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Box 1, Folder 1, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 7
  • Text: November 25, 1962; Mr. Joo C. Behrons, Chie? Conservation and Rehabilitation Branch Urben Reneval Division Housing and Home Finence Agency 6L5 Peachtree=Seventh Building Atlanta, Ceorgia = 30525 Dear Mr. Behrens: Some time ago at the request of Mr. Willian R. Wofford, the Building Official of the City of Atlanta, you reviewed the draft of the S0CA Basic Housing Code and submitted some comments. Under scparate cover, at Mr. Woffordts request, we have sent to you three complinentary copies of this cede as it was finally published. We are enclosing a copy of our Publication and Price List for your information in the event you have occasion to refer to this and the BOCA codes in the areas which you serve. ia Very much appreciate your taking the time to comment on the early draft of this code and must apologize for not earlier commmicating with you rogarding this. In the volume of work involved it was impossible for us te communicate our appreciation to everyone. FPlesse forgive this oversight. Your comments were carcfully reviewed by the Committee and you msy find that some of them wero incorporated in the code. © Others may not hava been used since in the overall concept of the Code the cormmitics may have felt it undesirable to use them at this time. We anticipate modifications of the code as experlonce indicates necessary and this may lead to the adoption of some of the things previously suggested but not accepted by the Comsittes. The BOCA Basie Housing Code isa propared to. be used in cone junction with the BOCA Basic Building Code. Together they provide all the necessary authorities for the administration of regulations governing both old and new buildings. Thoy are based on the policy that all activities dealing with the buildings in a community should cova under the direct supere vision of the building official. Housing authorities or similar local public agencies, plarming boards and other a ee branches of local government concerned with buildings and their use should have the full cooperation of the building department in determining the physical condition of the buildings and in such other uatters as may be necessarye Violation notices and correction orders regarding buildings should be issued by one agency only == the building departmenteealthough the fire prevention official may properly issue notices and orders regarding fire hazards resulting from the processes of handling of flammable materials over which he has jurisdiction, and the hoalth official may issue orders regarding sanitation - improper use of sanitary facilities or unsanitary practices < which are under his jurisdiction. We believe that these assumptions quite well take care of ali necessary conditions and that they are sound and practical. Under this arrangement appeals from administrative orders are provided within proper limitations through provisions of the building code. Such appeals would apply equally to orders issued in connection with | corrections under the Housing Code as to those issued under the Building Code. We would welcomes any further comments you may have in connection with this and the results of your experience or the experience of communities with which you may come in contact in its use. Sincerely yours, peb/f Paul E. Baseler , Executive Director
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 5
  • Text: Total Structures Residential 97879 Non-Residential 11830 Total 109709 Housing Units . -- 163205 % 100.0 Estimated Number of Structures and Hevsing Units City of Atlanta CIP Field Survey . Standard 66127 8543 74670 113999 69.9 In need of In need of Minor Major Repair Repair ' 20991 * 8988 2757 434 23748 9422 t $2412 30 !-s 13807 19.9 | 8.5 ee ee ne b a Dilapidated 1773 96 1869 2987 1.8 wy
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_002.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 2
  • Text: Municipal Court City of Atlanta PRESS RELEASE Date For Immediate Release MUNICIPAL COURT CITES €No. ) FOR HOUSING CODE VIOLATIONS defendents received sentences varying (No. ) from to : (Sentence) (Sentence) (Date) in Atlanta Municipal Court on charges of violating the City's Housing Codes. Judge handed down the following (Name) sentences: (Defendant) (Address) ’ » for (Sentence) (Charge) (signature) Judge, Atlanta Municipal Court
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 11

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_011.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 11
  • Text: {) S, | CITY OF ATLANTA OFFICE OF INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 800 CITY HALL ; TEL. JA. 2-4463 EXT. 321 ATLANTA, GEORGIA Housing Code Enforcement Report of Accomplishment and Needs December 15, 1964 PROGRAM (a) Sourt. A special Housing Court is held each Thursday and the number of eases heard depends on ability of available personnel to prepare and process cases. At the end of November, 1964, 335 Housing Code Cases have been tried in Municipal Court with total fines ef $7,979 imposed by the court. (b) Planned Program. A planned systematic Housing Code enforcement program which provides for complete coverage and inspection of all substandard dwellings in the city by the end of 1969 has been developed in conjunction with the Planning Department. This program consists of an up-to-date Housing Conditions Map with priorities established for proposed areas of enforcement and a Policy and Procedure Guide. The maps and program have been approved by the Urban Renewal Committee of the Beard of Aldermen and referred to the Finance Committee for consideration of additional personnel expenditure involved. A planned systematic program for Housing Code enforcement is essential if the City is to meet Federal requirements for re- certification of Atlanta's Workable Program for Urban Renewal in March, 1965. (ce) Compliance. Attached herewith is a report reflecting the number of buildings inspected, units involved, buildings repaired, etc., including the number of permits issued for alterations and repairs to residential buildings and the number of permits iecsued for the demolition of residential units. The report is complete through November, 1964. Projected totals are shown for the entire year of 1964, In addition to the above report overcrowding has been eliminated in 72 unite. i i en eae oe C es ——=a_ Housing Code eteruinant - Dec. 15, 1964 Page 2. (4) Generel Results. Results of the Housing Code enforcement effort te date have proven the need for stronger Code provisions. Several amendments to the Housing Cede have recently been adopted to clarify and strengthen the code. The most important of these are: Section 14.12. Mo building, plumbing, electrical or gas or other permit for an addition, alteration or repair of existing substandard dwelling unit shall be issued until such time as an inspection of the property has been made to determine the feasibility of rehabilitation of such dwelling unit or unite. Section 14.13. Utility services