to tvo alternative•. rirat, the alignment vbicla 1a generally along and adjace11t to tba eut aide of the L & H Railroad right-of-vay from C&acad~ • Cordon north to Marietta Boulevard . The eecoa4, would be paralleling th eut aide.of the railroad north from Gordon load to a point juat north of Waatviev Drive tbe11 bridgiq over the railroad and generally beiq ali&ned and adjaceat to -tba veat right-of-way lina of the railroad, th.ea recroaaing the railroad aorth of Bankhead Avenue. Eitlwr of theae alternative• would tbarafore follow a facility which preaently fonu the boundary line of- ••v•ral naiahborbooda. To vary away fro the railroad would further aplit &Dd daatroy the alty of adjacent neighborbooda.· . • I f In taking a clo•• look at tbia connector, you find. that it will be the exteuion •outh of Marietta loulevarcl &Dd 011 further aoutb you fia,d the . underpaaa at Waatview Drive. which 1a under coutruction, and the underpua and ramp• of the Weat Expreanay vhicb 1• alao under con•truction. Th• moat direct rout• between tbeae reatrictive point• 1• tba general align• ment along the L & 1' Railroad. In decidiaa vbicla •ide of the railroad ri&ht-of-way will be leaa daaagiq on the adjacent uighborhooda and individu l famili•• effected and vbich aide will be the moat economical uae of the tax payer• dollar, ve smat couider that the general alignment along · the we•t aide of the railroad vill effect approximately twice•• many familiea ancl vill require three major cro•einga of rail facilitiea while the a•naral location along the ea1t •ide vill effect fever familiea and require the cro1eing of only on• rail facility. Al•o conaiderina that in addition to thia four lane aoutbweat connactor in tbe future will requi~• the widening of Aahby Street where proviaion b&v• already bean made in the developmen~ of the Weat lxpreaavay as:ut tbe A.Ibby Street interchange for thia future wideni11g. Couiclaring the large IWlll»er of lDcluatri•• as:ul coaaercial activitiea that require railroad for aupplJ that lt wo•l4 not be poaalbl• to eliminate thi• rail facility aDII tlaa areat expeue aDll •naiDeeriq probl. . ~ -..~be 1Dcurn4 '"81opiq a elnat.. roadwq Oftr tba L a. I ript• . of-way. . , ' \ \ {... :: ,.,:.1,(L-V\/ . ~.. b, ,, ~ .. '"',.~ - .. ) .,. ·. ~ - - · - ' I ' • •, . • �Mellorandua October S, 1964 Page 3 After further wef.ahing the•• fact•, the City of Atlanta feel• th&t the phyaical, acoooaic. and •octal ••pecta of tbia clanlopaant have been thoroughly recouiclered and that it would 1110t k to the cit'j..81 beet intanaC in raquoati.J:ls a ch.age 1.11 the aonaral al~ut of the aoutme•t connector along the eaat aids of tM L • N l&ill'INMI ri3ht-of-,,q. hrtbor. that d.ace thia 1a a hltoa Comity project. it will k tM OCJ1mC7 nopoui'bility for epociflo lec:&tiea ef dlu roeduaJ u kM4 oa 4'.etail . ~llllNrllll n• ... ( ·.:t··'.:~.. ,a1naras•. _,: ,i '. .• ~ , . .., :·· "... ·,/ ( ... ~ .: . ' • • ' I . r i ·.' 4 \ ,.. •:. .. ' . 'l . ·;~. -~·t t.., ' , . ..t ". .... . " .. . .. I ... ,, ,, ·.... : ·t>. . ' ,, . ,., . ~ . ~ :.' •I I; :'4 /~... : t, r, ... '. . ~.\ .• .· ..,. ·1. . . • ... .1 .,..·:~ "',., . t' ' • ' L'l'! • ,:.:: .. ... . . ' . .. .. ... I ,~ ... ,·. . :, •.·~ . , .,.': . .• .. . ' ...., ! • . . . ·~ . ...·/ .... ... ····· ~, .., I~ . \ ~• • _,. ,, • ·. , .'• · \ \ .. . •. l,i .. . -~i i .. ..!:·:·:, ·. •. ·.~ . .. . 4 \ ' . ·: ... ' ..·, ,·. , .l ', , , \ "l r I • ,• I I ; . · ,' •• ,'.,( ~ _ \ , . ' 'j , ._ \,- ., ... .. ,I,~ ., I ·,."'-. ·, .. . f ... • ~ • • \ r ~J.· . . •·t . . 1 .• . ~· ·' ~!' ' , t' ' >· 'O . ' '. • .... ' ••• 1 ,· . ... ·r,' ' '. ... ·' . I , '. . ,· .... •, h ~ .'; , I. ,;, I , ' ' .. . ,, . . '. : ,... ,, . ·• ·. , ·t . ·. , ., ' , ,• ,. ,. ,· • ,.... ..:..-i., ~~- _.y-.... -~ .: ',• . ,.•.~;r::_:·~ ·?-~~., .:..,.. . :· ..... -~ . .. '• ,·•. ..., If • "° ;. ·, ...·,. ~,..-:-.. · .·~.... ll' '< · 't ·, ( · ' •7 ... ·,. 'fl..t . . ' .' I +- ,l' . .,' ... ' . .' '. ,,, - . 'f '.' ·. ~--, _.4 , ·"' ,~ !· • . ~'..' ~ ~ - ' ..· .. ' ~ '. ·. . I ~' . \ r ... •, ,., ... l I' . ... ·· ·. ' . ~:- ...; ~.;t- ) . i ... ': ·, .. . .' ,·. · . .... ·, ,. ·. ·. ···/; .• \. ·, ·! . , , ' , . •. ~: . :&.',:f \°'.•. . I.,"' ,..•. •., ~-..' - . . , • ' ·. .. I . ~ ,., . . I . ... .. ., 1· I ~ '°t ·• • ,, · I . ' . ·--.. - ,... .' ,.'. I ·< ' , . ~. , · ·; : ·. I ' •:. . ... . .. t r· i, ,.r-~: . . · ·"'1--. .' "·'··.·. . ..·-:·. .t \. ,; > ; ' I'· ·•, '{l. :•f ·. I · • . .... '; • ..,...' ··' JO . -r\,.._ '.\ ':., . .., ·' . .' .,., '. .. .. \. •• ...\: ··~. ..... ~- ~ ·i ·• ,, . . ·r ., • • ~ - .. .. ~ I .. . . ' . , .. . .-. : '··,. . ..., ..... ., , :--... i°"?·.~··,, ..'..'., i '• I-~ ,.. ..., • . • I :• ....., ·~ '="' ·.• "' . \\. ,.·.~ -~:-. .. ,, ..·,. ' • .• :. ·.,.·.:-' " .·; · 1 • • .... . . ; : '• ·:I · \ . , t: ,L ,· . •• l '~ ' t .· ·.' • ·' · ,, . . • .,. ·'. I •• - -- -- - ~ - • ~- . .. . ~ .. ·· .,· JI "- " ' ) .• • . • ' ' .. 'f ~:, ~~ I , . ,' .,_ .... . • . • .." •. ' ~ ~ ... .tt . ·' ·. ;,._. ·,., ( f,. . , • '• .; ,.;t ~ ' _l I • ",' • , .1 ,\ I • · ." f. . ., • . . ... ' . •, . .·. ,·... . :._;, ·- ·,.. .. · 1. .· ~. • 'I . " .. • ', I' { l~ :• • • ..· ~ ., I. ,. _..,· - .. ,' ~. '· . ·.•' ., ', ... 1"1, t ,. . ~~ •• • . ·, . ~. ~· \· -:~ I. I \ ... ,·. -·, , ' . _, ., • �June S, 1967 Dr. A . H . Letton Atlanta Me diralll Center 340 Boulevard, N. E . Atlanta, Georgia 30312 Dear Dr. Letton: Thank you for your letter of June 1st concerning the Atlanta Medical Center properties. We are di cussin thi further with Mr. Collier Gladin, the City Planner, and Alderman Rodney Cook, Chariman of the Planning Commib • Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. IAJr:am �June 1, 1967 Mr. Collier Gladin Head, Department of City Planning City Hall Atlanta , Georgia 30303 Dear Mr . Gladin: This is in respons to your request for Atlanta Civic Design Coimniesion Review of the report on D,esie prepared as part of the City of Atlanta ' s Community Improve nt Programcy Candeub , Fleisaig and Associat s, Planning Consultants . In gen r 1 found the report to be informative and useful in th general discus ion of design pr1ncipl a and objectivi s. We also thought good job w doo 1n identifying ao specific proble requiring attention 1n the J.tl nta are • We r particularly impres d with the choice nd range~ photographs and graphics used to point up th se problem. area • In hort, the comm.1tte ould have littl quarrel with th g neral m teri 1 cont ined in the body ot th port. On th other h nd, it is the consensu of the C 1ssion that the report as extremely k in the ares or jor concern to both public official an int r s d citizens nd of s ci 1 aonc rn t o mbere o! th Atlant Civic Design Co is ion--n ly in the r ·a of peeific propo als nd r oomm ndation. would b less than frank 1l we f il, d to tat th t had hoped for more cif'ic dvic a to wh t tep this community should be takin no to acM.i e b tter urban de 1gn in th futur . • Ot nin 1te included int S ry of Major Re ndations (P•i 3 ot th r port) find only two th tare re sonably speoif1c•-on c lling for CBD plsn and th other calling for an ordin nc tor late t oval ot tur tree • Unfrotunat ly • even thes r comrut~ations r ak n d omewhat by their position st th tail nd of the 11st, The other v nta of en ral n t d. r r he it d rsther th.an fir ost rt h y �Mr . Collier Gladin June 1, 1967 -2- in the United States t oday. They do not, unfortunately, reflect some of the thoughtful analysis contained in the body of the Design Report itself . Taking the points covered in the reconnnendations in the order of their appearance, we would make the following comments: (1) The statement of need "from the public and private leadership of Atlanta to a goal of a 11 designed city and to the progrom needed to achieve it" would certainly have the support of every Design Commission member. We do wish that more emphasis had been placed in the study on the development of such a progi-am. (2) The Con:anission ould agree that "Physical Design plans related to the Community Improvement Program must be carried out by the best professional designers available . 11 We would have appreciated some specific recommendations as to how this might be accomplished. For example.., believe that more us might be mad of design oo titions and we had hoped to see some discussion of whether and under what oiroumstanoes the consultant would support or oppose such procedures~ Also, some coneideration of an "awrds program" might have b en i:;rovided in the r port. (3) The Co isaion would probably support th id that stTh city must pr pal" and adopt o d sign ...growth strategy." Th r port, how r, is not too cl ar on what suoh a tr t ~ would con iet of or ho to achi ve it. (!.) (5) (6) Th Oommi s1on would most lik ly support th consul nts' reOonJm ndstiona th t de 1 n control n ed to be pro d "through stren th ning of the Subdivision and Zoni.Jlg Or-di• nc s" and prob bly that th Ci ic D sign C i sion n d to b trength n d lo, but r not too clear as to how thi 1 to b socompllshed. It would hlv. be n helpful if the Consultant could h v . prov1d d p cifie a ndm ts (in rough dr ft) for consider tion ot public offici 1 and Co is ion m bra. �Mr . Collier Gladin (7) Jme 1,. 1967 -3- The statement that "a formal design review procedure " is needed is confusing insofar as the Atlanta Civic Design Commission is serving such a function t the pr sent time. If the intent was to requir that all major private oonst ruet1on in the oity be made sub ct to suoh review, we wish it hed been stated more clearly. Under this circumstance,. we also would like t o see some consid ration of recommended limits and cut-off points fer review of private construction . (8 & 9) .Again, we wupport th r col!lmendations that a CED pl an and tree ordinance bed~ loped . e would have pref rr d to see th se itBms headipg this particular list b cause the bottom position does ap r tow ak n them. · In summary, 111e feel the report f lla short in the most important area--the are of recommendations . We are concerned both with the recommendations ctuslly pres nted and with those that were not. We beli th t the hand of public agenoiea cone rn d with d s i gn m t ters in the city would have been str ngthen d by l) a much stronger statem-nt of the case for a CBD plan; 2) a strong r commendation that a visu l survey nd design prQgram be dev loped and implement d with sp cific reco nd tions s to how this might be done, 3) a draft of pecific emendlll.ent to the subdivision ordin no, oning ordinance, build!ng cod , etc . ; 4) firm recommend tions for a tudy of the impact of ad valorem t xation on design; 5) r co nd tions for dev lopment of n incenti s program (swards or oth r) for encouraging good d sign; 6) reco endatio r arding wheth rand how deign c.om.pet1t1on might b mploy din th .turtheranc of good de ignJ 7) reoomm.endat1ona r g rding doption of ign ordinenc s 8) recomm nd tion r arding th d lopment of desi n plans tor speoU'io jor str et, e:xpr _s ys, r pid tran it st m nd public o n p c , and o forth. thinking 1 _ incorporated in thank yo for the opportunity- of renewt thi ri l. .. nr ti e, pl.ea e teel fr to 11 o u · for further ry truly yours, JO ph . • Perrin Cha1r J ' �CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING COLLIER B. GLADIN, Director June 2, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO: Planning and Development Committee FROM: Planning Staff SUBJECT: Notes and comments on workshop session No. 2 with Candeub, Fleissig & Associates The Planning Staff has not been satisfied with the work of Candeub, Fleissig & Associates who have been responsible for the following studies: Planning, Fiscal, Economic Base/Marketability, Equal Opportunity in Housing and Design. Although this firm enjoys a national . reputation for its work in the field of planning and connnunity development, we have found their work to suffer in Atlanta for the following reasons: (1) Most of the interim and/or preliminary reports and memoranda submitted to date consists of a parroting back or rehash of locally available facts, statistics and data. Often the facts and information submitted to the consultant or generated and gathered by them have been either erroneously used or applied with little, if any, attempt made at verification prior to the incorporation in a report or memoranda. All of this appears to point to one or more of the following: inadequate research, local consultation, follow-up, and/or general negligence on the part of the consultant. (2) Based on the reports and memoranda submitted thus far, little if any attempt has been placed on analysis of the facts, their impli~ cations or consequences, or to relate one report to another. Few conclusions and recormnendations have been drawn . Where conclusions and reconnnendations have been drawn and set forth, it is difficult for the planning staff to see how, from whence, and on the basis of �Page 2 Notes and corrnnents on workshop session No. 2 what evidence, they were drawn. In short, the reader finds conclusions and recommendations drawn not predicated on facts or analysis of the facts. In reading the reports and memoranda, the planning staff has been constantly confronted by questions in his own mind of why, how and for what reasons - the answers to .which are not forthcoming by reading further. (3) In general, Items 1 and 2 apparently have led to the conclusion that many of the technical reports and memoranda could be applicable to any City USA. Most often the reader is left unconvinced that Atlanta is the City in question in each of the technical memoranda and reports. There is a general failure on the part of the consultant to relate what is being reported, discussed, concluded, or recommended with the physical, social, economic and political environment of Atlanta. The staff has employed every known tactic to encourage and to literally force improvement in the quality of their work. But, we have not seen any appreciable improvement which we would call satisfactory. Flat statements, sweeping generalizations, techniques, approaches, reconnnendations and assumptions made in today's meeting - all must be challenged by the staff and the Planning and Development Committee. The Program for Improvement Action being recommended by the consultant is heavily weighted toward physical improvement. This is probably the strongest part of the Program and basically represents materials provided the consultant by the Planning Department. The Program is weak, shallow, sketchy and in some respects not feasible on the social and fiscal facets. We have not seen much of th? economic materials to date and thus cannot comment. Consequently, the Planning Staff along with the Planning and De velopment Connni t tee should prod the consultant with the "Whys" , "Hows", and "Wher es" until we ge t satisfactory a nswer s and an accep t able Pr ogram for Improvement Action . �Page 3 Notes and comments on workshop session No.2 Set forth below are some examples of questions. These will give the committee some idea as the types of questions that should be asked the consultant: PHYSICAL --Shouldn't your recorrnnendations for renewal treatment cover the entire City, particularly those areas to the extreme North and Southwest which apparently have been omitted1 --What are the side effects 9n adjacent areas of renewal treatment in any given area? How is this overcome? --Define types of treatment; which renewal actions should be public, which private and in which areas? --How did you determine priorities and how can we best make use of this priority classification system on a continuing basis? --What is the value of your priority classification system to the Planning and Development Committee and how will it help us in making decisions for projects in various areas of the City? --What are the alternatives of your priority classification system? --What projections have been made on land needs ana resources for the future development of the City? What policy implications are involved? --How have you treated Rapid Transit and Interstate Highway Locations in this broad scale program? Should these facilities be planned to serve exi s t ing neighborhoods·, commercial and industrial areas or should neighborhoods, commercial and industrial areas conform to the physical locations of the se facilities? --What additional physical planning should the City become involved in as a follow up to your broad .scale program? --What is the reasoning of the consultant in determining the s cores assigned for each staging area? �Page 4 Notes and comments on workshop session No. 2 SOCIAL --What and how have social factors entered into your broad scale program? --What are Atlanta's socio/economic problems and how have you approached them in this program? --How do you go about getting citizen involvement in such a broad scale program? gram? How will th e citizens of Atlanta benefit from such a pro- How can we best convince them of the need fo r such a program assuming we are in agreeme~t with it? --How do social problems relate to physical problems and how can the approach to both best be coordinated? --What social costs, if any, are involved in such a large scale program? Are these social costs reflected in the overall program costs and how are they to be financed? ECONOMIC --Are your land use recommendations . based on market factors, purely suggestions for development, or a combination of these two? --What ar e the most potential markets for Atlanta, (Scientific research and other us e s for e xample) and how can Atlanta best accomodate them wi t hin t he existing City boundar ies? --Jobs , i ncr eas ing indivi dual i ncome , hous i ng and edu cation are the . - .ii<. City's mos t pr ess ing probl ems . Wha t approa ches ar e you r ecorrnnendi ng t owards re s olving thes e problems ? --How can the City implement s uch a br oad s cale program with the apparent housing shortage and fin ancial limitations which the City currently has? �Page 5 Notes and conunents on work shop session No. 2 --What is the relationship of the broad scale program to the City's overall capital needs? --What sources of revenu e (existing and potential) do you foresee the City using in financing its program? --What alternative methods of funding this program are available? What, if any, financial limitations must the City overcome in financing this program? What changes in and what additional state enabling legislation will be required? GOVERNMENTAL --How do you foresee the City managing and coordinating this broad scale program? Who should be responsible for administering it and coordinating it? --What staffing arrang ements will be required at the sector and/or the staging area level? What will the administrative costs be? - - What, if any, other cities have tried this broad scale program approach? What administrative arrangements did they make ? GENERAL --What i s t he logic behind or why the need for a broad scale ur ban renewal program i n At lanta? -~ --How should the City go- about implement i ng such a br oad sca l e program? --What policy determinations (phys i c a l , so ci a l & economic) should t he Mayor and Board of Ald e rmen cons i der in light of the future development and redevelopment of the City? �Page 6 Notes and comments on workshop session No.2 --In your opinion is the broad scale program practical and feasible? --How does the City go about up-dating your broad scale program? --What recommendations have you made for the City to carry forward what you have done in each of the studies on a continuing basis? --What are the consequences of undertaking such a large scale program and what are the alternatives? --Are the time periods being recommended, i.e., 1967-1970, 1971-1975, 1976-1983 realistic? Do you expect the City to accomplish the recommended actions of the first time period (1967-1970) on time? Would it not be more realistic to revise these time periods to say begin in 1970 instead of 1967? �CITY OF A.TLANTA CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING COLLIER B . GLADIN, Dir e ctor May 19 , 1967 MEMORANDUM TO: Mayor Allen Dan Sweat FROM: Collier SUBJ ECT: Charles Harr visit with Mayor the mornin 1. Attached is a general outline. I also plan to have this a more detailed f o rm by Monday morning. 2. Following is a list of those to attend the meeting in the Mayor ' s office and the ones schedul ed to take the flight: a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. 1 Mayor Allen Glen Bennett Dick Rich Charles Harr Ed Baxter Charles Sonoborn Dan Collier 3. I have talked to Mr. Sonoborn concerning the details of the meeting and he suggested that Mr. Baxter be invited. 4. As I understand a press conference has been requested. I would suggest that this be ~cheduled around 10:00, prior to the flight. 5. I have been in contact with the pilot and we are to make detailed flight plans on the 23rd. �--.- ,,i .C ITY OF A.TLANT A. CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522·4463 Area Code 404 DEPARTMENT OF PL A NNING COLLIER B. GLADIN, Director May 19, 1967 TO: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. FROM: Collier B. Gladin SUBJECT: Outline for Discussion Meeting of Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. with Charles M. Harr, Assistant Secretary for Metropolitan Development, HUD, May 24, 1967, 9:30 a.m. - 12:00 noon Suggested items for discussion, Mayor's Office 9:30 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. I Physical and Economic A. B. c. D. E. Population statistics - city and metro area. Quality of Atlanta as a place in which to live and work. Urban Renewal Program• number, size and scope of projects. CoJIDDUnity Facilities (Regional in scope). 1. Airport facilities and expansion 2 . Atlanta Stadium 3. Atiditorium and Cultural Center Trans portation Facil ities. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. II Ai r Railroad Bus Trucking Expressways Rapid Transit Social A. B. C. D. Atlanta-Fulton County Economic Opportunity Atlanta (EOA) Program. Social Outlook and Trends Need for Regional Approach to Social Problems. Rapid Transit-concern for its impact on social and physical character of the City as well as economic impact. �Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. -2- May 19, 1967 III Governmental A. B. C. D. Atlanta's government; setting within 5 counties. Number of governments in metro area. Metro Cooperation. 1. Atlanta Regional Metropolitan Planning Connnission 2. Metropolitan Atlanta Council of Local Governments 3. Metropol 4. Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority Future Outlook - need for consolidation of governments along function~l lines. IV Adjourn for airplane tour of City and metro area, 10:30 a.m. to ll:30 a.m. �May 2J, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO: Mr , Collier Gladin FROM: Mayor lva.n All n , Jr. Ple se adviee me if the property referred to in the attached letter i in an ui-ban renewal area and the atatu of the acquj,sitlon. Pl e ~turn th corr the nece ·ry l'eply. pondence in order that l may make Sincerely yO\U" , lv · n Allen, Jr. Mayor JAJ~/br cl ure �M y IS, 1967 Mr. Paul Scovill 3678 Ros · B. d , N . E . Atlauta~ G ·or ia D 'I! Ml' . Scoville: Thi will ac owledge l"eceipt f your letteJ:" t"eg ~ding the zo • , appllc tion in y r ighborhood~ l forw r: Committee Opel" CUUl,iu.: • Sincerely y U CC: Mr• Collier Gladin , Jr .. • �CITY OF .ATLANT.A CITY HALL ATLANTA , GA. 30303 Tel . 522-4463 Area Code 404 DE PARTMEN T OF PL ANNI N G COLLIER B. GLADIN, Di r ecto r Ap r il 5 , 19 67 MEMORANDUM TO: Mayo r Ivan All en, J r. FROM: Collier Gladin SUBJECT: Relo cation - Sheltering Arms Day Care Cent e r R t\ \_ \.._W) I have turned to the Atlanta Area Community Council for support on proposed site locations, as we would normally do with a request from a civic agency. The Planning Department is very interested in supporting Sheltering Arms and other social oriented agencies in the selection of sites to best serve this growing community. As you know, the Community Council is responsible for the coordination of social planning activities, thereby providing the City with one agency who knows the goals and activities of all the community organizations. This enables us to select sites which will allow the least chance of service overlap. I will furnish you with site proposals just as soon as possible. CG/jp �CITY OF .ATLAN :A CITY HALL ATLANTA. G A. 30303 Tel. 522 -4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Adm ini strative Assist ant MRS. ANN M. MOSES , Exec utive Sec retary DAN E. SWEAT, JR. , Director of Governmental Li aison March 23, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO Collier Gladen FROM Ivan Allen, Jr. As I intrepret it, the Sheltering Arms is a civic agency and is interested in establishing a new day - care center. Is it within your planning function to make an unofficial recommendation as to a good location for the m to c onsider? It may be that the Community Planning Counc il would be a b etter source of information for me t o go to . Pl ease advise. It appear s that the officers of Sheltering Arms lean towards staying close to the downtown area, but realize that this is not n ecessarily the right thing to do. Pl ea s e furnish m e your suggestions and return this file. IAJr:am Att achments �Sheltering Arms ASSOCIATION OF DAY NURSERIES 214 Baker Street, N.W. Atlanta, Georgia OSGOOD SANDERS DAY CARE CENTER 214 BAKER STREET, N.W.