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Box 15, Folder 2, Document 31

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  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 31
  • Text: • Management Information Serviee International City Managers' Association/ April 1969, Vol. 1 No. L-4 �lessons From the Model Cities Program To the growing number of local officials disen, chanted with the problems in federal aid for America's cities, the Model Cities program has been promoted as a radically improved product. President Nixon had been in office less than a week when his associates made it known that the Model Cities approach is to be "applied across the board to the entire system of federal services." The program was enacted in 1966, authorized by the Demonstration Cities and Metropolitan Development Act of that year. Since then, more than 150 cities and counties have begun the involved planning process to implement the program. Grants of $512.5 million are available for operation, plus $142 million for urban renewal within designated Model Cities neighborhoods. The goal of Model Cities is to coordinate all other urban programs ; focus them on areas of physical and human blight in selected cities; offer additional funding; and forge a partnership among local government, the neighborhood people to be benefited, and the private resources of the community. The process involves concentrating public and private agency programs on related problems of, say, housing, education, health, and employment. Toward this end, sponsorship was lodged with local government (city or county) and structure was loosely specified to meet three basic objectives: • To focus on a rational demonstration of results so that viable solutions to basic causes might have lasting, nationwide applicability. • To develop citizen participation structures to insure involvement of the people whose lives are affected by planning and implementation of planning. • To serve as a planning and coordinating rather than a service-delivery vehicle. This report was prepared for MIS by Paul R. Jones, Executive Director, Charlotte (N.C.) Model Cities Commission, and Chairman, National Model Cities Directors A ssociation; and by Barbara R. Bradshaw, Ph.D. , Research Director, Charlotte (N. C.) Model Cities Commission. 2 Through this new "total-attack" approach, Model Cities holds great promise to city administrators seeking to identify and overcome the persisting problems of our cities. Yet it must be cautioned that Model Cities is so far largely unproved in practice. The progra m remains, after three years of federal activity , rather vaguely defined, even in theory, and the first "operational grant" (as opposed to the initial planning grants) was awarded to Seattle, Wash. , only late last year. The program, however, has by now generated various strategies for shaping Model Cities, as evidenced by examining the voluminous applications submitted to the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Since the initial application must describe the intended scale and depth of the full program to be undertaken by a Model City, a foundation has now been laid for preliminary discussion of Model Cities strategies that might be borrowed by other cities. This report briefly outlines Model Cities lessons that appear to be emerging from the program . �Patterns of Poverty and Neighborhood Deprivation HOUSING: Maintenance Costs Financing Costs Tax Costs Construction Costs Lan~ Costs Codes Absentee Landlords .ln-Mgration of ,~~ Disadvantaged Groups - Demand fo r lJJw Cost Housing lJJw Market Demand or Housing Improvements Out-Migration of Successfu l Fami lies & Individuals ~ JJ{_ lJJw Mai ntenance & Investment in Housing I lJJw Community ,t Organization & Leadership Substandard, ~ vercrowded & O Deteriorating Housing Ra~i:~j~d~~:nic ~ Lack of Observation of Communi ty Standaros Excessive Internal Mobility Poor Police Relations Cri me & Violence Inadequate Commercial Services Lack of Motivation; Drug Addiction Feelings of Frustration, - . . . . Alcnholism Powerlessness & Isolation ~ Juveni le Deli nquency Inadequate Community Medical, Education, Social, Legal Services & Faci lities _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _,. • ,!_ SOC IAL PROBLEMS lJJw Participation in Community Affai rs Racial & Ethnic Concentrations Lack of Choice in Housing Lack of Avai labi lity of Credit "' Inadequate Public & Private TransjXJrtation Lack of Access to OpjXJrtunities Inadequate Public Information System Lack of Job OpjXJrlunities 1 Changing Production Methods Lack of LDw-Ski lied Jobs Available Job Restrictions from Union Practices, Industry Hiring Practices & Minimum Wages Poor Job Skills Il legitimacy Lack of Fami ly Stabi lity ECONOMIC PROBLEMS lJJw Income High Unemployment Hi gh Dependency High Debt & lJJw Savings Lack of On-The-Job Traini ng OpjXJrtunities lJJwWork Performance i,' Absenteeism HEALTH PROBLEMS High Illness High Infant Mortality LDw Life Expectancy EDUCATION PROBLEMS lJJw Educational Attainment High School Drop-Out Rates Poor Communication & Understandi ng Figure 1 - Reinforcing Relati onships in Cycle~ of Poverty S o urce: Developing a Program Focus As an indication of the new Administration's support of Model Cities, Mayor Floyd H. Hyde of Fresno, Calif., one of the program's strongest boosters, was named HUD Assistant Secretary for Model Cities. Th4s, the Fresno Model City application serves as something of a "model among models" in characterizing the central focus of the program. Here is a statement from the Fresno application that well summarizes the program focus of most Model Cities: "It is necessary for residents to become acquainted with the steps and processes necessary for assimilation into the mainstream of community life. Any Arthu r D. Little, Inc., Strategies for Shapi ng Model Cities (1967) , p. 35. broad and general program that will be set up in this depressed section must take into consideration the lag in our present social, economic, educational, and legal systems and institutions as they apply to noninfluential groups, termed often as indigenous. "A comprehensive program must recognize that in order to bridge the gap between the existing institutions and the poor there must be an attempt to bring the services to the people on a decentralized basis so that they may take full advantage of them, for often the helping services of existing institutions are removed from the deprived community, both physically and psychologically. "Therefore, a major need for this community is to remove the physical and psychological distance of 3 �Model City Objectives To Combat Poverty and Low Income 1. By decreasing the number of families now living in poverty. 2. By reducing the number of unemployed in the area. 3. By reducing the number of underemployed (those working only part-time or in jobs which pay too little). To Provide Better Housing and Better Environments 1. By making more homes available, with emphasis on low cost. 2. By providing families with a choice of decent homes in environments of their choosing. 3. By providing adequate housing to families requiring relocation, and by minimizing economic loss due to relocation. 4. By improving the physical appearance of Portland West, making it compatible with family living. To Provide Better Education and Proper Child Development 1. 2. 3. 4. By providing adequate school facilities. By increasing the quality of public education. By raising the level of educational performance. By providing educational opportunities for all children, including the handicapped and emotionally disturbed. 5. By encouraging more parent involvement in school policies and administration. To Provide General and Personal Social Services to A ll 1. By improving and expanding existi ng services and making them read ily available t o all residents, young and old. 2. By making preventive social services avail able to all. 3. By providing day care for all chi ld re n. To Provide Adequate Recreational Opportunities 1. By providing conveniently located fa cilit ies fo r outdoor recreation. 2. By establishing indoor fa cilities for cult ural and recreational programs. 3. By overcoming barri ers which preven t more extensive use of existing programs and facil ities. To Reduce the Crime Rate and Juvenile Delinquency 1. By directing attention t o t he specific conditions which cause crime o r cont ribute t o it . 2. By emphasizing crime prevention ; by t reating delinquency in its early stages. 3. By aiding in t he rehabilit atio n of potential and chronic offenders. To Improve the Health o f the Community 1. By increasing public understa nding of health needs and atti t udes. 2. By providi ng comprehensive, coord inated health services to children and ad ults. 3. By recruit ing mo re health person nel. 4 . By making health information accessible to all. Figure 2 - Statement of Objectives, Portland, Maine 4 these services by placing them in the deprived area, and in turn, making them easily accessible to all residents of the area . A related factor in the provision of these services on a decentralized basis is actual employment, whenever possible, of people from the area in both professional and subprofessional capacities. Such a provision in a program will tend to show the residents why they should strive to better themselves. Providing the training and work opportunities for as many people as possible will help to change the attitudes of others and motivate them to strive fo r improvement." Statements similar to this can be fo und in the applications of other Model Cities, thus evidencing that the program has helped focus official thinking on ways to break the patterns of poverty and neighborhood deprivation (see Figure 1). The key word here is "focus," fo r Model Cities is designed to zero in on specific objectives for a limited area of the city. In the program formulation stage, the earlier specific statements of objectives can be developed, the more effectively they can guide the program. Specific objectives (1) provide a focus for data collection and evaluation; (2) speed the process of program design ; • • (3) provide a basis for selecting appropriate projects; and (4) prevent the formation of vested interests in specific approaches. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES In developing a program focus, a city is confronted with a bewildering variety of possible approaches to and proposals for attacking patterns of poverty. No accepted criteria exist for choice among them. To produce a coherent, integrated program strategy, however, a city must have some method of selecting and relating program elements. Experience thus far suggests the usefulness of focusing on a critical process (e.g., in-migration of disadvantaged groups), opportunity (e.g., enhancing physical and social mobility opportunities), event (e.g., construction of a new highway through the Model City area), population group (e.g. , elderly couples), or resource (e.g., private industry). Illustrative of a well-prepared objectives statement is the list appearing in the application from Portland, Me., and reproduced in Figure 2. Note that this statement of objectives builds essen- • �• ,,, • tially around the patterns of poverty specified in the Figure 1 chart. THE "TARGET-AREA" APPROACH As stated earlier, Model Citites requires a geographic as well as a program focus. Selecting a limited area of the city as the target for the program has several advantages: (1) It maximizes program impact by avoiding the diffusion of effort and allowing projects that reinforce one ano.ther. (2) It increases the visibility of the program. (3) It promotes efficiency in the identification and evaluation of program results. Cities have chosen their "target areas" for the Model Cities program in different ways. Some have selected the neighborhoods with the most severe and the most intractable problems. Others have chosen areas in which problems are less visible and less difficult. The shape and composition of the areas selected also varies. No one kind of target area is suitable for all cities, but several factors generally influence target selection. The "typical" target area has experienced significant economic and social changes traceable to regional industrial growth and the migration this has set in motion. Important elements of the population, particularly low-income and minority migrants, have been unable to adjust with the shifts in economic activity . They have thus suffered reduced job, educational, and other opportunities; increased social disadvantage ; and, for welfare recipients at least, continuing dependency. Physical environment and social forces have combined to concentrate a high proportion of such groups in the target area. Here poverty, housing, and environmental deficiencies, ill health, and other conditions are the most acute, and inaccessibility has contribut ed to underutilization as well as insufficiency of public services. Despite the advantages of focusing resources on specific geographic areas of need, an important lesson emerging from the Model Cities program is that problems do not stop at target-area boundaries. Robert A. Aleshire, executive director of the Reading (Pa.) Model Cities Agency, notes: "Meanwhile back at t he metropolitan level, a very legitimate questio n arises. How can a program which strives for a high level of achievement for 10 percent of the residents of a city be effectively meshed wit h a metropolitanwide effort to strengthen the impact of regional interests? For example, the streets of a Model Neighborhood may very well form an important link in a regional network and constitute the lifeline of a central business district. Citywide and regional interests demand increasing st reet capacity. This means more land and more t raffic, both of which tend to be adverse to the goal of strengthening the residential nature of the neighborhood." Thus "a balanced effort recognizing the goals of the neighborhood as compared with citywide and metropolitan interests ... is certainly not beyond the responsibilities· of a Model Cities program," Aleshire observes. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SERVICE April 1969 - Vol. 1 No. L-4 Editor: Walter L. Webb Management Information Service reports are published monthly by the International City Managers' Association, 1140 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Copyright © 1969 by the International City Managers' Association. No part of this report may be reproduced without permission of the copyright owner. Subscription rates (including inquiry-answering and additional services) are based on population of subscribing jurisdiction and will be furnished on request. This report is intended primarily for subscribing jurisdictions above 25,000 population. Concurrent monthly reports, prepared primarily for jurisdictions below 25,000 population, are available from Management Information Service. UNIFIED PROGRAM ELEMENTS Just as patterns of poverty, frustration, apathy, and decay are mutually reinforcing, an effort focused on breaking these patterns must attempt to integrate all elements of the program. The effectiveness of any single project or activity can often be increased if it is associated with the effects of other program elements. Different projects can thus reinforce one another. For example: • The value of a health clinic can be increased if information about the services it offers and transportation to the clinic are provided. • Assuring that jobs are available for those with certain skills increases the value of a training program. • Increased home ownership can provide community leadership necessary for improving the neighborhood environment. Yet experience has shown that project items must be consistent or they may nullify each other. For example , public housing or school programs geared to the cultural transition problems of children from ethnic groups now in the area would be inconsistent with a program to attract middle-class and other racial and ethnic groups t o a target area. Attracting such groups is likely to require provision of singlefamily homes and high-quality educational facilities. On the other hand, projects designed to make a neighborhood attractive to outside groups may lead to increased rents and property values and thereby displace current residents. 5 �Thus, the interrelations of program elements must be examined carefully to assure mutually reinforcing objectives. The Model City application of Portland, Me., illustrates this principle through its statement of overall strategy : "Our overall strategy is three-fold: (1) to increase the purchasing power available to residents so that they will be free to make choices in the planning and conduct of their lives; (2) to improve the physical surroundings and cultural opportunities of Portland West so that the residents will have a variety of alternatives among which to make those choices ; (3) to promote the ability of residents to make those choices wisely and enjoy them happily." OUTPUT SCHEDULE A major dilemma of the Model Cities program is that of balancing long-range approaches that do not immediately show results with the necessity of engaging in projects with high visibility and early impact. Priorities must be made , and the support of the community as a whole and the residents of the model neighborhood in particular is often contingent upon visible results. Though early-impact efforts are primarily symptom-oriented, they are necessary if the more effective, cause-oriented components basic to the demonstration aspects of the program are to be implemented. Therefore , some resources must be allocated to early impact, high-visibility projects, but care must be exerted to insure that more lasting, less visible programs are also begun early and carefully evaluated in accordance with the Model Cities concept. Such projects as the development of vacant lots for playgrounds; repair of street potholes; improved street lighting; street numbering; painting of fire hydrants , utility poles, and fe nces; and pest extermination can all be quickly initiated at little cost. Yet such activities can help develop support required to undertake projects with more lasting significance. Initial programs need not have a physical in1pact , but they must be finely tuned to neighborhood grievances and special problems." For example, meeting demands for appointment of Negro policemen and firemen for duty in the ghetto - or the appointment of civilian police review boards or neighborhood councils for police relations - can be effective, some Model Cities have discovered. Other highly symbolic projects are those whose impact is of unmistakable benefit primarily fo r the target-area residents. Among such projects are: • Programs such as changes in administrative procedures in welfare and social service programs to remove restrictions, red tape, and degrading investigations and inquiries. • Programs to make absentee landlords responsible for repairs and maintenance . 