shall not be provided to any existing vacant substandard dwelling unit or any substandard dvellig unit becoming vacant until such dwelling unit has been inspected and brought into compliance with this code and a valid certificate of occupancy has been issued. From the adoption of these amendments on June 15, 1964, through November, 1964, the Chief Electrical Inspector has discontinued electrical service in 173 vacant, substandard dwelling units; such service will not be restored until the structures have been rehabilitated to meet the requirements of the Housing Code. NEEDS. (a) Inspectors. in order to inspect all substandard dwellings within the city by 1970, 5 additional housing inspectors will be required as provided for in the planned systematic program of Housing Code enforcement. The budget request for 1965 includes a request for the aforementioned additional inspectors and one elerical position. Additional technical inspectors as requested in the 1965 budget are urgently needed, (b) Asgistance from other Departments. If the improvement of living conditions and general environment throughout the blighted areas of the city is to be accomplished a Aes eg wed ——=a_ Housing Code Enforcement - Dec. 15, 1964 Page 3. through Housing Code enforcement, it is necessary that definite and continued assistance be obtained from other departments by prompt reporting of obvious violations to the Building Department and prompt action upon conditions referred to them as being within their jurisdiction. Particular assistance will be required from the Sanitary Department so far as clean-up of premises and removal of junk automobiles is concerned and from the Construction Department for street and sidewalk improvements including the paving of some unpaved streets in older areas of the city. The Planning Department can assist materially in recording accurately the number and general condition of housing in areas warked for concentrated Housing Code enforcement effort and by scheduling the worst of the areas for appropriate treatment as Urban Renewal projects. (e) egisletion. Severel conferences have been hold with the City Attorney who is preparing legislation whereby the city can proceed “In Rem” against substandard property. This will permit the city to proceed against the premises or building and will eliminate difficulties with out-of-town owners, estates, incompetents, etc., which have ceused concern. We are hopeful that additional legislation can be enacted to require demolition of houses which have been boarded up and are vacant. Under existing laws the current practice of permitting houses to be boarded up and remain has not been @ satisfactory solution. (4) The Courts can assist the program by: 1. Promptly disposing of a11 cases without delays and postponemente. 2. By continuing appropriate fines when convictions for violations have been attained. 3. By imposing reasonable fines when a violator is convicted of an offense even though a correction may have been made prior te court action. o) A DK Housing Code Enforcement = Dec. 15, 1964 Page 4. (e) Public Understanding of the program is most important and is a field in which the Citizens Advisory Committee can be extremely helpful. Participation by all news media, civic groups and business organizations should be utilized to point up and rl emphasize the problem and to secure maximum cooperation from the public.
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 34

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_034.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 34
  • Text: ! A \v BUILDING OFFICIALS GE I \ ; ' ; { LLY mh tat ten 4° — — IV & CONFERENCE of AMERICA, Inc. V Area Code 3i2 . : oe 7ann.3e14 ewersitore 4 eaTs aToeer ast ih FAirfax 4-3400-3414 EXECUTIVE OFFICE: 1313 EAST GOTH STREET + CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60637 Yas et aie FOUNDED 1315 ; - 7 --, August 30, 2966¢ +37, -. 43 4 Fileoeilster el peso 9 7 SE } ATLANTA, SEQRGIA See cee S . Mr. Norman Beckman, Asst. Director RAYMEND X inceR Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations Soh ee we" Washington, De C. 206575 “cea SECOND Vice PRESIDENT Dear Mr. Beckman: i This is a belated acknowledgment of your letter of July 26, 19€6 r apc hetare questing the use of the BOCA membership roster or addressing services | WICLIAM H. LINDSAY. JR. for circulation of the Report of the Advisory Commission on Inter- peeuTr “i vars Ih EH & INSRECTIONS governmenta 1 Relations concerning building codes and making recommenda- WlES.GVILGINS PHILADELPHIA. PENNEY AVANIA tions for the complete restructuring of the present ae by which TREASURER building codes are developed and administered. The National Coordinating aon oe Council of the Building Officials Conference of Anerieas the International Nols Conference of Building officials and the Southern Building Code Congress together with the building industry have pointed out that the Report is EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE incomplete and based upon information which has | not been adequately FIRST raat eee backed by Fact. kK en Ud pede ae our years of knowledge and experience in the building code activity we believe that the implementation of these recommendations would re- sult in utter chaos and rather than curing the alleged building code } activity problems would create new and greater problems. * SECOND PAST PAE SENJAMIN SAL 1620 AVENUE BROOKLYN, Atw You BACKHAUS ic IMPROVEMENTS To DE MAR iYLAND ~ 5 - - 20! W. PRESTON StALET From a careful study of the recommendations in thé Report, based upon \\ | BERNARD T. ASCHENGRAND CH EF DUILDING INSPECTOR BERGENFiELS, NEW JERSEY The use of the BOCA membership list for distribution of information is restricted by certain conditions established by our Executive Bi MARYERH Committee. Under these conditions I am not at liberty to release this Pee ra eee ee information for the use of the Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental 7 y Relations for the circulation of this reporte If you desire and so dove: diver ben aenant indicate I will be pleased to place this matter before our Executive CARDEN EAT Aan CER n Commitee at its mid-year meeting in December for a ruling regarding ca, MINCENT DIMASE §=§©=6—Sss policy. In the meantime I have not the authority to grant the re- PROVIDENCE. RNOSE ISLAND quest in your letter of July 26, 1966. ’ WALTER E. GRAY d SUPT. PUBLIC BVILOINGSS WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS Very truly yours, ROANOKE, VIAG:NIA peb/t Paul E. Baseler OWEN PERKINS Executive Director CHIEF (NSPECTOR ROYAL OAK, MiChIGAN n FRANK ELLWOOD ccHM 469 OF BUILOINGS TORONTO, ONTARIC., CANADA STAFF BARCUTIVE DIRECTOR PAUL E. GASELER Core CORNELATON — Goca Coors TECHNICAL DIRECTOR RICHARD L. SANDERSON
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 15

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_015.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 15