-ZONE 13 DOROTHY ARKWRIGHT DAY CARE CENTER 89 MEMORIAL DRIVE, S.E.-ZONE 12 525-5765 524-5747 March 8, 1967 BOARD OF DIRECTORS 1966-1967 MRS. HUGH NUNNALLY, JR. PRESID ENT MRS . HAROLD MCKENZIE, JR. PRES I DENT-ELECT M RS. L . NEIL CONRAD, JR . 1ST VICE - P RES IDENT MRS . JAM ES 5 . DUDLEY, JR. 2ND VICE- PRES ID E NT Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia M R. G EORGE E . S MITH T REASURE R M R S. D . S , M A NNING AS ST. TREASURER M RS. GRI GGS SHAEFER DUES TRE AS URE R M RS. WM . C . W ARREN, Ill RECORD ING S E C RETA RY MRS. A . E . THOMAS , JR. CORRES. SEC R ETARY M RS. JAM ES H . CRAWFORD HISTORIAN Dear Mayor Allen: Mrs. Harold McKenzie, Jr. and I are looking f0rward to meeting with you at 2:30 P.M. March 22nd. We wish to discuss the program of Sheltering Arms Association of Day Nurseries and long range plans for relocation of one of our facilities. MRS . FRANK E •. SCOTT 0 . S. NU RSERY CHMN. M RS . J OHN P . K E RN 0 . A . NU RSERY CHMN . We are grateful for the opportunity to discuss our agency with you. Sincerely yours, M RS, J O HN B . ARMI STEAD /~--~ 7r~<-<,7 MR. E. C . BA R R MRS. FRANC IS B ENN ETT MR . HARVEY B OOT H MRS. PAUL BURT (Mrs.) Hugh Nunnally, Jr. Pres ident - 1966-67 MR . JOHN M . D E BO RDE Ill M R . T HOS. T. FLAGLER, JR. MR. E. S, F OR I O D R . C. D I XON FOWLER MN:eg M RS . GLENV ILL E G I DD INGS D R. ELLEN KI SE R DR . WM . H . KI SER M RS. CHAS . M . M C CUL LO U G H MRS . JO HN O ' N E I L L, JR. MR . GEORGE M . POO L E, JR . MRS. R OB E RT SHELLEY MR . WILLIAM S I MS M RS. HA RR Y L . SPR I N G , JR . M R , WM . C. W ARRE N I l l MR . ROBERT W I GG IN S MR . H . DI L LON WINSH I P, J R . E XE CUTI V E D I RECTOR MI SS MARG ARE T L. COLB E RT 1/ ,1/;.• ') · / A Community Chest Agency · I / ... I I I of your United Appeal �CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT OF SANITARY ENGINEERING Atlanta , Georgia 30303 March 24., 1967 S . W. G RA YOON Sanitary Eng inee r R . D . SPEER Assistant WILLELA OSBORNE Office Manager Hayor Ivan Allen City Hall Atlanta., Georgia Dear Hayor Allen: As it would be almost impossible to J.oce.te the offenders who are c reating a he alth hazard in the vacant lot a cro ss the street fro::n t he Shelterir:g ..'\r ns Day Nurse::.7 at 21h Baker Street., N. W., 1,ro are, tod~y, c:;ending our 01-m crews on t ::i this lo t and cleanin g i t up along with tte sidewalk are a that runs the e:1tir e l e:nc;th of the bl ock . The District In spector will then trace d o:-:11 the 01-mers of this property and advis e tl:.em tha.t it ~-, ill be their responsibility from now on to keep this vacant lot in sanitary condition. Very truly yours, StIG:~ld �I I I1_ She!teri11g Arms ASSOCIATION OF DAY NURSERIES 214 Baker Street, Atlanta, Georgia N.W. DOROTHY ARKWRIGHT DAY CARE CENTER 89 MEMORIAL DRIVE, S.E.-ZONE OSGOOD SANDERS DAY CARE CENTER 12 214 BAKER STREET, N.W.-ZONE 13 524-5747 525-5765 April 3, 1967 BOARD OF DIRECTORS 1966-1967 M RS. HU GH NUNNALLY , JR. PRESIOENT MRS . H ARO LD MCK ENZIE, JR . PR ES ID ENT•E L E CT M RS. L . NEIL CON RAD , JR. 1ST VI CE-PR ES IDENT MRS . JA MES S. DUDLEY, JR . 2ND VICE - PRES IDENT MR. GEORG E E . SMITH TREASU RE R M RS. 0 . S . MANNING A SST . TREASU RER Mayor Ivan Allen City Hall Atlanta, Georgia M RS. G R I GGS SHAE FER DU ES TREASURER M RS. WM . C . WARREN , Ill Dear Mayor Allen: RECORD ING S E CRETARY Kay McKenzie and I wish to thank you for M RS . A. E. TH OMAS , JR. COR RES, SECRETARY M RS. JAM ES H . CRAWFORD HI STOR IAN M RS. F RANK E. SCOTT 0 . S. your interest in Sheltering Arms. N U R SERY CHMN . The lot across the street has been cleaned M RS . JO HN P. K ER N D . A . NU RSERY CHM N. off and th e trash haul ed away. This cert ai nly is MRS. JOHN B . ARMISTEAD MR. E. C . BARR MRS . FRAN CIS B E NNETT an improvement and a service to our organization. M R. H ARVEY B OOTH We look forward to hear ing from you regarding MRS. PAUL BURT MR. J OHN M . D EBORD E Ill MR. THos . T . FLAGLER, J R . our future plans. MR . E . 5. FORIO Sincerely yours, D R . C . DI XON F OWLER MR S . GLENVI LL E GIOOINCS )Lu.,,_,,.,,___ OR. ELL E N K I SER O R . WM . H . KIS E R }&_,__,,e,Tder tbat it may r cei propel' con ideration. Sit,,cerely your• , lvan Alie M yor IA.Jr/br CC: Planning Department t Jr. �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 8, Folder topic: Planning and re-zoning | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 12, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_012.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 12, Complete Folder
  • Text: June 26, 1967 Mr . Benard South 332 Piedroont Avenue, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia 30312 Dear H.r. South: Thank you for your letter of June 21, 1967 to ayor Iv n Allen , Jr . regarding the playlot which has been constructed t the corner of Merritts Avenue and Bedford Place . Unfortunately, this uas the only large vacant availa~le piece of land in the area. 'e have graded the ground any number of times ·three times in the last month - and the entire terrain is full of rocks of various size. The more 1e scrape the more rocks we pick up. le have taken our entire labor ere and had thE"'..rn very carefully by hand clear the rea and then cove.r i t •11 t 1 granlte dust . The rock beneath the surface ork through s the large number of childr n use this very poor and limited facility. I live in the irnli1ediste neighborhood and inspect this facility d ily . It is a poor eJ:cuse for a recre tion facility, but it is better th n nothing. hrough the gener · ity of the ich Found tion, 10 ,rerc abl to purchaoe four port bl m--imming pools and one of them - s pl ced on this site. Plans have b en made to purchase a perm nent p rk loc tion next to the recently completed • c. H.i ll chool,, which is only block or o removed from this pleylot. Trusting fund will be av il bl, e would hop to d velo this park during th c 1 ndar y r of 1968 ~ c rt inly ppr ciate your kine ttention nd consid r tion to thi . ssuring you w will make every possible effort tom int in th f cility in om onabl :COndition until we c n have n d u t p rk , I probl nd r Cordi lly, ck c. Deliu n ral M gr of rk nd R er tion JCD:lq cca n, Jr.~ I k int n n u • �Miss Brenda "='nglish orth• est 'f. .t":: I~ 1 9 27- ? • -' l ·roo · • ,.l, t • • ~tlant, 1 Geor~ · a 30318 Center De r !-iis. Engli s h: Th n yo for OU'.' let t er of June 1 4 1 1967 to the Honorable Iv n Allen , Jr ., ,t i c~1 • ·-· juat e~n ' or.1 r·· - to t 1 · ic for re 1 y . I r l nc. n Th nk you gin for r, ur 1 t l Cordi lly, I JC al cc, , �June 22, 1967 I STOKLEY CARMICHAEL RECENTLY SAID: fr WE ARE GOING TO SHOOT THE COPS WHO ARE SHOOTING OUR BLACK BROTHERS IN THE BACK IN THIS COUNTRY. WHITE PEOPLE OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA WE ARE HAVING A GEM DANDY CLAN RALLY AT HOWELL PARK, CORNER PEEPLES STREET AND GORDON STREET IN THE WEST END AREA, MONDAY NIGHT AT 8:00 P.M. GIVE US YOUR SUPPORT BECAUSE YOU WILL NEED THE CLAN IF THE VIOLENCE IN THE CITY OF ATLANTA CONTINUES ! AS PER 755-3141 - TAPE RECORDING BY THE UNITED KLAN. �June 22, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO: Mayor Allen FROM; Jack Delius I have received a request from Calvin Craig for the KKK to hold a speech and ralley in Howell Park at the corner of Gordon and Peeples Street in West End on Monday night, June 26, at 8: 00 p. m. George Royal and I reviewed the recently passed Parade ordinance and then I consulted Ferrin Mathews who told me that this type of activity was legal and that I would have no firm grounds for denying the request. Of course, we have not been denying similar requests from Craig and will issue a permit for this one. �\ , •, ',._, ~i ~ . I ', ' • ,. .. ·"·(• -. . CITY OF DEPARTMENT PARKS of Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 June 23, 1967 JACK C. DELIUS · GENERAL MANAGER Mr. Calvin Craig P. o. Box 10753 Atlanta, Georgia 30310 Dear Mr. Craig: Permission is granted for the Ku Klux Klan to use Howell Park, located at Gordon and Peeples Street, for public speaking on Monday night, June 26, 1967, starting at 7:30 p.m. This permission does not include the right to parade and if that should be involved in this function, you should clear this matter with the Chief of Police. As usual, you are expected to protect the park from unreasonable and unnecessary damage, resulting from the use of the facility by your organization. truly yours, ~- ~ De lius e eral Manager of P rks and Recreation JCD:lg I CC: XCRO~ , f ' () f,-Y~ Su perintendent Fred Beerman At l a nta Police Department �CITY OF ( r, ( JACK C . DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER ATLANTA ~It ti'{ DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION R -l\ \ De N o t~ \? ~~ t~tl.. t ~ -c - 4 Q... f ' 0 ? f1 �June 20, 1967 Mi ss Bre da English No rthwest Perry H o mes Service Center 1927-29 Hollywood Road, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30318 Dear Mtss Engli h : I am sure there must have been an understandable oversight in the handling of your telephone call to Mr. Delius of the Parks Department, but, regardless of what the circumstances may have been, we are orry that your call was delayed. I am forwarding your letter to Mr. Delhl lin order that he may have· the d tails you outlined. Sine rely, Ivan Allen,. Jr. IAJr: m cc: M r. Jack Deliu �~ I l\, ~ A ,H ), 1 } - -·- 10U.J X I I \~ f,. -l~~gj'.j Q -~ ~ - AdDO O Ver . At each a nd e very meeting we held with the citize ns o f Thomasville it wa s empha s ize d that the d e v e lopme n t o f t hi s park, like all par ks, had to be done in s t ages . A great deal o f work ha s b een done on the land which would not be realized by simply look ing at the park site ; for example, storm drainage is undergr ound and c annot b e s e e n . We a nt ici pate spen d ing an a ddi t ional $1 4 , 500 during cal endar year 1967 for the install ation of a ball fie l d and p l aygrou nd e qui pment . Thomasville , i n terms of a c r eag e , is t he large s t park site we h ave acquired i n any u r b a n ren e wa l area . As a resu lt, it will take conceiv abl y more mo ney to ·dev e lop o In develop ing Bu t l er u r ban renewal p a rk site a n d Rawson Washingto n u rban renewal park site we were d ealing with only three or four acres v ersu s some 14 at Thomasvil le . The r efo re , t h e $ 7 5, 00 0 we had a vail able t o s pend o n Butler and Rawson Wa s hington went a long way becau se there just wasn ' t that much groun d to deve lop. Thomasvi l le ~ a long way �Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr . Page Two from being completed and it along with some 75 other items make up a total minimum park need over the next five years of $18½ million. I have supplied all of the above information to Mr. Mosley on several occasions and he has also discussed this project with other people in the department. We have pointed out to Mr. Mosley that such parks as Wilson Mill, Joyland, Daniel Stanton, Harper Park, etc. are being built or were built in stages. Trusting the above will be of value, I am Cordially, ack C. Delius eneral Manager of Parks and Recreation JCD:bjw �-~ m.i; ,- ' i~::J;SJ A"'~" I "'· .. .. -- ti:)) )() ... ?A:?,I( c:m,:s~~RUCTI ON .. THOMASVILLE PARK l3IDS SDBViITTED TO I NCLUDE (B~ceak bids down as listed below) 1. ··, ,. 1 \ . •• Cost f or ell Incidental Work (All labor, materials, and e:qu ipu1ent necessary to complete all miscellnfi,2ous ir:cide:.1tal items of work required by or i:1:ce:L~,:-0d from plans and specifications. Generally ~- includes incidental construction ·work, services, ' ., s ::.-:d s; p0:rmits, etc., wh:!.ch ce.1.··mot be allocated pro?c~ly to other sections of specifications Total Cost $____& ___0__0._......r?_O 2. Cos t ; o~ Clearing, G~bbing and cP Demob.t:1.on /-Jppf?ox . ...::>, 5 /Joas Total Cost $ U;-J,, PR ,c e 440. ()() /,:;cr?t: i t5'4O.00 ·I Cost i o-r G~a,dins (Incl;udes S\lbcut) (a) Appro~d.mat~ly 5,700 cu. yds. .t:ill . cut ana' .r. . ... Unit Price 0._5_'i /cu,, ·yd . (b) . . . .. Total Cost$ Rock (if encountered) )~ : 10 . - I c_u .:· yd • · un-i .1... . ·p r1.ce • C' " . 4. .. , ., ".-:_"; ' . :-·• . Cost for Sto:..'ill Drainage .. ! l ' .: :• ·.t ' (a) (b) I' .I 3 Catc h Basins ': ···· · A::,p:cozimately 22 ~ 50 v e.:t. ft. . ·. ' .- , · Unit Price f,, Q c~ /vert. ft. Total;,-. Cost $_'·_. _ _.),_.,3...._5_0.__,.0.__'IJ ·.... ; · li9p:..·m~imately 338 lino ft. 1511 ,•· concrete pipe (o~ Ur.it Price To,t al Cost $ /lin .. ft. 2,028, (}0 > ' .~·.~ T , Concrete Headwall (1) (d) Trench Rock ( if encountered) Unit Price ,-=?0,t?tJ/ cu. yd. .. ' • : , ,•,• I I . . . . ;\,., (e; ~--- ·-·-· . I I I .1 I Total Cost $ i I (b ) . ! total Cost $ Cos t for Masonry Work (a) I o {}/Per ch Total Cost$ Apprc:-dmat e ly Z cu. yds. c onc r z t e footing Unit Pr ice .T-3 .ric,J cu. yd. Total Cost $_ _ _ ?.._3_/...__#__0__0 PROPOSAL // 82 . 5tJ 4. ,. , ' �- ~ ..J 1~-m.;\..1, ->. d u .) \ou _,x ~)( " ") '-~ · ·o·....-.~ ·a '· ' !.. -1 -.... V B:i:DS sum-F TTED TO INCLUDE (Break bids do,,m as listed below) 5. Cost for Moso~rv Work (continued) (c) App::.:.·o:dmately 1 2 520 sq. ft. granite rip-rap. Unit Price ,. 0, /, 1-0 /c---.:·::--=:; :yd. s1. ~H. eve/ ,.l 2 /26. 00 Total Cost$ (> Cost for Concrete Work ,• . :~ (a) Approximately 1 .• 000 lin. ft • . . ..:...·, (b) Game Courts (c) (d) (e) 2,450.0tJ Total Cost $ ' ~?P~O~imately lli lin, ft. 811 =~ 10" flush cul:'b a.round .. :,-,i . Unit Price '". ·. 'I curb · 2.nd gutter Unit Price 2 , 4:.-S /lin. ft. Total Cost · $_ __,;,.,/'--,5~0~~..;,~;;..O;;.. Z. e:; /lin·~: ft. ,.·sq. P:pp'::"oxirnately 2. sss . . ft. comb. walk and curb Unit Price O. fo.>r /sq·. ft. I,, Total Cost $ App:ro,dmately 9l288 sq.,· ft. plain wal k Unit Price 0.18 /sq. ft. Total Cost $ -1;.1.,5 !J; 21: Approximately 286 lin. ft. steps -?'r; (;": Unit Price 0,ro/lin. ft, (Tota;L '. Cost $ / 1 I ,·· ( f) ( g) 7. Zt:/.zo ZI re : O(]. App:: :-_:..,. a t ely SL~ lin. ft. ~einforced concrete wall Unit Price 6Ec 7{ /lin. ft. Total Cost $ 1 Concrete Apron · (City of Atlanta) · Total Cost $ c;i_O~0O Total Cost.· $ Z,'!JO_9, 4-7 I 3., ZIZ so Cost f or Fencing ( a) APJ?i'"oxirnately 717 l in . ft. 10· fence (11 gau e ) 0 Unit Price 3 . 9 / / lin. ft. . · ., · (b) (c} (d) 3 Stee l Fabric Gates ·- . 3v x 7v Pad Lockable U:.:-.it Price · -1-..s, rJ(} / gate 11 3 lin. ft . 2-member galvanized steel hand rail Unit Price 7.t·o /lin. ft. 2 u; ·.·. . · Total Cost $_ _._ 1 ..... 3....,.~-----0__0 __ C Total Cost $_ _8___ (,,__/_._o_o_ / I- es. - I.'/' /.,xJo.I-o ,, C.,.O..· • /o-r(). I I ,,.. di l.os r .,, ·' ffO . 00 Z.Z 0(}tj t; a. I- e PROPOSAL _ _,,___5-.:-.:.~...,.;,;..:::;...:::;.. .)(i!VVJCe l7~L 11 f p,..,c e , -1;o �- 10t1 ::JX D1J " ,, '-n~ 1,·c ... ,. .. _._. •• J. ... , J:. --~OtJ-,o~ ,/·. JJ X - j Ad~~ ~ ( J..,j() J ~~ ( cr-.-, -1-Qr1\ '-' - - -- ';;:..L \ BIDS SUDL"ITTT:SD TO INCLUDE (Break b 4 ds do1;m as listed below) 8. Co st: for Aspha~t Paving (a) (b) (c) A1:)prmdrnatcly -~ .110 sq. yd&. Drive and P2rkiDg lJnit Price ?, ?0 _I sq .- yd. · 'J.'otal Cost Appro~imetely J_,.J.P,O ~q. ydiQ Tennis & Multi-use Courts Paving Unit Price ? ,ZO_I sq" yd. Total Cost $ Painting Lines (Parld.ng, Tenni.s (cl) (e) $~_4-t 42, 00 L!,. ~ Muiti-~se Cuurts) Total __ ___ ·cost ·$ Tennis N'Gt Posts ('!'enn:Ls Courts ) 9-5'. till/post;. Total Cost $_____ 1__4-__o____.o ___o Unit Price .t).spha lt: Swale at tower end of Tennis Courts . . ' _. . . , . Total Cost $_ ____,;7_5 ___, ~0;;.;.0 . 9.• P:i'.'ef2bric at ed Steel Buiiding Complete .Total Cost$ Concrete Floor Slab . for .. Steel uuilding - Approximate ly 96 sq_. f·;:. Concrete Floor. Slab . Unit Price /,/0 /sq. ft. 10. """""......., 3 30, 00 I 07Z . .5!J Tot~l. Cost. $____/ __0,_;;;5 ___, _b_t} ·.:.<··, Sprigging Area ... ·.\·.:_.·L.- · P,pproxi mately 106,200 sq. ft. Sprigging . :· · Total Cost $ Unit Price 0,07 /sq. · ft. .: , 1..: .; · :: ·, : · 11. Tops oil Approximately @ 4 1:[) sob cu ; cu. yd. ' LUMP SUH FOR J OB COMPLETE yd • . ' Total Cost $ $ 71:3f. 00 > 2.,-2.oa. oo 0.!_~:_:_,~--i) I t e·,us bid on a unit price basis a.re appr oxiinate and for comparison of b i ds only and the work may be increased or decreased up to 50% of the t otal aggregate bid without entitling the Contra.et a~ to any c l ~im for ext~a pay .because of any damage he may sus t ai n c~ acc ount of such increase or decrease and such addit ;on ?~ cGduct i on may be made to only one .item or may be d1stribu ted over the entire bid. PROPOSAL 6. I ··-I. ·1 �NEW THOMASVILLE CIVIC LEAGUE, INC. 1994 Akron Drive, S.E. Atlanta, Georgia 30315 Phone 627-7720 Mayer Ivan Allen Jr, City Hall At:13nta Geer~ia, 30303 De.ar J.\ayer; This letter is sent t you with all the c ncern •f the Germnunity • f Th•l11il sville. We have tried t ee~· ~rr•und doin~ this but •ur efferts were in vai~ s new we must turn t ee yeu. We dislike doin~ this, Qnd wish that we ceuld handle the matter ef the Park that is t be c nstructed in ur c mmunity thr~u~h ur alderman "but we have tried this f er three years and there have been n• defin.ite s.itiElfactiE>n !11ilde. .. · We wish t• say th.it this park have been prep sed in this cermnunity add there have been same werk dcine • n it h st year. Tais is f.ir frem 0empletein~ this ~rk which is needed se very b;dly in this e mmunity. There is absolutely nee recreatien facilities in tnis cemmunity at all, there is n• place fer the children to pl..ly se · the • nly thin~ that they ean de is t • take t• the . streets playin~ ball and d•d~ing ears. This alse is the r• ts •f mischief aid ether acts. Thia Park is being censtructed in staies each· year, am we think that it is the enly ene in th~ city that have been dene in this l11ilnner~ Cert.iinly we don't think that is even in the nei~hborheed e f b in~ ! ~Hd pl.an. By the time that this park is fini ... ehed the children will h.ve bee met•• •ld t• enjey it, add the faci~ities tat has been errected durin~ the first stage · will have eerrsded and fell th~ gr und by the time that the hst stage is finished. There haven't been .ny w rk d•ne this year and the geed seassen fer this k:tnd •f w.rk is definately passing by, Yet there is supp se tH be meney appreperated f~r wrk t • be dene. · Other p;irke have ·been started and cempleted and yet still enj yed since the w.rk be gain en this park. The Geverner can even g• eut and accuire meney t• build ether parks -ind yet there are parks that stand with enly A beginnin~ ·made en them and is needed se bad yet they stand incemplete. We are askini th. t y u l• k int• this matter and try tH get semething geing tew.rd cempletein~ the ·i:srk in Themasville se th.it the children will have seme place t• u:,e beside the streeto There is certainly n• reasen that A park sh u1d be censtructed in this manner. The city •ff'icials is capable •f getting the things dene if' it :ts urgent er if they need it, and we must say that this park is needed, · but will it ever be cempleted. M•ney ka• been spent fer cleaning, ~ading and ~assin~ A p•rti•n •f the parks area, seen it will be meney wasted because the weeds and bushes ·will. have taken ever all tat have been dene, then it will cest meney which ceuld be used fer further eempleting the rk be •ed fer the Hme thine. Please leek inte this ~tter and lp tbia cemmunity, it is ur~ently needed 0 Tkanking yeu in advance fer yeur understandin~ and eHperatien. · t•• t•• T•ur• Very Truely Mr. E.B. Mealey vro /JPr s1d �Mr. J sse Dr r Dr per- own ·a Company 44 Bro d Stre t.,, N. .. Atla11 . , G or ia De r .lease: The City of tlanta is ply grat f ul yo Dr r-Owens tor your eroue commitm of $5, 000 for acqul ition of e C in.Carnegie y Tra.nLiurle •. bout this pr~ject,. and a e ball C , l m Sine.er ly, r. lAJr:a cc: r. Cu.,~.,,v• Davla r. Colll•r c;_,.._.. 110 �JESSE DRAPER TELEPHONE CH AIRMAN OF ... 04 / 522 - 95 11 THE l"I NANCE C O MMITTE E DRAPER-0"\VENS COMPANY REALTORS AND MORTGAGE BANKERS 44 BR·OAD ST R EET., N . W . ATLANTA, GEOnGIA 30303 May 11, 1967 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor, City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor All en: To assist the City in acquiring the property bounded by Cain Street, Spring Street, , and Car~egie Wa y for development as a park, it is the intention of the undersigned to make a contribution in the amount of $5,000. This contribution will be paid to the City at your request and is subject to the City receiving a Federal grant in the amount of fifty per cen ~. of the acquisition cos t and contributions being made by other parties in amounts sufficient to finance the City ' s share 9f the cost. This offer is subject to cancellation at the end of six months. Sincerely 143.215.248.55 . Jess e Draper �May 8, 1967 r. Fr ncis e. Smith 717 Wood rd ~ . N . W. Atl :ta, Ge~ . 3032·7 ."' ill actiTtinurledge rec·eipt of your· le · ay lat rega..rdin the planned bicycle tr in the chtree Creek area. l l tter to the lo Committe fo Sincer Alie CC: Mr. Jack Delius y •• Jr. �/ May .s . 1967 Mr. Ci orge o. Taylo.r, .Jr. So\dbern Federal S ving nd Loan Hurt Buildin Atlanta, Geo · · D .n . rCieorge: receipt of your· te1ter the ~t.a1Jicd bicycle ~ac:.w~e Creek re • letter to the, ~ri . Sincerely your•, Alle, Jz. IAJr/bz CC: Mr. Jack Deliu I ·g Comm1·ttee �I l - - - -143.215.248.55- ,J ,_ '-,i< \J' l;J I l ' ·u "ui ~ ~i ; LJ3143.215.248.55 ·-~------------ -··_- --~---~- ·~ CITY OF .•·... · ,,.......~· ,\ · Atlanta, Georgia JACK C . DELIUS ...- 30303 Atlanta Parks Department 1085 Piedmont Aveo N.E. Atlanta, Georgia 30309 GENERAL MANAGER FORESTRY DIVISION Entomologist's Report Date M_.,i y } t 1~6'.i:~ Dear l·~. Delius: The following recommendations are made for trees to be planted in the planters beside the Hurt and other buildings in downtO\-m Atlanta. These recommendations are based on the combined thinking of some of the top authorities in the south east and include s uch men as R.Ko Smith and Elmer Roth-U.S. Forest Service, John Nixon and 'l'roy Keeble - Georgia Forest Commission and several others. 1-Crape myrtl~ is the first choice. 2- -'.ora ine Locus t-about equal to the above o 3-Juniperus scopulorum (western red cedar). 4-Flowering Cra b Apple. 'de think tha t no one species should be planted entirely~ but have at l eo.st t wo or three and if t bis is followed we reco mmend the first three above. Flowering cra b i s a very attrac t ive tree, but we are wondering how people would react if the apples were to drop on t he side walk and make slippery spots when t hey were crushed. Hr. Joe Lance and I believe that if the city is to be involved in planting and . maintaining trees in planters or any other site on the stre =ts that great care be used in selecting, pl anting and tending to the trees. We recommend: 1-'.Tha t we select the s pe cific trees from the nursery that sells them. 2-That the tree roots be balled and burlap covered. 3-Tha t t he ·trees be nursery grown. 4-Tha t the soil placed in t he planters be good fria ble top soil and that ap~roximately 1/3 by volume be peat moss. 5-The trees be approximately 2 inch caliper at the base and at least 6 feet tallo I have contactad several nurseries and find that t ho se list ed in t he dir ectory are l argely dealers that obta in their stock from other areas, and none of them handle Juniperus s co pulorum. This tree ha s beautiful silver green foliage and woul d remain green all year. It would also be a nice tree to decorate for Christmas. It can be obtained through one or more of the nurseries, but all of them state that it is too late to ~yint them this late in t he season • ,~ Distribution: ,• . ' Signed _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ W. D. Buchanan , Entomolol!ist FORM 3 4 - 2 2 J �1 0 A , (, ) , o --::_u~ ~ , ~ ....