6 • Financial aid, training, and m,anagement assist- ance programs to help small businesses in the area. • Provision of government information in the tongues spoken in the area and the use of bilingual personnel at key contact points. Focusing at the outset on such "immediateimpact" projects as these has been found helpful in overcoming initial resistance to "another all talk, no action" program - which is how many slum residents have come to view government efforts in their behalf. • RESEARCH AND EVALUATION In a demonstration effort, the organization structure must include a strong research and evaluation component. The lack of sound documentation has been a weakness in many other programs designed to alleviate urban problems. To be effective, such an organization structure must have fl exibility and engage in continuous planning so that research findings can impact on the direction of demonstrations and the search for effective solutions. By the same token , the research component must experiment with innovative techniques where indicated and be extremely cautious in the use of rigid experimental design. What is beneficial to a community often is not conducive to tightly quantifiable research results on a short-range basis, so that exploratory rather than experimental designs may fre quently be more fe asible. In this sense , research becomes " contemporary history" that provides a guide fo r evaluation of experience and consequences. 1 Quantifiable measures of various types should be used whenever possible to supplement and complement other approaches. The goal is evaluation on all levels to give the fullest possible picture of results of the demonstration. Dissemination of findi ngs should be an important component throughout to serve both educational and resource development functions. • Citizen Participation The Demonstration Cities and Metropolitan Development Act of 1966 states that there should be "widespread citizen participation in the program" including " ... maximum opportunities for employing residents of the area in all phases of the program and enlarged opportunitie s for work and training." Thus the law delineates "widespread" rather than "maximum feasible" participation (as was called for in the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964) and also designates city government as the responsible administering agency. If structure and auspice determine function ( or as Freud stated more colorfully, "Anatomy is destiny"), this consideration has important implications for citizen participation. 1 The discussion of researc h by Marris and Rein is most helpful in gaining a perspective on the role of research in poverty programs. See Peter Marris and Martin Rein, Dilem mas of Social R eform (New York: Atherton Press, 1967). • �• • • Citizen participation has been interpreted if! a wide variety of ways depending on the orientations of the sponsoring agencies. In some instances, such as under the direction of many community action agencies, citizen participation has been used as a base of power to force local institutions to assume greater responsiveness to poverty areas. In other instances, such as under the direction of many relocation programs, citizen participation has meant largely the task of selling residents on acceptance of projects and programs that have already been planned for them. The Demonstration Cities Act approaches the problem differently . The Act sets forth a challenge to cities to incorporate citizen participation into local government in such a way that a new institutional form can be evolved that relates people to their local government in a cooperative fashion. Many critics, looking at this dual challenge to Model Cities to be a part of the local establishment and the emissary of the less privileged people for change, might feel that the inherent contradictions are too many and complex for success. Indeed, success is improbable unless the dilemmas are clearly faced and strategies for meeting the problems are carefully implemented to develop meaningful citizen participation. Perhaps the most important single issue of our time is that of the distribution of power. This issue has bred its discontents not only in the ghettoized inner city but also in sprawling suburbia, where the middle class exhibits growing disenchantment and feelings of disenfranchisement. This sense of powerlessness is, in large part, a fu nction of the complexities and growing size of mass society, but it is aggravated by the inability of our institutions as they now function to cope with these complexities and to improve the quality of individual life. As noted by the National Commission on Urban Problems: " In 1967, our metropolitan areas were served by 20 ,745 local governments, or about onefo urth of all local governments in the nation. This means 91 governments per metropolitan area - an average of about 48 per metropolitan county. If these units of government were laid out on a map, every metropolitan area in the count ry would look as if it had been 'nonplanned' by a mad man ." There are at least three fu ndamental problem areas where awareness must be constantly focused if meaningful citizen participation structures are to be developed. These are: the place of Model Cities in the local governmental structure; the role of Model Cities in the mo del neighborhood community; and the relationship of Model Cities to the state and federal levels. THE PLACE OF MODEL CITIES IN LOCAL GOVERNMENTAL STRUCTURE As a new arm within local government and having broad, often unrealistic and poorly specified responsibilities, the city demonstration agency is easily perceived as threatening to the older, more entrenched departments. It is well-documented that bureaucratic structures are resistant to change, and Model Cities is rightly seen as an instrument of change. It is often seen as another poverty program, associated in the minds of many with disruptions, confrontation politics, and demands that local governments presently are not capable of meeting. This association, along with vestiges of the Protestant ethic often reinforced by years of experience with the most disorganized element of the poor, leaves many administrators cynical about the capability of the citizenry to make meaningful contributions to the solution of complex problems. Further, elected officials see citizen participation as a potential threat to their own political structures and interests. A pessimistic view might well see that an approach such as Model Cities would harden resistance and complicate the development of new alliances between citizens and local government, particularly in cities where conflicts among decision-makers and between government departments are many and unresolved. The strategies to be used to insure that residents from model neighborhoods have a voice in the decision-making process will depend on the special circumstances of each city. The role of the citizen must be adapted sensitively and with an eye toward the future so that such involvement may become accepted during the life time of the program, enmeshed with the ongoing fabric of government. In a speech to the U.S. Conference of Mayors, the former Assistant Secretary for Model Cities and Governmental Relations, Department of Housing and Urban Development, called for: " . .. a policy under which projects or programs that significantly affect the model neigl1borhood area will not be approved unless they have first been routed through the CDA (city demonstration agency) and its citizen participation process, and have been approved by the chief executive of the City ( or county)." What was being recommended is dual responsibility between local government officials and the residents, but no concrete suggestions for accomplishing this end were offered. This is the characteristic of all the HUD guidelines dealing with citizen participation. Thus, because of the great diversity of local governments, implementation is left up to the particular urban governments with only vague, generalized federal guidelines. However, based on the broad HUD guidelines and t he above discussion, a few directions emerge that should prove helpful in thinking through the problems involved. • First, model neighborhood residents should be included from the inception on the decision-making commission or board that ca"ies recommendations for action to city councils or other local governing bodies. They should be elected in some democratic fashion by the residents and should be numerically strong enough on the policy-making body to insure that the aspirations of the residents for their own community are given careful consideration. 7 �• Second, residents should be continually involved on planning task forces working to develop and implement a comprehensive program for the model neighborhood area. Full and significant participation is a developmental challenge that in most instances will take time and considerable patience in searching out representative leadership and establishing working relationships between residents and others involved in the planning process. • Third, because of sponsorship by city government, it appears that advocacy planning should generally be avoided. This is a highly controversial matter, but if the goal is to institutionalize a structure within the framework of local government in which citizen participation will evoke greater flexibility and responsiveness, then the planning responsibility should remain directly within that structure rather than be relegated to planners exclusively accountable to residents' organizations. • Finally, the oft-used term "widespread citizen participation" should be taken to mean not only involvement of residents of the model neighborhood area but also of citizens from throughout the total metropolitan community. This should also be oriented toward encouragement of private initiative and enterprise of all types builders, business and financial leaders, voluntary organizations, and concerned citizens from all walks of life. There are tremendous untapped resources of concern and enlightened self-interest in our cities that must be activated if the Model Cities demonstration is to be effective. -In addition, it is only through this wide involvement that many local governments can begin to develop mechanisms for responsiveness, not only to the needs of people in the most blighted areas but also to the total populace. All of this is a gradual process that involves maintaining a delicate balance and continually instigating mechanisms for change. It is clear, however, that the Model Cities concept will fail if it simply assumes a militant stance as have many community action agencies under OEO. Model Cities must utilize the growing demand for greater responsiveness from local government to reform the structure from within , rather than just react to demands from outside. Thus, a primary goal is to develop greater sensitivity in government and local institutions. THE ROLE OF MODEL CITIES IN THE MODEL NEIGHBORHOOD 8 Facing toward the model neighborhood community, the Model Cities concept is beset by an equally difficult set of problems. Residents of blighted areas are generally discouraged and disenchanted, frustrated and even hostile. Years of experience with local government have taught them bitter lessons about lack of concern, false promises, bewildering bureaucratic mazes, and their own inabilities to control the events affecting their lives. To convince residents that Model Cities is a serious effort to develop participatory mechanisms when the political realities of local government dictate a gradual process is a difficult task. It is further complicated by existing community groups who are demanding rapid change and by the general community attitude that combines alienation and militancy into a dangerous combustible atmosphere. As within city government, a delicate balance must be maintained if the city demonstration agency is to be effective in the neighborhood. There are obvious actions that must be taken and some less obvious ones that must be given careful consideration. Perhaps the most obvious is the necessity of earlyimpact, high-visibility projects. As noted earlier, these are usually symptom-oriented, and an easy fallacy is to place too much emphasis on such projects to the detriment of longer-range more basic programs. Yet as a technique to gain support, show good faith, and begin the process of true citizen participation, early-impact projects are of great importance. They begin the process of breaking through the barriers of apathy and distrust and move th~ disaffiliated away from destructive-like militancy toward a more constructive willingness to consider other alternatives. Also fairly obvious is the in1portance of expediting tjl.at aspect of the act that calls for "maximum op-. portunities for employing residents of the area in all phases of the program and enlarged opportunity for work and training." Focusing on employment opportunities, on a broad scale has two major advantages: (I) It gets at one of the basic causes of poverty and opens avenues for mobility that remained closed in many past efforts at citizen involvement. (2) It alleviates some of the preoccupation with confrontation politics by moving somewhat away from an emphasis on mass social movements. To the extent that Model Cities programs can draw staff from among the residents of the model neighborhood, there is an increase in program support. Most important, however, is the necessity of experimenting with innovative approaches to employment opportunities and job-upgrading methods that will receive the support of both public and private spheres and move significantly in the direction of an adequate standard of living for all people. For instance, in the Charlotte , N.C., Model Cities proposal, concern is directed toward an adequate minimum standard of living as defined by the U.S. Department of Labor, rather than focusing only on poverty levels. Therefore, programs have been developed that provide for "income assurance" incentives t o allow residents to take advantage of developmental opportunities on a " family career contract" basis that will eventuate in incomes adequate for entering the mainstream of American life. Also, economic and housing development corporations are being fo rmed that will allow for increased entrepreneurship among residents. • • • �CONDITIONS FOR COORDINATION The effectiveness of Model Cities as a coordinating vehicle is· dependent on a multiplicity of factors that will vary from one urban area to another. It is perhaps a truism to say that if some kind of workable coordination is not achieved, the Model Cities concept will have failed and the city demonstration agency will be only another of the many already fragmented projects being carried out in urban areas. The need for coordination is clear. Daniel P. Moynihan, chairman of the Council on Urban Affairs, has pointed out that as of December 1966 there were 238 different federal programs impacting on urban areas. In addition, both employment and expenditures have been increasing rapidly at the state and local levels. If the vast quantities of money and energy being expended can be brought together into a system - not systems - of developmental opportunities, past failures and the lessons we have learned from them can be translated into social innovations to meet the growing needs of urban complexes. The Model Cit!es concept is a logical alternative to further destructive fragmentation of local government. Implementation of coordinating mechanisms rests on a number of conditions within local government. There must be a recognition of the need for coordination on the part of key officials and administrators. Given the inevitability of resistance from some departments that view this as a threat to their interests, the recognition of the need must be accompanied by commitment from top officials to act to insure necessary linkage. Even with recognition and commitm~~t, successful coordination will depend on the capacities and capabilities of local leadership and the size and complexity of local governments. For instanc~, the idea of coordinating the 1,400 governments m the New York metropolitan area is a staggering notion. Obviously, selection criteria are needed to de~elop even minimal coordination of the most pertment agencies and departments. . Conditions necessary for coordination with orgaruzations not under the auspices of the local governmental body sponsoring Model Cities are similar to those above, but they involve some different problems and certain facets require more emphasis. Open communication channels are