  • Text: CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of PLANNING 700 CITY HALL Atlanta, Georgia 30303 WYONT B, BEAN December 9, 1965 _ PLANNING ENGINEER COLLIER B. GLADIN To: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. From: Collier B. Gladin \\\ if P Moo \D Subject: Steps to be taken under the City's current Housing Code Com Program. As was stated in Atlanta's 1965 Recertification of its workable program, the greatest disadvantage of the presently adopted Housing Code Compliance Program was having to rely on 1960 housing census data to determine the number of sub- standard housing units that the program faces. This, in no way, compromises the approach of the systematic Housing Code Compliance Program; however, it does make it difficult to determine the actual housing case load and, therefore, the actual number of housing code inspectors needed to accomplish the program during the allotted period of time. The City of Atlanta feels that a careful analytical approach has been made to the problem, together with realistic estimates as to what can be accomplished. The City saw the year 1965 as a trial period for the Housing Code Compliance Program to determine if the estimates were accurate. To this end, Atlanta Personnel and Comptroller Departments have been reviewing the personnel requirements of the Building Inspector Department in general. Administrative changes as they relate to Code Compliance are being considered that will balance housing code inspections with compliance. The Comptroller is recommending that within the 1966 budget three (3) Housing Code inspectors be added along with one Typist Clerk II. This will require an approximate $19,000 expenditure the first year. Considerable progress is being made on Atlanta's first Code Enforcement Project Area, Several areas were considered by the Planning Department, and the Center Hill area of 480 acres and 1031 families has been chosen by the Planning and Development Committee. Hopefully this application will be completed prior to the first of the year, Further, Atlanta has taken the position that through the Community Improvement Program, it will be able to determine precisely its Housing Code work load and, from this, the City will be better able to further develop the Housing Code Compliance Program to a greater accuracy and make any necessary changes in the conduct of the program. Page 2 December 9, 1965 To date through the CIP Atlanta has in her data system approximately 32 bits of information on each of the 110,000 parcels that lie within our boundaries. This information will be in a form that it can be evaluated shortly after the first of the year. This will enable the City to know precisely the number of sub- standard structures that we are dealing with in order that our Housing Code Program work load and deadlines can be properly evaluated. I feel that Atlanta is, and will continue, progressing in an orderly manner to provide her citizens with safe and sanitary housing in which to live and prosper. C foe
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 27

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_027.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 27
  • Text: August 29, 1966 To: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. From: Dan Sweat Subject: Journal Editorial of August 25, 1966 on Urban Renewal Code Enforcement I taiked to Reese Cleghorn of the Journal Editorial Staff Friday about the subject editorial. Reese said he wrote the editorial and that it was simply a matter of the newspaper's calling attention to code enffrcement practices of the city over a period of several years and that he felt the time had come to voice the paper's opinion more strongly. He says that it goes back to the establishment of the separate inspections some six years ago and the placing it back under Mr. Wofford. He gave no indication that anyone from the department had talked to him recently but did mention the Lightning situation and the name of Wayne Kelley and Willie Williams which would suggest to me that he possibly has talked to some of the dissidents in Vine City. He said so far as he was concerned the editorial was aimed at Wofford and the enforcement program and not necessarily the people inthe Atlanta Housing Authority. Since my discussion with him, I have obtained what I believe to be accurate figures on public housing in Atlanta over the last ten years. I have attached a summary of these figures. You will note a wide gap between the 7,576 completed housing units and the 20, 994 displaced families. This report does not Mayor Allen Page Two August 29, 1966 take into consideration the private sector of the housing market and I would imagine that a considerable amount of low and moderate income private housing has been constructed in Atlanta over this ten year period. I hope that we can document this information through our CIP study and I will follow up with the CIP to try to make sure that we can obtain this information. You will note I have shown the total figures and also broken out the units constructed or planned inside urban renewal areas. I am afraid that I would have to admit that we don't show up very well with low income units constructed inside urban renewal projects. However, I don't think this represents the true criteria for measuring the success of our urban renewal program, I do feel, however, that there should be a complete study of our housing patterns and the City policy on low income and moderate income housing construction. The CIP should shed much light on our current situation and perhaps we can use the CIP Housing Study ha the jumping off point toward a comprehensive housing plan for the city. DS:fy
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 23
  • Text: CITY OF ATLANTA OFFICE OF INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS Atlanta 3, Georgia WILLIAM R. WOFFORD, P,E., R.A. OR OF BUILDINGS INSPECT July 27, 1966 ELMER H. MOON, E.E., P.E. ASST. INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS MEMO TO: Dan E. Sweat FROM: W. R. Yoteoudsyec/ The attached are some recommendations made by a Committee of questionable Congressional authority concerning building codes. The U. S. Conference of Mayors in the June meeting in Dallas adopted the report by a margin of two votes (something like 38 for, and 36 against, were cast). It is questionable and highly controversial in building code fields. It is a product of some federal people who want a federal building code and are making every effort to get one, but the model code groups, building industry and others are opposing this move. I am acquainted with the Assistant Director, Norman Beckman, who presented the matter before the Mayors' Conference in Dallas and has been plugging the report all over the nation. The purpose of promoting the report is purely for the perpetuation of a few high federal government officials. Incidentally, the Department of Housing and Urban Development is taking a more realistic approach by asking the Building Officials Conference of America and other code groups what they think about building codes, These groups have been employed to make reports to HUD concerning building codes throughout the nation. (TI attended a meeting last week in Washington where this was discussed with Federal Code officials.) I think some of the high officials prodded Mayor Dailey and others to press for adoption at the Dallas meeting. Simce the Dallas meeting, the Advisory Commission is circulating the report, the contents of which are in direct opposition to the view of the model code groups, I am enclosing a copy of my monthly message to the membership of the Building Officials Conference of America. Enc. ATLANTA THE DOGWOOD CITY