~).., , .! I - - -- - ----\~ ~-------~ . Page 2 FORESTRY DIVISION Entomologist Report Atlanta Garden Center has Moraine Locusts that r ange from 8 to 10 feet tall . and sell at $18.00 each. They also have crape myrtle 4 .to 5 feet tall that sell at $10.00 each, and trees 12-15 feet tall run $40.00 each. Eonroe Nursery have crape myrtle about 6 feet tall that sell at %.00 each. '-ti e recognize that the survival of any tree that is · planted on the streets has much to contend with in the form of gas fumes from cars, changes in water available lack of space for the roots to spread, constant handling by the public etc. :•ie know that fsome of the seedlings will die regardless of how well they are tended, but if they are watered well and fertilized after being put in the planters the survival should be as good as can be expected under the conditions that v,ill exist. Inferior planting stock is expensive regardless of what the city of Atlanta pays !or itbeo~use survival is lese likely and tne s ame goes for t he c~e neede'1 in planting and oaring £or the treos Qfter they are planted. Sincerely yours,) ~ (j_Buchanan-Entomologist , ~ · d Le ~ 0 - - u.n. Joe Lance-Forester cc. Joe Lance FOR M 34-22 ·~ �May 4, 1967 w. Armstrong Smith 140S DeLowe Drive; S. W. Atl nta, Georgi 30311 Senator Dear Senator Smith: Thank you v ry much for your letter of Mny 1 , 1967 r garding the . requ st you have rec iv d from Mrs . N. O. Ger ld p rt intng to the replace nt of Dogwood tree in th Ca c de Hight are of the city . I am ncloeing carbon copy of a letter written this date to Mr. Gerald explaining what the City might be able to do . The Pla0,11ing Department of the City of Atlanta h s submitted an over 11 Urban Beautification Pl n hich cone iv bly could encompass a tre planting program in our city . ·P resently, there doe not exist a ufficient 1 bor foec in thi department to dlv rt from regular activities for an xten ive tree planting pro ram . We ill c rt inly try to ork out some solution and aasuring you of our appreciation, 1 Cordially, J C C . J)eliu G u ark• JCD:bj cc: Hon. Ivan All _n, Jr. / • Ide H r •• • .Joe A. Lance l>r. W. D. uch4nan I lo, e ,.,. 1 Manager of d & creation �May 4, 1967 • • O. Ger ld, Jr . 1212 Br r Avenue Atlanta, Georgia D r Mr•. 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(: j ! .- /1~ - '----t-------------------1- -------· -·---------------1- -- ----------------r----·----· ~----------l-------------------1- -------- +-------------------1-·---------------------------+------------·---------;---------- K---------+----------------i--------- ~--r------------- --------1,--.-------- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _o__ _ ·1==------~------=--=--=---,--.:_~_-_-_·-__-_ '- �~-:::. -._;·~-=-~~f - --.·-. : ··.;_ - Li St .., .,_.l,- /,- ..__. - · ·~ .. ~-,~ C (' - __,.r - ' · ., -. . - ~ - , --- ~ l l �/,,I / - ·- --- - - - + - - -- / // - - - + - - - -- - - - - - -- - + -- - - - - - - 1 t - - - - - ------ �May 2, 1967 ME OR.AND To: Mr. J DU • rtaiau I to ., It. ia ur maktng to L:lp CC: �CITY OF .ATLANTA CITY HALL April 28, 1967 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Execut ive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Governm ental Li aison MEMORANDUM. T o : Mrs. Ann Moses From: Dan Sweat J{./ Subject: Attached memo on Downtown Trees Jack Delius is going to make another request for some overtime to provide maintenance for these trees. Even though it is the responsibility of the adjacent property owners, the fact is the trees are dying and the City is going to get the blame. Most of the original trees which were planted have been in about a year. The original ball and burlap treatment usually carries these trees for about the first year. Then as the roots break through the burlap they are on their own and this is what is occurring now. I think we should support Jack 1 s request for a few hundred dollars overtime and he can have his people take care of these trees. It is my opinion that the City might as well get geared up to maintain the trees for the great mass of adjoining property owners will never do it themselves. DS :fy �,~ _ ....... _._._..... - · IMJIII. A , ·H I , : A dO.;) Adoo'\ OU ~ Otl 3 X Otl3 ~ - --- ···· • • •• ······--· -- • I. CITY OF A TLANTA i'd ,,, DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 AUJ:::--tv -~ R~ ~'c.(l.~ GENERAL MANAGER t-vr}~~ ~ ~ c7LS ~~ ~ . e;~~ ~ \u (l .,,...,,.._.- ,.:n m coloniaHL .. . fiora, blessed by· a loilt, \ . - . .,oould be protected for all time. i ~,.... ,afi · -1~ . .ne way to do it. , ·· · · ... ~ '~ 'h . r e ink ·lee •or l- \T2.E6' ~ _ J 'I I .. h~ ·Drought and Trees noi WE HAVE had a dry spring, broken by only · a few damp and cool spells. This could forecast a long summer drought . Drough~ are uncomfortable things to a city dweller and down-right tragic to a farmer. Dry years usually are very hot, and we suffer financially and· physically. j pa, ·an , VG . ar: ·or .. ,Cl Whoever takes care of the trees along downtown streets can start getting ready right now. In a normally wet year these trees need more water and attention than they have 0been in the habit of getting: They need cultivation and more frequent watering than we have . · · 8 been giving them. U In a dry year this sort of care ls impera- - f tive. Else a substantial investment ls going to .. ,:, be lo.st. ·· · . , ·· ·· r ., . ) . ' ·'I ' \ l ' .. . . - ---- We were not ai thorized any personnel or equipment to maintain these trees. More are being planted everyday • ~ '•. \)tt:;S E. 0-C{,,..__J You can prepare for a drought by mulching 0, your garden and your shrubs in order to con- . b · serve moisture. . ... . (') I·. l ' I',, . �April 1 Z, 1967 Honorable John H . Markland City Manager City of Decatur Decatur. Georgia Dear John: This will acknowledge receipt of your 1 tter of April 11th p rtaining to th po eibility of a contr ctural rrangem nt wh reby our Park D partment might b of some si tanc to you in your b utific tion program. W ar r £erring this m tter to Mr. Jack Deliu , Gener 1 Manag r of our Park , nd eith r Mr. Deliu or I will a.dviae you to th po ibility of uch an rr ng m nt. V ry truly your s R. E arl Lander Adminiatr tive A si tant REL:lp CC: Mr. Jack Deljus Jack: Please call me regarding this. �JOHN H. MARKLAND 373-3311 CITY MANAGER April 11, 1967 Mr. R. Earl Landers Administrative Assistant to the Mayor City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Earl: While attending a symposium at Agnes Scott, Mayor Hamilton discussed with Mayor Allen the possibility of the City of Decatur procuring plants from the City of Atlanta's greenhouse on a contractual basis. I believe also the discussion included the possibility of advice from some of your horticultures, also on a contractual basis. If you would be kind enough to look into this matter and advise me, it would be greatly appreciated. It is our intention to beautify city property, median strips, etc. Manager JHM:s �May 2, 1967 Mr. F. A . Johnston Dii-ector of Plant rantine Division gricultur 1 Re e rch S rvice U . S. Department of Agriculture Fed ral Center Building Hyatt ville. Maryland 20782 Dear Mr. John ton: I have a copy of the mo t recent letter to you from Mr • Charles Bu c:h of th Atl nta Bon i Soci ty regarding the importation of the bon ai tree from J pan. We ould be mo•t grateful for - ny dditional con ider tion you m y be ble to ive to thi requ •t in ord r t.o Vi the tree ahipp d dir ctly to Atlant • Sine rely,, Ivan JAJr:am llen, J'#. �UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF A E,RE ~ ¾- AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE PLANT QUARANTINE DIVISION FEDERAL CENTER BUILDING HYATTSVILLE, MARYLAND 20782 Oear • Busch: • co: J. L. Cr I All oh w/c April 211 tt r , Jr., or of Atlan • A. Burns �THE ATL 143.215.248.55l BONSLI ( COPY ) socr:TY Mr.F. A.Johnston , Director of Pl a nt Qu2r1ntine Division Agricultura l Research Service United St a tes Department of Agriculture Federal Center Building Hyattsville, ~a ryland 207 82 Dear Mr.Johnston , Tha nlc you ': or your kindness in su cc;es ting the alternative of the pos t- entry arrange1'1'!ent Hith Dr . Ave ry of Brooklyn Bota nic Garden . However , we would like to ask you to reconsider , in view of the f a ct t ha t we have very competent entomologists and pathologists here in Atlanta, avai l able for con- . stant check on the treeg Al s o pe r ~a~s it was not clear that the bonsai . would be kept apa rt from othe r nl ::m t s and not pla ce d in the ground a t a ll , ever . The Dr. A. Les li e Ste phen s ,Jr. Memoria l Bon sa i C~rden is being built on 2500 s qua re feet of ground with only a fe w small trees and shrubs , 1a nted in t ypical Japa n e-c·e ga rd en style , comuletely separa ted by fence from the re s t of the pa rk, and in spe cted daily by ~r. B.Oortman, Chief Hor~icul~urist for the City of Atla nta . We understood from Dr . Avery that the cultural and hygienic practi ces of Kyuz o 1"1ura t :::i. and the Kyukaen Bonsai Garden in Ja pan Wll?'re certified by the Ja rian ese riinistry of Agri culture and Fores try and r e cognized a s accentable by your de partment since the J rooklyn Bot3.nic Garden has been a lloi-red to import tre es in ori gina l soil from that nursery . i1e see on page 12 of the Quarantine Regulations, Item16b ( 319 . 37 -1 6b ) that lily bulbs from J apan a nd the Ryuk~u I slands may be entered in subsoil which has been treated with inse cticide and certified by the Pl an t Prote ction Se ction of the J ap~n ese Mini stry of Agriculture a nd Forestry . iould it be acc epta ble to request ~~r. I-iura ta to re:lant the tree in such soil , duly certified , for importation next year a t this time? ( Since it can only tra ve 1 in ~fay . ) We would pr efer thi s alterna tive to that of leavi n g it with the Brook lyn Bo t a nic Garden , because of the many aspects of care and sha~ing ~e cul iar to bonsai , and we prefer no t to have anyone touch it exce nt our own bonsai exoert , Ur . E. Felton Jones . In closing, please forgive our persis t ence , but we do not intend to forget our objecti ve of bringing t his bonsai mas t e r- piece direct to Atlan t a . n1ease do not deny Atl ~n ta the privilege of i mporting and taking care of her own property . Thankinc you for your kind attention and auaiting reply at your earlieot convenience, Your sincere, ( Si e,ned ) Mrs . Charles Busch , Sec 'y to Chair~an of Committee for Dr . A. L. Stephens , Jr . l'-.e~orial Bonsai Garden �df.tlanta .ionJai Societg Atlanta, Georgia 14 Apr il , 196 7 The Honorable I van All en, ~ay or of At l an ta Atlan ta, Georgia Dear ~ay or Allen, Enclo sed ple ase find co py of the second l e tter to the Di r e ctor of ~l a nt I mportation, Beltsvi l le, Ma r y l and , wh ich La rry Willi a ms asked me to send you. Your s inc e re, Mrs.Cha rl es Bu s ch, Se cretary to Chairman of Committee f or Dr. A.Leslie Ste phen s ,Jr. Me morial Bonsai C~rden c/o Gre e nwood 21 60 Ste wa rt Ave., S . ~ . Atla nta , Ge or gi a 30 315 ? �i1 April 20, 1967 Mr . R. M. Worthington . Manager Colllllerce Club Broad and Marietta Street , N.W. Atlanta , Georgia 30303 Dear Mr . Worthingt on: Thank you very much for your telephone call of April 19, 1967 and for your excellent suggestion that you have "Zoo Day" at the Comnerce Club for purposes of raising funds to buy ome exotic animal . I have checked with our Zoo For man, Johnny Dilbeck, and determined the latest price list we have on international animal exchange lists a 38 ~ 42 inch baby Asiatic Elephant (two to five years old) at $3,000 F. O. B. New York . We could not quarter the baby with four adults we h ve since they possibly would harm it; we would erect ome simple structure to the 1mnediate outh of th ixsting Children's Zoo and po s1bly some drive could be st rted in Atlanta for the construction of tho permanent and attractive •tructure which uld compare with the existing buildings t the park. All we discussed over the telephone, another excellent project that could so nicely be sponsor d by jour as ociation would be the equipping of various playlots in hard•core slum reas in Atl ta . W could name the lots after individual, or after the Comnerce Club and•• I quot d you on the phone I think 800 1 t would do quite a hand job . Unfortunat ly, the ti •nd line ther, l a t l •hort ge due to th ar, w.o have to place an order v U ln advance to r c iv •ny r a10nable d livery . W \D uld Uke to open our playlot• fuU • tima eff ctiv J lftt nd. run them through Labor Dy. Laat y ar we built se~ n, uaing Federal fund , and we hope to ba.ve po 1lble twenty• on.e this ye r . Another very rorth• while venture ld be to 1ponaqr a er of childr n froa the di•· advantaged areae of our City for a l • day r aident c xpert nee at our facility at tak: All too • w est te that 500 childr n could ••rv d durt &•week • r ,eaeon. They would be under the super~ vi1to of xpert c couneelor• wo are er, of thi1 depart nt and uld reel ear rding nd healthy experie ee ln th out•of• doora . �Mr . R. M. Worthington, Page Two . Th nk you for any consideration and assuring you of our appreciadon for thinking of the City , I am Cordially, Jack C. Delius General Manager of Park and Recre t i on JCD :bjw CC: Captain George Royal, yor' Office . / �o1,,.,, ,11,1,:'., ,.,,1,,,,,:.. ,. I,., ,, .. .,.l,,, ,,,,i. .. 1 • • ' · ·. ~- . I, ' · ~ t ATLANTA. GEORGIA ·I t DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING R O O M 3 0 !5 • 1 6 !5 TELEPHONE, CE NT RA L AREA AV E N CODE U E , S • 404 W , • 3 0 3 0 3 !572-2781 April 20, 1967 Mr. Jack Delius Director of Parks & Recreation City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Delius: I have enclosed two copies of the "Fulton County Park Plan" which was recently presented to the Atlanta-Fulton County Joint Planning Board and the Fulton County Board of Commissioners and approved by both bodies. This should be considered a preliminary report and may be subject to some revision within the next few months. However, I wanted you to have a copy of it for your own information and reference. We certainly appreciate the fine work that Stanley Ayer has been doing in conjunction with th preparation of the development plan for the Hannnond Drive Park. I certainly hope we can continue these cooperative arrangements. Very truly yours, &!6~ FJD:dms Enclosures ..~, _I ·----·-..-· ·--·-------· ~~ l< E R O r.o,• v - fit~ ~ �I. { I J ,I , ~-7 M)\ i O\'C. "'-\.~ E 'l'\\2.. (.. 1...1,\'N o·~ '(' ~~ \C ~ Ii / I ..S OR-, ~ W\. "-' \ lit"Ce. ! l COMMISSIONERS OF ROADS AND REVENUES ·'.! FULTON COUNTY, GEORGIA ·t COUNTY ADMINISTRA TION BUILDING ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 WALTER M . MITCHELL 'j TELEPHONE !57Z• Z791 AREA CODE 404 April 20, 1967 Mr. Jack Delius General Manager Parks & Recreation City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 11 ! i. ,.I Dear M~. Delius: Ii ! I Thank you so much for your letter of April 17 and your offer of cooperation with the County in carrying out our park program. ' We appreciate this-very .much and shall be calling on ~· . you in the near future . . Best regards. · .~ ~»?f4 Walter M. Mitchell ·, WMM:bf I,. ' I I I ~ IS~~il - - - - - · - - - - - ---.~ - ~ l~6~i l ""'P<"""'.,._""'¾r----•----.----.,--,---i; ~ ~ ----.-----~- ~~ ~t:,~,~ �·~----~----------- .Pril 18, 1967 D r Mr. Cu•r rate Iva All Yr CC: Mr. Mr .. Mr. Mr. Jr. Bradley Currey, Trust Co. of Ga. Collier Gladin Charles Davis George Goodwin �1 , · •~. : .•. rJ, ,.... r .. ·1, . \. __..· { '· .I .... .•. ATLANTA. GEORGIA ....... .. _ ·I I DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING R O O M 3 0 !5 • I 6 !5 TELEPHONE C E N T R A L AREA A V E N U E , CODE S • 404 W • • 3 0 3 0 3 !572-2781 April 20, 1967 Mr. Jack Delius Director of Parks & Recreation City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Delius: I have enclosed two copies of the "Fulton County Park Plan" which was recently presented to the Atlanta-Fulton County Joint Planning Board and the Fulton County Board of Commi~sioners and approved by both bodies. This should be considered a preliminary report and may be subject to some revision within the next few months. However, I wanted you to have a copy of it for your own information and reference. We certainly appreciate the fine work that Stanley Ayer has been doing in eonjuno t ion with the preparation 0 £ t he development plan for the Hammond Drive Park. I certainly hope we can continue these cooperative arrangements. Very truly yours, I • i~h Director ,a.m-.1 / FJD:dms Enclos ures I I .,J ~-- - ·-~~ ·-· - ___ ,.,_pl _ , �t ·' I' .Jo ~---·--·- -- - I I . l ! . :f I ' I COMMISSIONERS OF ROADS AND REVENUES ·j 'i' I!, FULTON COUNTY, GEORGIA COUNTY ADMINISTR A TION BUILDING ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 i i WALTER M. MITCHELL April 20, 1967 TELEPHONE !172•2791 AREA CODE 404 I I I --1 I I Mr. Jack Delius General Manager Parks & Recreation City Hall Atlanta, Georgia I i ' . !· ,. Dear M~. Delius: I'. · !, Thank you so much for your letter of April 17 and your offer of cooperation with the County in carrying out our park program. i· I I ! I I I I 1· ! We appreciate this -very .much and shall be calling on · you in the near future. Best regards. .,:- · I I I ~~»;»~ ! . 'I Walter M. Mitchell I ! WMM:bf !' _ __, Hr<: no r «.11"y ~ --,,_...,,...,....-._____...,..._ '-"' _ I·~ ooPvl.r->• __..,_i-.....-- - -..- -------'lr.w•v! '*""' ........_.._....,.._____ - �$f&7m~~Jl/~~/l ~~r W. A. SUTTON V I CE P RESIDENT AGRICU LT URAL DEPARTMENT 588-2279 April 211 1967 Mr. R. E. Landers, Corrq:,troller City of Atlanta 501 City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mro Landers: Leigh Anne lives in metropolitan Atlanta and she is the National Easter Seal Poster Childo You've been seeing publicity about her., but most important of all - she represents the hundreds of children in the Atlanta area who have severe handicaps, caused by disease or accident. We do not see these youngsters very often as they spend most of their lives indoors, watching the world go by eoo not playing with neighborhood children because they are confined to wheelchairs ••• not going to school and learning all the wonders of life around them. Like thousands of other Georgians who have been sidetracked from the rest of the world because of crippling, many of these little ones depend on Easter Seal services - loans of wheelchairs; physical, occupational, and speech therapy at the .A tlanta :. ;a.ster Seal Rehabilitation Center to help them learn to walk., ~ress, feed themselves, and to talko Some of them attend the Center's recreational and pre-school program to prepare them for future public school enro llnento ~he Sa.st.er Seal Society gives the services, but -we must supply the moneyl Your $100 gift supplies a wheelchair; $50 will provide a week of therapy; $25, a week at summar camp; and $10, a pair of crutcheso Your donations give all the Leigh Armes an opportunity to live a little closer to the rest of the worlno The work at the Atlanta Center has expanded, due in part to your previous contribution of$ 5oOOo Put your check in the enclosed envelope, and mail it today, won't you? Sincerely, >lfi~-~-yt_,; w. WAS/jw enclosures A. Sutton, Chairman M:?tropolita.n Atlanta Easter Seal Campaign FOR RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND I NTERRELATIONSHIP WIT H BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY �April 20, 1967 Mr . Jack Adair, President Ad ir Realty nd Lon Comp ny 56 Peachtree St . , N. w. Atl nta, Georgi Dear Mr . Adair: The tri ngular park at Piedmont and Harris ha · been finished except for the fount in ch nism nd w r advis d by the supplier th t hipment will be made from California no 1 ter th n April 23, 1967 . W a ume it 111 take we k or perhap t n d y for the trial tor acb Atlant d then perhap a we k for th install tion nd te ting . A pl qu has be n ord rd to be installed t the p rk identifying the City officials and leo acknOl'lfledging your gen roue donation. The wordin of the plaque ta id nttcal to th t which you furni bed to in a r cent 1 tt r . We would like ry much to have formal dedic ton of this n w b auty spot nd to prop rly cknowledg your noroaity . The City Cl rk h • b d prepar d fr d reeolution p••• d by th nd Bo rd of Ald rmen officially thankin you for your servic to the City nd at 1uch ti h v ad dication we uld 11k to pre• nt you with thie doc nt. How v r, if you woul lt it sooner I will b lad to hav lt dellv rd to your offic • abl Tru1ttng that no too many days will transplr d dicate thi factllty, I Cordially, Jaclt c. Delius tal Mana er of ark• and aecreatlon JCD:bjw cc i • Iva Allen. Jr. to �April 20, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO Stan Martin FROM Ann Moses I have advised Carol Shure, Pre ident of the Jewels of Judea, that the Mayor will have to leave Sunday eveing to go to Wa hington, and a ked that you attend as hi personal representative to rec iv the check. Arrangements have been made with Mr. Fierman, manager of the Jewi h Commimity Center, for you and Johnny to park in the front circul r drive to bring in the Chimp. I would ugge t you be there t 7:45, find C rol Shure nd go back t ge, to b ble to com out of the curtin with th Chimp to receiv the check before thei:r p rformance b gins at 8:00. The e youn girls don't comprehend th organization nd timing to put somethin like thi aero s effectively, eo don't he itat to dvi them as to how to handle the ceremony. ! Thank million to you nd Johnny for doin thi • �~'~3' ."'Jr - - -- ~-. - -------- . - ~w_. . A dO:.> Qlj3)( - , ,. •• o::,J· -~ I i >. C I TY OF A TLA_NTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 April 19, 1967 JACK C , DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER Mr. William F. Wall, President Cascade Little League 1807 Willis Mill Road, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia l Dear Mr. Wall: I I- On April 11, 1967, a delegation appeared before the Aldermanic Parks Conu:nittee to vigorously protest the cutting off of a large corner of the Cascade Little League area thereby exluding the West Manor Elementary School section and prohibiting children in that section from participating in the Little League program this sunu:ner. We were told by this delegation that the area cut off is bounded by Utoy Creek from Lynhurst Drive west to Fairburn Road, south on Fairburn Road to Cascade Road, east to Veltre Circle and Falcon Drive, and north to Gordon Road. As the Conu:nittee understands it, the ostensible reason for the above was that population had increased above the 15,000 limit imposed by Little League requirements. However, the above mentioned delegation of citizens contended that, while a group of new apartments in the southeast corner of your Little League area were included within the new boundaries , their neighborhood was omitted for ethnic reasons. I I 1 While the Conu:nittee quickly assured those present that it had no control or jurisdiction over the Little League - that, as a matter of fact, the Little League is private in all respects - the Conu:nittee does feel that since we are affording you public facilities you should reevaluate carefully your action in light of the allegations that the cutting off of the area was brought about principally due to the area undergoing a degree of racial transition. The City of Atlanta is not and will not be a party to any attempt at segregated practices where public properties a r e involved. The Department of Parks is under a Federal court order to fully integrate all property. We therefore reconu:nend, suggest and urge that you make such arrangements as are necessary to br ing the area set fo r th above back into the Little League progr am. t r uly you r s, c.~ eneral Manage r of Parks and Recreation JCD:bjw cc: All Members of the Aldermanic Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. '-Mr . Guy L. Foster Mr. Robert Haver ,'•, .. ,, •, •. ,,,,.1111•1 •1 �.. ·--· .~- / ,-io" ~ --- -...J..