vital in securing cooperation and willingness to participate in building a coordinated system. This is also true of departments within the local sponsoring government, of course, but it is less difficult to establish such channels within an administrative structure than it is with organizations having no formal interrelationship. A further condition for success in coordinating with other agencies is a willingness to sustain continued efforts, often in the face of initial discouragement and even 10 influence with no formal structure and never tried to institutionalize coordinative mechanisms. CPI clearly aligned itself with governmental structure and, although much criticized for its lack of advocacy of the rights of the poor, was able to accomplish much because it had the backing of existing structures that became committed to policies of change from within. hostility from some groups who feel theatened by the new agency and its directives to bring about changes . The hard truth is that many programs have been oriented toward providing symptom-oriented services rather than working in a direct, cause-oriented framework. Many past and present service-orientation efforts have been, in effect, direct and indirect income maintenance programs,4 which are fraught with disadvantages associated with continuing d_ependency while lacking the advantages of offering developmental opportunities to break the cycle of poverty. Although it is obvious that many present programs are necessary while change oriented to basic causes is taking place, some programs that are now aimed solely at providing finger-in-the-dike indirect income maintenance and other services for the poor need to recognize that planning must begin early so as to redirect energies and restructure goals within a developmental framework. In one sense, many service-oriented efforts are institutionalized tokenism which, with·the availability of greater funds, has become an overabundant tokenism with little lasting impact on the cycles of poverty, blight, and decay. Problems o~ c~ordinati?n, then become more than merely establishing working relationships with existing structures but also involve developing mechanisms for establishment of new goals and redirection of emphasis. In many servicedelivery agencies there is a growing recognition of the need for restructuring of goals. Such recognition can prove invaluable when incorporated into planning for change. Looking introspectively for redirection and new mechanisms that fit present-day needs, however painful, can result in far higher cost-benefit ratios than are presently obtained. MECHANISMS FOR COORDINATION From the above, it can be seen that coordinative mechanisms are needed on two levels: ( 1) planning, which should be of sufficient magnitude to contribute to the creative development of the entire urban area; and (2) service delivery. In addition, both levels of coordination need to take place in at least five overlapping arenas: local governmental structures, state government, federal government, private agencies and services, and (perhaps most importantly because of previous neglect and great future potential) the private sector. Coordination Within the Sponsoring Governmental Structure. A look at the organization of almost any city government clearly reveals the vast fragmentation that exists. One of the most important goals of the Model Cities demonstration should be to implement the development of a municipal department concerned primarily with coordination of efforts. Fo~ effectiveness this department should not be JUSt 4Welfare is the obvious direct income maintenance service. Indirect income maintenance is provided in th~ form of such services as public health clinics, charity hospitals, free school-lunch programs, public housing, etc. • • �• • • another line department but should be directly in the office of the mayor or chief executive officer ( or whatever other governmental structure is pertinent) and should act as a coordinating vehicle through which all planning endeavors - local, state, and federal - pass. It should be governed by a policy-making commission or board composed of broad membership from various departments involved, as well as citizens representing the communities most directly involved, and should be responsible to local elected officials. This central coordinating department should be staffed by professionals involved in the various planning endeavors as well as specialists who can act as consultants to develop coordinated urban responsiveness to federal and state programs. The success of such an approach will be highly dependent on local factors such as the multiplicity of governing structures and their willingness to cooperate, but at least the approach would insure coordination within the local governing body that has responsibility for Model Cities and would serve as a demonstration in moving more urban municipalities toward consolidated government. Model Cities has a special role to play in working for the development of a coordinating framework within local government. In effect, such a department must represent a new type of administrative structure in which change is institutionalized through a system of social accounting based on ongoing problem analysis, long-range planning, and evaluation of existing efforts. As a demonstration project, the Model Cities program provides incentives to move toward incorporating the demonstration technique into much larger social experiments that emphasize flexibility and responsiveness to the needs of the people. While it is undoubtedly true that most issues today are national rather than local, the capacity of local governments to adapt national program approaches to meet specific local circumstances is essential if an attack on basic causes of complex urban problems is to be implemented successfully. In this sense, the Model Cities concept is much more than a short-term demonstration effort to alleviate the causes of poverty and urban decay, but rather a vehicle that can validate the need for local coordination and implement the development of an administrative structure to help insure sound development of the entire metropolitan area. Coordination With Other Organizational Structures. No coordinating administrative mechanism can assume or assure involvement of other governmental structures. As with private agencies and services, open communication channels and continuing efforts toward coordination must be maintained, but given the multiplicity of governing bodies there is no assurance of direct coordination. In one sense, this may be used to advantage, since social change can be facilitated by competition among organized structures to prove their capacities to respond to the needs of the citizenry. Developing coordinative mechanisms with other governmental structures and private agencies involves continuing efforts and a delicate balance between planning and service delivery. On the planning level, the task force approach has proved an excellent mechanism for bringing together professionals, residents, and citizens at large in a mutual endeavor to plan in a comprehensive, coordinated fashion. Such an approach opens up communication channels and ·· institutionalizes cooperative relationships. This task force approach should be reciprocal, making for Model Cities involvement in planning efforts initiated by other agencies. Such a philosophy should be incorporated in all metropolitan planning efforts. Political pragmatism undoubtedly will be a keynote in such task force approaches. Utilizing the lessons gained from experiences of such organizations as the Kansas City Association, cities should not attempt to structure formal coordinative mechanisms quickly, but should be geared to developing alliances and working relationships through which trust, confidence, and support can be achieved. On the service delivery level, formal and informal cooperative agreements specifying functions to be performed can do much to insure desired coordination. Service-delivery programs that are in no way dependent on the existence of Model Cities may well tend to resist efforts for coordination, and it is not realistic to expect immediate full constructive alignment of all such programs. However, continual evaluation aimed at the goal of increasing social accountability can serve as a coordinative mechanism of sorts and can prove of some value. If the basic causes of poverty and urban blight are to be successfully alleviated, an essential coordinative focus must be placed on the development of economic and human resources within the private sector. With major efforts made toward developing new opportunity structures for the underprivileged, particularly in income and employment (with obvious but complex relationships to education), there is a need to recognize that the emphasis of the private sector on outcomes rather than processes has an invaluable contribution to make. Model Cities program goals should aim at developing economic resources in the metropolitan area that can meaningfully offer employment opportunities with upward mobility potentials to the economically deprived. Considerable coordination in planning can be accomplished by a developing partnership of enlightened self-interest among business and financial interests, social planners, and residents of the model neighborhood area. Constructive alignment can be further enhanced by economic incentives to the private sector fo r participation both in planning and program execution. One matter that needs more adequate exploration is economic development, exclusive of employment, in blighted inner-city areas. Attention can be stimulated by incentives to invest in the economic development of model neighborhoods. This whole arena of private sector involvement is only beginning to be explored, and local governments need 11 �to place high priority on utilizing the very talented and result-oriented capabilities of private business, manufacturing, and financial resources. In summary, then, coordination is an ongoing process that will face many difficult problems. Complete success cannot be expected and is, in fact, probably not even desirable. However, significant coordination at both the planning and service-delivery levels must be achieved to insure the success of the Model Cities demonstration and the development of long-lasting mechanisms to increase local problemsolving capability. The twin strategies of utilizing formalized mechanisms of coordination where possible and building informal networks of mutual cooperation should be applied with a realistic understanding of what can be done now and what can be developed in the future. Perhaps the most important contribution the Model Cities approach has to make is to demonstrate that coordination is an essential component for coherent, creative growth of metropolitan areas . Implications for All Cities City Manager Graham W. Watt of Dayton, Ohio, has succinctly summarized the implications of the Model Cities program for all cities: "Immediately, it would seem that the Model Cities program forecasts several basic implications of importance to all communities. Inevitably, we shall see increased decentralization of public services. Cities will, with increasing frequency, establish branch city 12 halls, neighborhood service centers, store-front police offices, etc. "Second, we will see growing application of a philosophy of compensatory services - we must prepare to design our public service programs specifically to meet the unique and particular needs of each of the neighborhoods within a city. "Third, we shall witness a much greater degree of participation by citizens in the identification of neighborhood needs and in the design of public responses. This will require of each of us a reorientation of our traditional criteria of success, for in the future we must accept to a greater extent than ever before the concept that participation by citizens is a desirable end product of our efforts." Over and above significant movement toward alleviation of defined problems, the Model Cities concept can be utilized to establish a framework on the local level that can increase the responsiveness of the vast institutions of government. Potentially, the Model Cities concept can be translated into concern about the quality of individual life - not only for the poor, but for all inhabitants of and participants in urban complexes. As a demonstration project, Model Cities is searching for ways to improve the quality of American life through local decision-making processes in a coherent, rational fashion. This concept and the mechanisms that can be developed during the limited lifetime of the program will be, perhaps, Model Cities' greatest contribution, by establishing within municipal governments movement toward clearly defined goals and ongoing response based on sound resear~h and social accountability. • • • �• Appendix Employment and Education Strategies for Model Cities • • Most Model Cities officials agree that deficiencies in employmen t (i.e., jobs) and education (i.e., training to get jobs) are major causes of other troubles that beset the residents of deprived urban neighborhoods. A man with a job, which in tum depends on being educated for the job, achieves through his earnings the purchasing power to make free choices about the conduct of his life. As a supplement to the general discussion of Model Cities strategies covered in this report, this appendix presents specific examples of Model City approaches to providing employment and education opportunities for the underprivileged. The appendix in large part is based on a discussion of these topics that appears in Survey of Model Cities Applications in Northern California, prepared by the consulting firm of Sedway/Cooke and published by the University of California Extension, Berkeley (1968). Thus, many of the examples are from cities noted in the study. Other example°s are taken mainly from Model City applications submitted to the Department of Housing and Urban Developmen t. It should be cautioned that the examples cited are illustrative only. The cities mentioned do not necessarily represent the best examples of projects cited, but rather reflect information available to MIS. Indeed, since the Model City application is simply a proposal, some projects may never actually be attempted by the specific city mentioned or may already have been abandoned. Employment Strategies Many employment proposals of Model Cities seem to be based on ground already broken by recent and on-going programs. Thus, job and income projects may be largely premised on existing skills centers, Neigh- borhood Youth Corps, Job Corps, and similar antipoverty programs. A few involve continuation of experimental projects. Employment proposals include the following: • Creation of jobs as a direct or indirect result of the Model Cities program. Residents would be hired as part of the agency or local citizen staff as community workers, research assistants, home improvemen t consultants, and similar subprofessional employees. Oakland, Calif. , would include payment to local leaders for their effort in attending to community affairs. Residents would be trained and employed in clearance, rehabilitation, construction, and housing project management and maintenance. New Haven, ·c onn., would focus attention on part-time jobs, a relatively undeveloped phase of employment, designed principally at three groups - family heads with underpaying full-time jobs, mothers with only half-days to spare, and in-school youths. • Increased job resources and upgrading. Applicant cities would search for new jobs in existing public and private establishments. Aside from a continuing inventory of vacancies, this would include a reexamination of public and private programs for possibl e new jobs and careers; of civil service requirements to see how present jobs could be upgraded, or where new positions designed for low-income and minority groups might be added; and of policies and procedures of employment services to make any necessary revisions (e.g., to put more emphasis on the trainability of low-income workers vis-a-vis other conventional standards). This also includes proposals for hiring residents as police cadets; interns; and aides to teachers, social workers, and health workers. In Seattle, Wash., some $75,000 of its Model City funds will go for a community renewal corporation, operated by residents, with city contracts to beautify the neighborhood. Dayton, Ohio, has been particularly active in efforts to attract Negro recruits for the police department. Other fun ctions for which deprived residents are being recruited include health, welfare, community relations, and automotive equipment maintenance. Detroit, Mich., also has been conducting extensive and successful efforts to attract the disadvantaged into city employment in these same categories. Richmond and Pittsburg, Calif., would appoint job development specialists. • Small business development. Aside from encouraging commercial and industrial establishments to locate in or near the model neighborhoods, a variety of means would be explored to help residents establish businesses as their main occupation or to supplement their incomes. Oakland, Calif. , would tap federal aid resources to establish small business development (or investment) companies to help residents create individual or cooperative businesses, encourage demolition and rehabilitation workers to form their own contracting firms, and provide for the development of "mom and pop" stores. New Haven, Conn., proposes creating with the Chamber of Commerce a small business assistance office in the model area, staffed by retired businessmen, to provide technical and financial assistance to small businessmen. �In Rochester, N. Y., the Eastman Kodak Company has