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 8
  • Text: November 30, 1964 Mr. W. R. Wofford, Building Official Department of Building Inspector City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia 30303, Dear Mr. Wofford: Below is a report.of inspections made on buildings by the Housing Code Division of the Building Department from November 1, 1964, through November 30, 1964. PERIOD 1963 1. Buildings inspected this month Original di5D 209 Re-Inspections 1448 ~ 2. Units Involved 289 S15 3.. Buildings repaired this month 122 62 4, Units repaired this month 214. 100 5. Buildings demolished this month | 48 10 6. Units demolished this month 107 15 7. Better Housing Commission DS -— 8. City Attorney Cases " 43 - 9. Court Cases . <27) 10. Amount of fines imposed $550 $140 June 1, 1964 -- November 30, 1964 . CUMULATIVE 1963 ll. Buildings inspected to date Original 13506 877 Re-Inspections 5696 - 12. Units Involved 2600 1505 13. Buildings repaired to date P4L 506 14. Units repaired to date 1139 94-7 15. Buildings demolished to date 220 -| 164 16. Units demolished to date 396 267 17. Better Housing Commission Cases to date 186 - 18. City Attorney Cases to date 365 - 19. Court Cases to date 240 56 20. Amount of fines to date $5512 $1991 ane truly yours, Se Se Suceanan “ive Chief Inspector 1g
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 10

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_010.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 10
  • Text: hd Ws CITY OF ATLANTA OFFICE OF INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 800 CITY HALL TEL. JA. 2-4463 EXT. 321 ATLANTA, GEORGIA December 10, 1964 DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS HOUSING CODE DIVISION - YEAR, 1964 CUMUIATIVE THRU ~NOVEMBER _ 1. Buildings inspected to date Original 2,660 Re-Inspections 10,524 2. Unite involved | 4,750 3. Buildings repaired to date 1,319 4, Units repaired to date 2,016 5. Buildings demolished to date 322 6. Units demolished to date 578 7. Better Housing Commission Cases to date 288 8. City Attorney cases to date 579 9. Court Cases to date 335 ae Amount of fines to date $ 7,979 Building Permits issued for: Additions, Alterations & Repairs to 4,000 Residential Buildings Demolition of Residential Unites 1,108 PROJECTED DECEMBER 2,904 11,480 5,184 1,440 2,200 352 630 314 632 366 $ 8,704 $4,651,186 Value
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 20
  • Text: i April 22, 1966 MEMORANDUM To: Mr. Collier Gladin From: Dan Sweat Subject: Code Enforcement Project application Ld I notice in your Neighborhood Analysis section of the Workable Program, you mention that the preliminary Code Enforcement Project application for Federal assistance was prepared for the Center Hill area. If you have an available copy of this application I would certainly appreciate having one for my enlightenment and files. ee
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 18

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_018.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 18
  • Text: aA Se yi
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 53

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_053.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 53
  • Text: 3 HOUSING CODE COMPLIANCE PROGRAdI Policy and Procedure Guide January Maximem efforts immediately to secure public understanding of tis and benefits of the Housing Code Compliance Program throug personal contact, pamphlets, press releases and other public ints x4 SeGla. Maminum coordination immediately with all other public agencies wy Conservation of those residential structures in good condition to af ee ~retion to~ ee L VESVETC tue spread of blight and decay through encouragement of maintenance efforts and protection from those conditions such as overcrowding and unaucnorized conversion which lead to blight. Rchabilitation of all substandard residential structures which ar: unsuitable for human habitation but where improvements can be mace reasonable cost to bring them up to standard and where such renaril does not conflict with other community goals by 1971. n Demolition within the City limits of Atlanta of all residential stru which are unfit for human habitation and where rehabilitation we.u prohibitively expensive or would otherwise conflict with other cozy foals by L971. Revicw_and re-evaluation beginning in 1967 on a continuing basis rr ' ¢ tn fo Oi ET. 4 rehabilitation areas which have been treated in previous years to determine their need for possible future systematic reinitiation of total rehabilitation effort. Areas and Priorities: A. The Housing Conditions Map reflecting the survey made in 1963 has been brought up-to-date. In this revision, close coordination has been developed between the Planning Department, the Housing Code Division and the Director of Governmental Liaison. This has resulted in an improved plan for a city-wide, systematic, comprehensive Housing Code Compliance Program. The basic map of the revised survey indicates on a block basis the following categories. 1. Conservation (Areas which principally require either no imprcvements or only minor improvements with occasional rehabilitation). Z. Intensive Conservation (those areas which because of certain factors such as age, transition in occupancy or use, or adverse fringe influences, etc., require a greater amount of surveillance in order to forestall blight and decay. These areas will normally require only minor improvements and spot rehabilitation). 3. Rehabilitation (those areas in which the majority of structures require rehabilitation which does not exceed 50 percent of their value; some spot clearance is anticipated). 4. Clearance - Code Enforcement (predominately smaller areas where the majority of structures should be cleared and the area rede- veloped. It is anticipated that these areas would be cleared through code compliance with emphasis on demolition. The oniy other corrective actions to be taken are those to alleviate hazards and to protect the health and safety of residents in the area). 