-------····--~----····•4····- Ad q~ 1 ~ !.J o~~ . . I ' C I TY OF A TLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 April 17, 1967 JACK C. DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER Mr. Arthur Sanders Arts Festival of Atlanta, Inc. Box 7432, Station C Atlanta, Georgia 30309 Dear Mr. Sanders: It was my pleasure meeting with you and Mr. Bill Finch on Friday, April 14 to discuss the possibility of developing a master plan for the renovation of Piedmont Park and more particularly making provisions for certain facilities nece ssary for the successful continuation of the annual Arts Festival at Piedmont Park. It would be our pleasure to work with a group of architects and landscape architects in developing the best possible plan and design for the improvement of Piedmont Park. This department's planning staff is so over-loaded at the present time that we would welcome outside assistance; and, we would be able to defray costs of blueprinting, etc. I believe that a permanent performing arts area which would include a stage, dressing facilities, audience seating, lighting and control features, etc. would be a valuable addition to the park in that it could serve not only the Arts Festival but many other groups throughout the year. Just l e t us know when you would like to meet again and to discuss at length the development of a master plan and thanking you again for your continued interest and assistance, I am Cordially, J ack C. Delius General Manager of Parks a nd Recreati on JCD: b jw cc : Mr. James H. Finch,FAIA Mr. Joe Perrin, Head , Arts Dept,. Ga. State College Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor Mr. Eric Harknes s, All Members of the Mr. A. P. Brindley V II 1· �I .... -~' \;::~'!.':! ' ,...,L ......- - --······ ..... ·····-·"·-. AdO"j O!ol3)( ~~ C I TY OF A TLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 April 18, 1967 JACK C. DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER MEMORANDUM TO: Mr. Eric Harkness, Planning Department FROM: Jack Delius, Parks Department SUBJECT: Master plan for Piedmont Park - Urban beautification program The Parks Department is very excited about the possibility of having a master plan developed for Piedmont Park, using donated services and skills of private architects and landscapers in the Atlanta area. Your urban beautification plan could be used to its fullest extent for the restoration of Piedmont Park and at the same time we could provide badly needed facilities for the Arts Festival and other canmunity groups. In the past, there has been tremendous oposition on the part of the public to any major change to be made at Piedmont Park. It is felt that no additional structures should be placed in the park if it should in fact jeopardize the wooded area, etc. The existing swimming pool has been condemed (along with four others) by Fulton County Health Department and we are on borrowed time as far as its operation. I feel strongly that by blending the talents and opinions of several of our better designers in the City we can come up with a plan which will be acceptable to the general public and at the same time preserve the chdrm of Piedmont Park. I would like very much for you to attend any and all meetings to be called by Mr. Arthur Sanders, Bill Finch, Joe Perrin, etc. of the Arts Festival of Atlanta in reference to the park . We appreciate your efforts to date towards the urban beautification program and pledge you our full suppo r t a nd cooper ation. J CD: bjw cc : Hon. I van Allen , J r. / " Al l Member s of t he Parks Comrnittee Mr. A. P. Brindley Mr. James H. Fi nch , FAIA Mr. Arthur Sand e rs Mr. Joe Pe rrin, He ad, Arts Dept., Ga. State College �April 18, 1967 Mii . Al n Kiepper County naget' Fulton County 165 Cent~ 1 Ave ., s.w. At l nta1 Georgia 30303 Dear Alan: Virgtnt ,c rillich el , Director of CN tion, ha been quite buy all tbi past eek pr p ring for the annual Tulip Fe tiv 1 t Hurt rk; and , in dition sbe and oth r mber of b r otaff v b en prep riQg for tbe Southern ecr tion Conf rence to be held in Bi ngh b ginning April 17 . As result , Mi 1 Carmicha 1 was onl y bl ive brief propo al for the oper tion of th r recr tion progr t th HBllimond Driv P rk Sit . to Mi s C rmichael wUl be b ck in the City on April 20 bl to xp nd on th cont nts of thia proposal que tlons you might ha • d nd will be n . er any First of 11, w ar delighted at the opportunity ith Fulton County to op rat r er ation progr Park . W r liz th i rt ce of of thia und rt ki113 in that it o~1d of Atlanta can do 1n th field of p rkl opportunity. •• Carm.icha plan itb would ti of •e 11 tl �Mr . Alan Itiepper Page Two to September l t ould amount to $2,040. An additional amount of money 1ould be nece sary for the purchase of a modeet mount of supplies for rt and craft , etc . We could better d termine this cot after concluding wh t age groups we will concentr te on erving . The only other expense to Fulton County will be the cost of financing fringe benefits to eniployeee which moun to pproxlmately 14. 98% of g:ro es lary . If you should need addition l information ple e do not he itate to advise and thanking you again for tbi opportunity, I am Cordially, Jack C. De U.u General~ . n ger of P rks and Rccr tion JCD:bjw cc: Hon. Iv n Allen , Jr . All Memb r of th Parks C011111ittee Mr . • 8 . L nder Miss Virginia C rmich4el �C ITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT o f PARKS Office of Gene ra l M anage r Atlanta, Georg ia 30303 April 19 , 196 7 JACK C. DELIUS GENERA L MEMORANDUM MANAGER TO: Mr. R. Earl Landers FROM: Jack Delius SUBJECT: Development of Allatoona Camp · You recently asked me in my office what plans we might have to start development on the 470 acres of leas e d property at Lake Allatoona. I advised you we would like to do some trail blazing and o~«er basic improvements this surrnner. I have recently talked with Dan Sweat and we have computed that' for $96,000 we could employ a total of 800 young men on the project, using a 100 per week for an eight week period. Dan has incor porate d this proposal in.tb some information given to the Mayor which is to be presented to Vice President Humphrey. If no funds materialize, we could of course greatly reduce the number of people i nvolv ed o It is felt that the Nelson Amendment people could be utilized at $1.40 per hour. We would have to have proper supervisiq f these young men. We would need stoves, tents, etc . a-----... JCD : bjw �April 18, 1967 Mr . Carl T. Sutherland. Director Per onnel Depart City of Atlanta Atlanta , Geor gia nt 30303 Dear Mr , Sutherl nd: On Wednesday, April 12, I was sked to meet with Mr . Allison of BOA along ith Mr . Tucker of the Dep rtnent of Housing and Urb n Development and ever 1 repre entativ of th Dep rtiuent of Labor . Th purpoee of the eting w . to discuss the o~called Nelson Amendment which app r ntly enables municipalities and other non• profit organizations to employ the chronically under employed and unemployed in public work projects . I a ked Mr . d Farro of your department to b pr s nt in that I b d feeling that the progr would b appplic ble not only to the Dep rt nt of Parks but to ny otb r diviaions of City gov rnment . lre dy advi ed you, th progr ny f •tures of the N ighborhood Youth Corp , to b th t the rat of pay will b $1 . 40 appar ntly no age limit tion, t ir program it i k11lt in th une loyed and providing th with for pr tio •od p nt plo nt ith th re ag· nciea. etc . It appe r that the City of At nta to at le••t i ea px th t nett ~ ould be n° 1- n nt positio fte~ • on y ar period oft tho recruited under thie progr ld be the r contractor o( ;;lac:1n • 6400 individ anomic Opportunity Atl nt, Inc . d h th rath r Ugg ting r spon ib111ty 18 in vai-1ou joba. �• Mr . C rl T. Sutherl nd P ge two If I may be of any service to you do not hesitate to advise and I remain Cordially, Jack C. D liu General Manag r of Parks and R ere tion J.CD:bjw cc: Mr . R. E. Landers / Mr . Dan E. Sweat, Jr . Mr . Bd Farrow Mr . William W. Alli on, EOA ��J �\' - - - -- ---- ---------·-·---~ ------ ~ Jv.. A'-1 CJti- fol·: I ' . ': '- -------- 1> I\ (lies Co""' "'\,A,, / G 1' 'i,(. '-~tc1?.f ,_/ COMMISSIONERS OF ROADS AND REVENUES FULTON GoUNTY, GEORGIA =u.N:rv- A'OMI NI S.TA-A:T lON · 9'U-1L:0, NG- ' . I . I ATLANTA, ·GEORGIA 30303 • JAS , H. ALDREDGE TELE!"HONE 1572•279 I April 18 , . ,,I ---~-- AREA coDE 404 . I !,.. · I l !: Mr. Jack Delius General Manager Parks & Recreation City Hall Atlanta, Georgia ·I ' I '.I ·.'I I ,-t-· ' I I I Dear Jack: ' I· I I This is to acknowledge receipt of your letter dated April 17, 1967 in which you express the cooperation of the City of Atlanta Parks and Recreation Dept. with Fu_lton. ,_ , County in carrying out said program. The Commissioners deeply_appreciate your willingness to assist us in this e1'/ieavor. J .. ·! . . l . ' • • r , · ~- N . ". r:-., • . ..... JHA:bf '· '• ,I' ' i1,. <, I· ' .,,.~ ,.'I I l I I 1· i' I ~ 1.· ·. Jas. H. Aldrepge, Chairman . .: : i . i Sincerely, I I I !I ' I II,,,. II I I iI ,. �.:·. I ·: ···.· ...... . I~- FULTON COUNTY ATLANTA, GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING R O O M 3 0 !5 • I 8 !5 TELE?HONE, C E N T R A L AREA A V E N U E , CODE S • 404 W • • 3 0 3 0 3 !572-2781 April 18, 1967 Mr. Stanley T. ~artin, Jr., Administrative Assistant City of Atlanta Parks and Recreation Department City Hall Annex Atlanta~ Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Martin: Thank you for your assistance and for the helpful information you supplied today on Urban Trails. Enclosed are the two photostats you requested of the Bob Harrell article · on Urban Trails in Atlanta. -I 8)1/ely, d4aamser Planner GER:dms Enclosure cc : F. John Devaney, Director ~ ·- ·- - ----r---..,;.:~~-------------- �C I TY OF A T~NTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 I , i JACK C . DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER ri' .,.,...r"...,. ... . .... 1~ . --- ,af 1 ,, Is lehe ' .•~n m colonial' 1,i....- _ l1ora , blessed by a lol'lb . • . .,oould be protected for all time; '• . 1~ .:ne way to do it. r··~ · • I.' hat ·Drought and Trees WE HAVE had a dry spring, broken by only a few damp and cool spells. This could forecast a long summer drought. Droughts are uncomfortable things to a city dweller and down:right tragic to a farmer. Dry years usually are very hot, and we suffer financially and· physically. Orf DO! Pa' ·an VG ar: ·or You can prepare for a drought by mulching your garden and your shrubs in order to con- . o· serve moisture. J -! · Whoever takes care of t he trees along downtown streets can start getting ready right a. now. In a normally wet year these trees need more water and.attention than they have 0been in the habit of getting: They need cultivation and more frequent watering than we have , · a been giving them. t1 In a dry year this sort of care is impera- , t tive. Else a substantial investment is going to . . be lost. ·· t ' We were not to maintain everyday. '1 ·· . I �-- ~· I Auo :, Ott ~~ ITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 J~CK C. DELIUS Atlanta Parks Department 1085 Piedmont Ave. N.E. Atlanta., Georgia 30309 GENERAL MANAGER / FORESTRY DIVISION E:ntomol ogl 1t' 1 Report Date _A-=-pr_-1_l_l_3_ - ,___ ·l_9_6_?_ __ Dear Mr, Deliue: Today I went to the home of Mrs. Beerien Moore-3648 Kingsboro Bd. N.E. where I found the following: 1-Sapsuckers have made many holes in the trunks of loblolly pines in 4 or 5 trees in her front yard~ No evidence of insect attack exists, and there is no danger that the trees will die from the sapsuckers work. The trees are mature, but should live for years. 2-0ak trees in the yard were found to be free of any serious problem-one tree appears to have be en struck by lightening some years ago, but the area is being enclosed b:,, wound tissue, and should live for years. 3-It seems that some self styled "tree expert 11 recently told Mrs. Moore that she should have her pine trees removed because they are filled with bugs that could emerge and kill the trees in neighbors yards. The same person also told her that her o:ik s are in danager of falling and need to be removed. I assured her that neit her is a likely thing. This points out the great need we have in Atlanta to have a tree ordinance that would provide supervision of these so called 11 tree experts". and preverit them from preying upon the uninformed public. We have had several reports about unfounded insect and disease problems given to property owners by the organization that contacted Y.irs. Moore as well as other groups. ~ Distribution: FORM 34. 2 2 d~~ &4ruUU- Signed W. D. Buchanan, Entomologist �April 14, 1967 Mrs . W. M . EUi Ellaville, G r Dear Mr • Elli : Thi will c 1 dg receipt of your t tt I" April 11th telling me f your plans to bring_ . p f Br~-.....:...,, Sc uti to Atlant on Fricla:y. April 21 t. your dea-i• t vi t the Cyclor • rtrn nt C clorama are gl With I •m at • f . a moet ry eut riait t Ada ta. Sine r ly y -:.i / Iv Alle , Mayr lAJ /h CC: Mrs. B rb r Wilkins 0 . �H \ A ,h l. ) ~ O U :J X A,H.)J OU :J X C I TY OF A TLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 April 14, 1967 JACK C . DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER Mr. J.C. Barrett J.C. Barrett Construction Company, Inc. 3455 Sexton Road Chamblee, Georgia 30005 Re: Concessions Building - Grant Park Dear Mr. Barrett: I thank you for your letter of March 29, 1967 and am genuinely 'pleased and relieved that a target date for completion of the above project has been determined. I still feel that July 1st is too late to complete this project particularly due to the fact that we will be in the midst of our most busy season. I managed to inspect the building every weekend and sometimes find it difficult to determine that any work has been done. I strongly urge that you fulfill your contract with the City of Atlanta by completing this building as rapidly as possible and I am assured by the Architects involved, Tucker and Howell, that they have in no way delayed making decisions on changes, modifications, etc.; and, from their statements in writing, I assume that they are presently not holding any decisions that would delay you proceeding with the project. The undersigned would particularly appreciate being kept advised if anything should develop to delay this project further and I am ery truly yourns·n . ( .~ eral Manager of Par ks and Recreation JCD : bjw cc : Hon. I v an Allen , J r. / All Member s of the Par ks Conuni ttee Mr. Thomas F. Choyce Hon. William B. Ha rt sfie ld Mr. A. P. Brindley Mr. W. o. Street Tucker and Howe ll ·1 · t �-~·-·# - ··.:J · ~ ' ,r,·, 1UtJ IX • ~ r\ , r f ' - \~ ' r~ ·.i· J, . l .. . ' /-, ·: - ~ · .. r =.:,::..l .~ (_ !-/ I i'··."-\ .;~<~ I..J Hr . Carl T. ,;;,utoorland Director of Personnel City of l~tlanta Atl~nt , Oeorgii 30303 Dear Mr . Sutherland: It is becoming increasingly more apparent that salary Range No . 54 ($94 38 - -$ 11, 6 22 ) ia r..ot sufficient to ettract a l2rge rn.unb er of qualifi e d appliccnts for the position cf the Zoo Director. To date, we hc:.ve h ad thr0e legitimate • I I . applicants ; one of t'hern HithJre"d his 11ar,1e at the l ast moment, a second one said he ould consider t he position if it paid nore money, and ti1e third one is interested in the job at the range now presentJ.J o ff..:.red. 'lne thi rd applic'1nt appears to be qualified eventhouCJh he is only twenty-six years of age . We were hoping for an older and more experienced individual but possibly may have to make a n ultim~te selection o f thi s single applicant. I feel vecy strong ly that two things shou ld ~e d~ne. 1, that the Personnel Bo ar d ohould pass e resolution ~uthoriz ing the General Manager of Parks to start the Zoo Director at any one of the six s teps in Range Ho. 54 . 2 , rin l , . , i24~ '.i:hi s app0ars to be the minimu.'11 r ange ne cessary to attrect a fully qualified individual and I fee l v e ry strongly that if 1e can ' t get someone who is competent in al l respects we would be just as well off without anyone . Thanking you f or your continued assistance a.,.~d oonsiderat.d.on to this department , I am Cordially, Jack JCD:bjw cca .fr i i c. Del ills General Manager of Parka and Recreation Mr. Ed Pritchett~ Personnel Dept. Hon. Charlie Leftwich, Chairman, Parks Com.'llittee �April 13 ~ 1967 Mr . Wend U Campbell , Off c ter Wor er Ma Department City of Atlant Atl nta , G~or i 3030J D r Wendell: Th nk you very much for yO'l.li t 1 phon c 11 of Aprt l 11, 1967 1nqu1r1ng if ter upplted by your department hould b pl c d on ft(m• r enue ba i wh n \UI d by prtv t 1 tvidual to care for the tree• planted int.he downtown are . tbes account• should b non-- ars Truati thf.a· 111 autt your purp08 • ln dtaeuea ti~ ttee 11 ·1 Water C Cordially, JD: cc: •Jr. / ·. hrb C tt.ea �April 13, 1967 Mr . Georg~ W . West W . t Lumb r Compaiiy 1491 Piedmont Av nue , N . E . Atlanta, G orgia De r George: Thank you for your letter of April 12th copy of you.11 1 tt 1' to Jack D lius . With , lam Sincerely o Ivan Allen~ Jr. Mayor lAJ / .. ,' ) I J th �OFFICE OF CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD April 12, 1967 Mayor Ivan Allen City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Ivan: I know you are a busy man but I hope you agree with my brief explanation to the Parks Department Manager. I have managed to fuss about signs on my end of the park along Ponce de Leon Avenue , which is in the county, and I can assure you it has taken some right cute police work to get it done. With best wishes, I am GWW:sac �r ril 12, 19 7 anager .. all Atlanta, 0 or ia D ar u-. Jo .anag r: le ho Uv on t ri ht h i of Po c e Leon parka by attempting to pl e all ort of signs in I hope you do agm . '1th bes wish s. 1 am G - �I Apr il 17 , 1967 Hon. J H. Aldredge , Ch irman Ful ton County Boatd .o f Comniaaioners 2409 Court Hou c Annex 165 Ce.ntr l ~ nue , s. w. Atlant , Geor 30303 r Mr . Aldrl!d e~ f ny aa•1 tanc • pl • do not h itata t o contact Cordi lly • .lC :bjw ll 11 , Jr./ f the P. rb C NOTE: Same letter also sent to: Hon~ Charlie Brown, Vice Chairman Hon. Walter Mitchell , Member �April 14, 1967 Honor ble John H. Markl nd City Manager City of Decatur Dec tur, Georgia Der Mr . M rkland: Mr. R. Earl Landers of the Mayor's Office ha referred to me your corr spondence of April 11, 1967 in which your is d the pos ibility of the City of Decatur procuring pl nts from the City of Atl nt ' Gr nhopse on contractur 1 basis . I b 11 ve you re also int r ted in having the advice and ~econmend tiont of our Horticultu~iet. Nothing would suit b tt r than to cooper te 1th the City of Dec tur sine th t ia wher I • is d nd tt nded chool; and, I h ve notteed your lovely triangle in downtown Dec tur n r the Court square . You r to b nded for your ffort • Preaantly, w have only two Gi-e nhouse in production. We have pl n to build two addition 1 unit sometime in th next five y r,. but t the pr nt time it is all can produc bord r plant oth r trial• for our par sy tem. As r sult, ny plate r purchased frOtn private ource such as Monro r•ery, Golden Stat Roaes, tc. Of course, 11 re bought on low bid through our Pur~ha in Depar nt. r plea1ure to• nd It vould be Mr. Oort Mr. Oo-r out r than h 1• exc By arrang ha• n, n n nt opy of thh 1 tt r, I am aakl , Mr. r n to contact your arr to et vtth you at yout conv ie110e. office A al_, 1 vteh could • of · 1 ~he re-q _ •ta e ••it ce and Cr tally, J bjw e: • • a. • rl IA der• • rt do a r cb.t.e �Apr 11 J2 , 1967 Atlanta Board of Al dermen Cl ty Ha l I Atl an ta, Georgi a 30303 ATTENTI ON: Che trman of f' rk O~ar Oept .• ent> r-s of the Board: tt g ives us at Pop atnet Jun ior league Football Nattonal Headquarters gr at p l easure to writ& to you In pr als of one of our long aff lll at d Pop Warner Junior League Football organ l za~ tlons, the Norf hslde Youth Or ganhatt on , Inc,; sponsors of t he out stand I ng Buckheed "R d Devi Is • footb 11 tea of your city .. Buckhead uR d o vi 1s0 and th Ir head coach, 11 Robert 11 ., of 4545 Po r s Ferry RQada N• • , Atl anta , hav b en afflll t d with our n tlon Ide Pop arner s af ty-first, c edemle footba 11 progr am for .-·the past ten y ar s . fh S l ac k tn each of tho e ten ye ar s t he ir t ea hes a l ys b n one of th top ex p i es of the Pop ar n r p~ llosophy of. cOl'l'O lnlng outst Ad lng footb a ll Ith t he scho l astte echle'(ement and sport n• sh Ip of eeeh end every on of It boy•• L st y ar thl contlnuoualy -o utstand ing r ecord capped with net Ion I success when the Buckh ad 0 Red Oevl Is'! on the 1966 Pop er,-er S-cho I Ii t I e-.,Foof b 11 Wor Id Champ I onsh I p ov• r a I I oth r Pop r n r ,~. ms In th Ir ege and l ght dlvl e ton In t he naf f o,i. 8 cu• of thl , and • of th Ir years of ex mp ll yl ng t he b s t qu titl es of Pop rner Jun i or L ague Footb It, l ast pte er t he Buckhf d 0R d O vi I " w r e I nv i ted t o Ph i I de lph l t o p l oy an exh l btlon of Pop ar i, r footb II on Fr nk lln F l e ld b f re 0. 000 f n• folt owl n the lneugur I of the Atl ant "Fe Icon " In the Ph lt de l ph f a" at Ion I Foctb a l I Le gue, p loy d gl••" ga i n t t h • In c nc. lu, lon, we feel c.ert In th t ny yout~ cthfty the North• lde Y uth org n.lzaf I on, the Bue~he d •• td vi 18 0 0 obert " I ckR I I· wou ld undert ke, whefh r In • • t h r $ ort auee•••• Of" tven s non-sport ct l v t ty , , Atf nte, �April ll, 1967 D 1 Sine rely y Alle • Jr. CC: Mr. J ck Deliu �c:Atlanta JJon~ai Society Atlanta, Georgia 1O Apri l, 1 967 Mrs.Anne Moses Secretary to the Mayor City Hal l .Atla nta , Ga . De a r Mrs . Mo ses , Larry Williams asked me to send this rough draft( oelow) to you as he i s very anxi ous to get speedy a ction on the permi t and your help will be gre a tly appre ci a t ed ! I enclo s e copy of the l etter sent directly to the Director of Pl an t I mportations. Thanki n g you , and s i ncerely , Mr s .Cha rle s Bu s ch, Se cre t a r y to th e Cha irman Committee f or Dr.A.Le s lie Ste ph ens , Jr. Mem ori a l ::l on sa i Garden Dire ctor of Pl an t I mportations United States Department of Agri culture Be ltsvill e , Maryland Dear sir , I am aware of t he proj e ct of the Atlan ta Bonsai Society to bring a 100-year ol d Pinu s pen t aphylla in it s container and s oil from Japan and that the Ci ty of At l an t a as wel l as our Chief Horticulturist, Mr . B. Oortman , will be responsible for the USDA pos t- entry requirements. Sincerely yours , ( Si gned ) Mr .Ivan Allen, Mayor of Atlanta �(COPY ) ATLANTA BONSAI SOCIETY Director of Plant I mportations United States Dep~rtment of Agriculture Beltsville , Ma ryland Dear s i r , The Atlanta Bonsai Society ha s tal ked to Dr.George Avery of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and he has informed us that we can get permission to import a 1OO-yea r old Pinus penta phylla from Kyuzo Mura ta of Kyulcaen Bonsai Garden , Bonsai - cha, Omiya Sai tamo, J apan . Because of the great age and high cost of this bonsaitree we would like to have it ship ped direct to Atlanta , Georgia, in its container with soil not removed, via Air Express. We feel that you will grant such a permi t in view of the fact that this tree will be pla ced in the newly constructed " Dr.A.Leslie Ste phens ,Jr. Memorial Bonsai Garden"at Piedmont Park and tende d by competent members of the Atlanta Bonsai Society. Mr .Berend Oortman , Chief Hortic ulturist for the City of Atlanta wi ll be directly responsible for the health of the tree as per the post-entry requirements . The City of Atlanta is aware and coo perating in this project. We would like to shi p this tree from Ja pan during the month of May , so your soonest coo peration will be greatly appreciated . Thanking you in advance , Your sincere , (Signed) MrsoCharles Busch Secretary to the Chairman of Dr.A.Le s lie Stephens ,Jr. Memorial Bonsai Garden Committee Copies sent to: Senior Senator Richard B.Russell Mrs.Grace P. Wilson , American Horticulture Society �Apx-U 10, 1967 Mr . Fr ak H. N ely, Pr aid nt Mr . Rich rd H. Rich. Vice Pr The Rich Foundation, Inc . Post Offic Box 4539 tlant • Georgia 30302 Gentle id nt n: I acknowl dge and than you for your 1 tt r of April 4, 1967 and for th nclo ed ch ck in the mount of $28.500 de pay ble to th City of Atlant for th purpos of purch sing and installing t 1 at four portabl swilllning pools in the hard-cor poverty ar aa in our city. We de ly ppreciat this enetous gesture on the part of The ieh Foundation and look forward in the next f w daya to aupplying you with a fr d copy of the resolution cceptin thi gift. W will ka p you info d •• to the progr~•• bi eon tbe pUt"chae and •• ly of th &e pool• and anticip•te with pl aaure dedication of th•~ n w facil1t1e in th four reepectiv ar as el cted. Thanking you a ain. I a Cordially. Jack c. DeU.u• er l p J 1bjt, • I Allen. J r . ~ ru and na.gu· ot ere ti �0'.' A ,;., OU J ,) X ~ l VA-'-N\ l\. ·- -j~'.