proposed a plan aimed at promoting formation of independent, locally owned businesses in Rochester's inner city. Suggested businesses include such industries as wood product manufacture, production of vacuum-formed plastic items, ,camera repair service, and microfilming of public documents. The company itself would also serve as a potential customer for some of the products and services of the new businesses. K,odak also has agreed to provide training as well as production and marketing advice and consultation to the enterprises suggested in the plan. • Comprehensive training and employment services. Cities· would expand or continue expanded programs and facilities for "outreach and intake," testing and evaluation, counseling, training, and placement and job-upgrading services. In an effort to raise the education level and increase employment opportunities for model neighborhood residents, Waco, Tex., proposes to use the facilities and resources of the James Connally Technical Institute of Texas A & M. Located on a former Air Force base, the Institute will provide temporary housing and total family training for some families and vocational training and retraining in 60 separate fields. Training periods from three months to two years will coincide with construction and rehabilitation of housing in the model neighborhood, so that families who live on the base during training will return to upgraded housing. The city also envisions using a massive public works program as a major in-service training device. Cincinnati, Ohio, officials recognize that it does little good to provide employment to an individual if nonjob--related problems interfere with his work performance. As a consequence, an "employee diagnostic center" is to be set up as part of the Cincinnati pilot city program to assist people in solving such nonjob-related problems as drinking, poor health, family sickness, and marital difficulties. Similarly, disadvantaged youths in the Oiicago, .J/1., Jobs Now program receive instruction in how to understand oneself, others, the community, and the world of work and money management. Richmond, Calif. , mentions a "Youth Tracking Program" that would trace the patterns of employment, education, marriage, military service, etc., of youth aged 16-21 years to determine their problems and aid in their education and employment. • Subsidies. Pittsburg, Calif. , would provide a maintenance allowance for breadwinner trainees and a "training stipend" for underemployed trainees, in addition to payments for day care, transportation, and clothing under its current vocational rehabilitation project. Oakland, Calif., would examine the possibility of subsidizing transportation for area residents employed or wishing to · be employed in the suburbs if transportation costs are found to be an inhibiting factor. • Education Strategies As with employment programs, proposals in education appear to be based on conventional and innovative approaches that are already current. Proposals usually include the following: • Broadened and intensified curriculum including adequate programs and facilities for both preschool and adult education. . Among these would be compensatory education programs, "motivational" education and day care of nursery-aged children, and job- or home care-related courses as well as basic courses for adults and prospective employees. New Haven, Conn., proposes creation of • • �a "center of innovation" in which preschool through second-grade students could be grouped in small units of 15 children, and selected teachers could be given the opportunity to develop and implement new forms of organization, new teaching methods, and new curriculum. Outside resources could be used, and the center could become a base for the training of teaching staff aides and community workers who could carry new approaches into the classrooms of regular schools. Richmond, Calif. , contemplates an adult education program that would help mothers train their children from infancy. • Team teaching, ungraded classes, reduced teacher-pupil ratios, tutoring, and new technology. As the typical inner-city teacher ordinarily comes from a middle-class background, it is important that he be ex posed to life in the model neighborhood. Hartford, Conn., therefore proposes to renovate suitable structures or to construct new dormitories in the model neighborhood so that teachers and educational personnel employed in the neighborhood can reside there. Hartford also proposes establishing a "tutoring corps" drawn from college and high school students, including paid indigenous tu tors and regular teachers. Oakland and Richmond, Calif., contemplate a departure from the singleclassroom, all-subject-teacher format and would also utilize new technological teaching devices (closed circuit T.V. , computers, video tape, teaching machines, etc.). • Racial integration. Hartford, Conn., proposes these steps in pursuing · its strategy for integration: (1) Substantial expansion of intercommunity compacts for schooling model neighborhood children in suburban schools. (2) The construction of "middle schools" for which sites have been selected. They would be situated so as to draw together pupils from widely diverse social, economic, racial, and ethnic backgrounds. (3) Establishment of a series of child development facilities physi~ cally related to existing schools and so located as to bring together preschoolers from widely diverging social, economic, racial, and ethnic backgrounds. • Facilities and physical plant. Aside from proposals to repair, expand, or modernize the physical plant, some cities are examining the development of educational parks as a major alternative to decentralized facilities. Pittsburgh, Pa. , "plans to establish five large, comprehensive, strategically located high schools that will serve all the children of the model neighborhood along with children from the entire city. The new high schools, to be called "The Great High Schools," would be the fust truly comprehensive and fully integrated high schools in the country. Their very size, each enrolling 5,000 to 6,000 pupils, would enable enriched curriculum offerings including over 100 separate vocational-technical programs. Berkeley, Calif., is contemplating the establishment of "middle and satellite" schools to implement the educational park concept. Experimental facilities are also proposed to be built into model schools. The basic thru st of proposed programs, both in employment and education, seems to be - fust, determine all possible or conceivable resources, then "deliver the inventory." Present services would be made more comprehensive in terms of the types of assistance provided and the opportunities offered; They would then be focu sed and extended to the clients, through the decentralization or "local centralization" of service facilities. Many cities thus come close to proposing junior civic centers as the main symbolic vehicle for their programs. �What you get by subscribing to Management Information Service • 1. Inquiry Service. Ask a question of us and get an answer within 48 hours, if you write, or within 24 hours, if you tele phone . If an inquiry requires extended' resea rch, you will receive periodic progress repo rts . Answers include facts and figures, stati stica l data, and up-to-date reports on successful methods bei ng used by other cities in solving their problems. 2. Monthly reports. Dealing with subjects of practical interest i\lnru14Crncnt hoomu,ilon Senk't· lnttm,llioNI City Mm.gm' Assocl1 tiot'I / April 1969, Vol . 1 No. L-4 to local officials. Issued in two edi tion s each month-one geared to the need s of large cities, th e othe r focusing on problems of smaller juri sd ictio ns. Dozens of earlier reports also are available and may be ordered . Reports are designed for handy filin g in 3-hol e'bi nd ers, which we supp . 3. Special Publications. Periodically yo u receive reports puo li shed by govern ment agencies, uni versi ti es, and other as sociations. 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  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 15, Folder 5, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 5, Complete Folder
  • Text: EOP ESTOWN 16:07, 29 December 2017 (EST) PRIDE ---==========--- The Pe op 1e's Vo i c e ----======--- �August 19, 1969 Mrs. Fannie Lewis Chairman Model Cities Program 7416 Star Avenue Cleveland, Ohio 44103 Dear Mrs. Lewis: Your letter to Mayor Allen, dated August 15, has been forw rded to me. We will be delighted to have Mr. Willie ~ufts visit Atlanta on August 26 and although I don't have enough information on your requeot for a workshop, we will be availabl to diecu s th matter with you .. Kindly let us know Mr. Tuft's tim of arrival. Sincerely, X rnon Clayton Dir etor of co unity Aff ir (Mr • ) bh �CITY OF .ATLANT.A August 6, 1969 CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR MEMORANDUM To: Dan Sweat From: Ray Fleming R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison The idea of management seminars for the concerned businessmen (or those affected by relocation) in these areas is an important idea. However, in light of the language of the people, I think it may be still too "highbrow 11 • It needs to be thoroughly oriented to the average businessmen in the area. It is folly to try to assume .t;:f,.:'i~! market potential or training for most of these businesses. Seminar classes should focus on business practice s such as bookkeeping and development of the neighborhood market. I would also sta t e that b esid es s imple busine ss skills , the definite stressing of awareness of agencies that can h e lp in the relocation and new facilities expenses. These agencies, public or private, should be more than advice givers . I believe that these businesses cannot survive the relocation move if not given financial help for they are pretty close to marginal status now. Concerning relocation -- relocation should be made as closely as possible and retransition should be made as quickly as possible so that to preclude the loss -of each business' narrow market. AU center should also keep an ongoing, free advisory agency for helping these people and Ehould encourage "rehabilitated" businessmen to help and contribute with their views and opinions. In summary, I think the project is useful for some redirection toward a short term approach to keeping these exi sting small er busine sses alive. RF :j e �THE REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND BUSIN.ESS SERVICE CENTER ATLANTA UNIVERSITY BOX 236 ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30314 July 29, 1969 Mr. Dan Sweat Deputy Chief Administrative Officer City Hall 68 Mitchell Street, SW Atlanta, G e orgia 30303 Dear Mr. Sweat: For some time, The Regional Economic Development and Busine ss Service Cente r has been observing small firms ope rating in the Mode l Citie s Area. Much atte ntion was dire cted toward ways a nd means of how the Center could assist these small firms. I would appr e ciate it very much if you would review very carefully and critically t he e nclos e d state m e nt. If it is r e l e vant to Mode l Citie s , the n we will d e v e lop more in d e pth. We b e lie v e it may h ave some m e rit. Thanks for your attention. Since r e ly yours, /2 . ~ ,,v..-ri{~ ;l/, 1 /?~ ' C . E. Prothro, Jr. P . S, M ay I a d d m y c ongratula t i o ns o n you r recen promotio n. You ce rta inly meri t t h e hono r . Bes t w i s h es. A PROJ E CT OF THE GRADU ATE SCHOOL O F B U S I N ESS ADMINISTRATI O N , ATLANTA UN I V E RSITY , CO-SPONSORED BY ECON OM I C D E V E LOPMENT ADMINI S TRAT I ON, U. S. D EPARTM ENT O F COMMERCE �ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ATLANTA - MODEL CITIES PROGRAM The Regional Economic Development and Business Serwce.1Center Atlanta University The objective of this report is to provide Atlanta I s Model Cities officials with a working tool to assist in the planning for Economic Development activities in the Model Neighborhood Program Area. Rather than wait until the Center's work on this subject is complete, we have prepared a preliminary description of two ite ms : One is the various problems and conditions affecting the lives of business people in this area. this area. The other is the reactions of these business people in To what they feel, rightly or wrongly, are the conditions under which they live. A full understanding and empathy with what they face and what they feel is a prerequiste to improving current socio-economic resource and developing new ones. It is also neces - sary in order to plan effective for economic development in the area. The style of thi preliminary report, therefore, was deliberately chosen to communicate this under tanding. In order to facill t the use of socio-economic information use in other studies conducted by the Center at the same time , it was necessary to anticip te our final results. analy i This has been done through an of all our vailable local data and where necessary, an inter .. polation of thia data baaed on the results of re earch conducted elsewhere. �z The local data has been developed from three major sources. First, we held nearly fifty individual interviews with businessmen ope rating a business in the program area. During these interviews, the problems. attitudes, and reactions to exis ting services and conditions were investigated. The second source of data was developed through using graduate students attached to the Center's staff who spent a total of about sixteen (16) weeks primarily in the five different neighborhoods (one or two blocks in size ). Their work involved the use of informal and unstructured interviewing techniques as well as simply continous observation of day-to-day movements. This se c orld a p proach provided us with much more depth of understanding than could be obtained through more typical survey techniques. The third source of data is the available local stitistics on income, employment, family characteristics, health, and other factors. Most of the local data that we have thus far collected is from the program area. This area of approximately 3, 000 acres containing slightly less than 50, 000 residents is bound by the East Expre sway on the north, the Central of Georgia Railroad on the west, Atlanta and West Point Railroad on the south and east. The six communities of Grant Park, Summerhill, Mechanicsville, People town, Pittsburgh, and Adair Park compose the target area . Some of our investigations, howeve r, have been conducted in other areas of Atlanta. On the baeia of thb comparative information, we feel that, while there are �3 differences among different areas , most of the preliminary conclusions in this report are applicable to other low income areas of Atlanta. In the overall view of needs and assigning priorities to these needs, it is immediately evident that these represent problems of substantial magnitude for the marginal and sub-marginal businesses in the Model Cities Area. The provisions of the Model Cities Program, theoretically, created an ideal situation for the small entrepreneur in a relocation situation. At first glance, it would i\ppear that, by and large, these persons would be anxious to relocate in modern, well planned facilities; as opposed to the dilapidated, dingy and antiquated structures in which they presently operate. We have had an opportunity to converse with many of these businessmen, white and black, within the inner city, and the reaction has been less than pleasant anticipation. Many realize that their problem' is that of selective or captive patronage. This is coupled with the lack of managerial capacity to appeal to a tot 1 market. If they are required to move to a new location then they will for all practical puJr.poses, lose their patronage. Many further feel that if they are eventually moved back to th ir present location , they feel that the financial requirement necessary to acquire modern furnishings and fixtures would be prohibitive. Mo t �4 persons who have operated for some period of time are of the opinion that they would not be able to be more than marginal operators. The reasons given are age, financial resources , and lack of academic training . Attention to a report submitted by a consultant for the Regional Economic Development and Business Se rvice Center, indie cates similar findings as a result of a study conducted in a similar area. At this point the Center recommends the assigning of top priority in these cases and make the development of managerial training course an integral part of the transition period. It is felt that such a program would contribute immensely to assisting these persons enhance their managerial skills, as well as demonstrating the advantages of appealing to a total market. Even con idering those who would return to present sites, it would do much in improving the ability to render service in his given area. This is presently lacking in most of the small, individual pro- prietorhsips in the area. This could be done through the Center conducting manage rial eminara on campu seminar sit s and/or in the various communities. could be conducted and attendance requirement made of the reloc tion subsidy which the e persons would receive a of the Model Cities relocation provisions. The part a part �5 These seminars would serve to assist in making many of these persons aware of the various government programs available in easing the adjustment of relocation. The foregoing recommendation would consist of programming the general managerial needs of these neighborhood enterprises. This would include choosing and improving sites , exposure to the various marketing techniques useful to small business , raising of capital, record-keeping and personnel management. Program should be de- signed to include the above items , but not limited thereto. Coordination of