5. Clearance - Title I Urban Renewal (those areas in which the majority of structures should be demolished, with some rehabilitation, and where the size and cost of the contemplated action justifies the use of Title I federal funds). The map also shows division of the city into halves, for supervisor responsibility; each of these halves is sub-divided into five Sectors. Each of these Sectors is assigned to a Housing Code Inspector, as his area of individual responsibility. The map also has on it areas of various sizes outlined showing the neighborhood designation with numbers ranging from ‘65 to '69. These areas indicate where and when an intensive program of systematic housing code compliance is to be undertaken on a house to house basis. The target date assigned to a particular area indicates its relative priority. Those with a high priority have an early date; those with a lower priority, a later date. Priorities for the areas have been based on: 1. The number of compliance inspections which the Housing Code division can undertake in one year, while maintaining full city-wide coverage, 2. The relationship of rehabilitation areas to surrounding or internal community activities, community facility development or Title I Urban Renewal Projects. 3. General conditions in the particular area. Those with the most skevciae rehabilitation needs will be undertaken first, 4. The long range goal of complete housing code inspection of substandard dwellings by 1970 and compliance in all designated rehabilitation areas by 1971. 5. An additional consideration in subsequent revisions will be the need in the future for more treatment in areas previously covered as blight reoccurs, This item represents the first step in the changeover from program with a fixed completion date to one on a continuing basis. fo D. Proposed Community Facility Locations: a map has been prepared which indicates the location of all proposed community facilities and highways (exclusive of urban renewal projects) in the City of Atlanta. The locations have been indexed and color coded to identify them and to indicate the agency responsible for their execution. Ii. Organization and Administration A. Organization and Personnel for Housing Code Compliance, Department of Buildings 1. Supervisor of Inspection Services 2. Personnel, Housing Code Division a. Chief Inspector (1) b. Field Supervisors (2) c. Housing Code Sector Inspectors (10) d. Housing Code Inspectors General (6) e. Housing Code Inspector II (1) (assigned to Codes Compliance Officer) Concentration Area Inspectors (10) Fh ® of e, Clerical Personnel (8) 3. Related Personnel a. Rehabilitation Specialist (1) b. Codes Compliance Officer (1) Duties and Responsibilities: L. Supervisor of Inspection Services. Overall supervision of ail forms of code enforcement such as plumbing and building with primary emphasis on Housing Code Enforcement, including coordination with other Departments. 2. Personnel, Housing Code Division: a. Chief Inspector (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) Overall supervision of inspections, field work and administration. Coordination of relocation efforts with Atlanta Housing Authority. Pursuit of resolution of difficult cases. Direct supervision of clerical personnel Coordination with Codes Compliance Officer; Rehabilitation Specialist. Training program for new Housing Code Inspectors. Coordination with other Divisions of Department of Buildings. b. Field Supervisors (1) Direct supervision of five inspectors and their sectors comprising one-half (%) of the City. Ce (2) (3) (7) Supervision of intensive program teams and Inspectors General when operating in their one-half (4%) of the City. In-Service training for inspectors to include principles of Housing Code Enforcement, selection and scheduling of work, and standardization of requirements and acceptances. General conduct of housing code compliance program within their one~half (%) of the City. Assistance in resolution of difficult cases. Assistance in preparation of court cases when requested by Code Compliance Officer. Qther special duties as assigned by Chief Inspector. Housing Code Inspector II (1) Assigned to Codes Compliance Officer to assist in preparation of cases for Court. Housing Code Sector Inspectors: (1) (2) (3) (4) Conduct of Housing Code Compliance Program in their sector. Primary responsibility for resolution of all cases and compliants in their sectors, Prepare cases for presentation before the Better Housing Commission and City Attorney. Assist in preparing court cases. Housing Code Inspectors General (1) (2) Investigate, document and prepare cases for presentation to Court and appear as witness. at time of trial (three inspectors and one Housing Code Inspector II assigned for this purpose) Preparation of cases for "In Rem proceedings and Derolitian Grant Program (three inspectors assigned to these ‘unctions. 6 L-1L-67 intensive Program Housing Code Inspectors (1) Operate as team members (2) Conduct housing code compliance program in rehabilitation areas according to scheduled priorities. Clerical Personnel (1) Process notices, letters, records and prepare periodic reports. (2) Receive telephone calls, prepare lists for Better Housing Commission hearings, City Attorney hearings and Court. (3) Record minutes of Better Housing Commission meetings. Related Personnel (1) Rehabilitation Specialist (a) Public relations--(promoting good maintenance and Housing Code Enforcement) (b) Inspection of apartment developments (30 units and up). (2) Codes Compliance Officer (a) Responsible for preparation and conduct (including attendance in Court) of Housing Code Court cases with assistance from Housing Code Inspectors and Supervisory Personnel, (b) Advises Housing Code Division on requirements for prosecution of cases in court, appropriateness of specific cases for Court action and preparation of charges. (c) Prepares Court calendars and reports on results of Housing Code Court hearings. Notices and Follow-up Action Inspectors will use standard methods and prescribed time intervals as 4 a guide for their processing of cases. Written procedure is on file in the Housing Code Division. Coordination Ie Relocation: Inspectors will fill out slips (on AHA standard form) to be signed and forwarded by the Chief Inspector to the Housing Authority for relocation assistance to the families threatened with displacement by Housing Code Enforcement, such as placarding occupied units, when a directive is issued to reduce the number of occupants and/or units, when demolition is imminent, and for other reasons. Community Facilities Chief Inspector will consult map showing location of proposed and scheduled community facilities; will determine agency responsible for execution; and consult and coordinate with that agency to determine exact extent and status of project and the appropriate Housing Code Compliance Program for the areas at that time. Public Housing No Housing Code Inspections required. (Existing units 8874; under construction 650; planned 1140). Municipal Services In conduct of the Housing Code Compliance Program, Inspectors will 8 L-1-67 be alert for needed improvements in municipal services and other such problems. Need will be recorded and referred by the Chief Inspector to the appropriate governmental agency. Possible referral agencies are: a. Sanitary Department b. Construction Department c. Traffic & Street Lights Department d. Police Debereuene: e. Water Department f£. Fire Department g. Parks Department h. Board of Education i. County Departments of Family and Children Services j. County Health Departments 5. Data Bank The Housing Code Division will participate continually in furnishing certain types of information, obtained in connection with its normal activities, to be placed in the data bank, Complaints {11 Housing Code complaints received will be recorded on forms provided and investigated within,.one week and appropriate action initiated imme- diately. Written procedure is on file in the Housing Code Division. Handling Unresolved Cases At the end of each quarter, Sector Inspectors will thoroughly review their unresolved case files and determine what positive action should be taken, 9 L-1-67 Procedure for handling unresolved cases is on file in the Housing Code Division. IV. Area Housing Code Compliance Policies A. General: 1. Placard promptly vacant substandard units and structures considered unfit for occupancy and cause utility services to be discontinued. 