·0.,,I . f\Llt:=N, ~ ~ ~ i THE RICH FO~ TD.ATION , INc. P. O. BOX 4539 TRU STEE S ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30302 FR A NK H . NEELY RI C HARa° H . RICH I. OSCA R R. STRAUSS, JR , April 4, 1967 JOSEPH K, HEYMAN Mr. Jack C. Delius General Manager Parks Department · City of Atlanta 260 Central Avenue, S. W . Atlanta, Georgia 30303 De'a r Mr. Delius: The trustees of The Rich Foundation, organized in 1943 for the promotion of religious, educational, and charitable facilities, and in recognition of the splendid contributions you have made in your field of endeavor, have voted to aid your activities to the extent of $28,500.00. It gives us great pleasure to enclose herewith a check from the Foundation in that amount. It is our understanding that this gift will be used for the installa tion of swimming pools at the following locations, at the price you quoted to us: Rhodes Street Play Lot Merritts and Bedford Play Lot Connally Street near Richardson 196 Savannah Street, S. E., or 373 Thurmond Street, N. W. This gift is made in accordance with the resolution passed by the Board of Ald e rmen on Monday, April 3, 1967 . Wi th best wishes , we are ~;r CM~ Cordi a lly y ou~ , /J,· . ~~ Vice P r e s ident Enclos ure s . . '( �April 5, 1967 HE TO: ORANDUM iss Peggy Bk r, ~ , Miss Virgin! C rmichael and Mr . ~ M ~ r t i n FROM: Jack Delius SUBJECT: Summer recreational program - possibl nd priv te ssist nee Feder 1 To solidify our thinking on hat transpired at them eting c lled by Dan~ eat on April 3, 1967 I und r the following impressions . I will -trite a proposal for a city-wide uoperation Chap" program to b gin Jun 1st and go through Labor D y. I will su it thia propos 1 to cert in official t HEW . Their na s 1111 supplied to me by Dan Swat or others . Miss Virgini Carrnich 1, Director of ecreation, will compile comprch nsiv 11 t of pl yground equipment and supples he to pro rly operat the proposed 21 playlots . This 11 t giv n to the F d r 1 xecutive Committ for ere ning purpos s nd hopefully v riou gencie such u •• or stry Dpt ., etc. will come forth with ice che ts, ahelt r h lv , pl yground pp ratus, tc. J: will h v my proposal on April 7, 1967,. JCDsbjw 11 0p r tion Champ" r dy by Frid , �[Eal r• FULTON COUNTY ATLANTA, GEORGIA STATEMENT BY THE COUNTY COMMISSION ON THE FULTON COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION PROGRAM APRIL 6 , 19 6 7 The 1967 Session of the General Assembly of Georgia adopted an amendment authorizing Fulton County to conduct recreational activities in unincorporated areas using County personnel. The Bill has now been signed into law by Governor Maddox. There has been some speculation in the press and elsewhere regarding the intentions of the Fulton County Commission in this matter, and we are issuing this statement to clarify our position. It is not the intention of the Fulton County Commission to establish and operate a comprehensive program of supervised recreation under the sole jurisdiction of the County government. We believe that the best interests of all c iti zens will be served if duplication of services between the City of Atla nta and Fulton C ounty a re ke pt to a minimum , c onsi ste nt alwa ys with good ope ration. �1 , m:il / -- A ,H ~,J ' \....i \ .1. ._-10.:,1 ~31 \OU JX 0tJ3 X .,__ rI I I -2- It is our purpose to provide park and recreational services as follows: 1. The County will try to provide suitable neighborhood parks and playgrounds in the unincorporated area of Fulton County, including ball fields, picnic ar:eas and playground equipment. We recently submitted an application for Federal assistance in the purchase and development of neighborhood and _ community parks. 2. The Commission has also recently approved a long-range com.:. prehensive plan for the purchase and development of large tracts of open space suitable for future use as regional parks and recreational areas. It is our intention to implement this plan as rapidly as funds, including State and/or Federal grants, are available. 3. We do not plan an elaborate supervised recreational program. A possible exception will be the limited program at Hammond Drive Park in Sandy Springs where the County has already requested the City of Atlanta to plan and submit a proposal for the operation of this facility when completed. 4. It is our intention to cooperate fully with the six municipalities in Fulton County having populations less than 5,000 people, in accordance with the Constitutional Amendments approved by the voters of Fulton County last November. This amendment permits the County government to provide not more than one -half the cost (not to exceed $5,000 . 00 for each municipality) of the annual cost of recreational programs within these municipalities. General guidelines for these programs are being developed in cooperation with the municipalities which have requested same. I �-~- . . U ...---- ·-·-········-······--·· A.JO~ / OtJ:3Xj ·as--··· -3- 5. The physical development of parks and playgrounds will be handled by the Department of Public Works with the assistance of the Department of Planning. The advisability of contractual arrangements with the City of Atlanta for the operation of recreational programs will be explored in each instance, as in the case of Hammond Drive Park. Where the cost is acceptable and the particular operation most efficient, we will request the City to provide services. The Commission is aware of the county-wide need for improved recreation and park facilities and services. We are attempting to meet these needs in an orderly and economical fashion within the framework of applicable laws. The newly enacted statute will provide greater flexibility, especially in the outlying communities where there are few recreational facilities of any sort. The Commission has no intention of frustrating or violating the basic objectives of the Plan of Improvement, namely, that duplication of services between Atlanta and Fulton County should be kept to a minimum. We heartily support this objective and are doing all in our power to provide services necessary to our citizens, with a minimum of cost and duplication . FULTON COUN'IY COMMISSION Jas. H . Aldredge, Chairman Charlie Brown, Vice Chairman Walter M . Mitchell �Apdl 4 , 1967 Mr . Geor pe ley, Br _ , Inc . P t omc BO¥ •soi Atl ma, Ge rgia 3030.Z Dear Mr . .. U 31'd t the Sln,cerely y Ivan Allen, a . r CC: Mr . Jack Delius •, J•. �April 7, 1967 MEMORANDRUM TO: Miss Virginie C rmich el , Dir ctor of R ere tion FROM: Jack Delius SUBJECT: Hammond Drive P rk 51 te - Guy Webb School Fulton County P rk System I received t lepho request from Mr . Al.an Kipper, the County Manger, asking th t at the earliest date possibl sUbmit to hi office a propoe d program for the o ration of th Hmmnond Driv Park Site djacent to the Guy Webb School for this coming summer . Fulton County ' s dep rtm nt of Public orks under Mr . A. T. McDonald re proceeding to d velop th driv y and p rking re of th rk and I a sum will do cert in underbrush cl aring . Stan Ay r of our P rk Engin ring Division is r pidly compl ting th working dr wing on the walk in th perk es well s gr ding sch for th tenni courts nd mphith ater . I und r tand thet Fulton County School uthoriti will m k v 11 bl two b ball di nd adjac nt to th ait which r a:,nn ct d with Guy bb School. ould like th progr m could tart r of staff, type nd n Pi a Mr. Ki pp r rear ·t1on po sibly th ec ivity inc Thank you v ry much. JCDcbjw CCI All M Ion. rs of the P rka ·Co arl L nd r V itt �1 pril 4, 1967 Mr . Ch rlie Leftwich 1C65 Jonesboro Rd ., S . E. Atlanta , Georgi 30315 Dear Mr o Leftwich: You prob bly have notic d , mor nd more trees are being planted in the downtown are by priv te property own rs ~ No provision was made in the 1967 Budget granted this depart nt for ersonnel or materi 1 to maintain thes trees i _·pr oper fa hion . Alre dy , sever 1 have di d bee use of the 1 ck of atering or beceus of the intense he t being reflected off of light colored buildin s, etc . ;fuen the tr s did, it seems that thi depart nt receiv a critioi m from the gcner l public hen inf ct we h d nothing to o ith pl nt1ng the trees . I jut h to make it clear th t di sk for uffici nt help nd ipment to adequately mint int owntown tr e planting progr m but it s not s. i l ~or it to be budget d and our reque t w not gr nte. V ry truly your ., J ck c . G n r l P rk J cc• 1bj Hon . Ivan All ·t ric H r'kn 1 Mellnber • liu n gr of and R er tion �, ~ •41 ) ~) ~ · -· - j AdO O ~- -- \~ ~ Hollywood, California. 90069 January 16th, 1967 Dear Sirs: In Record at Fulton County Page 761 i t &ta~es clearly that a ten cents to see th~ Cyclorama~ Fulton, Georgia in book numbEa:' 128 and ·nominal fee be charged not to exceed This has been broken and as only living heir to my father the late G.V. Gress. If restitution is not made immediately I will offer the Cycloriuna to be moved from Atlanta, Georgia and make i t a National Monument in Washington, D.C. of the Civil War. John H. Gress ,J �I . ;r, j · ~\OU:J)( I -- ,. - XP.~!A,~ef\.)\ - J ci i' ~ i .• 7 -~ -u;:~ - Januory 26, 1967 ·Mr. Tho.-nas P . Chcvc e Assod.ate City i.ttorna,.1 City o f i~tlanta Law Depeirtment 2614 First ?~o,t.iomal E~; Duilding Atlanta, O~rgi Dear Tonia C'll J enu ary 25 , 1~167 , I received in the ma ils e letter from Mr. John E. Gress, dated January 16, 1967. For YQUr in:;ormation, .I letter; ar.i quotU'!g verbetiin his 8350 .. ta.r.:m::mt Iinne, HollY'",'Oed, Ca lifornie ~mos9·, Janua ry 16, 1967. Oe~r n1rs: 0 !n reccr~ et Fulton County, Fulton Ceorgi~ in book number 1 29, e.n d Page 761, it at.etas, clearly that a nr-,..minal fQG be c-..herged, not to ~""eed ten eents to seo tl1e (,yol.oranul . Thi ~ bea been broltcn , and ~s only living heir to my father , the late G. V . Gresa, if .restitution is not. mede i ~...edi t.ely offer tl,e Cyclor:runa to t.-e moved from i~tlanta, Georgia end mtilr.G'l it e Hationel Monument. in Wasl'lington, n. c. of t..1-ie Civil War . J ohn H . Gr,eae w/siqnatl.lre..• l. will ?Till you pl ease inve.&t.igeto this mattGr end reply to .Vz.r. Grose• letter? Jack c.. Delius · Gsneral Mmrnger of Pens and ~t.Lon JCD:mjh dtl l/2.5 co, All Members Aldermanio Par'k Committee I )• ~ i '. ., / I �11 / ,..... - ~A·R~-> 1au:1x -- ( A,_,_no:.,·•. ~.' ~t§J . C I TY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT OF LAW 1114 WILLIAM- OLIVER BUILDING Atlanta, Georgia 30303 February 1, 1967 HENRY L, BOWDEN CITY _ATTORNEY FERRIN Y. MATHEWS ASSIST~ NT CITY ATTORNEY ROBERTS, WIGGINS MARTIN MCFARLAND EDWIN L. STERNE RALPH C. JENKINS JOHN E. DOUGHERTY CHARLES M, LOKEY THOMAS F. CHOYCE JAMES B , PILCHER ASSOCIATE CITY ATTORNEYS Mr. Jack C. Delius General Manager Department of Parks and Recreation City Hall Annex Atlanta, Georgia ROBERT A . HARRIS HENRY M. MURFF CLAIM S ATT0Rt-!l;:Y $ Dear Jack: The attached opinion is a bit more formal than I normally get with you as you may wish to write Mr. Gress or contact the members of the Parks Connnittee. I Inasmuch as I do not feel that I should go into direct connnunication with Mr. Gress, I respectfully request that you forward a copy of this opinion to him if, in your good judgment, you wish to do so after reading this. Let me know if you need anything else with respect to this opinion. Jack, I am of the opinion that the next step belongs to Mr. Gress and not to the City of Atlanta; however, I am not attempting to over- ride your judgment with respect to sending Mr. Gress a copy. Yours v ery t ruly, TFC:jc Encl. 1 Thomas F. Choyce 1 . �7 Aol0. J ~ ~ C I TY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT OF LAW 1114 WILLIAM- OLIVER BUILDING Atlanta, Georgia 30303 February 1, 1967 HENRY L. BOWDEN CITY ATTORNEY FERRIN Y. MATHEWS ASSISTANT CITY ATTORNEY ROBERTS, WIGGINS MARTIN McFARLAND EDWIN L, STERNE RALPH C, JENKINS JOHN E, DOUGHERTY CHARLES M. LOKEY THOMAS F, CHOYCE JAMES B, PILCHER ASSOCIATE CITY ATTORNEYS Mr. Jack C. Delius General Manager Department of Parks and Recreation City Hall Annex Atlanta, Georgia ROBERT A, HARRIS HENRY M, MURFF CL.AIMS ATTORNEYS Dear Sir: I am in receipt of your letter of January 26, 1967 in which you advised me that you received a letter from Mr. John H. Gress, dated January 16, 1967. You then go on to quote the letter and end up by requesting an opinion from me as to the contents of the letter and such other germane documents and consequences I find necessary to investigate in the premises. To begin with, Mr. Gress is correct when he states that the original deed of conveyance from G. V. Gress to the City of Atlanta did make a recitation such as the one he alludes to in his letter. More specifically, the recitation is made in a deed of conveyance, dated April 14, 1898, between Mr. Gress and the City of Atlanta, and reads in part as follows: "It is understood and agreed that the said picture shall be used for the benefit of the whole people, and shall be kept open the year round, subject to reasonable rules and regulations, and that only a nominal entrance fee shall be charged, not to exceed ten (10) cents for each person, an d that t h e said bui ldi ng shall bear an app r opriat e sign indicating t he battle which the painting repr esent s, and a l so that i t was pres en ted to the City of Atlanta by the aforesaid party o f .the first part." 'I . • �d,,.o~ aJ______ \~ - Page 2 Mr. Jack C. Delius 2/1/67 I have a photostatic copy of this deed in the event you require further inspection. With respect to the deed itself and besides the provision above quoted, the deed is what is referred to as "honest on its face", that is, we have no reason to doubt the validity of the instrument nor should we doubt its validity. Also, I am of the opinion that not only a nominal c<;: msideration was given for the picture (stated to be One ($1. 00) Dollar in the deed), but also that the additional consideration is sufficient to give rise to the theory of a deed of gift which was duly accepted by the City of Atlanta, With this in mind, the first question that poses itself is whether or not Mr. John H. Gress, who purports to be the "only living heir" of G. V. Gress, has the right to bring about a forfeiture of the picture in question. I am assuming that the portion of the letter from Mr. Gress that he is the only living heir of G. V. Gress is correct. With this as an assumption, I am of the legal opinion that no one, including Mr. John H. Gress, has the right to create a forfeiture such as he envisages in his letter. My basis for this opinion is found in the case of City of Atlanta vs. Jones, et al, 135 Ga. 376 (1910). at page 379, wherein it was in part held: "The language of the deed constituted a covenant, rather than a condition subsequent. Where an owner of land conveys it to a city, and states in the deed that it is to be used for a specified purpose, he may have such an interest as to prevent its sale or diversion from that purpose to others, or perhaps he may have an action of covenant. But such language a lone does not create a conditi on subsequent, on breach of wh ich a f orfeiture r e sul t s and the or iginal owner may recover the land . Devlin on Deeds (2d ed . ), 978 and notes; Warvel le on Rea l Property (2d ed . ) , § 317 ; Thompson v. Hart, 133 Ga. 540 (66 S. E~ 27 0) . It may be thought by many laymen that such language creates a condition subsequent, but it is well settled in law that it does not do so. If parties desire that a forfeiture shall result, or that an estate shall terminate because of the breach of a covenant or failure to use ·." �A d tl : 1 ' - '- \OtJ J Xj - .- - -- - ----------- Lil9_~~ -. ------ ··· -····-····-··- . 143.215.248.55 -- --- . ------ .·---J---- --.:-~J3J£i.- Page 3 Mr. Jack C. Delius 2/1/67 the property for the purpose mentioned in the deed, they should so state." It is my opinion also that there is no language with respect to that portion of the deed dealing with the nominal fee which would give rise to a forfeiture inasmuch as no reversionary provision is contained in that portion of the deed. We now have disposed of the easy part of the opinion. The hard part is, what consequences, if any, arise from the City of Atlanta's maintaining the current admission price to see the Cyclorama? Once again, we refer to the language in City of Atlanta vs. Jones, et al, wherein it was in part held that the grantor " ••• may have an action of covenant." There is very little law with respect to a breach of covenant in Georgia and it is necessary for me to refer to other legal precedents to determine what the consequences of a breach of covenant are under these circumstances. With this as a background, I am of the opinion that the ordinary remedy for breach of a covenant is by an action at law for damages. (20 Am Jur 2d 589). However, in a proper case, equity will sufficiently enforce covenants or grant an injunction to restrain their violation. (Ibid.). Therefore, I am of the opinion without more, as will more fully be hereinafter set forth, that a proper party might bring an action against us to enjoin us from charging the fee we are now charging. The next question which addresses itself to us is: are proper parties to enforce the covenant?" "Who Pl ease bear in mind that the language of the above quo ted port i on of t he deed sta tes, " • • . the .said picture shall be u sed fo r the benefit of the whole people, and shall be k ep t open the year round, ••• and t hat only a nominal entrance fee shall be charged, not to exce ed ten (10) cents -f or each person ••.• " With this in mind, I am of the opinion that this is the type of a �-···- -----·· / AdOO,-----J .. ·' ,,·11e ) f - -- ~w ,OU 3 X ' •. Page 4 Mr. Jack C. Delius 2il/67 situation which pennits a third party to enforce a promise made for his benefit, and a covenant made for the sole benefit of a class of persons not parties to it may be availed of by an individual of that class. (20 _Am J~A92). In other words, we have a third party beneficiary contract which can be maintained in the name of any person who constitutes not only a citizen of Atlanta, or Fulton County, or the United States, but anybody in the world; which, being a rather large class, is, in my opinion, a beneficiary of the Cyclorama. Therefore, I am of the opinion that an injunction could be maintained by anybody in the world to enforce the covenant as written. I do not know exactly how long we have charged more than a ten cent admission fee to the Cyclorama. I trust that you will use your good office to detennine when this practice began. This factual detennination by you is very important in the . light of the next portion of this opinion. Although we have a technical breach of a covenant, as set forth above, I am of the opinion that the doctrine of estoppel is applicable to the situation here involved with respect to the enforcement of covenants. By this I mean that a person, or a class of persons, may be estopped by conduct from asserting a right to enforce a covenant. (20 Am Jur 2d 590). By this I mean that if we could satisfy a Court of Law that the beneficiaries of this covenant, by their inaction, acquiesced in the charge of more than a dime, this would act as estoppel to prevent them from enforcing the covenant. While acquiescence is spoken of as estoppel, strictly speaking, it is no more than a part of estoppel. By this I mean that I am inclined to believe that a Court of Law would prevent anybody from initiating an injunction against us because the entire class of beneficiaries had acquiesced to increased charges. Legally speaking, no set time is necessary to constitute estoppel such as we have in this case ; rather, it would be that amount of time which induced us to a c t to our det r i ment. It i s my thought that ten years would be sufficient, although I am reluctant to detenni ne what a Court would detennine t o be sufficient. t' · = . �'- ,,u . .> U \~ -~ - - -- ----· -- ______ l../143.215.248.55 -·-- ·- . . ···-··-·--· ··· ···--L-,!143.215.248.55..J . . .._______,___,.. . ,___, . . ·-· -···- · ···~ .·,~-}( . ~ J~ · • ,. c. Page 5 Mr. Jack C. Delius 2/1/67 I know that this has been a lengthy opinion and one on which you will probably need further elaboration; however, for the purpose of recapitulation, my opinion is as follows: (1) There are no words in the deed which would give rise to a forfeiture; (2) A suit might be filed against the City of Atlanta praying an injunction be granted to prevent the further breach of the covenant by any person; (3) In the event such a suit is filed seeking an injunction, I am of the opinion that we could plead estoppel in this case due to the acquiescence by the general public from asserting the breach of the cov.enant at the time of its breach. Should you need any further elaboration in this matter, please feel free to call upon me. With my kindest regards, I am v7 truly yours, ,JrL JlKv TFC:jc Thomas F. Choyce ~~ �I >-·.143.215.248.55 16:00, 29 December 2017 (EST),. ) • ,r-" lO~ February 3, 1967 ~.r. T.homaa F. ~,lee Aaoociata Ci~I Attorney City of }~tlanta Depart.uent of Lt:r<11 · 2614 First na·t ione.l Ban.~ Dldg. ~tl~nta, Georgie 30303 near Tom: Thank you for your letter of Febru~ 1, 1967 and the ettache7. We trust that this will be of service to you. Sincerely yours, J;:~·!e~ JCB:mb Enclosure (1) �~ ~~- -- - ---- ------ J. ~A143.215.248.55 16:00, 29 December 2017 (EST) u AdO (J I Ott:3X - C. BARRETT CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. 3455 SEXTON WOODS DRIVE CHAMBLEE, GEORGIA 30005 TELEPHONE: 451 - 5416 March 29, 1967 Mr. M. A. 'Iucker Tucker and Hm.iell 815 Rhoda&•Haverty Building Atlanta, Georgia Grant Park Conceaaions Building Re: Dear Mr. Tucker: We urgently request immediate decisions made for Itema 1, 3, S, 7, 8 and 9 of Proposal sent to you on March 6, 1967. Thaae items are and have been delaying construction. Also, we would appreciate it if you would prepare a Change Order for the other items of the same breakdown, along with these mentioned above. Please note that we bad requested ninety (90) days time extension. Please allow another thirty (30) days, plus whatever time ia re~uired for you to iasue ua the instructions necessary to procee.d with thia work. Also, we have not received a reply to the Change Order which I signed on March 27, 1967, revising the concrote walk• and addina aome sower work. Very truly youra, J. c. Barratt JCB:mb cc: c. Delius, General Manager of Parka and Recreation Mr. Jack �CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT OF LAW 111¢ WILLIAM-OLIVER BUILDIN,G, ATLAN,TA, GEORGl,A 30303 March 24 , 1967 Personal and Confidenti 1 Mr .• Jack C. Delius General Manager of Parks and Recreation City H 11 Annex Atl nt , Georgia Dear J ck: This 1 tt r is in respo the following question.: "Can the City of A~ ----buildings inclu Cyclorama in G cert in land it d to, the Before I c n g r four ba ic ther f 11 : tf.ty for (2) ntity for (4) public purpo priv t public entity for a priv t L as v to nd of the opinion th t thi situ tion could (1) (3) 1 1 recent inquiry posing priv te ntity for it to your good jud ent to d t in above categorie this p cific situ tion you would fall. . ' ,. purpo purpo •• public purpo • into hicb of the ref r ce to As you know, th City of Atl nt war c ntly iv the int rat in p rk ' prop rty. Thia bill, pow r to ali n t �Page 2 Mr . Jack C. Delius 3/ 24/ 67 passed during the 1967 Ses sion of the Georgia Assembly , is known as House Bill No. 299 . I enclose herewith a copy of said House Bill for your further perusal. Please bear in mind that this opinion is predicated upon the Governor signing this Bill into !,_;!!. Absent the Governor's approval of this Bill , the answer to the question posed by you is in the neg tive . Let us assume for the purpose of this opinion that the Governor shall sign tluls Bill into law . The general rule applicable to this situation can be stated as follows : (1) "As a general rule, city my not lease public park t o the exclusion of the right of public eajoym nt, or contrary to the purposes of the dedication of the land . Nor may th legislature authorize municip lity to lea e land dedicated as a public park, square or common . So also, legislative power to autho• rize a city to leas a part of a park, where the public right to the fre u of the l nd leased is not prevented, has been recognized. And a lease of state land devoted top rk purposes m y be su tained s consistent with the dedication of th l nd to public u e. The uthority of a municip lity to nt r into valid la e of p rk l nds i som times xpre sly uthorized by t tut . The v lidity of al ase by the city h been u tain d wh re it 111 r ult in furth ranc of th public u • Th v lidity of l by the inhabit nt of a town of 'comnon 1 nd 1 not r nted into priv te own r hip nor need d for public purpo sh lso b sust inedo "A r gard th inco cquir d for public p been d cl rd t t uch voted to public u a." 39 Am,Jur 810 1 811. �Page 3 Mr. Jack C. Delius 3/24/67 (2) "When land is dedicated for special and limited use, use for any other purpose i e unauthorized . Whether a particular use amounts to a diversion from that for which the dedic tion was made d pends on the circumstance of the dedication and the intention of the dedicator, and is therefore largely a question of fact. In any case, however, such use is uthorized as is fairly within the term of the dedication and reasonably serves to fit the property for enjoyment by the public in the mann r contemplated . The dedicator is presumed to have intended the property to be used by the public, within the limitation of the dedication, in such way as will be most convenient and comfortable and according to not only the properties nd us ges known at th time .o f the dedication, but also to those justifi d by lapse of tie nd chang of conditions . " 23 Am Jur (3) y s.7, 58. "The municipal use and contJjOl of public parks my b ubject tor triction con• tin din th grant of the land therefor. Wh r donation or dedication of tr ct of land i made to municip l corporation ol ly for public p rk, the municip lity c nnot us it for purpo e incon i tent ith th purpo ·s of such grant." The Georgia l aw with r sp ct to port 1th t g ral l wand can b g n ral probl c d s follows: - �Page 4 Mr . Jack C. Deliu 3/24/67 "Prop rty dedic ted to a public u e y by the dedicatee be put to all cu tom ry use within the definition of the use . Any use which i in• con istentp or which substantially and materi lly interferes, with the use of the property for the p rticul r purpose to which it was dedicated , will constitute a misuser or diversion; and whil under the general rule misuser or diversion of the property for ny purpose other than th one designated will not work a reversion of the property freed from the easement to the owner of the dominant fe, equity will, on the petition of proper partie , enjoin such misuser or diversion . " Brown v . City of East Point, 148 Ga . 