such a program could be implemented by the Cen ... ter. Personnel could be selected from the School of Business of Atlanta University, as well as the cooperating universities in the Atl anta area. This would make for a comprehensive program of Economic Developme nt and Technical Assistance . It should be empha .. sized that these programs and seminars · would be geared to the level of academic preparation brought to the seminar by these entrepreneurs of the communities in question. This would be in oppostition to many pro- grams heretofore developed which would not lend themselves to meaningful participation by such persons due to limited academic or comm rcial preparation. It would be further recommended that the Center would use contact resources to encourage on-going industries to locat in these reas. would be well to empha ize that such indu tries would initially install lt �6 their own management personne l with efforts made to train and promote local personnel to these position in phases . The Center could initiate progra ms which would fa cilit ate the u p -. grading of t he l ocal pers onnel in the direction of fi r st ...line management . There could be further efforts , e nga ging t he s ou r c es of the C ent er, to seek out and determi ne the feasi bilit y of the expansi on a n d / or c r e a t i on of service industry enterprises t hat indicate a p o ssibility of succes s operat ing or based in these a r eas , but again, not limit ed to the respe ctive communities . There is an imme d iate need for the foregoing provisions . There could be immense benefits derived fr om such an undertaking , and i t is felt that from these a meaningful program of Economic Development could be designed for these communit ies wit h long - term implications . �October 10, 1969 Attorney James B. Pilcher Associate Cit y Attorney 2614 First National Bank Bldg Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Jim: I have talked with Alderman Grigg about him introducing a resolution jointly with Alderman Millican that would allow the Model Citie Program to negotiate a contract with the Strength Cleaning Comp ny, Inc,. , for the maintenance and upkeep of our office f oilitie. you know, one of the primary objective of the Model Citie Program i to i t in th developm nt of neighborhood based entrepreneurship . Through the program, we h ve lent a i tance to Str ngth Cl aning Comp ny, Inc., which is totally owned and operated by re ident of the Mod 1 Citie Area. A Please prepare a re olution that would· ations with this firm. llow private negoti- Sincerely, Johnny c. John on Ex cutiv Director JCJ:vlo cc: Mayor Ivan All n, Jr. / Ald rm n Gregory Grigg Ald rman v r tt Millican \ \ �MDA M ET RO POL IT AN DEVEL O PM ENT ASSOCIATION OF S YR AC USE & 0 NON DAG A CO U N'T Y INC. JOHN R. SEARLES JR.• EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT October 1, 1969 Mayor Ivan Allen Atlanta, Georgia . Dear Mayor Allen: After our splendid visit t ~ tlanta in 19 67 with Mayor Walsh, I have retu r tllecl to Atlanta to view the progress of your Mode l Ci tYy Progr am. I find i t mo s t i mpressive and an outs ta nding Mode l Ci ty effort in the Uni ted States. Syracuse is a second round city and we are ju s t now in the stage of putting our program togethe r . A complete c o py of you r program wo uld b e tremendously helpful and I have written Mr. Johnnie Johnson about this and hope that he will be able to send us one . Again, I congratulate you and y o ur staff on th e splendid job you are doing in this very complex program. With best wishes, Sincerely, A(=.ir. Executive Vice President JRS: cw 1900 STATE TOWER B U ILDING SYRACUSE . N . Y . 13202 TEL . 422-8284 �/{) [I~ October 3, 1969 Mr. Gilbert Dulaney, Administrator Fulton County Department of Family and Children Services 165 Central Avenue, s. w. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Dulaney: The October Model Cities Executive Board meeting i scheduled for Wednesday, October 15 at 10:00 a.m. in City Hall, Committee Room #2 . In order to bring all bo4rd member up to date on progress in the Model Cities Program, we would appreciate a report from your organization at this meeting relative to project you have pre ently undertaken. To allow the me ting to move along, we ask that presentations be limited to approximately five minute nd encourage the use of any visual aids you may develop. We feel that the members of the board will be interested in both succe ses and dificulties that you may have encountered. Your report should b particularly beneficial to the board, demonstrating jut what i happening in Model Citi s. we would appreciate your cooperation and per onal ttention to re unable to attend ple e let us know who will repre nt you at thi meeting . this r que t , howev r , if you Sincerely, Johnny c. John on Executive Dir ctor vlc ec: Mayor Ivan All n, Jro Mod 1 Citi Ex eutiv Bo rd M mb re �October 2, 1969 This same letter was sent to the following agencies inviting them to give reports at the Executive Board Meeting on October l&. AGENCY REPRESENTATIVE Atlanta Transit System Mr. W. P. Maynard President Atlanta Board of Education Dr. John Letson Superintendent Georgia State Employment Service Mr. Sam Caldwell, Comissioner State Labor . Department Urban East Housing Consultants Mr. · James S. Robinson Atlanta Association for Retarded Children, Inc. Mr. G. Thomas Graf Fulton County Department of Family and Children Services Mr. Gilbert Dulaney, Administrator Sen'or Citizens Mr. Al Horvath Ex ecutive Director At lant a Housing Authority Mr. Lester Persells Director �CITY OF ATLANTA. OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM September 30, 1969 673 Capitol Avenue, S.W. Atlanta, Ga. 30315 (404) 577 -5200 Ivan Allen Jr., Mayor J. C. Johnson, Director TO Model Cities Executive Board FROM Johnny SUJBECT: Model Cities Executive Board Meeting Members c. Johnson, Director~ The Model Cities Executive Board will hold its regular monthly meeting on Tuesday, October JI,, 1969 at 10:00 a.m. at City Hall, Committee Room #2. ~~ A detailed presentation will be given on the progress and status of the entire Model Cities Program, including the projects and activities being carried out by the delegate agencies. In addition, a briefing will be given on the ·new focus of the Model Cities Program. This meeting will be very beneficial and informative and I look forward to your attendance. VLC Endlosures: Minutes of September 9 meeting Confirmation Card �MODEL CITI ES EXECUTIVE BOARD MEETING Tuesday , Sept emb er 9, 196 9 1 0:00 a .m. The monthl y mee t i ng o f the Model cities Exe cutive Board wa s held on Tuesday, September 9 , 1969 a t 1 0:00 a.rn . in Committee Room # 2, City Ha l l . The fo l lowing member s were pre s ent: Mayor I van Allen , Jr., Clmai r man Mr s . Matt ie Ansley Represent a t i ve John Hood Al derman E. Gr egory Gr iggs Alderman G. Ever e tt Mil lican Commissioner Wal ter Mitch ell Mr . J . D. Newberry Dr. c. Mi l es Smith Mrs . Mar tha Weems Mr. Joe Whi t l e y Absent: Commis sioner Sam Caldwell Mr. Clare nce Coleman Deacon Lewis Peter s Mr . Bill Wa inwri ght Othe r city o f ficials , representative s from neighborhood organiz ations, t he gene r al public a nd the pres s wer e also present. The Chai rman, Mayor Ivan Allen , Jr. , c alled the meeting to order. He t h en entertained a motion for t h e adoption of the August 12 Minutes . It was so moved a nd unaniir~us l y approved without correction. REPORT OF THE MASS CONVENTION STEERING COMMITTEE In the absence of Deacon Peters, the Chairman asked other members of the Steering Committee if they wanted ta:,make a report. Mr. Whi tiey then stated that he wanted to call t o the a t tention of the Board that there is a lot of unrest in the Steering Committee and that he thinks it would be a good idea for the Review Committee to review all the action taken by the Steering committee. Mr. Hood explained that some discrepancies have occured in the Steering Committee and attributed these discrepancies to the failure of the Steering Committee to hire an Executive Director of Model Cities Mass Convention, Inc., to take care of some of the duties that Deacon Peters has had to perform as chairman of the Steering Committee. He said that as soon �~ as an Executive Director is . hired, the business of the Steering Committee and the Model Cities Mass Convention, Inc., will run smoothly. Tbe Mayor then said that the did not think _i t will be necessary to do any checking into the Steering Committee at this time. Mr. Newberry pointed out that some of the S~~ering Committee mem- bers think that the Steering Committee should see and check all contracts before the Executive Board passes on them. Mr. Millican stated that the Steering Committee could recieve a list of contracts passed , but that they should not be~given a copy of the actual contracts. Mr. Johnson pointed out that all membe~s of the Steering Committee had received a copy of the Project Descriptions and that this information should be filtered down. Mr. Hood agreed that the Steering Committee should go through the .~ oject Descriptions and raise any questions thatt they might have as a result of the review in their meeti~gs. REPORT OF THE MODEL CITIES EXECUTIVE BOARD REVIEW COMMITTEE Each Board member received a copy of the rnemb~andurn from the Review Committee that made recommendations concerning the remaining projects of the Model Cities Program. Mr. Millican moved that projects listed to be approv~d be approved. These projects were: RE- 002N Model Cities Atlanta Youth council RE-OO SN Community Resources Development SS-OlOC Senior Citizens Services SS-047N Ent:ichment Services CD- OlON Group Foster Home RC-OllN Visual ana Performing Arts Program RC-012N Store Front Libraries RC-013 Atlanta Girls Club Program Expansion RC-OlSN Recreation Advisory Councils HR-003N Greater Atlanta Housing Development Corporation HR-004N Special Relocation Assistcn ce TR-Olli?N Public Facilities Impact Evaluation �SS-OSON "1 Common Data I SS-OSlN Day care Services EM-014N Purchase of Training Dr. Smith seconded the motion and it received unanimous approval. Dr. Smith moved that the four projects being held for fu.i:ther consideration dealing wi th the Health Component be reviewed by the Review Committee. The projects being HE-002N, Health and Education Services; HE-007N, Form Group Practice; HE-009, Medical Facility; and HE-014N, Pr eventive Dental Care. The motion was seconded and approved. Mr. Millican asked that the proj e c t involving the capital improvements of the Atlanta Girls Club, Project RC-007N, be held until some legal questions can be answered. It wa s then moved and seconded that the projects recommend0d for deletion be approved. The motion carried. These projects are: RE-OOlC, Model Citie s Resident Organization(Reduced by $33,000); RE- 004N, Training of Residents; EM-OlSN, Resident Work Attitude Change; EM-020N, Rapid Job Order Transmission; EM-022, Automated Manpower Coordination ; EC-OOlN, Neighborhood Development Corporation; EC-002N, Commer cial Loan Officer Training; ED-026~ Capming Programs; ED-030N, Coordination and Evaluation; ED-044N, Truancy and Absenteeism; SS-02 3N, Income Maintenance; SS-049N, Project Expand (reduced by $60,000); HE-008, Health Screening; HE-018N, Health Screening; HE-018N, Mental Health Planner; TR-002C, Transit Information Program; RE- 003N, CD-OllN, CD-012N, Coordination Services for Children and Youth , United Outreach and Juven i le Delinquency Prevention; CD- 006N, crime Data;- TR-004N, Bus Stop Shelter s. The funds freed up will be put in the - General Eunds Account for use in other projects. DIRECTOR'S REPORT Operation Breakthrough Mr. Johnson presented Mr. James Robinson, President of Urban East Housing Consultants to discuss the "Operation Breakthrough" project. Mr. Robinson gave a brief description of the Operation Breakthrough Program, which is a program sponsored by the Department of Housing and Urban Development to develop on a systems, mass produced basis a demonstration housing program . The application from the City is due in the HUD office in Washington on September 19 and an all out effort is being put forth by the City Planning Department, the Model Cities Staff and the Urban East Consultants to meet this deadline. The project will bring to Atlanta a new industry that will serve the entire s outheast. Mr. Robinson asked the Board to �4 approve the sites located in the Model Cities Area that are to be used in the project and that $3,000 be allocated for expenses in preparing the application. It was moved and seconded that both requests be approved. The motion received unamious approval. Tuskegee Institute The Model Cities Staff r6ceived proposals from Georgia Tech and Tuskegee Institute to do a study on Housing Choice Commun.ity _Analysis. The students from Tuskegee worked all last summer pr eparing their report. They are requesting that the Model Cities Program pay for the printing and reproduction ,of their findings. Mr. Johnson asked that the Board consider their request for funding in the amount of $1,100. He also stated that the report will be of great value to the program in next ye ar's planning. Mr. Millican moved that the request be approved. The motion was seconded and unamiously . approved. Atlanta Housing Authority Mr. Torn Eskew made the pre s entation for the Atlanta Housing Authority. T'ne Housing Authority asked for approva l to make changes in Site No. 4 of the 1969 Clearance Proposal. This site was f irst des ignated for mult-family and single family housing. The Housing Authority asked for approval to put i n a To¼nhouse Development and introduce a Community Unit Plan. A di scussion f ollowed on the zon ing and relocation problems connected with the site. Mr. Griggs t hen moved t hat the reque st be approved. The motion wa s seconded a nd approv·ed by the Board . Mr. Eskew then moved that the Board appr ove the sites selected for clearance in 1970. He po inted out the areas on a map ind icating the '69 and '70 clearance areas. Mr. Johnson stat ed t h at t he Model Cities Sta ff recommends approva l of the clearance areas. It was then moved and seconded that the 1970 clearance areas be approved. The motion carried. The meeting adjourned at 11:40 a.m. Mayor Ivan Allen ~ Jr., Chair man Model Cities Executive Board �L \ Auguat 14, 1969 .. Clue.nee D. Cole es Smith alter Mitch&l ~IAUol'-6 a Dl,llli•-• Mocei Cities fo:r • CCJ r �Tel£'pho 111' : (-10./J 688 -8778 National Urban League. Inc. So 11 th £' m R C'giona l O.f.ffr£' Clarence D. Col em an, Director /36 Mari£' 11a Stn'i'I, N . W. A 1/a111a . C eorgia 30303 o August 11, 1969 \u v S\ -v·o"~ The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta 68 Mitchell Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 u Dear Mayor Allen: · We, the members of a special committee of the Executive Board of the Model Cities Program, in an attempt to satisfactorily resolve the Model Neighborhood, Incorporated contract, wish to make the followin g report: The committee met on Tuesday, August 11, 1969, innnediately following the meeting of the Executive Board. We reviewed the correspondence between Model Neighborhood, Incorporated and your office. We concluded that two areas of concern in regard to the proposed contract are: 1. Adequate staffing, and 2. A Board of Directors of Model Ne i ghborhood Incorporated that is fully capable of exe cutin g the contract successfully. We believe, a letter to you dated August 5 , 1969, from Mr. Joe Stalling, Chairman of the Board of Model Neighb orhood, Incorporated, proposes a staffing pattern which can assure the satisfactory administration of the contract. In regard to strengthening the Board of Directors of Model Neighborhood, Incorporated, your special committee met with that Board in session on Tuesday afternoon, August 11, 1969. During this meeting, the following persons were approved as additional Board Members pending acceptance: Mr. Herman Russe ll, Mr. James Johns on, Mr. Ira Jackson , Rev. D. D. Dunbar and Mr. Samuel Mills . As signments were made to contact these persons t o secure their agreement to serve. I h ave reques ted the Chairman of the Board of Model Cities, Incorporated to furnish the special connnittee the reconstituted list of members of the Board of Dire ctors as soon as it is feasible. the basis of these developments, the special committee is requesting tha t the Executive Board of Model Cities, Incorporated be reconvened on On President Treasurer Board of T rustees J AMES A. LI NEN IVA N C . Mc LEOD Mo rris 8. Abram Mrs. Max Asco li W illi a m M. Ba tten Senior V ice-Presiden t Assistant Treasurer RAMON S. SCRUGGS L ESLIE N. SHAW V ice-Preside nts Mrs. Haley Bell Execwi1•e Direc to r Ed ga r M. Bronfma n WH IT N EY M . YOUNG, JR. C heste r Burge r Ba rbara Burto n Kenneth W. C lement Da ni el A. Collins Milto n K. Cummi n gs J OHN H . J OHNSON LOUI S E . MARTIN MARTIN E. SEGAL Secretary ER SA H. POSTON Vivian J. Bea mo n Wend ell G. Freeland A.G. Gast o n, Sr. J o hn A. Gro no uski C ha rles Ha milton Paul Jennin gs M a rt in D . J enkins T almad ge Kenly Mrs. Art hur 8 . Krim Robert Laza rus . Jr. Ina bel B. L ind say Henry A. L oeb Sta nl ey Marc us M rs. 0 . Cl ay Maxwell , Sr. F loyd J. M ccree Do nald H. McGann on Iva n C . M cLeod Mrs. Leo M . Mervis G. Wil li a m Mi ll er J a mes F . Oates, Jr. Frede rick O'Nea l He nry G. Par ks. Jr. Bi shop Haro ld R. Perry. S.V.D. Co11 1ribu1io11s to th e Nat io11a/ U rba11 L eague are tax dedu ctible Sa muel D. P roc to r Francis S. Quill a n Henry J . Richard son, Jr. Lesli e N. Shaw Ashby G. Smith , Sr. David Sulli va n Mrs. Arthur Ochs Su l zherg.er William J. Trent, jr. Edward M. Tuft Katie E. Whickh a m Leonard Woodcoc k Clayto n R. Yates Mrs . Bruce Zenke! Dw igh t R . Zook Honorary Trustees WILLIAM H . BALDWIN ROBERT W. DOWLING LLOYD K. GARRISON