2. Promptly report to the Better Housing Commission and to the Atlanta Housing Authority Relocation Housing Office (for relocation of families) those occupied units and structures considered unfit for occupancy. 3. In order to keep abreast of changing conditions conducive to deterioration and blight, each Inspector will endeavor to observe his entire Sector and initiate corrective action as needed, 4. It is anticipated that each Sector Inspector will process a minimum of 20 new Housing Code major improvement cases per calendar month, and comply an equal number per month outside of rehabilitation areas in which teams are working. Effort should be made where feasible to keep each Sector Inspector's workload of uncompleted active notices to approximately 200. All Sector Inspectors combined should comply at least 3500 units per year. B. Conservation Areas (See Housing Map): 1. Inspector will encourage maintenance and conservation 10 L-1-67 4 verbally where early signs of blight appear but no valid code violation exists. Housing Code inspection to be made primarily on a complaint basis. Intensive Conservation Areas (See Housing Map) Ls Housing Code inspections to be made based on an apparent need. Accent to be conservation rather than waiting until rehabilitation is necessary; Inspector will give more attention to details to discover any significant changes conducive to blight in these areas, Inspector will encourage maintenance and conservation verbally where early signs of blight appear but where no valid code violation exists. These areas will be closely examined for consideration as possible future federally assisted code enforcement projects under the 1964 Housing Act. Rehabilitation Areas (See Housing Map) These areas have been designated according to priority of need and placed on a schedule. (See Map) — These areas will be intensively covered house by house by inspectors of an intensive program team (2 - 4 men). Conduct of Compliance Program a. All Housing units in rehabilitation areas will be inspected and necessary compliance notices issued or statement issued that property is in satisfactory condition. il L-1-67 b. It is anticipated that three large areas (approximately 7000 units). .. and three small areas (approximately 1900 units) ' will be covered this year (approximate total 8900). Any cases remaining unresolved at the end of this year will be assigned to Sector Inspector for resolution, ce. it is anticipated that each Team Inspector will make approximately 7 new inspections or 7 first follow-up inspections per day. These areas will be closely examined for consideration as possible future federally assisted code enforcement projects under the 1964 Housing Act. E, Clearance - Code Enforcement Areas (See Housing Map) kL. Enforce Code only to: a. Placard where warranted and seek demolition. b. Correct hazards. c. Reduce overcrowding. d. Vacate unfit units. e, Clean up premises, Discourage rehabilitation action in industrially zoned areas, especially in marginal cases. Seek maximum coordination with other divisions of Building Department to discourage improvements other than to correct hazards of any housing units and structures in areas, 12 L=1-67 Clearance - Title I Urban Renewal 1. Proposed and Planning Stage Projects (See Housing Map): Enforce Code only to: a. Placard where warranted and seek demolition, b. Correct hazards, c. Reduce overcrowding. d. Vacate unfit units. e. Clean up premises. 2. Urban Renewal Projects in Execution (See Housing Map): a. Issue no notices unless instructed otherwise by Chief Inspector (usually upon request of Atlanta Housing Authority). Community Facility Locations, including Public Housing (See Community Facility Map): 1. Scheduled for construction or property being acquired a. Chief Inspector will consult map showing location of proposed and scheduled community facilities; will determine agency responsible for execution; and consult and coordinate with that agency to determine exact extent and status of project and the appropriate Housing Code Compliance Program for the areas at that time. b. Normally Inspector will issue no notices unless instructed otherwise by Chief Inspector. 2s Planned - construction anticipated but not scheduled a. Chief Inspector will consult map showing location of proposed and scheduled community facilities; will determine agency responsible for execution; and consult and coordinate with that agency to determine : exact extent and status of project and the appropriate Housing Code Compliance Program for the areas at that time. b. Normal action will be to enforce Code only to: (1) Placard where warranted and seek demolition, (2) Correct hazards, (3) Reduce overcrowding. (4) Vacate unfit units. (5) Clean up premises. 14 1-1-67
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 37

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_037.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 37
  • Text: Properties Referred to the Atlanta Housing Authority 454 Dover's Alley, S.W. 449 Dover's Alley, S.W. 456 Dover's Alley, S.W. 445 Miller's Alley, S.W. 453 Miller's Alley, S.W. 405 Chapel Street, S.W. 409-A Chapel Street, S.W. 409-B Chapel Street, S.W. 447 Chapel Street, S.W. R-447 Chapel Street, S.W. 429 Chapel Street, S.W. 412 Markham Street, S.W. 414 Markham Street, S.W. 416 Markham Street, S.W. 418 Markham Street, S.W. 420 Markham Street, S.W. 424 Markham Street, S.W. 419 Markham Street, S.W. 421 Markham Street, S.W. 448 Markham Street, S.W. 422 Markham Street, S.W. 554 Markham Street, S.W. 82 Haynes Street, S.W. 80 Haynes Street, S.W. 72 Haynes Street, S.W. 74 Haynes Street, S.W. ape 76 Haynes Street, S.W. 78 Haynes Street, S.W. 38 Haynes Street, S.W. 89 Haynes Street, S.W. 179 382- Chestnut Street, N.W. 384 Foundary Street, N.W. R-359 Magnolia Street, N.W., #1 R-361 Magnolia Street, N.W., #2 106 448 240 242 238 395 501 718 460 457 859 721 780 754 Randolph Street, N.E. Whitehall Terrace, S.W. Mangum Street, N.W. Mangum Street, N.W. Mangum Street, N.W. Mayes Street, N.W. Edgewood Avenue, N.E. Capitol Avenue, S.E. Arnold Street, N.E. Arnold Street, N.E. Center Hill Avenue, N.W. Tifton Street, N.W. Capitol Avenue, S.E. Capitol Avenue, S.E.