85, hn . 3. Now to nswer the specific question po ed by you. Under the Bill itself, we can, for period not to xc d four years nd for av lu ble consideration, lease the subj ct property with the following reservations: (1) We can lease to a public entity for public u not incon 1 tent with the original dedic tion; (2) w c nnot lea priv t (3) u to a privet tity for of the incon 1 tency; b eau w cannot lea e to privat us public entity for b cau e of th incon i t cy; and (4) W can 1 u de ication in thi instanc is that which Mr. Gr lly t forth in the de d of gift wh r by the Cycloram Th origi to a priv t ntity for public not inconsi tent with th . d dication. �Page 5 Mr . Jack C. Delius 3/24/67 was to be opened to the general public. Also, this opinion presupposes that should the le ee be made to a public entity, the public entity would be authorized by law to enter into a lease such as you may, from time to time, envisage. Trusting that this answer your inquiry, I remain Very truly yours , iv--~ Thomas F. Choyce TFC : jc Encl. 1 cc: Hon9 Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta C1ty Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Mr. R. Earl Landers -./,,Admini trativ A aistant City H 11 Atl nt, Georgi 30303 �CITY OF ATLANTA \ .b DEPARTMENT OF LAW 1114 WtLLIAM•OLIVER BUILDING _./ / ) ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 \ . \ I Q) , , .. \ ) \)-'~ Su,(),\, March 24 , 1967 Personal and Confidential Mr . J ck C. Delius General Manager of Parks and Recreation City Hall Annex Atlanta, Georgia Dear Jack : This letter is in the following question: "Can the City of buildings inclu Cycloram in G recent inquiry posing nd a.c-:1:1:H,u: of the opinion that this itu tion could ther f 11: (1) public entity for a public purpo e; (2) private entity for (3) public entity for (4) L to _ private ntity for priv t priv t purpo . • purpos ; public purpo I 1 av it to your good judgment to d t rmin into thich of th bov cat gori this p cific - itu tion you mak r f r nc to ould f llo po As you kno, the City of Atlant w r c ntly giv the r to l i n t int r tin p rk 'prop rty. Thi bill, �Page 2 Mr . Jack C. Delius 3/ 24/ 67 passed during the 1967 Session of the Georgia Assembly , is known as House Bill No . 299 . I enclose herewith a copy of said House Bill for your further perusal. Please bear in mind that this opinion is predicated upon the Gov ernor signing this Bil l into law. Absent the Governor ' s approval of this Bill , the answer to the question posed by you is in the negative . Let us assume for the purpose of this opinion that the Governor shall sign this Bill into law . The general rules applicable to this situation can be stated as follows : ( 1) "As a general rule , a city may not lease a public park to the exclusion of the right of public enj oytr1ent, or contrary t o the purposes of the dedication of the land . Nor may the legislature authorize a municipality to lease land dedicated as a public park , square or counnon . So also, legislative power to authorize a city to lease a part of a park, where the public right to the free use of the land lea ed is not prevented, has been recognized . And a lease of state lands devoted to park purposes my be sustained as consistent with the dedication of the 1 nd to public use. The authority of a municipality to enter into valid lease of park lands is sometimes expressly authorized by statut • The validity of a lease by the city has b en sustained where it will result in further nee of the public use. The v lidity of a leas by th inhabit nts of a town of 'common 1 nd 1 not granted into private ownership nor needed for public purposes h s al o been sustain d. "As regard the income from lea e of land cquir d for a public p rk, the rul h b en decl . r d th t uch income mu t b d voted to public u e ." 39 Am Jur 810 1 811. �Page 3 Mr . Jack C. Delius 3/ 24 / 67 (2) "When land is dedicated for a special and · limited use, use for any other purpose is unauthorized . Whether a particular use amounts to a diversion from that for which the dedication was made depends on the cir cumstances of the dedication and the intention of the dedicator, and is therefore largely a question of fact . In any case, however, such use is authorized as is fairly within the terms of the dedication and reasonably serves to fit the property for enjoyment by the public in the manner contemplated . The dedicator is presumed to have intended the property to be used by the public, within the limitations of the dedication , in such way as will be most convenient and comfortable and according to not only the properties and usages known at the time of the dedication, but also to those justified by lapse of time and change of conditions . " "'v'.'.' 23 Am Jur 57, 58 . (3) "The municip l use nd control of public parks may be subject to restrictions contained in the gr nt of the l and therefor. Wh r don tion or dedic tion of tr ct of land is made to a municip 1 corpor tion olely for a public p rk, the muni~ip lity c nnot u e it for purposes incon istent with the purposes of such grant . " Vol . 10 1 McQuillin on The Law of Municip l Corporations, 172. port Th Geo r gia 1 w with r spect to the gen r l probl com• with the general law nd c n b wmn•riz d follow: �Page 4 Mr . Jack C. Delius 3/24/67 "Property dedicated to a public use may by the dedicatee be put to all customary uses within the definit ion of the use . Any use which is in• consistent, or which substantially and materially interferes, with the use of the property for the particular purpose to which it was dedicated, will constitute a misuser or diversion; and while under the general rule a misuser or diversion of the property for any purpose other than the one designated will not work a reversion of the property freed from the easement to the owner of the dominant fee, equity will, on the petition of proper parties,· enjoin such misusei: or diversion . " Brown v. City of East Point, 148 Ga . 85 8 hn . 3. Now to answer the specific question posed by you . Under the Bill itself, we can , for a period not to exceed four year nd for a valu ble consideration, lease the subject property with the following reservation: origi (l) We can lease to a public entity for public u e not inconsistent with the original dedication; (2) We c nnot lease to a private entity for private use bee u e of the inconsist ncy; (3) We cannot lea e to a public entity for priv te use bee u e of th incon istency; nd (4) W c n le s to a private entity for public u not inconsi tent with the dedication. The d die tion in this inst nee 1 th.a t which Mr. Gr lly t forth in the deed of gift wh reby the Cyclor �Page 5 Mr . Jack C. Delius 3/ 24/67 was to be opened to the general public . Also, this opinion presupposes that should the lease be made to a public entity, the public entity would be authorized by law to enter into a lease such as you may, f.rom time to time ., envisage . Trusting that this answer your inquiry, I remain Very truly yours, ~ ~ Thomas F. Choyce TFC : jc Encl . 1 cc: Hon . Ivan Allen, Jr . , Mayor / City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Mr . R. Earl Landers Administrative Assistant City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 �t'Ch 27 , 1967 Mr . Dick Donny King & Sp lding 434 Trust Comp ny of Georgia At lant , Geor gia Dear Mr . uilding nny: I ttaeh h r to hope to introduc rough draft of the Re olut:ion ,-,hich to the Board of Aldermen on Monday, April 3, 19~7, a~ 2:00 P.M. , City Hall . Pl f el fro to any ugg ted changes . By copy of thi 1 tter, I ending dr ft copy to Mia Anne Poland for any co ente Mr . Rich might h v . t njoy d t lking with you this rntng, nd I Cordially, Jack C. Hu G nsral nager of P rks and Recre tion JC : jh Encl . ta, Ga. ccr rabl Ivan All n, Jr. �Ma re . 1 7 , 196 7 Mr . Thomas Choyce, Associilte City Attorney , Cit; L w Department , · 614 First N.1 tiondl B.:nk Building , Atlantn, Georgia . Re: Contrcl ct Between J . C. B rrett Construction Co . & Cit y of Atl ~nta De a r Tom: Confirming our verb 1 conver ation, I wi s h f or you to place on notice the abov contr.:Jctor th the is dr · stica ll y bot. ind in his schedule of construction . The contr act , da te, I be lieve, November 4 , 1965 c a lls for t he ork to be completed in no more t h n 270 consecutive c ul ndll r d y . Of cour e, t 1ere hdve n sever 1 c h nge orders to the contract . ·n t he , have nec~s ril y cau ed slight del ; s , By copy of t his letter I am r3 ,uesting the Comptroller to forw rd to your office t h origin 1 contract ith ~11 aupporting docu nts chang order • etc . ; h n you fini hed with them, pl a e return t lie to t he Comptrollers office . re Th nking you f or your continued ssist nee , I ~m Cordially , J ck C. D lius Genera l n er of nd JCD: jh cc : Mayor Iva n Allen, Jr. ecrea tion »rk �C ITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 March 21, 1967 JACK C. DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER TO: HONORABLE IVAN ALLEN, JR. FROM: JACK C. DELIUS Further Information on Gun Club Park - Perry Homes Robert Dobbs We will shortl y start Pha se 2 of Gun Club Park Site, and as my previous memorandum pointed out, this will include two b a seball fields and a football field. Presently , all of Perry Homes is north and east of Gun Club Pa rk and is physicall y separated from it b y Proctor Creek. The Housing Authorit y pl ans to build on the pa rk side of t he creek the Perr y Homes Ex tension a nd will involve putting in a bridge across Proctor Creek, ma king it re adil y accessible. Until this bridge is built, a ccess to Phase 2, wh ~ch is on the low lands, a nd visible to Perry Homes, and a ccess to Phase 1, which is on the high lands, and some d istance from Perry Homes , will be r a t her difficult, e xcept b y a round- about route . I have discussed these problems in det a il on severa l occ a sions with the Project Man ager and tena nts and the y seem to full y a ppreciate the difficulties . �M re h 21, 196 7 MEMORAND UM TO: Miss Anne Poland Director of Public Relations Rich's, Inc . FROM: Jack C. Delius General nager of Parks nd R creation In reference to a proposed donation from the Rich Foundation, I submit the following propo al . m pleased to Ue propose to purchase four portsbl swimming pools and install them on pl ylots located in four poverty neighborhood" of our City . Thio ill not onl y provide ihole ome, he lthful recreation for these underprivile ed cOtI1munitie , but ill also enable us to teach many underprivileged children to swim . D t ils of our plan s follows: LOCATION AND ATT NDANCE Th four location 1. eh vc ele tcd for the pools arc: iodee Stre t Pl ylot b tw en Sun et and Vine in nv1ne City" . 2. Merritts and 3. Connally 4. 196 dford Playl ot in '~Buttermilk Bott treet Playlot n ar ava.nn b tr et, II ichardson in ' ummerhill' . • in Cabb g Town" • ting to secur o l on the avann Street prop rty at thi time . In v nt th t are un ble to ecure thi 1 ase, Wi ha~ elect d an altern tiv location of n exi ti pl ylot on 373 Thurmond treet, N• • in th 'Li htnins' ar • �Pol nd for the fir t tn e pl 1lota du~in& th sus:r-:er of tad att ad •forth S vw:mah tr t location, ticipat • t t 1 r of 6.S, 71 for the entir r t ·11 four loc t ou . A br akdown ti t att ndunc for sch pl ylot is foll ~ t l 5,971 C , 11 4,17 .oo 450. 0 1, .oo 1,12,. 7,1· , . $ ,500. 0 • �J !72_,LJ1VZLl RHODES STREET p D [LOP SAVANNAH STR EE T LEGEN D £LEMENTERY 5CH OOL5 EXISTING PA/2KS P R OP 05£D .PARK5 e CONNA LLY STREET PLAYLOTS SELECTED FOR PO RT- 0 - POOLS �March 15, 1967 MF.MORANDUM TO Jack Delius FROM Ivan All n, Jr. Upon your return, please see me ebout the It is not sufficient. Attachment lAJr: ttached information . �L/1 /4 /7 c=;r- /J ~/_ d/- //] C ITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 March 10, 1967 JACK C. DELIUS GE N ERA L MANAGER MEMORANDUM TO: Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr. FROM: Jack Delius SUBJECT: Mr. Rich's donation to equip four playlots The Land Agent is attempting to secure leases on a number of new playlots. Until we have the land in hand - and I have urged the Land Agent to proceed with all possible speed - we can't really give Mr. Rich any locations or equipment needs. However, we do need the following equipment for existing playlots: 373 Thurmond (Lightning) ---- Utility pole, lights and reflectors, outdoor electrical receptacle. Gillham Park (Blue Heaven) --- Utility _po.le, lights and reflectors, outdoor electrical receptacle. Haygood and Crew (Summer Hill) ---- Utility Pole , lights and reflectors, outdoor electrical receptacle and water fountain. 255 Dodd Avenue (Rented house f or recreation) ---- Pool table, electric water fountain, outdoor water fountain. Windsor Street near Richardson---- Swings, slides, basketball go a ls , sand box ,utility pole, lights and ref lectors and outdoor electrical receptacl e. Park Avenue & Lansing S.E . ---- Utility Pole , lights and reflectors, outdoor e l ectri cal receptacle , water fountai n~ Arlington Cir., N. W. ---- Utility pole, l igbts and ref l ectors, outdoor electrical receptacl e and water fountain . �-2We are trying to lease a house at 81 Little St., S.E. (Summer Hill) as a Recreation Center. We are attempting to locate land on Bender St., S.W. near the Candler Warehouse. The Land Agent is also trying to locate land in Plunkett Town which is in extreme southeast Atlanta near the Airport. We propose a new playlot on Hardee Street at Aberdeen (Blue Heaven) as well as a playlot at Perry Blvd. and Lively St., N.W. (Perry Homes) and anohter playlot for Haynes and Foundry Sts. (Lighting). We deeply appreciate Mr. Rich's offer and we shouldn't look a gift horse in the mouth. But, if it would be possible, we would appreciate having the funds donated for supplies, milk for the children that come to the playlots, equipment, and the expense for renting busses for transportation to-the swimming pools, Stone Mountain, Mathis Dairies, the State Capitol, etc. Of course, you have already advised me that Mr. Rich is interested only in equipment. We appreciate this very much. We estimate a cost of $ 2900. to equip.•.t . :bhe existing lots as outlined above. If we are successful ~in leasing six additional playlots, it would cost us roughly $800 per lot to grade, equip, install lighting and water fountain. JCD:bjw �March 15, 1967 Hr. B.ich rd H. Bi.ch Rich's, lni:. Atlanta, Georgi Der Dick: J ck Deliu i out of the city nd I hcaven" t yet been able to get the speelfic information you have ked for. As soon as he g.eta information is ck I will ccumulated. e that the Sincer ly, Iv n All n. Jr. Wr: �Marc h 21 , 1967 Mr. Robert Dobbs, Chai rman No rthwest Coordinating Council 2455 Abner Place, N. W. Atlanta , Georgia Dear Mr . Dobbs : I appreciate your letter of March 16th a.n d I am attaching a summary report from the Parks Manager of the action being taken at the Gun Club Site P rk. I am ure that after you receive thi information, you will ee the vigorous efforts the city is making to improve the original park plan. I am sure you will ieel v"'3ry much better about the whol matter. Sincei-el y , Iv lAJr:am cc: Mr. J ck Delius Allen, Jr. �C ITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 March 20, 1967 JACK C. DELIUS GENERA L MANAGER INFORMATION ON GUN CLUB PARK SITE The first phase of construction began April 11, 1966 and was concluded in February, 1967. It amounted to $83,456. and included the following thirteen items: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Clearing and Grubbing Rough Grading - West Area Utilities - Water - Sewers - Lighting Drive and Parking Sidewalks 2 Tennis Courts Play Mound Fencing and Retaining Walls Restrooms Storage Building Concrete Benches Landscaping - Trees and Shrubs Grassing and Finish Grading We received the first HUD development grant in the nation on this p r oject. We are preparing an application for Federal assistance to begin Phase IIi we expect this application to be submitted to the Regional HUD office by the end of this week. Working drawings for design have been finished and only the specifications need to be written. Phase II includes an athletic field with two baseball diamonds and football field, an entrance drive and parking, utilities for camping , playground · equipment for Phase I, and necessary site wo r k such as grassing and grubbing, finish grading , etc . We estimate the cost of these few i t ems at $77,542 . The Par ks Committ ee has appropriated $ 8 0 , 000 . for Phase II . We have been notified by HUD that the 50¾ assistanc e for park development has been cut t o 12½¾ of acquisition cost. We p aid less than $50 , 000 . for Gun Club . �NCRTHv7Z2T COORDINATING 8GUHCIL 2l}55 Abner Place• H.w. Atlanta, Georgia 30318 March 16, 1967 Ivan Allen. Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Sir: I am writing with reference to the Gun Club Park Site located near Gun Club Drive, N.W., and the total lack of recreational facilities in the Northwest Perry Homes Area of Atlanta. I don't believe the Parlrn Department and the Board of Aldermen has acted in good faith toward the citizens living in Perry Homes. Scottscrossing, Carver~-lollywood Hills, Lincoln :-Iomas and the Bankhead Road area. Funds for the Gun Club Park !3ite were approved three years ago and additional Federal funds have been approved for Parks construction. however. there are only four (4) finished Tennis Courts on this site. I am sure Parks Director. Jack Delius and members of the Board of Aldermen are aware of the fact t~at over fifty-seven (57%) percent of the population in these communities a:::e below the age of eigh·i :een. Atlanta was able to build a Ctadium in one year. but it has re~uired three years to build four (l:.) Tennis Courts on a Park ~it:e which will serve a predominate Negro populadon. The Gun Club site would be adjacent to the huge Perry Homes Housing P=oject. The Citizens of these conmunities would appreciate a personal investigation by the Mayor concerning the reason for the serious delay in completing thic Vei'7 important public facility. Fe will be looking fo ruard to your reply. .: incerely youi:-s, ~ ,,v f - ~ Robert Dobbs , Chairman Northwest Coordinating Counci l Hember of Community Relations Cotllllissions RD:jjj CC: Jack Delius Authur H. 8mith Mrs & Eliza Paschall �J. C. BARRETT CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. 3455 SEXTON WOODS DRIVE CHAMBLEE , GEORGIA 30005 TELEPHONE: 451 - 5416 SK IL l INTIGIITY h ., • 1%7 • J«ck o. Deli Geaenl n1111,11e,111t: Cf.Cy At tlant4. of Pane flrul'IT'a'! liua: 1. 2. J• •• • �MR. Jh.CK C. LUJS ,. • 1 cc : �C ITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 January 16, 1967 JACK C. DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor City of Atlanta Atlanta ,. Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Allen: Some months ago we employed two experts to evaluate the canvas painting of the Cyclorama of The Battle of Atlanta. At that time, we were advised that the painting could possibly fall in the next four or five years. Already, two years of that time has passed. The City of Atlanta has not reached a decision on whether to remodel the e x isting building or replace it .with a new one and, if the latter course is followed~ where the new location should be. The undersigned is o f the opinion that a new building is needed and that it should be placed in Grant Park. Based on preliminary figures supplied to us by an architectural firm, plus the cost rendered to us by the art experts, Charles Davis has computed that it would take $3 ,. 000 , 000 to adequately f inance a new structure. Alderman Leftwich and I wish to urge the City that if a futur e bond issue is off ered to the public that one o f the high priority items to be funds necessary f or the restoration o f the painting and the proper housing o f it . Thanking you f or any support you can give this, I am Cordially , ~~ - ~ ck c. Delius neral Manager of Parks and Recreation JCD:bjw cc: All Finance Committee Members All Park Committee Members Mr. c. L. Davis, Comptroller �zch 9, 1967 r . Bruce A . McNaughton 230 Park Avenue ew Yor , Ne York Dear Mr. McNaughton: Tha you very much for yoUl' contribution for n home for the Cyclor painting. Tbi i indeed plendid ge tur on your part d I t ithin th1!t near futuJ:" the new home will provided. i cerely your•, Ivan Allen, Jr. yor JAJr/br CC: Mr. Wilbur George Kurtz, Jr. �Wilbur George Kurtz, Jr. Atlanta P. 0. Box 1734 Mallc.h 8, '196 7 MJt. Ja.ci.k Ve.UM; Vvi.ectolL .CUy Paitl<-6 Ve.paMmen;t / Wy Hali'.. A.:te..a.n:ta., Ge.M.g-i.a. . Ja.c.k. • • • .· Atta.c.he.d b., a. le:t:t.eli. wfuc.h I 1te.c.uve.d Matr.c.h 6:th 61tom B1tuc.e. A. McNa.ugh;ton 06 230 Pa.Jr.k. Avenue., New Yo1tk CUy. Y,ou can ~ e.e. 61tom the. lette1r. he. haJ., a.n in.te.~ e. in:te1r.u.t in :the. Cyc.loJu:ima. pa,.lnt.ing, a.nd bee.a.Me. 06 ~ , he, e.nc.lo~e.d a. c.he.c.k in :the. amount 06 $10.00 whic.h -Ui , .to . ~eJtve. Ma. c.on-tlubULlon .towa11.d .th~ new home. 0qJt .the. Cyc.loJWma. painting • • • in be.ha.lo 06 .the. g1r.e.a:t, gJte.a..t gJta.ndc.hildll.e.n on Andll.ew Ja.c.~on McNa.ugh;tdn,. 8:th W..u.ic.o~.lrt · · Reg.-ime.rit, Alrmy o0 :the. .Cumbelr.la.nd • • • whic.h wu.t pa!Ltl- . . upa:te.d .in .the. Bat:tf..e. 06 A:tla.n;ta. a.nd -l6 indic.a:te.d on the. c.a.nVM . . Th..u.i ..u.i a. 0ine. gu.tull.e.,. indeed, a.n.d I .think U ~hould . be. a.c.knowle.dgcid by you a.rJ.d Ma.yolL Allen. In.Mmuc.h M ·. .the. c.he.c.k l6 ma.de. pa.ya.ble. to me., I wl6h to be. a.dv..u.ie.d ' by you M .to how .to ·e.ndolL6e. U ~o U _c.a.n be. de.po~Ue.d . in a.n a.c.c.oun.t whl_c_h ..U., e.aJuna.Jtke.d oOJt .the new home Oo the. Cyc.loMma. pa,.lnt.ing. . · I wlU. hold :the. c.he.c.k untU. I he.a.Jt 6Jr.om you. .... veJr.y muc.h . Tha.nk1> Co1r.cllally, c.c.: ialr.h.\ Cluvi1.u Le6.twlch~ C""'1.lkttee I va.n Allen • •• Ma.yo1r., CUy o6 Ati.a.nt.a. / �-· I --- ---.- .- ~- - -- ~ Bruce A. 1\\cNaughton 230 Parlc Avenue New Yorlc, New Yorlc 10017 February 28, 1967 Mr. Wilbur Kurtz The Coca-Cola Company P.O. Drawer 1734 _Atla~ta, Ga. 30301 Dear Wilbur_; Thank you so much for taking time to see us last Friday . O:f course I'm sorry to learn of your father's passing but he certainly lived a rich, :full productive life. The Cyclorama was all you said it was and more. It is really impressive. As a Imnn Yankee from Wisconsin you can imagine the joy at seeing Old Abe who my great grand-daddy told me about. Thanks to men like you and your 1:8.d scmeday soon I' 11 be able to show my children· a living part of their family's ·and country's history. .