THEODORE W. KHEEL LINDSLEY F. KIMBALL HE NRY STEEGER �-2- Friday, August 22nd at 10:00 A. M., for t he purpose of receiving the committee's report. If special information is required prior to this meeting, please feel free to call me, Dr. Smith or Mr. Mitchell. ~~ ~ CLARENCE D. COLEMAN , CHAIRMAN C. Miles Smith, M. D. Commissioner Walter Mitchell cc: C. Miles Smith, M. D. Commissioner Walter Mitchell Mr . J. C. Johnson CDC:mf �Profiles of Model Neighborhood, Inc. Board Members MR. IRA L. JACKSON Mr. Ira L. Jackson, a resident of Atlanta for the last ?O years, owns successful businesses in the Atlanta area. Among these businesses are Jackson Pure Oil Service Station, 2320 Gordon Road, Jackson Auto Parts, 2596 Bankhead Highway, Arlie Tire Center (Uniroyal Dealer), and a Recapping Tire Service, 2807 Bankhead Highway. Mr. Jackson was one of the five (5) Black business leaders recently honored by Commu~ity Relations Commission as outstanding in various fields. He is active in numerous community groups and is presently a candidate for Alderman. He is a graduate of Clark College, Atlanta, Georgia. MR. HERMAN J. RUSSELL Mr. Herman J. Russell, a life-time resident of Atlanta, is President of H.J. Russell Plastering Company, Inc., H. J. Russell Construction Company, Inc., and Pardise Apartments, Inc. He is a member of t he Board of Directors of the Atlanta Mortgage Brokerage Company, Inc., a gradua t e of Tuskegee Institute, a member of the Board of Directors of the Citizens Trust Company, Chairman of the Board of the Atlanta Inquirer , and a member of the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce. These are but a few of his accomplishments. MR. SAMUEL MILLS Mr . Samuel Mills , a resident of Atlanta for 12 years, i s a Correcti onal Officer with the Ci ty of At l anta Prison Department. He serves as a Recreational Director with this department. He was selected by his department to serve as a representative on the CRC. REVEREND D. D. DUNBAR Reverend D. D. Dunbar, a resident of the Model Cities neighborhood, has been in the house wrecking business for 13 years. He is owner and manager of the Southside Wrecking Company. He has the distinction of having studied under Dr. George Washington Carver at Tuskegee Institute while studying agriculture and preparing for the ministry. He is Presiding Elaer of the first district of the Triumph Church and Kingdom of God and Christ. �-2- MR. TED LEWIS Mr. Ted Lewis, a resident of Atlanta and a successful business man for the past 39 years, owns several businesses in Atlanta, plus $150,000 worth of i nner city property. Among the businesses that he has s uccessf ully owned and operated are : Pr essing Club , Laundry and Dry Cleaners for 33 years, Barber Shop, Package Store, and more recently a Bonding Company. He is very active in community affairs and has the distinction of being on the YMCA Board of Directors for the past 18 years. MR . J AMES JOHNSON Mr. James Johnson has been in the laundry and dry cleaning bus iness in Atlanta for th±rteen (13) years. In 1966, he acquired the Ted Lewis Laundry, Cleaning and Linen Supply Company. This i s the only Negro owned linen supply company in the wor ld. Mr. Johns on' s firm has betwe en fi fty and sixty employee s in i ts main plants and two branches. MR. CLARK MARTIN - Secretary A resident of the Pittsburgh community f or t he past 56 years. Mr. Martin, a 32nd degree , is a Past Master of the St . James Lodge #4 of the Pri nce Ha l l Mas ons. He at tended W. H. Cr ogman Elementary School and graduated from Midway Radi o & Te l evision Institute of Georgia in 1952. Since 1952, Mr. Martin has been t he owner and manager of h is own business, CLARK MARTIN RADIO-TELEVISION SERVICE, 439 Fletcher Street, Atlanta. He has enjoyed the operation of a successful business for the past 17 years . MR. JOE STALLING - Chairman A resident of Summerhill and Peoplestown for the past 65 years, Mr. Stalling has worked actively for the improvement of his community. Mr. Stalling is a business man in the community. He operates the main branch of the Manhattan Laundry and Dry Cleaners. Mr. Stalling~s business had a gross sales last year of over $230,000 and he employs over 50 people. �-3MR. HAROLD OWENS A life~time resident of Pitts burgh for 45 years . Mr . Owens was an employee of WHITES PROVISION MEAT PACKING COMAPNY for 23 years as a butcher . He is presently employed with Devoe Paint Company a s a s hipping clerk and has been wi th this company f or t he pa s t six years . MR . PRINCE MARTIN Mr. Martin is a life-time res ident of the Pittsburgh neighborhood. He owns a nd operates a s ma ll contracting business in t he bui lding field. He has enjoyed a successful busines s for the past t went y years. REPRESENTATIVE C, G. EZZARD Mr. Ezzard was born , r a i s ed and has s pent his adult l i f e in t he Summerhill community. He is a re tired pos tal employee of the U.S. Postal Servi ce . In his 39 years with the Post Office he worked most l y as a l etter carrier. Mr. Ezzard owns property in t he Mode l Ci t ies area and is actively engaged in c ommunity affairs. He is a member of the Atlanta Community Relations Commission and is presently serving his first term as State Representative, House District 102 in the Georgia Legislature. REVEREND JOEL W. MARSHALL Reverend Marshal l is President and founder of Pioneer Developers Enterprises and New World Developers, Inc. He attended David T. Howard High Schoo l, Booker T. Washington High School, and Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia. He is a corporate organizer and has over thirty-five years of experience in retail merchandising. Reverend Marshall organized Marshal l Cash Grocery on Fraser Street in Atlanta, Widow's Curb Market, Alabama Streamline Car Wash, United Community Stores, Inc., and X-Cel Super Stores, Inc . in Birmingham, Alabama. He is chairman of the Ways and Means Committee of the Atlanta Business League and Associate Minister of Paradise Reed Street Baptist Church. �-4REVEREND AUSTIN FORD Father Ford, an Episcopal Minister, is the Director of Emmaus House which is located in the Peoplestown community. He organized this grassroots organization and is very active in the Welfare Rights Movement. He was the principle organizer of the Atlanta branch of the National Welfare Rights Organi zation (NWRO) at Emmaus House. MR. JACK COFER Mr. Cofer, a resident of Grant Park, was born at Grady Hospital forty years ago. Since that t ime he has lived in ~tlanta and most l y in the Model Cities area. He is ,professional Piano TunerTechnician. He is self-employed. Mr. Cofer is the organizational committee chairman of the Model Cities Mass Convention. He is the Democratic Party Chairman of the 102nd House District, the Vice President of the Grant Park Model Cities Citizens Organization, P.T.A. President of the Grant Park Elementary School, member of the Policy making board of the Comprehensive Health Program of the Community Council of the Atlanta Area (CCAA), and Board member f or the Educational Improvement Program , and a Ford Foundation Education Project. MR. CLAUDE BARNES A resident of Pe oplestown for the past 35 years. Mr. Barnes works for the United States Postal Services as a letter carrier. �July l, 1969 MEMORANDUM To: Mayor Ivan A llen , Jr. From: Dan Sweat Subject: Edward Moody Following i s a list of events concerning Edward Moody and the d evelopment of M odel Nei ghborhood, Inc . 1. Moody was perm nently empl oyed by the Parks Department s Community Recreation Le de r on September 26, 1966. His sal ry was $340. 00 a month. H wa dismi eed on May 24, 1967 . He w dismissed bee use of conflict with th staff w ith which hew s working. He was re ssigned to another conununity center but w lked off the job. He w s subeequently dismiss d . Z. He w s mployed gain by th City on M rch 5, 1968, e Community Work r on the Model Citi staff. Hi s 1 ry w s $240. 00 a month. He w d lsrnl d on May 14, 1968. for l llur to follow directions. 3. On January 18, 1968, the group known a Model N ighborhood, Inc. (which was ln lta third year of xlstenc ) becam a eh rt r d non• profit org nb tion, a.ft r being advie d to do o in ord r to be Ugibl for federal grants , found tion fund• nd s e d money from diUerent gencles to fiAance its programs d p1'oject • Edward Moody ls preaid nt and Bron Clevel nd and are consultant • obert W. Waynier �Mayor Allen Page Two July l, 1969 4. On October 22, 1968, M r . Moody received a letter from Johnny Johnson informing him that his corporation, Model Neighborhood , Inc ., would receive $6. 000 from the C ity of Atlanta ' s Model C ities Progra m . It was an EDA grant for economic development in the Model Neighborhood Area. This money was approved by the Model Cities Executive Board , the Board of Alde rmen and the Mayor. · 5. In May 1968 MNI was granted a $10,800 loan from the Trust Company of Georgia to obtain an option on Atlanta Housing A uthority p roperty at Georgi a Avenue and McDaniel Street. See att ched memo from George Berry. 6. Economic Development A dministration grant .. totaling $121, 750 of which 86, 780 is federal cash contribution and 35, 000 comes from the City of Atlanta (Technical Assistance Grant Project No. 04-6-09154) as given upon s trong recommendation of the Atlanta City Demonstration Agency (check their lett r to EDA of January 27., 1969) . Responsibilities of th corporation: 1. Outreach program • providing technical minority entrepr neurs 2. Planning and dev lopment of in the M odel Citi s Ar a . ssist nc to primarily shopping cent r or simil r facili The EDA gr nt w pproved on May 13. 1969; by Robert A. Pod st £or a 12 month p riod. Atl nt CDA pproval inf'luenc d this decision heavily. 7. The Small Busin sa A dministr tlon approv d $50,000 lo n to MN1 in June 1969 (la t w ek) to be used in th developm i:it and op r tion of the MNI manu! cturlng pl nt. The manufacturing pl nt ls loc te-d on Georgia venue nd produc wom n's c sual · pp rel. 8. The St ring C ommittee of th Ma Convention met Tu sday, June 2-4. 1969, and voted 7 - 0 a inst the MNl gr t J' quest for $35 ,000 M od 1 Citi s suppl m t 1 f~d tom tch the EDA grant. Two m mb r ab tained, six w r• b nt. DS:fy �- --- - - -- - -- - - - - - - ++ ·t- i J: -4- l+ -------- �II - ~~ - ~ ~.~ - - - - - H - --1-V ~LI----,---; ~ - L 4 _ , ,u;:7_0!':=.~ ~~ - - - - - ~ - - - - - - �• _ _____,_..__ __ ----- --- . - -· --- - -- I -- - - j - --++II - - - 1- -- -H-- - -- - - - - - - - - --- --- - -- - - - - - - - �Moad - - - 1....-1-1--J....--- - - - - - 1 - ! - - - - - _ __ _ _____, ~~ - - - - - - - - - t-o-- L - - - --- -- -· - -- a• ���Econom ic pportunity Atlanta, Inc. 101 Ma rietta Street Bl dg . • Atla nta , Georgia 30 30 3 • T el eph one 688-101 2 T. M. Parh a m Exe cuci ve Admini s cracor , . June 25, 1969 Mr. Edward Moody, Director Model Neighborhood, Inc . 700 McDaniel Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30310 De ar Mr. Moody : This is to acknowledge receipt of y our memorandum of J u n e 24 , 1969 , transmitting t he proposa l of Mr s. Mar y Jane Co f er . The $72 , 000 mentioned i n the material is OEO money to b e made avai l a bl e for r esidents of Mode l cities to r e c eive t echnica l a s s is tance and t ra i n i ng . An OE O- HUD a greement requires that EOA , Model c _i ties , and the City o f At l anta jointl y select an accountable community group to r eceive the contract for these mo ni es . The group that has b een s e lected is the Ste e ring Committ e e of the Model Cities Mass Convention . Th i s group has a firm bas i s for d emocrati c selection and participation in the Mode l Cities COiT1muni'ty and can be held accountabl e by the residents th rough the annua l el e ction proc ess . S i nc e ; d l y you·r ~ , _,../ \ .-'l/ 1. . __ ~ T. M. P 2rham Exe c u t i ve Admini strato r I' I TMJP/ gj bee: Mr. Mr. Mr . Hr. Wi lli Alli on Johnny John on D n Sweat .,,......-- John Calhoun ·/ . ·-· �Feb1ua1-y 19, 1969 Mr. Edward Moody Model Ne i3hborhood Manufacturing Company 55 Ge orgia Avenue, s.E. Atl ent a , Georgia Dear Hr. Moody: Rec ently our Inspector r eque s t ed tha t you file a 1969 Applicat ion fo r a Busine sD License . You s tated to our Inspect or that you we re not r equired to s ~curc a Ci t y Bus ines s License fo r the Hode l Neighb orhood Hanufo ctur1.ng Company. Unde r the current Bus i nes s License Ordinance all persons engaged in bus inccs within the corporate limi tn of t he Ci ty of At l a nt a fo r t he purpose of pr of it , ga i n , or econo~ic i mprovem<>nt are r equ i r ed to fil e an App lic a tion for a Business License and pay t he f ee . If you do not be l ieve that you f a ll wi~hin the int ent of the present Bus i ness Lice ns e Ordinance , t hen please write us e,,a ctly why you think t he Hode l Fe ighborhood Mc.nu fac t uring Company shoL~ld be c;;cmpt . Enc lose d are the r equired Appl ications f or a Business License and an i nstruct i on book . If we tasl)' be of any ass i staace i n t he prep<1rat ion of your r et.u.rn , pl eaoc c.ill us a.t 522 - 4463, E:gt . 205. Marlon D. L evy Busincsa License Administrator MDL/cd Enclosures CC: Mr . Sidne y Andrews Mr . Bill Man3ui·;1 Ur . George Berry �-~·.-.:. Volume 1 I! u@ber 20 February 1, 1969 n~******** MASS CONVENT ION CHL\ilGED · WITH UNFAIRNESS By Edward Mo ody Two months ago severa l r es idents and I All the officers of the ~esidents Participa tion Croup identified as the t·lns s decided that Hodel Cities Program inforConvention, was elected to serve a s ain for raation was not re a ching the Mass of the one year pe ople. A mea sure to bring the informa tion to the Community was studied , a nd an ag r e The officers are LeHis Peters Chain,mn ement was !1l(:;. V a ft erwar d a plan was t a ke n . C .L. l"lcClain Vice-chni rr:wn, Carrie \Jr i Gh t Secre tary, and ~osa Burney Assi. Sec. One week be for e the Conve ntion our plan call e d for me to write notice s to the EXECU'.l?IVE l30AD.D r egul a r a tte ndan ts, a nd othe r r e sid ents a s Me ch:micsvil le Lewis Peters f a r as oy funds would Go• The n ot ice s was Ada ir Pa rk Jir.-1 Newberry as kin g the peop l e to s up port me for cha irSurn.1erhi 11 t1a ttie Ansley raan of the Mass Conve ntion. It was anticPeoples town ifa rtha Weems ipa t ed that I wo ul d s ee thnt informa tion Pittsbuq;h John llooc]!would sure ly r each the r e sidents. Grant Po1:rk Joe Whitley Ove r 1,000 stamps and e nve lopes , plus NEIGl-IBOJll-ICX::. D VIC. fi: - ClT AIRMAN mcneo pn pe r wa s bought, a nd two secretaTi Mechanicsville Alyce Nixon e s we r e pnid to he lp ge t out th e notices . Sur.1merhill Ida Wri ght My cha mpa i gn expe n ses cane out of oy pockPeopl es town e t. nut a s f or as sooc one e ls e champa i gnGrant Park W.F , Cox ing, h e was a ssiste d and s u pported by two Adair Park Calv in Craig Agencies, and City Ha ll . Persona l l e tters Pittsburgh Bea trice Garl r,mdwere coopos ed , sten cil ed , run-off, sec1led There will be six Coornun-ities with 11 and me t e r staoped for this pe rsonc The Operatin g Committees. Each committee will explan a tion first, was tha t this is fundhave a cha irman. It would be wonderfut if ed to the Coor.mnity for Citizens Particia ll these committees were active, and not pa tion a ndit was le ga l . That is not true . just the Ste ering Comoittee. The Steering Federal funds ca n no t be us e d for ind ividCoor::tittee are the Ex.ec. !3oard r;ieobers, and ual purposes. For residents participation the Vice-ChAirma ns froo each cor;imunity. in the neighborho od on l y . tiASS CONV1'.l',lTION S.E-ELECT OF~' ICE,_:S k**** * ***kk k* **** * k***** A Wee k l y Publishe d By Mode l Ne i ghborhood Inc Editor - Edward Moody Ci rcu lat i on 600 Copie s Pr ice Fre e MODEL NEIG1mo:rnooD MACHINE ~ npair;n spee che s we r e a llowed to be oade fron the star;e . Even the Model Citie s Director wa s partisan in o a king his r e por t a ~nd, the nost ioportant part of a ll is tha t there wa s not a qorum of r e si de nts at t e n d(S e e Fa i rne ss page t wo) ********** �********** .,'****** ********** MODEL NEIGHBORHOOD WEEKLY ********** (Fairnes;s) to speak for the total community. I want my expenses paid back tone. And based on the privileges given to the one person and not to the others, and wath the assistance from the two Agencies, and &taff,HUD·will ... be~ontacted and requested to disqualify the Mass Convention as the resident representative that speak for the property owners, residents, and businessmen. All total they amount to only 1/10 of 1 percent of the effected redevelopment planned area. -/'*<******* page two MACHINE MECHANICSVILLE NEIGHB01HOOD ADVISOP.Y COUNCIL TO MEET The NAG of Mechanicsville will meet a t the Community Center Wednesday night 7:30 P.M. Mrs. Alyce Nixon is the ChaiI'!ilan. The purpose of the meeting is to e]ect the 11 Operating Committee Chairmen and get a· report from the NAG about the money that has been spent, and what it was spent for. C~nters address is 389 Bass St. s.w * SUM-MEC SC~lE OF COl'lGRESSMEN This is taxation with out repres entation, and tha t is uncons.ti tutiona l. LITTLE BEill LIGHTS Oi."l MACHINE AND SAYS "I went to ~£ -"":-:.,\ the Mass • ' '---...._ Convention \ ./ '---and wha t happened' - ~ man I neve r forg e t : i ' -../,.v .-·=~-- '-- ' f MACHINE. "What hap pen Bird" "Moody did not have a chance . And he did not know it. But I give hin credit he trie d. Anothe r thine he is pretty near right then ·wrone;. Oh ye s Model Neighborhood Inc. lost the ir good friend the Community Cente r. Afte r six oonths of he lping sane r e sidents, the y o rhne>J. Sm:.ie of the a r ea s the y0\.1 u e; p 0" pl P t,,. 