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 43

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_043.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 43
  • Text: ‘ - DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS The Department of Buildings administers and enforces the Zoning Ordinance, the Housing and Slum Clearance Code, the Housing Demolition Ordinance, the Georgia Safety Fire Law and the Elevator Ordinance. Its responsibilities generally regulate the private use of private property. The manner in which the department does its job and works with other agencies both in and out of the City government will be reflected in the quality of total community development. Staffing, organization, and records must be so developed as to have flexibility, comprehensiveness, and sesnitivity to the needs and requirements of area action. . The Department of Buildings has been the subject of extensive review and reorganization to better prepare it for its role. Implementation of the reorganization is now in the final stage. It would be inappropriate to attempt to evaluate performance. Or ganization In 1964, Public Administration Service prepared a survey report relating to the consolidation of inspectional services in the City of Atlanta. This report reviewed and identified all inspectional functions carried out among several departments within the City government. The major attention of the report was focused on the Department of Building Inspections. The findings of the report led to recommendations for an expended department of Page Two Building Inspections to include plumbing inspection ivom the Construction Department), electrical inspection (from the Department of Electricity) and housing code inspection (from the Department of Urban Renewal). The City adopted the full report. The Departments of Electricity and Urban Renewal were abolished when their few remaining responsibilities were transferred to other departments and agencies. No one lost his job or was reduced in salary due to the implementation of these recommendations. Consolidation began in July of 1964, In the beginning little more could be accomplished than to effect a legal change. The various offices were spread from the third floor of City Hall to the thirteenth floor. In late summer 1965, one year later, major office realignments were made at City Hall which resulted in the Department of Buildings occupying all of the eighth and ninth floors. Further office assignments were made in 1966. Physical provisions were made for a central records and statistical unit and the central permits desk. Staffing for the Records Bureau was provided by clerical personnel formerly assigned to each of the inspection divisions. Staffing The Department has a technical staff of 72 and a clerical staff of 16. The technical staff includes the department head (Building Official), an assistant Building Official, two architect engineers, ten plumbing inspectors, Page Three ten electrical inspectors, two elevator inspectors, nine heating and ventilating inspectors and engineers, sixteen building inspectors and fifteen Batecks engaged in housing code enforcement. Six technicians are either registered engineers or architects. Most of the specialized inspectors are licensed in their trades. Work Program Inspectional services are provided to insure the health, safety and general welfare of the community. Building inspections insure that structures will be built, repaired and altered in accordance with accepted standards. Plumbing inspections insure that water and sewer facilities are installed in a manner that will protect the occupants health. Heating and ventilating inspections assure that heating units are installed properly and include provisions for smoke abatement in order to reduce air pollution, Electrical inspections insure that wiring installations will reduce fire hazards, Housing inspections differ from the above in that the housing code is concerned with buildings that were built under former regulations (usually these required lower standards of safety and sanitation). It is the general purpose of housing inspection to upgrade the standard of living in existing housing. Zoning ordinance enforcement activities support the regulations of land use, control of height and bulk of buildings, establish area requirements for yards and other open spaces. Page Four The volume of work undertaken by the department may be measured by the value and number of building permits issued in the past ten years. Year Value of Building Number of Permits (Millions of Dollars) 1955 76 10, 613 1956 59 9, 682 1957 59 7,791 1958 108 8, 327 1959 > pe 8,728 1960 91 8,311 1961 96 10, 158 1962 117 9, 357 1963 109 : 9, 168 1964 150 9, 142 1965 Building Codes The City of Atlanta provides through these various codes a high standard of construction. The National Building Code is basically used for building In 1965 a revised National Electrical Code Win -be issued which will be adopted by the City. ) Currently the City is using the existing National Electrical Code with sone local amendments. The City is a leader in developing a Heating Code. This code has received national acclaim and has been widely adopted by other cities. The Plumbing and the Housing Codes are not based after any model code, but do incorporate high standards, Page Five Generally, the codes provide for eight inspections to be made during actual construction, A final inspection is made upon completion of all work to assure conformance to land use, type of building, area of lot and other requirements of the zoning and building ordinances and codes. A certificate of occupancy is issued at that time. Reven c Budget and- Revue The department collects in fees enough funds to cover all the expenses of operation. A recent survey of municipal building inspection practices indicated that 72 per cent of 101 cities spate 100, 000 population receive 75 per cent or more of their operating budget from fees. Thirty- two per cent of these cities receive 100 per cent or more of their operating budget from fees. Public Convenience The consolidation of inspectional service and a central building permits desk serves as a public convenience. A contractor or individual can get all building permits at one location. He must, however, still go to several other locations within City Hall for other basic information and permits. Water permits, water meters and location of water facilities are obtained from the Water Department; sewer permits, street opening permits, sewer assessments, curb cut permits and location of sewer facilities are Page Six obtained from the Construction Department. hoeite seas for rezoning and street numbers are provided at the Planning Department. Copies of the Zoning Code are purchased from the City Clerk as are licenses to engage in the construction business. Complete consolidation of these information and permit issuing functions requires considerable study and would effect changes that cross over departmental lines.