• Towards the new home for the Cyclorama, would yo·u ·please see that the right :folks get the enclosed small contribution on behalf of the great .great grandchildren of Andrew Jackson McNaughton, 8th Wisconsin Regiment, ·Anny o:f t he Cumberland. t t If I can be of any service to you, please do not ,hesitate to call on me. Regar ds a s ever, BAM.cN/rs encl. -· -- - - - -.--::-=-----------c---- -- - - -- ·- ~--' . ) �rch 10, 1967 Mr. ilbur G. urtz , Jr. Pot Office Box 1734 Atl nta , Georgia ar Mr. Kurtz: Thank you for your lett r of Mr . Bruce A. McN ughton of you eh 0k in th mount of $10 . cont t.ion towarcls th n " ho Pl e endorse your cheek a follo of City of Atl nt 91 nd m 4.1 to my h ndl th 11 fr th • ply -ciae inly left hi ay th tb all d t 1 • t y the , I CCI Iv All n, J r . / • C arlia Lef wi h rl • L. via P y only to th ord r tion an I ill �C ITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTM E NT of P ARKS Office o f Gene r al Manager Atlanta, Georg ia 30303 March 8, 1967 J ACK C. D ELI U S GENERA L MANAG E R Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta , Georgia 30303 Dear Mayor Allen: St an Martin and I will be out of the city from Saturday~ March 11 through Friday, March 17, 1967 attending the Revenue Sources Management School at 0glebay Park in Wheeling1 ·west Virginia. If you should need to reach me you could call Wilson Hall at Oglebay Park. In my absence, Mr. Pierce Whitley, Assistant General Manager o f Parks, will be in charge o f the Department o f Parks .. ~a kc . Delius G eral Manager o f Par ks and Recre a t ion JCD: b j w cc : All Members o f the P ark Commi tte e Mr. Pi e rce Whitley Mi s s Virginia Carmi c h a el Mr .• Henry Larett �March 9 , 1967 Mr . D n E . Swat , Jr . Government 1 Liason 0ffic r Office of the Mayor City of Atl nta - City Hall Atl nta ; Georgi 30303 r D ni A you perh ps know, th City i becoming incre singly concern dover the adv need tate of the deterior tion of The Cyclor ma of the B ttle of Atl _nta. Sev r 1 xp rts have giv nus their opinion on wh t must don to the painting nd there re several decisions to be mad 1 for xampl, wher to locate the new Cycloram - or hould we simply re.mod 1th xisting building. I b li v th t you m ntioned in th Demonstration City ' s Bill th re i a provision for the r toration and pre erv tion of hi toric 1 building , etc. Sine Grant P rk li in th v ry he rt of the model city are I wond rd if you ould r rch the itu tion littl further nd if cone i ably could r ceiv Fed r 1 assistanc . ppe r that G n r l Bondi i out for this proj ot. Th nkinq you for your e i t nc, l Cordi lly, Jack G P rk JC01bjw CCI Hon . Iv n All n, Jr. Hon. R. rl Land r c. r 1 lius Man nd R er rot t1on �March 9 , 1967 Mr . Thom F . Choyce A soci t City Attorn y City of Atlant partment: of L w 2614 Fir t National Bank Bldg. Atlant , Georgia 30303 r Tom: p this matt r nfid nti 1 for th t n tlant t your Opinion , Pl s non ne with JC abj c, Hon. I an All n, Jr. • -- erl L d rs / V �March 2, 1967 Mro . Charles E. Clark 684 Hillpine Drive , N. E. Atlanta , Georgi a Der Mr . Clark: Thank you very much for your letter of February 23 , 1967 ddr essed to M yor Ivan Allen , Jr . His honor has forwarded your correspondence on to me for reply . I have inspected which you refer to ret in the ar the City Perks in its Bond Fund the strip of wooas ·on Monroe Drive to nd think the best thing to do uld be in its natur 1 condition . Unfoz;-tun tel y , pert nt does not have ny money rem ining for the purch se of additional p rk 1 nd . Your suggestion that Mr . Wilbur Kurtz , Sr . be memorialized in som eppropri te m nner is well t ken - and I person lly feel very strongly th t w must ck.nowledge 11th t this fin g ntlemen did for Atl nt. Th nking you gin for your 1 tt r , I am COrdi lly, Jack c . ner P rk G JCD:bjw cc: Hon. Iv n All n, Jr .• Hon. Rioh rd c. Fr ~ n of tion �684 Hill pine Drive, Atlant a , Geor gi a 30306 Februa r y 23 , 1967 l~onorab le Ivan llen , Mayor Cit y of ~ tlant a t lant a , C-eor gi a ear Iia yor All en : a s you know a tlanta was saddene d by t he r e cent deat h of i:._r . ' il bur urtz, Sr . , who had been so outsta nding in ou r ity ' s 1istory and i t occurred t o me what a wonderful tri bute t o his memory if t he i t y coul d o bt a in t he littl e stri p of woods on -,=onro e Dr i ve , whi ch i s up f or re- zon ing now, eti tion ' - 66- 260 - B, and conver t t hi s i nto a "Confederat e Lemorial Fa rk . 11 Our a l derman , on. icha rd G. ~ eema n, ha s fou ght s o hard t o try and keep t hi s proper t y from bei ng re - zoned for apartment s and before i t bocome s a l o s i ng ba t tle .,_ humbl y a sk t ha t you to s s t h is i dea a r ound and I ' m sure there ar e hundreds of peopl e wil l i ng and ready t o contri bu te t o a memori al to I-.Ir . Ku r tz . Unf or t unat el y , t he City re f used t o a ccept t hi s pro pe rt y y ears ago wh en i t was off er ed a s a par k area , and I am under t he i mpressio n t ha t t here is v ery l ittle money t i ed up i n it now. It wo ul d be mo st f itti ng as a "Confeder ate !1:emor i a l " a s l under stand t he Civi l 1,/a r was fou ght har d in t hi s vic ini t y a nd even t oday t renches can be f ound testifying to the bat t le . I f t here is a ny s pa r k of i ntere st on your par t , I ho pe you will a ct pr ompt l y , a s t bi s ma t t er will be de cided by the Loni ng Commi tt ee v er-1 soon. He s pe ctfull y , Mrs . Cha s . E. Cl ark cc: Hon . rlic hard • Freeman 1650 .::,u s sex Road , N. E. Atlan ta , Geor gi a r -"' • �, . ., I • .' . .l· , I , " . . . ' -..,, · ' ~. • - \ ' I .,. · r1 ,: ....:..: , · ; ·· . · 'u' , . ' "' •\,,' . ··_'(..·,j·, . · ,... . -1' .: •. / . .··,. -,. ·. ·:, I °' I j . · .: ' • • '. '. · ' . r �March 9 ., 1967 Mr . Thomas F. Choyce Associate City Attorney City of Atlant partment of L w 2614 First National Bank Bldg . Atl nta., Georgia 30303 Dar Toma Pleas k bing . p thi m tter aonfidenti l for th time At your arli t conv nience pl s rend=.-*·~ an Opinion if it uld b · l ' g 1 for th City of Atl nt to lea part of Grant P rk to th Atl nte - Fulton County St diwn Authority . More specific lly, th l ing of the Cyclor m Building nd imm i t grounds thereof. i might po sibly u the Authority s fin ncing v hicl , nd the op r tion of th Cyclor it s rvic to th ublie , tc . would not b ch ng d. I e i d yor All n end Mr . Land r y terd y th t you h d inform d th t th Hou h d r port d out the Bill which ould correct th 1958 1 w which prohibit our laing ors 11ing p rk d diet d 1 nd. do not di cu s th a v ry t nt ti plan rly r ply, I nd th nking you for n Siner ly, J ck c. G n r 1 P _rk JCDabjW CCI Hon. Ivan All n, Jr. _,,.,/ Hon. • rl L der _,- liua n er of nd R er tion with �M rch 9 , 1967 Mr. D n E. SWe t, Jr. Governm ntal Liason 0£f1cer Office of the Mayor City of Atl nt ·- City Hell Atl nta, Geor ia 30303 Dear D na A you perhaps know, the City i b coming incree ingly cone rn dover th adv need tate of the ~erior tion of Th Cycloram oft B ttl of Atlante. Sev ral experts h ve given u their opinion on wh t mute done to th p inting nd ther ere rel decision to be made, for xemple, where to locet th n w Cyclor - or should we simply remodel th x1sting building. I b li v th t you m ntion d in the · nstretion City • Bill ther 1 a pro iaion for the r tor tion nd pr servation of hi tcric l buildings, tc . Since Grant P rk 11 sin the very he rt of the mod l city re I nd r d if you would r rch t itu tion littl furth r nd if cone iv bly could r c iv F r 1 assist nc. It ppe r that e G n r l Bond issu is out for this project. Thanking you for your i t nc, I Cordi lly, J ck c. lius G n r l Manager of Perks JCD1bjw CCI Hon. Iv n Hon • • 11 n, Jr. arl L nder V / nd R er etion �March 9, 1967 Mr • .J ck Delius, neg ir Atlant r Dep rtmcnt City Ball - Atl 30303 t, r Jack: D As a r ult of our con.£ r und rataodi g that yo ar to clot rad.a. th City' l properties for the purpose Wh n y uh e may ce y s rday aft rnoon. it gain to chec · 'With th City Attom y 1 rights to 1 11 park di cd• d. e thf.a d t rin1 d. tion• hov to proc Sine rely youra, rl Landers uiatract •tat · nt L:lp th t �C DEPARTMENT of PARKS Offi c e of Genera! Man a g er Atlanta , Georgia 30303 March 2, 1967 J ACK C. DELIUS G ENER A L MANAGER Mr . Donald R . Dietlein Na tio na l Zool ogi cal Park Washing ton , D. C. 20009 De a r Mr . Dietl ein : Along with a numbe r of other peop le, I have received a Xerox copy o f y o ur report of February 8, 1967, dealing with the Zoo at Grant Pa r k. I appreciate you r o pinion s and concl u s io n s and f e el c e rt ain that when I select a Zoo Direc t o r that y our repor t wi l l serve as valuable ba c kground inf o rmat ion on some corre c t ive a ction whi ch may be needed. The undersigned is rela t i v e l y new i n h is j ob , h a ving become General Manager in March o f 1964; at a time when a ll o f the major zoo buildings were completed or substantially underway. I immediate ly began to request a Zoo Directo r and , as you may know, I have only recently met with succ ess when the p o sitio n was created by the City effective January 1, 19 67 . We were disappointed at the pay range; h owever, we will make every effo rt to select the most q u alified individu al f o r thi s most vi t al po s ition. I have written Dr. Reed, along with thirty o r f o rty o ther Zoo Directors, asking and advising him to pass along to any o f his interested staff the application for Zoo Director. It may be that one o f y ou gentlemen may be interested i n this position and I trust that I might hear further from you. I am r eluctant to make any change in the Zoo until I have an individ ual in charge si nce I am an admi nist rator o f eleven divisions of Ci ty g overnment and c ertainly do not profe ss to be a spec ialist in hort iculture , z oology, f ore stry, recreation, e tc. A Zoo Di rector will be able to organize and operate the Zoo to s e rve recrea tion, preservation, conservation and education. After considerable thought, and t~usting tha t you will a ccept my rema rks in the same context which I accepted your report, I would l i ke to c omment on your conclusions r eached on Page 3, paragraph 3 in referen c e to the Reptile House. Fir st of all , we are not remodel ing the Reptile House. It would take several �Mr. Donald R. Dietlein Page Two pages to des c ribe to y ou t he d if fi culties involved in the cages o f this building but basically the facts are these. The same Ar ch i tect designed t he Reptile House as did the Primate and Feline Buildings. About the time the Reptile House wa s nearing completi on, we noti ced a strong irritant in the air which caused one 1 s eye s to wa ter and a burning of the throat. It smelled like f o rmaldehyde t o me b ut we engaged a toxicologist at the Communi cabl e Disease Ce nter in At lanta to verify this. The next problem was of course what was causing the formaldehyde. We employed a wood technician, a Dr. James Rice at the University o f Georgia. Dr. Rice has spe nt most of his academic career working with particle and chip board. The cages were made of particle b o ard and it was a n atura l thing for Dr. Rice to investigate the proble~s encountered with thi s material. About this time, the c ages began t o s we ll and b loat and materials which we re one inch thi c k expanded t o l ½ inches. The d ime nsional intergrity of the c ages simply coll apsed. We refus ed to open the building to the general publi c in that, in the opinion of our legal counsel, to do so woul d be evide nce o f acceptance of the building. The Archite ct blamed the builder, the builder blamed the Architect, and the subcontractor bl a med the supprer. We have had several dozen meeti ngs over this problem and have called in e x perts in several fields. The end re sult is that we are replacing the cages with o ne s built o f fiber glass to be enclosed in an exterior grade plastic impregnated plywood . I can assure you t hat so much money is involved and the legal entanglement is so compli cated, that as Director of this department I would not be so f oolish as to allow a lay curator" carte blanche" privileges to reorganize and remodel a $38 0 ,0 00 building. I do n 1 t have that type of authori ty - thank g oodness - and don 't desire it. Cage replacement is being supervised by the City's Building Inspector, Law Department, and this depart ment. 11 11 Now as t o the statement that the Curator is a lay curator o r amateur. This reflects on the Civil Serv ice department of the City of Atlanta in that Mr. Dobbs sco red the highest among the approx i mately 16 app lica n ts f or the job. The test was conducted by a doctor of veterinary medicine, a PhD wi th his doctorates in Zoology (Reptiles ), and a c linical psychologist trained in testing. Of the 16 appli ca nts, seve ral had Ma sters Degrees but no practic a l e x perience . Mr. Dobbs is y oung and has only a high schoo l d iploma . However , he s eems to hold his own wi t h people in si milar positions a nd has made quite an impressive re cord f or the s h o r t time he has been in Atlanta. He is complete ly dedica ted to his work, was reared in a zoological environment since h i s pa r e nts are in the business, and has in eve,ry way attempted to be p ro fe s s ional as far as I . am personally co ncerned. He plans to ente r e vening college in the near future. Of course, re too received a copy of your repo r t and, to say the least, your remarks tha t he was a "lay CuDator" were cruel, e x cessive, unne c essary , a nd completely inaccurate. The damage is done, the word is out a n d I can only ·say that it is a surprise to me that three gent l e men r epresenting the National Zoological Park would make such a cap r ici ous remark without thoroughly investigating �Hr . Donald R. Dietlein Page Three the ba ckg round of the circumstances of the building and the qualifi ca t ions of the Curator. You have, in all fairness, been given some erroneous information. As t o Page 4 , paragraph 7, I am at a complete loss as to how you determ ined that there is a need to improve the cooperation bet ween the Zoo and educational system that controls the ·-science room in the Primate House. I believe you made your inspection on a Saturday and therefore would nd:have had an opportunity to meet the Te a cher assigned to the science room. I have contacted the instructor and she is at a complete loss to know exactly what y ou are talking about. She also wo~ders as to where there is a lack of cooperation between the Zoo and the educational system. She suggested that possibly that it may be at a higher echelon since it certainly does not exist at her level. I have co nta cted the Superintendent of Schools and he too is at a loss. Need less to say, vast improvements can be made in the utilization o f the Zoo as an educat±onal tool and as soon as we have a qual ified Director one of his duties will be to develop a complete educational program. I think it is worth noting that at the co nvent ion held at Houston, Texas :·.two years ago, the AAZPA recomme n ded our educational system as a guide and we were flooded with q uesti onnaires from interested zoos who wanted to include a science room in their zoological complex. Again, in all fairness to you, I believe you have been given some erroneous information. The individual who is distributing your report transmits it with a cover l etter stating that the three of y9u are very brilliant men. I am sure this is the case or you wouldn't be ·a ssociated with our . nati onal zoo if you were not top notch. I hope you are also m<=n enough to apologize to our Curator of Reptiles, and retract y our statement concerning the blank check approach to 'remodeli ng" the Reptile Building. Very truly yours, Jack C. Delius General Manager of Parks and Recreation JCD:bjw cc: Mr. W. J. Armstrong Mr. W. A. Xanten Mrs. Margaret A. Dankworth, Executive Sec. AAZPA (, ·-- ....... --- - ····- ~ �l j -1--,,l ( I' C ITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 March 6, 1967 JACK C. DELIUS GE N ERAL M A N A GER MEMORANDUM TO: Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr. FROM: Jack Delius SUBJECT: Piedmont and Harris Triangle - New Fountain Thank you for my copy of your letter to Mr. Jack Adair of March 2, 1967, regarding the plaque and the dedication of the above park. We are proceeding to have the plaque cast and it will take several weeks. The trees and other plants have been hand picked by A. P. Brindley, our Parks Engineer, and we hope the Purchasing Department will release the purchase order to Monroe Nursery this date. We have requested the fountain supplier to expedite the shipment o f the mechanism that goes in the basin. Delivery is being quoted to us from 4 to 6 weeks. I think it would be advisable to h a ve the park completely planted, the fountain in operation, and the plaque installed before having a formal dedication. The Parks Committee has not decid~d on a name for the tri angle but we are referring to it in our resolutions and in our d e partmental f iles as the Pie dmont and Harris Triangle. I th i nk it would be best if we would o f ficially name it thi s but re f er to the f ountain as the 11 Adair Fountai n". We alre ady have an Ad a i r Park . I hav e a ske d Jimmy Little to h a ve a f orma l resolut i on wi th the seal o f t he Ci ty f{ ~del i vecy to Mr. Adair. JCD:bjw ~ �684 rillp in,e 1 V8 , Atlant . G r gia . • E. 0306 }.. l'Ch 6 , 1967 c. Deliu , Genora.:J. Par·s and l ere tion Atlanta, Georgia 303:>3 r:x·. Jack De r . an.a er , Delius: Thank you for your promptne a in 100 i ug into :my su. stio:n to ayor len that • -:i.lbur .6.urtz , • be memorialized v1th Uttlo "Cont'ede r te Park 1' . trip of . ode ( som si:i; a.er s} runnina raJ.1 to offered fr tot City y ~ s o, t.ut it i my undering t t i t nov r accepted by tb City. Uow that the adj eent 1e up for re-zoning, .t ti tion Z- 66- 2 0 - D, and the •valop ra to noro chi on tb park ar , thi ia to e k t t you pl •? oc 1t or th City. Other than be.ck t x s th r is no znon tied up in this · x and t deT lo er , by claimi thi , ,tlveo t, m , a er d ty hould b l lo d in thi a congo to G f rri that you think th ba,st thing to n tural oondi tion encour o to undor it j risdic·1on, to worry a ,ut r nc r lY, r . C r 0 • �March I, 1967 Mr. Beverly M. DuB e , Jr . 627 Tr t C"'.l,&Ji~ny of Georgia Building Atl ta, Geo>rgia 30303 D r verly: I ackno ledg r ceipt of your letter regardia th l ti of tb ' 'Ge eral. 11 ck D llus to give c • ideri ·on t Sine rely your , Sr. IA:Jr/br CC: Mr. Jack Delius �M reh 1 , 1967 o Ch rl L. D vi Comptr ller City of tl nt Atl n , G rgia 30303 Der Ch rl 1 �• Ch rl Two L . D vi p g It my ell be th t I ill have to co b ck to you nd sk for you to fre ze dd tion l poei tion so · .s tto ccrue more th n $ 8 , 000 in order to c · rry on th se various nd unorthodox progr s. I i nt to h ve thy com off nd h l p , I d up for tbi sut1tvnetr so th t th nking you ·or your ssi Cor J G p JCD:bjw cc -: Hon . Mr . l Jr . lly , lius g r of R er tion ~ nee �/I January 16, 1967 lanie Moore 215 Piedmont Avenue, N.E. Apartment 701 Atlant , Georgi 30312 Miss De r Mi s Moor : Thank you for your letter of January 8 , 1967 to the Honor ble Iv n All n, Jr. regarding the po ibility of addle horses t Pi droont Park. The tables you refer to at Pi drnont Park r used for work hop and storage . We d p rat ly n d addition 1 ar as and could not imagine giving up thi pace at th pre ent time unl ss it could be replaced by modern adequ te werehou e . Horses r provid d t Ch stein Memorial Park but vn thi f rout r posing eriou problem which t thi to mo nt re cau ing th Ald rrn nic Committ conaid r th elemination of hors 11 rk r s. We r elize the recreation 1 v lu ridibg but r gret that w · c nnot Pi dmont P rk. Th nking you cco you gin for your 1 tt r, I Cordi lly, J ck c . G ner 1 P rk JCDabjv ce, Hon . Iv n All n, J r . / liu Manager of and R er tion t �(I tJ) C TY OF ATLA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 January 30, 1967 JACK C. DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER Mr. Charles L. Davis Comptroller City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Re: EOA's Recreation Funds Dear Charles: 1-..s you know by nm,r , Economic OJ:portuni ty tlant: slashed from their budget appropriation all funds rtaining to Recreation and therefore cancelled as of December 31, 1966 the three separate and distinct contracts under which this department of City Government carried out specialized recreation programs. These programs were namely the Neighborhood Playlot l ·rogram, Summer Recreation and Job Opportunity for Youth (Operation Champ), and recreation for senior high rise apartment dwellers. It is the opinion of the undersigned and Mis s Carmichael that the neighborhood playlot program takes priority over the t wo other projects. This opinion is one shared in by Mayor Allen. The number of playlots continues to grow as we attempt to meet the needs and demands of citizens in deprived areas. It is anticipated that Ne will shortly have a total of twenty-one neighborhood playlots, t,m of ,,'lhich involve the renting of dwellings for a year-round type operation. Since the cancellation of EOA funds, we have continued operating a few of these playlots on a part-time b asis, good •;reather permitting. The hasic expense involved is one of salaries and the rather substantial expense of renting outdoor toilets. Salaries are being charged to account 780C, Extra Help, Umpires, etc. and the renting of the portable john s is being charged to 771C. Account 780C does not contain sufficient appropriations to carry on a full time summer program at these twenty-one locations. For your information, the following playlots either exist or are under construction or in the negotiating stage; A �Mr. Charles L. Davis Page Tl-TO 1. Rhodes St. Between Sunset D Vine (Vine City) 2. Magnolia and Maple (Vine City) 3. 373 Thurmond St., N. ~J. 4. Merritts E. Bedford (Buttermilk Bottoms) 5. Gilham Park on ~Jade Ave. (Blue Heaven)* 6. ~lylie & Tye (Cabbage To"l>m) 7. Connally St. near Richardson (Summer Hill) * 8. McDaniel at Georgia Ave. (Mechanicsville) 9. Haygood & (Lightning) Crew (Summer Hill) 10. 255 Dodd Ave. Recreation Center (Mechanicsville) ** 11. ~·1indsor St. near Richardson (Mechanicsville) 12. Park Ave. 13. Haynes and Foundry Sts., N ; ;J. (Lightning) - proposed 14. Per ry Blvd. a nd Lively St., N. ~J" (Perry Home s ) - pro po s ed 15. Hardee St . at Arberdeen (B l u e Heav e n) - pro po s ed 16 . Huff Rd. area in northwest Atlanta - pro po s ed 17. Arlingto n Cir ., N.~1.* 18. 533-539 Central Ave. l C? . Plunkett Tm•m - to be located 20. Bender St . 21 . 81 Little St ., S. E. Recreati o n Center ( Summe r Hill ) & Lansing St., S. E . - no lea se s .·. 1. s. :-J. - to b e located These are park properties owned by the Parks Department. Houses and lots are leased for $100 per month. playlot s are l eased · fo r $ 1 . per year. All other wish to advise you of all the expense that we can think of that will be encountered in the operation of these twenty- one locations. Therefore, the following is our basic and minimum requirements for the successful operation of the neighborhood playlots for the summer of 1 9 67. 'i !e �Mr. Charles L. Davis Page Three Playlots, 1967 Summer only Salaries •Je anticipate operating full time, six days a ,.reek, from 9 a.m. - 12 and 1 - 7 p.m., from Thursday, June 1 thru Monday, Labor Day, September 4. This is a ninety-six calendar day or eighty-two work day program. '::e will staff each playlot vrith at least one Community Recreation Leader making Range 34, $15.70 per eight hour day, $1. 9 6 per hour o l-.li Recreation Leaders ·will b e under the direction of a Recreation Supervisor making Range 45, $24.95 per eight hour day, $3.12 per hour. The Supervisor will work a total of 5 4 hours per week. As the above list indicates, there are approximately twenty-one playlots to operate. Of these, a total of fourteen are existing and seven are under development or the land is in the process of being leased. Each lot will have supervision for a total of nine hours per day, fifty-four hours per week, or eighty-two work days for a total of 738 hours. A total for all lots of 1 4 ,760 man hours of Community Recreation Leaders time, amounting to $38,929 .60; plus the Supervisors time amounting to $2,302.56 for a grand Recreation salary total expense of $31.232.16. (830C) Presently, four men each are ,_,rork ing thirty-two hours per pay period doing clean- up and maintenance work on the existing playlots . This fo ur man crew consists o f a Fark Foreman II, (2) Labor Foremen II, and (1) Laborer. They are paid straight ove rti me on the basis of a Park Foreman II, Equipment Operator I, Labor Foreman II, and one Laborer's pay. I ,..,ould suggest this arrangement be maintained since most personnel declined to work overtime and these individuals are willing to work. Park Foreman II earn $3.53 per hour; the Equipment Operator I is paid $1.88 per hour; Labor Foreman II is paid $2033 per hour; and the Laborer is paid $1.5~ per hour. These men will be involved in approximately ten pay periods at 32 hours per pay period times $9.23 per hour for a total of $1,453.60. {Maintenance is a twelve month item - this figure is just for the summer) Thus, total Recreation and Maintenance salary cost will be $32,686.00. 