1ch e. d upon w(c;. r e ; How t1id th e area Not only will th e r ,:: sicents get funds look twenty years ago and how will it for assistance in planning the y will be l ook tw e nty yea rs from tol ******** ·******** ** '• ,:. '~*** �S·aiturday Jan. 25, 1969 MODEL NZIGHBORHOOD WEE l',:LY MACi'. INE 'JOTJ 'l r,,, ODE L CITI ·~S (cont'd) 1.ernembe r in my l a st writing I sta ted that th e re a r c thos e of us who 2re qua lifi e d and c apa bl e of filling "Inside Mod e l Citie s Jobs?" We ll this is th e time f o r us to come forw a rd and oakc ourselve s known. This we must do for our c!1ildrc n and 0 ~1r ne i ghbors. By so involvin g ours c lv2s, there is no d oubt that this will indeed be; YOUR rJODE L r:::r.rns. I must a pol og iz e for not ~ig~ing my name to my l a st a rticle. I am by no ~ean s a Ghos t Writ e r, ne ith e r ao I a Write r by prof~ss ion. I am me r e ly a conc e rn e d and qu a lifie d a r ea r e side nt. myrtle ford 'k ;,; ·A k ,'<**** LITl'J,E LIGHTS ON lVil:,CH UlE AND SAYS WHAT J0:3S WILL NEIGR30RHOOD 1,7 0 {.KEJ.S GET ? ? . ? ? ? It wa s hoped that by now the nei t;h borhood workers would be qu a lified for bette r ernployr.1 ent in the Mode l Citie s Adninistration. But from hea rs ay this is not likely. The r e a r c ru5ors th a t the workers will continue in the same category. Are sone of the outsiders· ousclin g the workers out of a bette r po sition? No. The outsiders are not inte r e sted in meniel er,1p loyrae nt. This is sooe thing f°or, then to con&ider, ne ither is the workers. ***** Lad i e s - Girls-* ·k***** lH ~D page 2 Sl a cks th a t wera ma de in th e Com~unity a t th e Mode l Ne i ghborho ods tfanuf a cturin g Pl a nt will be on display a t the Sum- Me e Ce nte r Friday, and Sa turday, J a nua r y 31, a nd Fe brua r y 1. These slacks ~re not to be sold i.n a cl o thin g store , but d ona ti ons will be a cce~t e d . Pr oceeds will ~-;o t o purchasing sorae baseba ll uni for0 s for the Littl e League " We ll I te ll it like is a n d s oI!le liste n t ~an _ s thi·s sunoe r an d s ane dont . I onl y wa nt to he lp the c omounity . I say a5a in, ge t soI!le pe opl e Ge t a s u a ny pa ir a s y ou want Q th a t will. support progr e ss. Stop l e tting a smal l c roup of do-~oode rs p l a n fo r the e ntire po~ul a ti on. Le t eve r ybody a t l east OUR CHILDct.~N ARE FUTURB hear abo ut wha t is ha ppenin g All of our . hope, joy in 1 i fe and the See you a t the Mass Convention • future of our c m:1. r.:iunity r e st in the hand s and I will t e ll it like it is.---Flie s of our sons a nd daughters. Our children off S ee you ne xt we e k. a r e ou r future, they are our new l eade rs doctors, businessnen a n d bui l de rs. I f you '~*** g i ve one child a de ce n t break in li fe i t wi ll be r ewarded ove r an d ove r in ~a ny STAJ.T NOW ATLANTA IS A GOOD ID~A ge ne r at i ons. Con ~ra tul a ti on goe s to ,the Ne i ghb orh ood BUT WHEN DO ATLANTA -:}ET STA:1TED Ai des at Sum- Mee Ce nte r for the fin e job they d i e. in r e cruitin 6 childre n for the STA::'T WHAT? MAYBE THIS IS THE P2.0 BLEN llBAD STA-:',.T P.1 0G~Ai·,; Over 500 y oun gste r s in the S1.m-Me c Area wre r e cruited t o pa rticiGETfI NG ATlANTA TO GET STARTED . SO:U.Y--- pa te in th e protsram c oo in g up this yea r. Suo-Me c Ce nte r Bob Wayoe r, Dire ctor 'k* �. . . ,··c- ~... .- • .,~ "'-i MECH: NICSVILLE N. :·l . C. · MET ·1:0D EL CITIES , . . • ' ABSENTEIU Sl-i PROPOSAL The Mod e l Ci ties 'Hei ghb orhood · It vvas ·in · 196 5 .the 'ril'echa n i c·sAdv i sory -Counci·l for Hech2.nicsville ·; Summerhili Impro ~e me.nt -'. ville met at the home of tf.;.-;: chair- · Committee entered a act i on proma n ~-Irs.J\lye:e·N:i.xon 703 Coo:F)er St. ,ject to alleviate Absente:~.sm Ut: dnescl.ay. · · · · in the eleme nt.a l'J' scho ols··-~ nd · There were 8 residents, an ::c .o. hi gh schools th, t s e rve the t wo A. Mod el Cities :. ssist,a nt . to Bro· commu ni t ies. ·.Hrs._ Alyce Nixon fe s sion, assi ~n·e d to )t:echanicsville was and still . is the Chai r ma n of Mis s Hos e - Ma ry Stewart Mod e l Cities· that-. comm.{ttee. No one -h !ls been· Nei e:hborh ood Or e;a nizat.or Sr:e d .A.li.st. ...-,c l c::ic.ted for the past t lire·e yea rs . r-Iiss Stewa rt. Via s i1mti·o du c e d to Maybe its best t h a t no one has · t he group by r-'Ir s •· Ni x on., Niss been elected to serve · a s cha ir·St euart ga ve a brie f d:escripti.on · man . . of the N. i .c. purpose · a nd duties, The committee in 1965 after t h ere was quest ion's and -answer a nd severL: l months of researchin g and a limited c'.lmount of que st.i ·on' s. compilin g f a cts ., app rove d a· -rP. It wa s est,a bli s he d · tha t a ll _the cotnmendati ,Jn to curb n b s er..+r- 7i~m a r ea b l ocks had · o r ga n iz ed ex c e pt . in thG schoo ~.s. FrotLth:::~;,:::,:::,~:,~~:~:~;.;:;;;.; ::;::::~::::c::;:r,:: : ;-: :::::::{::::;,::;, :::::;;,,::: ent, are expectocl t o vote . They .,__·. A REPORT FROh: SAVi-i.NNirn 'v'r ill vote for .:-i. repre s entative to .· \li7hen the ma chi ne -vtent ·t o px-e-ss serve on t h e N . 11. .c. Hechanicsvi lle it had n ot ree;ievP-d .a word of the Comr,iun i ty. .. 32 resi dent · t r i_p tp ,· -the c:Lty of Mrs . Rosa Bu r ney a · r(;3s i dent Savanna h, for Mode ~ Cities . I t is l iving on Gariba l di St . wa s a s ked t 0 antioi, pa t ed b y the .Ms ch ,. ne that c a ll a meeting of h e r area . blqck !' ·· re po r ts will be ava ila ble by t i1P. She a gre(3d to . Th e n :ren 'b lock is · nex t issu e . . . nurhbcr . 3. The boundnrieS nr e Ba.s·s ·· ,:~,::,:.:,:::,:::,:,,:,,:~,:,~:, ~,:,,:~,:,,:~:::,,:,<:,~:,~:, ~,,:,,:,,~,:, St..,. ,north; ~cDn nte l St . wes,t -; Sou . 1.Jh os e s ide nro you on Bl~cks, R;R south; Wind so r St ,. ea st • · '.Jhose s ide nre you on. �r;TQDEL NEIGHBORHOOD ·. WE:i:KLY. M.A CHI NE ( PAGE 2) ~************* EDITORIAL · MODEL CITIES BOA RD - APPROV:SS 1969 PLflNS Model Ci ties Exe cu ti ve Board has li ro the peoples in At l an ta ap proved the proposed 1969 C.Do A. that aro r 2s idont s of the Gommp:J..an. The plan vfa s r ecieved by :he unity /, cti on Age nci e s,· Cities . federal officials also, who may· Demonstration ~genci e s, and suggest changes or approve as is~ others, acknowled ged of tho pro Johnny Johnson in his hrief re3;rc1.ms o~ ough to pnrticipct.e in port s ai d ~bout 500- 600 jobs will tho complicated sy~~ em of be i ng de i·i ve from t he employ1he nt conponin vol vod? em.,, fo:r . area r esident$ . To a ssure .· r:a¢h of the age.ncios are using thi~ a l ot of the require~ent will . :the s ame ~dcntic a l st~uctQre , : have to be waived tha t will enable ,· .:md the s c.me po.rtici po.nts . In the r esidents to ge t these . j obs . a ll . fiirness . tha po. rticip~nts Tho latt e r ··s,ent en c e is trssences of o.ro so involved thnt some of thcr.. the r eport •., . . don rt know ·whnt · is happening Ab out 017, million is tb be· s pent thomsclf. in th e Mode l Citi es a rea , for the It was recommended that t he first yea r, ~p200 milli"·on ~;ill be s:tructuro of the s ystem be brobudget ed for the five year plan. . u ght _tn . t ho peoples for und erstanding •. Th0 ma j ori t y of the r asidents do not know what area bloc.ks . are ·' what i'1.dvisory CounARE...~ BLOCK TEN :MET . .· . . cils ·ro; what r e pre s ent ative s AT PRYOR ST. SCHOOL a r c ; what a Board is; what th?Y d~· or a r e ele ct ed to do. It is If you live i n area block t en , no'wondor r e sident partic i pa tion or know whor e are:1 bl ock ten i s i s at o. minimum . you shoul d have beGn ~t Pryor St. Tho r esi dents must know be Schoo l Thursday night , 7:00 P.M a for e they can ge t i nvo l ved what There· was a Mode l Cit.i es Me et-the program is all aboui. The ing to get Repres entative s for the Machine r ecommend s Program kn.ow Niode l Ci tie s Nei ghb orho o.cl Advisory -lodge first. Tak~ time and l e t Council. A 12 pound turkey wa s to tho r e siderits know what the probe given away t o tho lucky t ick et gram · is, o.nd how they wi ll benho l der. W6r e you there you should've efit. They wi ll thGn got .i nvc;i i ve( been . . ~**~ ~ ~ Li ttlo Bird Li ghts On Via chine. Pl, IR ,I,RZ UPS ETTING COl,J JJ NITY h rumor is boing sprea ded by a 1\nd ___ / · .,,.-'Ji Said, pai r of unidentified people s , urg./-..:...__< ( _.,/ ;~ ing r Bsid. ents to make haste ctnd move. This pair ha s been stated to bo em~ 11 ~ p l oyed by the Noda l Cities, office~ hcro is ',. ' the Sum-Mee The rumor is tha t tho pe.rnplo s t :h ~t Centers '·. < Director? a r e livin g in cJ nri. r n ncu Hr on.s or Ho was 7l4, why- ·can v t . they kee p r., oorly ko pt hon sos Phon ld mo ve inc'.l Dire ctor? 11 t o th e ho11si nr: 1•1·c;_7e ct bo cnus a: Ivinrhj n n n nswc rs, 111 have, t hey . q11 ;:i l i fty • And' t h 0 y { 1.· n · }Ho'-r i Ylfl: n.sk nd thnt s c::. mo q1w:::r1 -.i.C\n plenty fas t . Hnmo r or not, is th e cause ot· ti m,,s, I myse l f donYt kn owH~ go_µd or bod ? 11 .Je ll, 11 Bird· to ke s off. ••I will ns k E.O. A a nd t e11 ·you The Mc:-tchinc is Publishe d .Jcekly n ext weak what t hey s o.y ,, Byo 11 Mode l Nei ghbo r hood Inc 700 McD 2ni c l ,,. ,,, St. S oF o Edward -Ioody ---Edito r ~ --. '\ , ,. . 143.215.248.55 ~ ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~~ ~ ~ ~ 143.215.248.55 143.215.248.55 ~~ 16:07, 29 December 2017 (EST) .,,_..r ___ ...... . 16:07, 29 December 2017 (EST) 143.215.248.55 ~ ~ .. , ....... ~ .. , ..... , .. ..,1 .. ... , ...., .. .. , .. .. , ... ... 1.. ..., .. ... 1.. .. , ... ... , ..... 1.. .. , ....., .. .. , .... 1....., ... �__;_0KLY L~,CHINB ~~**************************** 3 pnge ,: -,.. ..::;.:: ::;..::::.:: :::.:: ::;.:: ::;::: :::::: ::;:: ,:.: :::::: ,:::: ,::::::;::: ,:.: ::;::: :::::: ,:::: ::::: :::::: ,:,::::: ... :::::: :::::: :::.:: ::;::: :::::: :::.:: :::::: :::::: ENiP LOYT-IZN T IWDJL CITI:i3S lj , s & A:, s Fi e ld Represcnt o. tive : Q,. Duti es ; Setting up Tovm Ho.11 r,10e t1.Jha t is the ,S tee rin g Com;::i ttee? ings in tho CoE1.t--:1uni ties for tho Comr:mni ty Rol e.ti on Commission, 2nd The Stee ring Committ e e is the s e rve as a lic.ison be tween the com- out growth of et Tc..sk Forc e Commitmuniti e s nnd tho Commission te 8 thnt wns ori gina tly the InterMinimum Require;mcmts; Thre e t -.., fi vo e st ed Group of citiz~ns thnt met y onrs oxpe~i enco in the socio.l ser- · 2nd approved the pre s ent Resident vic e field. A long · timG r e sident of P2rticipation Plan. Atl['_nt a is desired. Q. 1'Je r e they elected, or appointed ? Sa 12 ry; ~r6 , 4f's 7 i l, • Cl 8rk -Typist Duti6s; Routi ne typing 2nd cl a ric~l work . Kooping orde rly fil e syst em, a nswe ri n g _te l ephone Ccnd 2 cting n s r e ce ptionist for th\J Commission. JI.Iinimum B.cquirmunts; Bo c:tble to ty.:.. peat a s peed of 40 wo rds n minutoc S2 l 2 rY; $. 3 5 5 pe r month · Co. 11 522- 4463, ext. 433 Mech2nicsvillo Mnnpowor 'li::irL 0. Job men , women Cv e r y ' T1 10.srl n.y 1.aoru i.ng 9 ,, . L ti l 1 2 Noon , Goo r gi c-. St a t e .i:::mpl. r' jmc u 1, Ropr ascnt nti vo wi ll int erview 2ny pe rson looking f or 2 job. Me chA.ni c svj_J l e C~mmuni t y · Center C~ ll 5?.2- 8530 Tua s. 9-12 .......,.... . ...,........ ................ ,.....,,.... . ..,....,....,........ ..., , I, " 1'"1' ,..1' ' I' . .. ...,....,. . ..,.. .., ,.. They were first n select e d group uf volunteers, r e sidents volunt e er ing to serve. Late r by virture of s e rvic e we r e e l ec t ed by the I nt erest ed Group. (~ . T.Jhe. t pnrt do the y play in the r~ode l Ci ti e s Pro gr o.m? 1~ • It is the St eerin g Committ e ~ th c.. t r e presents t h e r e si dents living i n the h odel Cities ~r ea , through the j\In ss Convention, tha t is con si de r e d the Citiz ens Pn rticipa tion 01·g::i ni 7«--: t j_on . It is t hrou gh 1.J s-i-.oorin g C0mn1i.. t t Go t ha t the r esidents i dea s , p l ,' ln· · n1,ct i u v u ] n --· me nt is ncc o11 l°it- 0J. ns, Citi zens P,:1. r t.i '.-'ipat,i on. 10 ..,..........,.....,. ..... .., ......, .. ..... ' 1' "1" ..., ..... 1... ......., ...... .. Hunru,H t Mo. nuf 2c.:turin g Comp2ny ' To Ope n NOTICE ? ..1..... , .. .., .. .., .. ..., .. ........, .. ..,... ' 1' '1' NO TICE! .. ..,,...... ....,,........ .. . .,........... ,....,,.... NOTI CE l The Ea chine is a Commu11i ty n ews weekly . It i s t he intent of the pub li she r to ca r ry the news , announcAm~nts and a d s , of every Communi t y , a nd Crga ni.. za tion tha t i s 0n t ha South -side of town , and Ci ty- wi de .~en it i s of value to our nei ghbo r s . ~t l 2s t the c om .unity owned , fi r s t in htlant a , wi ll open fo r production . The Officers and m~mbors of Mode l Ne i ghborhood I:f g o C11t a r e n ll glc:'. d t ha t a t l a st this i n a number of I ndus t rin l De v e l oping Corporation i E~ now unde r wa y . ~ppre cintion i s hereby placed Press dea dli.ne i s 1~dne sday to the Atla nta , Jayc e es , the ~dvis- of ea ch weok , The phone number now ory BoG.rd of r LI'l1TLE BIRD LIGh7rS ON MACHT.NE . AND SAID A. Election ar e held onc e a t ear t o serve f or one :,3ar only. Terms expirt?.' in December., q. Some c ommunities a re still '.1nl ,li :1.P, el e ctions. Is this a pa ~·t-. . ,r M, 1.clel Cities .Steering C o mrni. Lt- rcJ ? Yes. The e l e ction prococdure is; Ele ct Ar ea Bl ock Representative s to serve on the Neighborhood Ldvis ory c ouncil; Aper s0n is el e cted i n the N. A. c. to s erve on the steering Committe This is whe r e a ll t he residents in the 11oclel c ities rr0g r mll is r epr esented . I flew a -vray from thq Hong Kong flu arirl I d i d not ask E . C. A. ab out the Dir- e e-Lcr of Suru- Mec Center -:; -hen vrill the present members of · th e· Steering commitee terms expire? A. I.. _,, 11 e2 . .,11 - ·hen dll t hG residents see the pl ans f or Model Cities? Machine a skes Li"itle Bird ., A. When will Me ch2-.nicsville get a Center S11pe rvisor? " 11 Lit\le B'ird . 0 ,S & A ,S Q. After everybody e l s e h.:ive , Mnybe ther u sir:i=mt .s vfi11 see the pla ns . q. " Nerl wee k. ol d pal ." ··hy d i dn 1t the ~e sidents r eview t he' pl ans f i rst bef or e everyb.~dy el se?_ 1 A. Answer is n ot av a ileble . \ / \ f \ 1 , 1~1 i \1\1\",, , ,- Lonnie King Ele (?ted Pre side nt At.lan+,a Brcinch N., f • • A. C. P. The members of the Atla nta Br anch N .f. ,: . • r;. P an•l the bl.., ckand white pe opl es of t bi .s g r eat City aro aske d to s upport t.he new Pre sident and th E:x:c cutiucc omrnitteo for the year 1969e This is one ' •l'[.'/ · 1d2.at.ion t ba.t, is needed i r1 t.hie City I51lt- :i 1-. i:1' 1,s ~- r ,,m~,:i 1 1 r,rn1- p ol~ !'.ica I., 1 MECHANICSVILLE NE;""S Lett ers of cons i-c.1-t-.117..:-rr,i ons a r e be ing mEtil od t o per s ons that 111as electe ~ as 11.epre s ent,a~-ivei, in Arca Bl ock 10. It v:as, int-erest.ing t o know s a ict one res ident , I was asked t o vote f or someb ody I hadn rt , ever heard of.. How do I know vhat the y will do? As a matt.or of fact ju;:;\-. -wl1:d·. j s it all ab out? ~ -'t u 'fl: 8 l\.f!c,cl d 11(.; i;_;,_ l-,r.Hr : n CV (; X-y rd, ;t;-1:,r, , l_ ntr1rnh e r C, · >1 •>-". r c- ~,u l :-, i- ·.i.1 •Y, Ts t.ld.s news •. • l .., " .. ~ ' ( " ""I\" .'< \(.. I\>-: �r - ;~--=~~;~·~ i~f~:- ' •: A ode I A/rzqh6vt-/2 c:""-'"'"' ,r,, " ,. " ,. " " ,. " " ,. ,.-,, ,. ,. ,. .. ,. "" " "" "" 1968 ~ e ~d1~icm' "-'L" ~L'!...H-" "~LlWL'WU~~'....!UWWt-'U' "-'L" "-~W'~L'~Ll v ' ' - " "...J~'L...JUULH...H-'WW'-"~L.'lJ'-'-W . ·, '-Q ~ ~ " "-,, " " " " ,, " " ,H, ' ' " ,, ,. ,, " " ,r,, ,, ,n, " " ,, ,\I, " ,, ,. " n " " " , , " " " " ,r" " " ,, ,, " " " ,. ,~,,- ,. ,.-,, ,, " r. , , ,. " " 'l' , ~~H, " ,, , • ,, . I .Y-" ,t....,.,~U 1..)L'~ L '\~..V '- " 'LlWL..' L'~U 1 I\ " " ,, " " " " " NEWS RELEASE MODEL NEIGHBORHOOD INC~, (NON PROFIT DEVELnPERS) MODEL NEIGHBORHOOD INC. GOT STRAIGHT IN 68 WJLL NOT BE BEHIND IN , 69 r 11 • 11 Model Ne ighborhaod Developers Inc., presently located in south side ATLANTA is on J an. 1 8th 1968 , after t wo ½year sa c ommunity or ga:nize d c or parat i on wi t h a of or p.:a nizing, Model Ne i ghborhood I nc., planned pr ogr am.. obta ined a charte r, enabling it t o beEconomic is the order of the day . ~()me- a bona-fide delicate agency with a , Being R part of the econoNy and receiving purpcso Jnd goal. s ome of the ca sh fl ov1 is the opportunit y Model Nei ghborhood Inc., is l?res e ntly t-o be of fered by Model Neighborhood I nc. gCuVo:rned by a board of Trustees that are Her e at 55 Geor gia Avenue S ..E ~ is one l ong t ime res idents of t he c oilllllunit i es of of several pl anned INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENTS Mechnaic sville , Summe r hill , Pittsburgh, t o b e built in the area., This is a garment and Pe oplet own. All membe rs are bl a ck pl ant . Thirt.e en (13) women will be emex ce pt one. ployed he r e , the r e a r e nine ( 9) wor king One of s eve r al developing projects is now . On the shoulde rs of the se womens open and operating . Model Ne i 3hborhood r ests the suc cess of thi s pl a nt. Mfg . Cor p . i s empl oying 13 women , who Statistic s shows the r e are mor e women will earn as much a s ~80,~90, and ~100 heads of house holds in these c ommunities pe r week . The r e i s pl enty of work for t hese women in t his plant l ocated 55 (Model Cities ) then t he r e ar e in Atl a nta. The unemployment rate is t he highe st. Geor g i a Ave . S .E. Model Neighborhood Mf g . will not be abl e The ne~t pr oje ct i s the shopping to put all these women to 1,11ork, but i\ cente r . f i nal pl ans are be i ng c ompl eted, will try. The success ~f this plant lead with possible construction to beg in in to employing 200 or 300 in the near fut ure . F eb . 1969• This is a first for Atla nta, and i .,. ~HHHHHHHHP-HHHHHHHHHf-:HHHHHHHHHHHf--*lHf-:HHHHH~ i s located in the !,edel ~ it i es area one block from the C .D.A • (Ci t i es DemonstraMODEL NEIGEBORHOOD 'WEEKLY MA.CHINE is tions Agency) planning office , and next willing enough and eager enough to carrv door to the E •.o..A., neighb,-rhood s e rvice new of t he six c ommunit i e s (Sur.1rr1o rhill) ce nte r . Model ne i ghborhood Inc . is a . MechanieSVille, Peopletown , PittsburGh, good exampl e of s elf-help . M. N. I. enGrant park , Adair Park,) . courages Black peoples t e do it for them- • Deadline for receivi ng news i s Wea. sel ves . of each wee k • M.N . I. appreciates your prayers your s upport , and wi sh you all a Merry Chlris--t- -:..