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 21

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_021.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 21
  • Text: CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of PLANNING 700 CITY HALL Atlanta, Georgia 30303 WYONT 8. BEAN May 26, 1966 PLANNING ENGINEER COLLIER B. GLADIN CHIEF PLANNER TO: Collier B. Gladin, Assistant Planning Engineer FROM: Jerry Coffel, Planner II SUBJECT: Federal Code Enforcement Program Recently I have reviewed the Center Hill Code Enforcement project materials and discussed it briefly with Woody Underwood, Comptroller's Department. While I was not unaware of them, I again considered the ineligible costs of providing sub-surface community facilities -- water mains, sewer lines and storm drains. As you recall, the City's action on the project turned on its lack of funds for the last item. The purpose of this memorandum is to provide you with a few additional thoughts on Center Hill. Through the Basic Sewer and Water Program, the City could now obtain Federal funds to provide the needed sewer lines and water mains for the project area. Also, the Regional Office has indicated once that it anticipated that storm drains would be made qn eligible project cost in the 1966 housing amendments to the code enforcement program. At the present time, the Comptroller's Department is preparing bond issue statistics based on our preliminary estimates for Center Hill; this includes the cost of financing the ineligible cost items. If the bond issue is passed on this basis and the storm drains become an eligible project cost, the City would gain an additional $60,000 in Federal funds and @ould release an additional $60,000 in bond issue monies. : Now I think we can initiate two actions to get the Center Hill Project underway. First, it will be most appropriate for the Mayor's Office to contact Congressman Weltner to enlist his assistance and influence in modifying the 1966 housing legislation to make storm drainage work eligible cost items in the Code Enforce- ment Program; this could be begun by transmitting a copy of this recommendation to Dan Sweat, Director of Intergovernmental Relations, for his reaction. The second action involves coordination with the Water Department and Construction Department to insure that the cost of needed water mains and sewer lines in Center Hill are included in their application under the Basic Sewer & Water Program. I believe the only improvement in their applications related to the Center Hill area is an additional water main along the Bankhead Highway. The best means of accomplishing this action would be to get Dan's support in getting an amendment to the existing City's application to H.U.D. Collier B. Gladin May 26, 1966 Page 2 In essence, what I am suggesting for you to consider is meeting the needs of Center Hill by influencing the 1966 housing legislation and coordinating the use of another Federal aid program by two other City departments. No small undertaking I agree. However, it can reasonably be accomplished and the City's financial obligation in Center Hill lessened. If you think the ideas have merit, we should probably talk them over with Dan Sweat. Dovey OHpel
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 40

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_040.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 40
  • Text: October 3, 1966 DRAFT MEMORANDUM To: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. From: Dan Sweat Subject: Low Income Housing Program, City of Atlanta In accordance with your verbal direction ‘of September 28, 1966, the following program is recommended to meet the requirements outlined for acceleration of the City's housing code compliance program an adequate ‘ and development of imaciexnate supply of low income housing. The program as outlined herein is desigged to accomplish two major objectives: 1. Relocation of a maximum number of low income families from the worst slum areas and demolition of substandard structures prior to June 1, 1967. 2. Acceleration of construction of authorized public housing ~ a 4 A ; Page Two units and development of new public housing resources with target dates of June 1, 1967, and June 1, 1968. In order to accomplish these goals the following major recommendations must be considered: 1. Adoption by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of a strong policy of Housing Gods Enforcement and issuance of a clear implementing directive to all officials charged with such implementation and operation of the Housing Code Compliance Program. (Copy of proposed policy attached) 2. The Housing Code Compliance Policy adopted January 1, 1965, be revised to provide for priority treatment to ''clearance, code enforcement'' areas and firm designation of Title I Urban Renewal areas on a 2-year maximum delay schedule. (Copy of propesed revision attached. ) 3. Addition of a minimum of 14 new positions in the Housing Code Compliance Division, including 10 additional inspectors and four clerical employees, 4, Adoption by the Atlanta Housing Authority of an innovative and energetic program of public housing using all available resources Page Three of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, including lease and purchase of renovated private housing under the ''turnkey'"' program. 5. Encouragement of and assistance to private,, non-profit and profit housing developers by the Atlanta Housing Authority for the construction and development of private and semi-public housing resources for low income and moderate income families, utilizing the '221" programs as well as private capital. 6. Immediate review of all pending and authorized public housing projects and initiation of necessary action to complete all ‘ scheduled projects prior to June 1, 1968.
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 13
  • Text: October 5, 1965 Mr, Henry L. Bowden, City Attorney 1114 William-Oliver Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Henry: In response to your request, I am enclosing a copy of Senate Bill 4 that was passed by the 1965 Legislature which grants home rule authority to municipalities. Section 4, Subparagraph 6 of the Home Rule Act states as follows: “Action affecting any court or the personnel thereof, except any municipal court having jurisdiction only over municipal ordinances." Section 5 of the Act provides that the City has the authority to fix salaries, compensation, expenses, etc., of their employees, but makes no provision what- soever for the changing of duties of the employees, In a meeting in Mr. Landers' office with you and Miss Dusthimer, we discussed the possibility of changing Miss Dusthimer's title from Chief Law Clerk to some other appropriate title in which we could vest more authority in her position to consummate court orders, etc. As you will recall, the position that Miss Dusthimer holds was created as a local act by the Legislature and is codified under Section 5.1.34 of the 1965 Charter. This section reads as follows: "There is hereby created in the department of municipal courts in the City of Atlanta the position of chief law clerk, who shall be appointed to office by the chief general judge and shall hold office at his pleasure." The question that I would like to raise to you regarding Miss Dusthimer's posi- tion is whether or not we have the authority under either the '62 Home Rule law or the '65 Home Rule law to change her title and her duties. I would appreciate your early answer to this question. Yours very truly, G_ Charles L. Davis City Comptroller CLD:CW Ene. ec: Mr. R. E. Landers er
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 38

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_038.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 38
  • Text: CITY OF ATLANTA MUNICIPAL COURT General Division 165 DECATUR STREET, S.E. — JAckson 4—7890 Atlanta 3, Georgia EDWARD T. BROCK Associate Judge September 29, 1966 T. Cc. LITTLE Associate Judge ROBERT E. JONES Chief Judge Mr. Earl Landers, Administrative Assistant to the Mayor, City Hall, Atlanta, Georgia. Dear Earl: There has been some discussion between the Building Inspectors' Office and the Court regarding the Urban Re- newal. I am enclosing herewith a copy of the letter that Mrs. Colette Dusthimer, who prosecutes these cases, has sent to Col. Malcolm Jones. Mrs. Dusthimer has discussed this problem with Mr. Bob Lyle, of the City Attorney's Office, and I am sure he will discuss the matter with you. The copy of the letter enclosed is simply for your information. In the future, if any controversy comes up regarding the Urban Renewal Program where the Courts are concerned, I would appreciate it very much if you would give me a ring and allow me the opportunity of discussing the Matter with you. With kindest regards. Sincerely yours, R. E. Jones, Chief Judge, MUNICIPAL COURT, General Division, City of Atlanta. REJ/dj Enclosure
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021

Box 1, Folder 1, Document 41

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_001_041.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 1, Document 41
  • Text: October 13, 1966 MEMORANDUM To: Mr. Bill Wofford From: Dan Sweat 4 Thanks for the copy of Dr. Weaver's speech to the Building Officials Conference, He had some interesting remarks which I am Sine glad to get for my file. DS:fy 2 SE a atte
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 1, Folder topic: Building department | 1964-1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 28, 2021