1 r.-J e will keep as many . Recreation positions vacant as possible during the winter months, thus hoping to accrue approximately $32,000 to hire additional Community Recreation Leaders as needed, in unnumbered positions, plus limited maintenance expense, during this summero �Hr. Charles L . Davis Page Four J:.uto l.llov-rance: The Supervisor ·will draw $50 per month car allo1 ,rance. A total car allowance will be for ~6 calendar days times $1.66 per day for a total of $15~.3 6 . Transportation: Last year ·we spent approximately $-1600 on transportation in the playlot program alone not counting "Operation Champ" . This year the Park s Jepartment's thirty passenger (for kids) bus will be used to the maximum. Children 1_.1ill be carried to (1) Cyclorama, Zoo, and special lecture by herpetologist; (2) State Capital, City Hall; (3) Greenhouses, Training Center, lecture on insects b y ~r. Buchannan at Piedmont Pa r k . Three trips p er lot times 20 lots is f. 0 trips in the 82 work day program. Games, Supplies l . Rentals : (771C) $100 per playlot times 20= Portable toilet s a t $ ~0 per mo. t i me s 20 loc a tion s times 3 mo. = $2 ,000 2 , 4 00 $ 4 I ~-00 Ma i ntena n ce~ ( 81 3C) $100 per playlot x 20 = Equi pment: $ 2,000 ( 570C) 11 lots to be equipped at $ 200 each = $ 2, 200 Special Proj e ct Expense: ( 771C ) Refreshments, awards day p icnic - estimated $2,000 Renta l s 255 Dodd Ave. is $100 per mo. x 3 mo. = $ 300 81 Little St., S.E. (Summer Hil l) rent to be paid by Citizen's Trust Co. as a donation to the City of Atlanta at $100 per month. Utilities: (771C) - lights Two houses at $10 per mo. for 3 months== $ 60 �l'-1r. Charles L. Davis Page Five Account 714C: (Fuel) T·wo houses at $ 20 per month for the fall and winter if the program is successful - not figured in this proposal. ~Je are holding to an average of 12 vacancies in the Recreation Division (Account 83OC} and we should come very close to having a $ 32, 68E surplus for salaries. ·:re ask that you make this money available in unnumbered positions for the individuals involved in the operation of the playlots and ,.,re also ask that you authorize expenses for automobile allowance amounting to $150. 36. e ,., ill make every possible effort to absorb the additional cost for games and supplies ,.,,hich we ,,rill charge to lkcount 771C; for maintenance to the lots Hhich '.\re will charge to Account 8l 3C; for equipment whi ch w·e , .r ill charge to Account 57OC; for special projects expense which we ,_,rill charge to Account 771C ; and, for rentals ,-,hich we will charge to i .ccount 771C. •,Till b e as conservative as possih le b ut these are the· figures arrived at after careful consideration and He are advising you of the financial aspect at the earliest time possible. ·! e Althaigh Mayor Allen made no committment as to supporting us in our desire for additional funds f or carrying on the neighborhood playlot program I believe I am at liberty as quoting him as saying to "Do your very b est to carry out this top priority project and if you get into an impossir.le situation financially, let me know, and perhaps some emergency appropriations can be made, etc . . . . " The above appears to solve the problem of summer operations but leaves unansi:,r ered the long and beautiful fall and spring days - and for that matter some ,.,rinter days - uhen the playlots should be operated. In addition, it appears \·1e will have t,,.,o houses rented which ,.-.rill operate the year-round as Recreation Centers in conjunction ,..-Tith the playlot program. ~Je must .:irrive at some solution as how to fund the salary, supply and rental - utility expenses involved. I 1 ·1ould hope that we i:muld not have to cut back existing and regular services in order to carry out this vital program. �Mr. Charles L. Davis Page Six Again, let me emphasize to you in writing that 1.ve are sorry to bother you as busy as you are uith these details and i.·re ~-.r ish to thank you for your usual fine cooperation, and I am Cordially, Delius neral Manager of Parks and Recreation JCD:bj,,1 cc : Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr. , Mayor : / All h embers of the Park Committee All Members o f the F inance Committee I"·-lr . R. Earl Landers, Administrative Asst. to the J,iayor Mr. Carl T . 3utherland, Director of Personnel flr. :)an E. :3"weat, Jr., Dir. of Governmental Liason Mrs . Grace Hamilton, Dir., Atlanta Youth Council Niss Virginia Carmichael, Dir., Recreation Div. Miss l\lberta Murch i son, Asst. :Jir. , Recr eation :Oi v. Miss Jimmie Hims, Asst . .J ir . , Recre ation .Division �C TY OF A LANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 February 24, 1967 JACK C. DELIUS MEMORANDUM GENERAL MANAGER TO: Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr. FROM: Jack Delius Thank you for sending me a copy of your letter to Mrs. L. W. Roberts concerning the report she had prepared on the Atlanta Zoo. I agree substantially with the report but Mr. Leftwich, the undersigned, and Steve Dobbs all take exceptions to the remarks made concerning Steve's qualifications. He is certainly not a "lay Curator" but is a professional in every sense of the word. Also, we take exception to the remark that we have given anyone a blank check to remodel the Reptile House. We are actively recruiting for a Zoo Director and many of the changes which I realize must be made and can be made will be more easily initiated and operated with a professional director on the scene. We appreciate your that when you next in good order • . JCD: bjw to the Zoo a nd I trust a call you will find things �C ITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 February 23, 1967 JACK C . DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER MEMORANDUM TO: Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr. FROM: Jack D9lius Thank you for your memorandum of February 22 concerning the cleanliness of the Children's Zoo at Grant Park. You are absolutely right that the area does become untidy particularly on the weekend. I propose the following corrective me a sures. The addition of about ten to. twelve tra sh receptacles strategically placed within the area ; a prisoner or extra zoo att e ndant to constantly police the general area ; the h i r ing o f a b ui ldi ng cleaner who will constantly clean the restrooms in the Children' s Zoo a s well as the other b uil d ings at Gr ant P ark . As t o the short-cutt ing across the grass and through the shrubbery, we have tr ied chain fences, sign s, e x tra shrubs, e tc. I've come to t h e conclusion that the smartest thing to do where pract ica l a nd whe re esthetics will not be injured is t o actu a lly pave the p ath s the way people are walki ng. This is being d o ne in the deve lopment of a lot o f our modern p arks and so we propose t o try i t o n a limited bas i s o f the Children's Zoo and then go i nto it ful ly if it prove s practical. Aga in, we will proceed cau tiously so as not to disturb the gene ra l desi gn featu r es, etc. o f th e Children's Zoo. Thank you f o r your interest and I appreciate your visit t o the Zoo . J CD:bjw Gr- �Ir ~ February 20, 1967 Mrs o L. W. Robert, Jr. 959 Biltmore Hotel Atlanta, GeoTgia Dear Evie: I appreciate yO\ll' s nding ine a copy o-f the report you have had prepared on the AUanta Zoo. I think it is a very good report and I am · ur the Parks Committee will give consideration to the recommendation • Sincer ly your , lva.n Allen, Mayor lAJr/br J•. �FRIENDS OF THE ATLANTA ZOO A Civic Organization Mayor Ivan Allen, Honorary President Mrs . L. W . Robert, Jr., President Jesse Draper, Vice President February 15, 1967 Freeman Strickland, Treasurer Margaret A. Le itheiser, Executive Secretary DIRECTORS Mrs . James D. Robinson, Jr. Mrs. Henry H. Ogden Dr. John Richardson Mrs. Wm. B. Harfsfield Mrs. M. W. Wagar Furma·n Smith, Jr. Louisa Le Roux, Secretary Dear Ivan: We were extremely fortunate to be able to get the help of these very bril liant men to evaluate the Atlanta Zoo~ We feel it is an excellent appraisal and hope you will read i t carefully. This brings my best to you in hopes tha t we may soon get off the ground. Sincerely, - \_*-" ~ "- ~ Mrs~ L. w. Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr~ 3700 Northside Drive, N.W. Atlanta, Gaa 30305 Biltmore J./.otef 959 _A.tfanla, (}eorgia I I Robert, Jr~ �('• '- l o(,-, / __, I 1967 _,. ·.·· -- . ... ...... - .!. ' S:: E.-- - - . ..  :· ·. :: ,:, .': 3C: tr.e zoo for-er..;in . 1.)y r·. )ilbeck showeu. us 0v8:c 7 C(J'-.:..r--'.:,csJ ':.·..:::-csscci by his l oyc;'.h,~ -~ -) "' Le zoo . -:··c, :'.s ~i vi ded into I . ;,,·cp:::·s Ja ::rL, city z.oo.s w 0r e P2.ant, .l. . eci-,e,tJ.::.,;h ad 1:,0 e:-:l1ibi·" & sr;:al~ call e e- The se l-:-'. er.a _:;· eri0s !': ad ::.o '- _;_· c.:::t j_o .al values or e conomical ba sic fo existing . -~any c iti8s _· c, lizod 0-:her cities built 'll:'." :,:, 'ir zoos for educati onal prog2.~3.r.1s, · ·_:'.. ~ .' -::-.~ ;_\·ealt: :'..e:.:· ci' .:..es bet:an to tal-:e inta ·est in the cons e~ vation Toe.a/ , ·:.he.:::--e is a tendency to col7l'oine t hese val ue s , and in rcali t;;r , 1.r .· .L. ' ...... ...,_ ~ I. .L L., . .. ' _ - T-E:.:S:CAL PLAWI' Tf,c tn::'.'ee rr.ajor building s of t c Atlanta Zoo are outstandin3 . ·-.·..:.: ::..c:.::..r.gs ;1cre clean and uell r:ia.inta::..11ed . .:·-~ :·~vin1:, sucn ?.. S · Some of the details n3cd lacing swin~::.!\3 bar s in the c enter of the pJ. imate All �::;~ .c c c 3.r, .,~... ~:·~~-li z3Q , 7 7 1 J :,:... r ~~ J _ J.. ") •....,_ _ 7 __;_ ..,. . ., (,.).J 1 ... ·--:"lir..a :;_ ':. :c 12.c.{ of 01-:t s i d c c age s at t a c: .JC1. t ., the bui l h g s is ver y not i c e..- 2"...lc :..:-.;.:, sin c e t _e bui l c.ing s a r e a lrca cy b"t.:i l t , it i3 u.n::1cc e ssa r y to Th e l a ck of info r r.ia tive s i ~r,s is ·,rery di s tur bi~:.,s , and t h e l oss o: oct -ca:.ioLal -.ral ue i s o viou s . I. , :~IYAL COLT,.~ TION O.x.,er ,;ati n 3 : Tr.er e are defini t8l y s orr:e aninals that s hould 'be ahi~3 s s~ould b e off displ ay until t hei h eal t h pr o bl eDs are s olved , Jr- e:xar.:ple , the s pot-t.ec. l eorard . T:1cre s es;,,s to b e a lac~< of !:mr µo se i n t he col lectioi. : -- - ·-, ..... ,. "' ·::::e :.;,,-:_,ical ~oo an:ir.·.al "': .os J' £ e:: .-- a·~::.o:n.s : ~ Gl-=..r_e hi ~~!:"O Z, ::i .c .:.f _fes , and bi~d s . Rcv,ork collect i on so the··e is an a::.~ ay of an~ ':ic.l s ouse . By removing all but on.e goo d breeding pai r o.:. t2.:,c~~s, t .ere v1ouJ.d be roon fo :."' a pair each of cheet ahs , s c .. val, .::..~.:n cats , hyenas, etc. �February 8, 1967 - 3- ouse . 2 ) Pr ir.1a.t Pl ace G:i.bbons in t . e pr esent Pi[{tail cd nacaques 1 c&.:::;c ; obtain -a lega l orangut an; thus all rcpre entat iv s 0 · ) :.~~_,;:;!·, Since th • s ::.c t.ens cul d b 3) house i s cont r olled environm ntally, rar e an di spl aye • · ptil ? House. ~~bli~, the uimsua l Consi e ril-,,g the house has never been ope olle ction can be cons idered impressive . t o t .e As far a s it coul d o dc~eIT.lined, there are no t anks t o displ ay pre aquatic t ur t les, for exa.; ple, !a.ta mata and the African Soft s hel l; turtl es are very popul ar ui.th t he public . We r comm nd t hat r emodeling of the Reptil e House be hel d in ab yanc unti l a direct or is a ppointed so that a profes s ional can govern its oper ation . To a llow a lay curator ca rte blanche t o r organize and r model a new building is fool i s h . Profess ional curator s , such as Roger Conant of Philadelphia, Herndon Dowling of New .York, or Earl Herald of Sa.~ Franci s co, would be pl eased to survey t he workings of the building and sugges t ·ways and means t o modify i t at the l east e.xpense s o i t could be op ned tot public . (4.) Hoofed. Ani mal Exhibit . These could be r i·: orked to display interesting species which would help conservation of t hreatened species . As it is now, t he few donkeys, etc . is an extremely uni nt erest ing exhibit. (5 ) Childr en ' s Zoo. This was seen under wint er conditions but it i s obvious that a better colle ction of animals could be obtained 1 i . e . pigIT".iy goats, llamas, and Fallow deer . Some of the wild babies t hat are born at the zoo (lions, t igers , monkeys , bears ) coul d be incorporated �t -- .. .L - ., _~ • ..I ..., . . . ' . .,.. ·-- J__ ,_ --::. -· L _, _ r; r ... ~ "- ...... - 'e' r:..'. a-:-:-y --- ,- .... • "" c.1 3a:c to (',~ Sir:c e t r,e zoo c.oes not c::--hi::,i t .. .:; .·:'. ..::.si ns . 8, 1967 i n. a irC:s ; a 1-:::ole zool o.;i cal c.ivi- 1 ve, ,vithout a ·0irdl Ol: s;;, a t:;o od c olle ction co·1:i.(· .)c 'c :-::.:t : ::..a:~,:c bi.i.ds mi x ed wit: t- r:e :1oofcd stoc:~ , pa 2·ot 3 on out.:;i c:;o , , ja~- ~ in th e green ho;1ses 1·rit Ir,·\ I. I , ·.h O V C.. ,ent is i1ee"ed i n the cooperation bobrccn t he ~oo a:::: - .,... ,..... -... -· "Y"1 t :.;;; :,::.:..:.c ·::.::.0:.,2.:!.. sy st em t ha t cont::-ols the scienc e room in , o c;":af: ~c!"!)C s c o'Uld cond1.:ct tours, _,·. c.s.l sctools . ' ~ -- - .I. tne Prirr!El:te ::o~_.::;o, -ivc L cc lectures, There is a n endless lL;t of ways to promot e :-"!o-~e t:-:e educational asp ect of the zoo . C':'CUiSION rr·-:c z.:;o is lacr:inc3 in imaginatior. . An cxa.rnpJ~ 9:_ l'OH c.ni u.~5 ooulc. r. .:; ~.-or·~~ed ir::,o t:1e p e s erJ.t physical s et11p t o rna.l< e it !:lore attrac tive is -,,.,~ 2.c ::.in"' r:o.ca1-1s to the planted ar ea s o f t he Prim.ate House, and sJ.1.all ~ ::c::.e: s ·,:o, 1 ld do vcc":· ".· :ell ir, the waterfall areas of t ..G 7cl:.,.o :-:oucu. ·.r.r.::l~::;::-•..,i 'Te ::mt side ca g es could b e bui].t to hous e t h e ccr.!?:lon :::1.onkcys anc. ·a:'..~~ :':"a n~,als . I.,a,nds cape walks acros s fro m the bears coul d pass through Far:-: a,,d pa ddo ck fences coul d en close an unused ar ea or . o ec. sto c:·~. ~iiti: t!"1e advanta,:;e of t he so ·t :1ern Heather, outside pla:-its a:rsd a n21.al::, �r:: - .,1 - ZJ G ~. 1-. .:_3 ,c.c!·.::_nc of the society a· · city, t:1e .:;.::".'~:. --iit-· - both a s a culturaJ. 3.2,cl -'- ,00 c -:,1;.l c. b ,:; a va.lun.' 2.e 2s:::: -:./ i:. to ec r-;2tic:1al 111:1 ,iio ic.1 Zo lo0 i asnington, D. C. '!; C (>ff::,c 1 r • �t / Y!;)rLeJ ?Z .• '7 .r.h ~ ~ O /J /? ·1/1'/_J y ,Y,l/1,,_ ~, -' ~/-- ,;·j/ v /. , £ .• .., '"' {/'• J V // / -~ ,?' / Ju U. ,,//. / ~ l/ ,- ,·.' o·.,· J 9- J • • ,,,,.., - ~ • • •"-' ' , ·'- .. . ~ c;x . . v:2 . . tJ0111-l/l.LJ.Jto.1t.- J Ptel1'611u/llr111/ ..L4.Jln.r~ @t1/lft.1UJ/v rp Zo/l:;ru:u~ JJM1t:kf.1. C. :-q· 1~:: .:,p T H C D ;R: c...:.·: oR !1J0Jto1v fJ.2/.21 'Y 7 9 196? ~,:_•so 1,.,. W~ ~ obert, JrG Pr0 s · d0nt ~ri ~~s c~ t he _ tlanta Zoo 959 ::.l'cmo;,"e .-otel A~ l n~, Georgia Ja ar M s. Robert : Tha you for s endin0 me the inf o rmat o .. cone e r .ling nt t' e op n· g for Zoo Director in the city of At Q Earl·" er• I h d expres sed a n interest i .. th s posit i on .. oweve r, t e salary r ange, a s established.s> is not high n oug o that I can jus t ify making an applicationo I hav e ~ea ·d a great deal of t he develop nt nd potent· al of the Atlanta Zoo.I) and I am sur e I wold nj o y an s sociation with t and with t he Friends of · .. e .. an a Zoo .. It i u nf ortunat e that family fin n i con iderat:on precludes me f rom submitting an appl "cat on. do hop y ou_ search for a competent z oo direc t or is suc c essf , l . Truly yours~ MET . DIST . ZOOL. GARDENS \ ' ·- '/\ \' .... Walter D ., St one Director �FRIENDS OF THE ATLANTA ZOO A Civic Organization Ma y or Ivon Allen, Hono rary President February 15, 1967 Mrs. L. W. Robert, Jr., President J e sse Drape r, Vice Presid e nt Freemo n S tri ckland, Tre asurer Ma rgare t A. Le ith eise r, Executive Secretory DI RECTO RS Mrs. J ames D. Ro b inson, Jr. M rs. Henry H. O g d en Dear Jack: Dr. J oh n Richardson Mrs. W m. B. Hortsfield Mrs. M. W . W a g ar Fur man Smith, J r. Louisa le Ro ux, Secre tary We were extremely fortunate to be able to get the help of these very brilliant men to evaluate the Atlanta Zoo. We feel it is an excelient appraisal and hope you will read it carefully. This brings my best to you in hopes that we may soon get off the . g round~ Sincerely, Mrs. L; Mr~ Jack Delius Pa rks Department City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 /.Si/tmore _j./ofef 959 A tfanla, (}eorgia w. Robert, Jr: �- February· G, 1967 . ' -- ~: J J J n c;.or t on Visit to Ath.nta Zoo on Januar;;r 28, 1967 J C) ,:..,.t...J , 1967 the undcr:::;ir;n cd v:i.::,itcd the Atl,:i.nta Zoo. Durir<; ,' :: : :: ·,. ., look ed at the zoo aG t;n)ical visitors; in the aftC;rnoo,1, · -~ ·.::.- cs co ,,·:~e..:l :)y t h e zoo forem.:i.n. ·,-_-._ ,..·:.;;'::, j_;;11)rc:.;scci -, · Mr. Dilbeck showed us every c·ou.rtcsy ,, oy his loyalt;y to the zoo. '_·;-::..s rc;_xl:..~t is di vi dcd into tn:c ee p0.Y·ts: I . 1 _I. · Physica~ Plant, !',r:.::.r.·2.l Coll e ct ion, -and III. Conclusioif:· - In ye2.rs pa s t , city zoos were e:Jtablished to exhibit a small coll ec:-: . .:,:1 o: ar.i;-:,2.ls , in o ther words, a menaeei·ie. These i;nenageries c,a d-no sc:.c2-c,icr:al val ues or economical basis for existing. ·>··"-' Hany · ci ti .;)S ::.'ca.lizcd i: ·a·.-:in 6 }:Owe:- of animals and · began to build up their zoos for tourist 2·;:,J._,_ ·c3. ct::.ons. Oth er cities built up their zoos for educational programs, · ·r;:.. . .: . -c,r.c ,-:calthic::.." cities began to t ake interest in the c onservation -~: .. L. v J t -. 0 ~GO . ·.:·octc1y, the1~0 is a tendency to combine these values, and in reality, .:-.1.: ~ - c.o . ~- 2.8.:",8~--.t caci:. other to the a dvanta::;e of the city. With this ·----~_:_c3o~r..~, in rrd.nd ., this report is 1irittcn. ·--::--,o -_,:-,:2e e ma jor building s o f the Atlanta Zoo a re out standing . ·.:-, __ : _:_r' :_;1g s ·.-1 cre clean and well maintained. All Some of t he details need ·: -~ - :·o·;int::, s u c h a s placing swinginG bars in the center of the primate �______ .....• -2- Februa r y 8, 1967 'l'h , ou.t ::;id c co.r; cs on t he ::;n:;:1.ll cat l :i.no arc c:xtrc:-;-i cl;y ::;r.i:-i.11 <'.l. n d --~ ,;-_ :)c ::' CHO l' l·~ cd for better run::,. ·:·.:·~ c~ul c: oe The bear dens arc very unatt 1·a ct i ve i n:provod by land3capin:; and pa.intinr, .. The hoof cd ~nir;;,,.l ,_.' c2.. ::-. ~..:c,: s a ~ood l.:cnd scape plan to provide shade and prevent e:::-osic:.-1. . ~ .. zoo animal s paces could be made more attractive . ,1., _•_, ':';10 2.ac;..: of outside cages attached to th0 buildings is very notice2 • c.,J.c '.J ,t ::,ir.:.c c the buildings are already built, it is unnecessary to c:t::.J.:.i c :..zc -~hi s disadvantage • The la.c-;. ;: of informative signs is very disturbing, and the loss of .::<;.;.c2..".-,ior:al val u e is obvious. II . ,'.?I;·.:;\L COLI -EC TION O~,ccrvr.tions : There are definitely some animals that sho·cUd be ·c·:ovcc. from display, i.e. tailless Jaguar and Black Leopard. Some ~ .ir; 9.ls shoul d b e off display until their health problems are solved, -~. ~,--; : · c.-::am.pJ.e , t he spotted leopard. There seems to be a lack of purpose in the coll ection: , . ·'." ·,,--:,: ~:;-, ~.ion. s , ti ~ers, Pi gtailed macaques, and chir.tJianzees; while absent ,:. - zoo an~..r.ials: ...,. .1. 0-:: r.: _ _-.n~~,q_- ~j_ons : hippo s, giraffes, and birds. Rework collection so there is an array of animals ·:.:. ·-.. t;::, ~8J:~·. . . s0nts the anirnal· .k ine dqn1. ·,: 1 ) f eline House. ~i~: s ~~ ~n ~ ' •'•h · - - - h h . By removing all but one good breeding pair of t~c crs, there would be room for a pair each of cheetahs, serval , c at s , nyena s , etc. ·- -- -, �February 8, 1967 -.3- (2) ?ri r2tc House. ,;..;.__: ., ~ 0bt.:i.::..;i ) :.~(;c;cnt. . Place Gibbon3 in the proscnt Pigtailed macaques• a lcc .:i.l orangutan; thuG all represontatives of the ~pcs are Since t ho house is controlled environmentally., rare and .unusua l $:~3cir.:o;.: s ccul d be displayed. f,... 'J,) '"'n0ptile House. Considering the house has never been open. to the _:;·,1b::::..ic, t h0 collection can be considered impres~ive. 1:,e: As far as it could c:.e:, ccrrr.ir.ed, ther e are no tanks to display pure aquatic turtles., for c.::-:x::iplc, r-1:tta mata and the African Soft shell; turtles are very popular We recor.muend that r emodeling of the Reptile House be held ii.1 ~bcy~nce until a director is appointed so that a professional can govern its operat i on . To allow a lay curator carte ·blanche. to reorganize and tc:::odol a new building is foolish. Professional curators , such as Roger Con"'nt, of Philadelphia, Herndon Dowling of New .York., or Earl Herald of S2.11 Francis co, would be pleased to survey the workings of the building and 1c; 5est ways and means to modif y it at the least expens e s o it coul d be Ofene~ t o the public . (L,) Hoofed Animal Exhibit. Tl1es e could be r·eworked to display ir.tc r 0sting species which woul d help conservation · of threatened species. J.,. 2, i t is now., the few donkeys., etc. is an extremel y uninteresting exhibit. (5) ChildTen 1 s Zoo . ~~ This was seen under wint er conditions but it obvious that a better collection of animals could be obtained., i.e. pi g:-..y goats , llama.s, and Fallow deer. Some of the wild babies that are bo~n at tho zoo (lions, tigers, monkeys., bears) could be incorporated �j .. I Februa~y 8, 1967 ~;2 . ~-LJ t;1::;~, :r-t.::i.ch aY"! ar;c when it Lj no l onger ::mf e · to keep thcr1 in <1. '.Tith a l:i.ttlc thoueht, physically, tld.::; ccct io1; c011ld · . ·-·- . ' ' . -··- ----···n::; ~-;r,:n·ovc:d f or a cJ.oser association between the children ai.1d tbc. animal!J . . C : . : ·' ' .. ·._: ,·, I ::; '3:.)() • . ,o .) .,.uc c r.,ne I t \ \ .-.. .~ . .. 1 ..., __ ,, __ :..s ;:-:t :;cin~; . ,, zoo d ocs no t eY.h:i. bit birds, a whole z,oologi ca l c.ivi- Even without a birdhouse, a eood collection conl cl be ·c:~.,::r~: l.::.rsc oi::.·ds mixed with .the hoofed stock , parrots on outs:i.ci.'c c:·.,..,::..-·.s ) ~.:::.rs in t he sreen houses uith the alligators, and s er.ri.- J.-;:;_·o~ical (7) I:-i:pi·ovement is r.eeded in the cooperation betwoen the zoo arn:i t::2 c.::--...:cat ional sy ctem t hat controls the science room in the Primate House. ~c:c :;taf: I:""t0rr10ers c ould conduct tours, eive free lectures, and tak:e ani mals '.:.o ·;:,:1c local schools . There is an endless lis t of ways to promote more i;-:.-'.:.c:·c st ir. the eciucational aspect of the zoo. 7ne zoo is l a cki ng in imagination. An example of how animals could be ·,.co:::-:<::e.:l. i nto the present physical setup to make it more attractive is 8Y adC:.::.nz m-.caws to t he planted areas of the Primat e House, and small .'.':..nc '.".cs -t!ould do v ery wel l in the 1vaterfall areas of tl1e ~elin0 Hou:::;e . c~e rcc~i v e:::; the impre ssion of always being indoors. Relatively .: . :):-:pe::-,sivc outs::..ci.e caGcs could be built t o house the common monkeys and -:2.:':..~~ 1r:<1r:-:'.1al0. Landscape walks across from t he bears could pass through ~-2.r;-: aild paddock f enc es could enclose an unused area for hoofed s tock • .::.-:-.n t:.c adva!: t agc of the southern weather, outside plants and animalo I. �.. -5---·· ,·· ·-~--- --··--- l~c ?_ruar-y 8, 1967 co: .~:.·_:_ ·:1;i.l-~c the overall appearance of the zoo r1or e dcliGhtful. 2vcr, ·C.l-.ou~;1 t he zoo is limited in total acrcn.'._'.c, the re a:r:-e many .r:;j_c:::-ov e::.:.ent s t hat could be made to give 11 feeli ng of la.r 0 sn0ss. 'ic10 .J.-tlarrta Zoo has a vast potentinl; with the cor1•oct c uidc1.r1c c: I ':.:--:-.c:-:in.::; of the society and city, the z.oo could b 3 a va.luA.ble c0:TI,,l:..:.1iJ.:,~, - bot:i.1 a::; a cultural and recreational c enter. D ~ '·(i~in~ lJ__J _:·~bt::J:=::::::::::;;;-=-- w. Ar mstrong ~ /dlj./ >~~- National Zoological Park Washington, D.C. I I �/!. ,t"; / /J 71/ J Pla.-J.-Jt1c/1t1,.Jet/J/ 02i . ·, ..:.·-~ -\ ,7177 /?;! J/1,& (!JtJ'l.///JJ/0:1l111eal?/// , /// (j/i . /,2 . ( /r:J . . e../ //U!t11oj1ot1-/ru1, ;:L lt.J (ncb (:JOJlbil/L.J.Jt.ill/ @wuJI0/1/ o r· ,.-i c c or- i H U o ..~c ~ ·.-0n rp Zoqy,;cu~ :§0/1~/W /J!JoJ to1v {}2/2/ ______ .. -· . .... . ~... February 7, 1967 ~rs .