~HBHHHHHH} mas , and a Happy New Ye ar. To Summerhill, Mechanic sville , Pe oples MODEL NEIGBB01tHOOD i•'EBKLY MA/-:PINE Town, Pittsburgh, Grant Park, Adair Park , 700 MCDANIEL STP..EET S •11' and the City at large . This is a ChristATLANTA, GB0:00-IA 30310 mas present. Circulation------------------500 MERRY CHRISTMAS Price pre copy-------------Free Editor & 'Publisher HAPPY EVERYBODY YEAR F,nwa rd }Joody J I �-~-- - , ,:--· MODEL NEIGHBORHOOD page 2 MODEL CITI~S OW.ST I ON Rt. AN~?'EPu.S .-· tIT1\E BIRD LIGHTS ON rr:AcHINE AND SAY Q. i:~he n , 1ill the r e be anothe r Ma ss Convention ? 1 A The third, Sunday in Janua ry. J an . 1 9, 1 969 . q. 1--hero will it b e he l d? A. Ma c h ine , Can you keep some thing c onf i dent i a l ? u Macrdne says , 11 r JTT l e Bird that depends . Tell me fi rst then I 1 11 say ye s or no . 1ru:e1 1 If Lit tle . Bird Sc'. ;f !I The r e a r e some membe rs of the Model Cities St eerin~ Commi t t e that dont i:1ant to L .: t other r c sidents serve . I hea r they a r e b e ing pa id, and -vmnt to get all they can for themselvc s 11 • Ta king off . 11 Pe oples be1ot e r get rid of them, a t the i~a s s c onvc ntion!J At the Ii. H. StcJ.nton Elc . School, 970 Martin St . s . E i n peoplostovm . 0 • -- ill the r e b e a ri El e ction of Ne,,· offic ers f or the r"a:ss c01rv n1rt-:i c 11 :1 r, 1-.\ds moc tir,:3: ? 1 l'. . • yes . ~ 1 .I 0. n 1 ats next in tho ~-rodol Cit i e s :Pl an? A. Tho 1969 one ;f8 Ar i m11l cmcnt ing . i ··1 TF,NAi'TTS EDITORIAL 1 'ANT:P.D FOTI. SHOlWING CF.NTEH c a ll ]l,T odcl Ne iE hborhood Inc . 700 Mcnanfol s t . s .,., . Tho Pa r ents of Pryor st . School have been for ye a rc att e ridin;~ Christma s pro~ra ms, e ithe r by the school or by tho -Parents (P . T .A.) The r e a r c questions being a ske d . ---as the r e a Ghristrnas this yea r . ? If it v1a s whe n did it pe rf orm? The Par0nts , all of them, enjoys the yulGtide ·p r og rmns . The Ha cbino pref e r s pa r e nt s b e ing inv0lved . Pa r e nts g ot b e hind t he P . T . A . -Pres i dr:mt of Pryor St . school and h8lp her help y0ur childrcns . APOLT.0 S FLIGHT succ~ss POVE11.TY P11.CG~7AM NOT STJCr:BSSFUL Y.-::T r -oNDF,n. HCT HA.NY I-fUNG RY FAM ILIES SEEN THE CAPULF. TAKF, C;FF AND LAND J.,A '['Ti;n_ , 523- 6301 Model Ne i g hborhood Inc . will undertake in the first t vro nonths in 1969 ,,n effort to e stablish a ~osur.i.e propa ring Course for ·inte rostin~ pe rs ons in the Model Gitie s Ar ca ThEJ course lfrill basically as sist tho applica nts in 11 How to f ill out employme nt ,,applicat ion forms, the n the job desc ript i ons nnd classifa ctions v ill b e fil e d for r e f e rra l s that appl ic a nts a r c qualifi e d to c1o There v1i1l be 300-500 j obs av a ilable in the }·Iodol Cities i rnplomcmtin~ pl an . The re v1ill ne c e s sar ily b e traininG f or the untrained, and j ob pl a ceme nt for the tra ined and ski lle d . furthe r inf ormat i on n0xt week ~ -TIIINK- THAT BIG OLD PILL? "'<-' '1r" J\ I \ , _ 1../ \ I\ I\J " I\ " /. I �(vi \)t.L NE\G'rl\lvRr\00D, \N.C, 700- McDAN\'tL Si., S. W. 't,.°!'.~ i'\1At c:,,oRG\I\ 30310. 'M:• Dan Swat City liall Atlanta ' Ga• 3U3U3 . , ··- .' , • ~ -~ I )-, i ,/ J' .. .,I . ! ... , "' '"( I ' �TRUSTEES CHAIRMAN OF BOARD EDWARD MOODY VICE-CHAIRMAN JOE STALLING NON - PROFIT DEVELOPERS SECRETARY CLARK MARTIN TELEPHONE : 523-6301 TREASURER C . G. EZZARD 700 MCDANIEL STREET, S. W. MEMBERS AVERY SHIELDS NATHANIEL PROTHO SAMUEL COCHRAN REV. AUSTIN FORD PRINCE MARTIN, SR . HAROLD OWENS CLAUDE BARNES REV. JOEL W. MARSHALL ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30310 TECHNICAL ADVISORS C . BRON CLEVELAND PAUL MULDAWER ELIZA PASCHAL MOJEL NE t G\--1 ~OP\~-tOC)[) MFG. COP\P. PL/~NT OPENI\JG M Q\J ./)E( .2 3/, 1968 ') -< ("--J.; . ' . • ! /\ 1~ /: --- ( . \ The d oard of Tru,, t e e s of uo c.;7 1 J. Ei ·: h::i orhoo c'l , Inc., t hE lo'·' i r c o.·e ;, are a, Fie .;-ir': t i n the . ,o de l Cities 8 rE:::i . .( �/tfvc!P I A/e ig/2/;c/l h0ud Werzilu /!16c hinrz ~~********************************************** Vol 1 Number 13 December 7, 1968 Free Edition ~************* fl"PHAT KILLS A COMJ\'iUNITY PLAN 11 GIRLS CLU B I N TALENT SHmJ In'doin g or planning , t he l a tt e r Me chanicsvi ll e membe rs of t h e fir s t, th e unre sourc od plans n e v e r Girls Club, wi 11 r e pres e nt this g e t d one. This is wh y c ommunity Comm.uni t y i n a t ale nt .shuw ·" 1 ·<->J1 f',r ,r ~ r e sid efits are c onti n ously ca u ght in ed by t he Gra d y Home s Gi r ls Club. a bi n d. The show will be h e l d a t the To p l e v e l organ i za ti ons 1'1Ti th Ant oin 8 C:ra v t! s Hnine , 12 6 Hi l li. Rrd money a ro a ble to s t oa l th e l i ttle S~rcet . Date to b e annou n ced. peoplG p l .'1.n s and do some t h i ng wi th the m, wh et h e r th ~ doing is g oo d or ba d, u sua lly ba d . A group of Sou t h -Side Civic n ASK YOURS ELF 11 wo rk e r s got to gethe r a n d s e nt a 11 Hh os e side are y ou on Bl ac ks , r e s o l ution to tho -Mayor a nd the Board of Alde rmen , ( ove r o p posit i on VJho s e side are you on ? 11 o f s e v e r a l drn1bt o rs) a ski n g tha t t wenty thr ee (23) squa r e mi l e s of You are d oing e v e r ythi ng y ou ca n to l a nd on the s out h side b e t he s i te ke e p Bl c1 cks d own a nd whi te s u p . i n a Citi e s Demonst r a t i on Pro g r a m. This wa s in 02 r ly 1966 . Th e g r oup " Whose s j_de 2re y ou on Bl a c k s? 11 me t in t h G Sum- Me e , EOA Se r v ice Cont e r . Simply b e ca us e the f i r s t mcnt .ing WA s he ld i n the Cent e r , E. O. A., i s tak ine; cr0di t f or 11 MAN BEATEN BY POLI CE 11 b rin ging th e Mode l Citi e s Pr ogr am to Atla nta . The E . O. A., di d no t Mr . Hilli e T-L ggle 41, of 38(J d o thi s a nd shou ld n ot st e a l the Ormon d Str e e t , SE . , was beat en se cre d i t fo r it . v c r e l y b y an At l anta p o l i c eman Sa t Community cre ate d p l ans, f or the u rday ni g ht in fr ont of hi s h ome . l a ck of f unds will lo se to hi ghe r - On e of his e yes wa s b eo.te n out a n d u p s e v e r y t ime . The y will 10s 2 the h e wa s t a k e n to Gra d y Hos pi t a l ·fo r p l a n - p l us tho jobs , b uc a us e of t r eatment . His c ondi t ion wa s so b i g ;'D o g Eating n li t t l o do g t a ct i cs ba d , h e w2 s una b l e to a p pear in t hD.t pr ofe s s iona l s a r e a b l e to c ourt on Monday . i'1Ir . Ti ggl e wa s d e vou r the m with . i ntoxicate d . Loca l c1ge nc i es wi l l n ot t r y to Hi s wi fe , Dora Ti ggl e , mothe r wo r k wi th e xisti ng commu nity of t we lve ( 1.2 ) wa s ord e r e d to appea organiza ti on s. Inst ead , th ey try i n c ourt on t h r ee c ha r ge s ; cursi ng , to e r ase the m. And t he y a r e o. b l e i nte r f e rin g with an off ic e r 1:md to d o t his b c c o.u se of fund s that ·resisting . The c ur s i ng , r e s isting the peo p l e r o prescnt nti v c s rt lloca t e .r.h.ct r ges we re dismi ss e d . She was Tho soluti on fo r t his , is fo r · fine d $2 7. 50 for t h e int erfe ri ng . c ommunit y orgnni zatj_ons t o c ea se A wit ne ss t estified t hat Mr s . Ti gg] b e ing us e d by the ·1 I n -Crowd 11 t hn t was a Ch ristia n woma n and s he hnd a r e maki ng empl oyme nt of t he · ide as n e v Gr h ea rd J\'irs. Ti ggl e use profane and p l ans tha t "?e l ong t o t he . l anguage in o.ny sense . The hearing communi ty . It is best t o remain for Mr . Ti gg l e is set for a l .: J.ter in tho slums or ghet t o ? than t o l e t d nte . Pho.t will Mr. Ti ggle ' s f i ne ( Cont ' d pn ge 2 J b e??? ? ????????? �PLAN (from page 1) LIT'i' LB BIRD LIGHTS ON HEEK LY i .. ,CIU NE AND S11YS: oth e rs plan your community f or you. Getting a ll the good thin gs, jobs, 0 ~./ money and wh2t e l se? The cre dit if - -- ~ - ~1,···· .,-, it succ eed s. The communit y 1;;,i ll . ,,_,__ ,.,.../~ sure ly be blamed if it fails. ""---.....,__~c· ---~-~~ Community re s i dents are re\ minded to r ehabilitate your n eigh-~ ..;;l__, borhood with your neighbor 2nd keep 11 1\BOUT MODEL CITIES LITTLE BIRD?:, your plans to yourse lf. · So f a r Mode l Ne i ghborhood; Inc., has The Ma chine s .:1ys; 11 J\fodel Neighmnnnged to do this, but some·of borhood Inc. , is includ ed in the th eir pl ~ns a r e being stol en . Model Cities plans. The Corporation will be doing Ec onomi c Deve l oping from a community level and th ere will be something beneficial ! 6r ACTI ON all the residents in the a reaV. / / .,,.,~: ; , ; ; - - - I ' ,.. • - / ·/ ~• ,,,_;.,,. ~ -·- \ Sitting still nnd wi shing NOW TELL fJiE ABOUT 'l' HE EX'l'EN:SION :MGRS 11 0 H? 11 Bi rd looks at Mn chine; 1rThe y 2 r e suppo st t o work the The Good Lord sends the fishing But you must dig the bait. outside boundc:t ri es , such a s Gra.nt · Park to bring into t h.::tt communi ty, the s e rvices tho,t are o.vai l ab le in th e Nei ghborhood Cent e r s . I f t he y are do i ng it, I d on ts l:now . But I MODEL CITIES Q' s AND A's Hope they wi ll': 11 Mc:1.de no p ers on grea t Q. ·w hat l and is to be clea red and ·when ? A. I n four communiti e s l and is a l re~ dy approved for clea ring in _ 1969. AS BIRD FLIES OFF , M~CHI NE ASKS HIM , TELL iviE 1\BOUT MODEL CITIES STEERI NG CQil1irUTTEE NEXT WEEK " BIRD LOO KS DOUN ••.•••••• "0 . K. ' 1 XXXXXXXXXXXXL ~L"'C P:Lttsburgh - Stephens St . on th e north , co l eman St. on the wes t MODEL CITI ES RESIDENTS TO VISIT Rockwe ll St . on t h e s out h and McSi1Vi~NN1i. H Dainel on t h e oast . · . Thirty two (3 2 ) resid e nts and Me cha nicsvi lle - Fu lton on t u e ff b f r1 ;; de l ci· ties area th · 1-J' d t '-,. _ ,.._ c bl sta mem e rs o HO. nort h ' c· i n ~ortonl:, · L~ ~,1de s u, runt11h ey and I-'I odel C:ities Offi ce, wi ll go sou t , oopGr o .tici.1et r son on e <' . o·i· a t hj s 1oy b us t O onvan. L1ci h , Ge or c,· e ci s • week- end to obs e rve t hat Ci t y 's C. D. A., pl anning pro gr a m. Summe r hill - Betwe en Glonn a nd Crumbl ey on t h e no r t h , I·fa rtin on t ho wo st and Geo r gi a Avenu e , South Ave nue on t ho east . r i - Pe opl est own - No rt h of Va nira on t he n orth , Conna lly on t he ·west, Tu s kc egee on t he sout h and uast of Pri mr ose on the ea st. ~*** �/ ,ql l~I .I ~ / I /) V - -· r. C. v.( I ,, ! ,1 ~' j ,I' ' ,. / .... - J( l."-.> ! I /,1 r~· _,/ / . I / .' Id 'X /I ! ·-~;P" /7 /1/l!..., (Jr ~,.,(_ · r U .. l....l,I ,,r- (-,' ' l :1 I j -"7 ,f / I . ... (_//l /7 >Lt: -. p·"! ~ '-'"-· '"'-1"- ,rMODEL C~',""n~S I?~;;,qTI)B;-;:~~·11 EDITORIAL ATTLi·JDElJ PU3L..i::C ttEAHlNG H1'Jl-IEN WILL BLACK PEOPLE UNITE 11 Neighbor hood Developing Program a n ew co11.cc:::Y::; to HoltsL:.g a:u Urban DeveJ c pi,::.5 1,;lans r eq1..j.r-cc: tha t public >c.Jring s i.r: 2~1y p la::1.ned clcara~c~ proposal, be held by t he l oca l lir·:·;:Jn :;:;.e.rwwc.1. l P~_an.n:i.::ig .:_T. "111 Col'lIIli < l - , V . ·t, . _, In the communitie ,3 all over thr e -")_:.JC,...,. "'"'" .LC:.,_.,J_J ~ a ·1 ' ! · r i·,,., Lo•T ;'- nCC""8 l ' 'l (j CJ..... . l . l y -~ ..i. J. · ..~ \'V.--... LJ. .,; C..l.--!. ,··jlt> .L . ! ' C '"'""' ' ·1-~e~tS tr1r• r0 jcdi ' vj- ~ m __ ..._1 · __ : ,.-_ .!. ... l: ! V L .i. c.; ' .- •• .:.. ,...., • )J sio, e J143.215.248.55 l ~it y among ~oighbo r s i3 , d.c'~:i:-::i.::18:1to.l and t he o i:1.l.y 1·0s1..ll.~-~:1. uC' ' r. l ,-; -._. ~~-o,r Y C Wh2:::-,,'Jvcr neig'hbors .:iJ.low nny- ,..., v ..., ~ ,, 'TJ10 J."G V'i ·,.. :re t-11-r·c: o r.~1.~.-:~a s o =." 'f:~ r.- .,. ,.--.. .L ,l ~ l'C ,:• ;.. .J 7 IJ ~·"'- J--l; J1"J. .0· ':'·'·'· '""';1 ,...y for h c " '"l, J'~ l·' ..;~ ~ r, ·1 -·l, ·r · No1r0.;ibc ,."' ,t.J~~.:1. _ -~~,:id.nc:y C,:::,oJ<: :::..2 c ha ir~o.n of t l::o 'i J:v,b-:-.:·, I~8,";.8~N,1 J. ·'.".r.d P~anni.ng :Ucvc l c,p:r.,on-':'. Cc,;-,:.' ~ : ·~ ~er:_ Df ·;·,t1Eo b ca~-,:i ~J .f A.J.C.13::'Jd:in, .:'8:~ : :;J .::u , 1 , (... .1, Pl.. r · n \..• :__ rr,c.., ,· r'1 c.·in~ (' nnr r·J· ;:, J -' .... - .':,, . .1.\...,; ' WGJ."e l1 , : ; _:, , J.. ..-,I. l~l l J ~CP f !j ( )t~ o l .. - 0±- t~_.:; (:~~ = ~~ (;[: first n0;.-;:;o :,.1 to - ' •'• .I, - ~ -~ • • ·, ,;or': ., -[ 'J,. -. . . _L • {;_, ,; J l .·, : r:-i - - -~;..; .·. -: J , ' '. ) -J , i..-., I " ... .,... thi n~ , or a~ybcdy to comA betwe en thE:r::, i .t c.:iu ::,Gs · d r~ str·,_1c t.i c n., Aft.er t i1e c~ ~:-:.\·.:;---ur.;t.:~oa , the or.A r e s ponsi· ' ..,,,;. · ' g ··· -~r: . ._ \l..,; 1r'·•\ .. t 0 1//11 t:..' ".,.,.L "•., e· i·- hey , ·\' .1...._ r_, b ...L.S C:" ,i'i-:: .:.•:::.~. 1_,:,...:_ •;e rJ~e n0i ghbor,s ·, ..,--' ..., " r '1 o+ h ,_....,..z."" "Ild C...... ~ b C Ve ,,,t_ ,L V J . ' ~ - •· ·'..::i.. . cL ·J j_,"! t=:ci o 1 +-.i · C<"' 1',Jc·., i ; i_,C·,l.k 1,r:.: r r,_r r .,,.....,-.. (""\ - r1,l.., r r• .: no-+,...,.., ~ ·- C:Ll ~:·:2., ,:-, J.:·! J~Ot'lli.11 ,, -.t;C:, 8 ·,:,: ~ i_(·-.j. '1 . r ho .. ._J ' 1 Y" C.~ .. " ·, , ..,. _J ~ ' ~ \ ., ,. • 1 J. V U i. ...... . .......:....., . • 1.....1.. .,1,.. ..1,..,, .. .,1,..,1,. ..,,.. ,.,._ •'," "'f' _.I.., ' : " " I' ' f " .-,-. .-,, _.,._ ' I' ' I"" GID.L TEEN--.AGERS TO MEET ,~,1 _,L C01;.1.10.i -r-, t o E: b ~:..sj_ 1,e ,". r::-:1.a n c..ln.·l h -_.'11 0 , - r ., Tn 'l . .,~ . ( · ' "11 ,c_,1 Cf 1 ""·~- 1~ ,., ..... E ~ .... ·, ... ·,;}-, i r'h Ov-,(ll e· .. .1.._ _ , .. ·-J .·_t; - .,: •., ... ···:·· · ~ ,_. ~..:} f: [t c -.~·:.;.cl. Lj_ .v G u.: -;1:. a~. r: +j t) 0 :~ ·:; Cl~-~-~ .L-~.r::;1. S to be a J .-~c, ,vE, C. +:<: ..-·r,~.:1 0,..: i.t a'.:.8 its ~J f · w:'. t r:, -~ 1 tn~-!~~ z._-,_[!-1. ;-"· s;:: ;_ ~,to :i ce t l-12·~ clrG ct·~·a~ Ja·::,18 in t -f:e.:.· l-~(,Cc.c:..· c~-ti f;[; p:r.o. ,::•; ~ Tt5. ~ w~·J tc r ~cti c~~ t~c f~ ct t hat t hc r G w~s a l 2t 0f h c~:~·i i~ y b ot wocn Mro CL1.rd.:1 g·l:·l)l: 'cJ ll'.: ~.- '1,.3. . . c c vi· 11 , Macnnni . e t cen nge gi. r~s, 1-5,-J 7 wi 11 meet with Mn;; . Shcp:-1.rd .:t t:'.l t;ho Mcch.::micsvi lle Girls Clu·1) 'v\"i1cn tho club rr.e8t. s Hcc.rrnsda y 2ecm.'.b D:c ; , J.963 nt 6: 00 PM., o.t Me::1;.r..2.nicsvi lJe Communi ty Cent, e r 0 ... , .. ..1,. ... .. ..... ..... ... .. .., ... ..., .. ........., .. ..,1... ..,1.. ....... ..., .. ........... .,.. .., .....f ...............1'" ' 1.......... MODEL CITIES HOUSING CHAIRMEN MST s neakers ·that f.:-- 1:.1.:: v:·,:c,d. e:-;;- '.'.c j .:.L... J y Chai:rr.1en of the six c owmuni ti~ C•J. . . -J.dJ,,...,,,. 1 " r ..1 ·; . l. n· t_, hr-i..., ?~. !... ,...... , - -t.:11i'·',;;r·,l. c.~... 1 .• . ...,... J. .. ·es t hc."'!.t nre ·withi n th e Mod e l C:i t:;_ c c c:.u mo°': t,,_) c on::_ec: ) whe r -:: i'-'11"', A:·c o.. met with Mr o Pnul ~rnJ.do.we r, C1.l:l'.'ri ngt on i s r E-r.iO :i:'ks -!Aj'C.:'G ~ :!"t s 1-1 p- - J\. rc h i t ect, of the MuldD.Wt'; '!"' o.nd · p ort of the i\LdP .l Ci. t i..0 2 p-.:irposr~s .? PcJtt.0.:rson fi ,·m , Tue sdny nj_ght a t it 1,1,cJ.s ob-.ri01I~J y true ho w2jt. c d the the Mutle l Cities offic e; tc gi ve tr)t c:t l n c i ghb o~:-11~·..:d. i _:rr)o:l '!od J iP.. id c2a t h at t he housing commit tees a l]. 2ro2~ of plannt~ ~r He said fo.v orccl in type s o.nd d esign.s of in hi s ~o~arks that n f 8W p eople h ouGing to ~e builded, that the arc r:nkin g dr-::: <:5. :-; ·i o·,1s fl)c ~h (:· r e::;:i.dent s h.::i.d c ons iderede 'I' crwn c·,1t.1 cc c :::-mrn11n.:. ·,y, ho n l f·o t ::, :i.::i h m~scs , get rd en · type c1p2rtments tc. e: ,:·.)r;'lJ.:'li'l t C(? -._,:') O"G t, 0 (.;l(, ,L '."C u !':d h i gh-rises , were o. f e w S UClC ltor:. ~t·J. ·tn J_ -~ i·[·;;j(.j 1. Ci.:·,::.. ~~S sut-ini tt e d. o plc.m~~ t ~1;:.·;·. ~ the-, ·;· ,-, ."C. ::-~t,t bc~.·... g to lti a bou :. ~ · ( co:c:.t I c1 :=·,l. .f'.S ~) 1 L.,..., -.J . • L,· ,' .J .., �MODEL NEIGHBOREOOD UEEKLY MACHINE ( pn ge 2) ~*~**~************************************** RESIDENTS (c ont~ d) SITTLE BI F.D LIGHTS ON HEEKLY lfu~CI-i:i NE AND SAYS: Such as n ei ghborhood Dcvalo pin~ Groups thnt cnn devol0 ~e i n their own comrnuni t y. Get gr.:::::i.ts t ~) _..,..--..,. repair their home s, got low·in~cr0ot ,.L. .... . lo[\ns c.t long t erm pc.yr:10nts,, Tho.t tho hoc:t n . ng ·w.'."2s for· r cic eivod very l itt l e oppositio~, er fo.vortism. Four scpur.::.to plo.ts of l nnd wo. s the ordor of business . aMo.y I &sk you a question?H l and to -be cleared for deve lo ping · 17 Yes. 11 11 \"Jho..t in 1969. Tho committ e e hc2rd gives · between Mode l Ne ighho::::,from Mr . Howe.rd Opp onshnw, At l o.~-;:,a hood: Inc., and Ivlode l _Citi es? 11 Housing Authorit y Developing Dire c- "]VI.:1chi ne 1i II I d on 't kn·ci"w. Why n .:::-c tor. He presented the proposed nsk Mode l Cities?H l nnd cloo.ro.nc e th8t is to bo zono.~ (Bird Takos off ) for Urbnn Ronowo..l, Tho 15 o r· rno:cc 11 I will do just tho. t nnd l et you thc.t sopke, did ~ a t dire ct th oir know next week . l1 rem~rks to tho s~b jo ct 1 hardly .::i.t n ll. The comai t tc o d id appro ve FLIES AWAY the proposed 1969 cl c2 rn ~c ca Y J 'J i\J EXT WEEK -- 1 -~- 143.215.248.55 ~ ~ ~ ~ 16:07, 29 December 2017 (EST)16:07, 29 December 2017 (EST)~ ~rT~·~T ~ ~-~~T 143.215.248.55 16:07, 29 December 2017 (EST)TT~~T~ SENIOR CITIZENS FIRST ANNUAL THANKSGIVI NG DINNER 2GU7J SIPE DAY-C~RE BANQUET South-Side Dny -C~ro Bo.nquet wns o.tt c nded Tue sdRy Ni ght Novemb0 Mc chnnicsville Senior Cit ize~s 26th . T~e p2 r king l ot indi c2t e d e njoyed a thanksgiving t ro~t~ t~c. t people or bo~rd membars co.me Senior cit izen s from a ll over f:;:·om ' 1,,,1ithout the communi ty to fe} l r M8cha nicsville di ned Gt the · Mcchs :_1 i p with t he C1Jntc.:rs Staff, merr:bc.nnic nville Conmunit y Cunt e r , 389 of t ho boa rd and po.rents. It i s B2ss Stroot , Ucdnc sd-:i. y Novm:1bc r bo l.i r;vod tho.t it w.::i.s n ve r y hci ppy 27 o It w2s c1 g::lln c...-~.fo.i r ------e-oc. c2.s~on. Con gr o.t u l nti ons to r,rs ., Susie CQrte r, chni r mo.n, So~ior C~tiz~ns Mc cho.nic s ville nn1 thos6 th2t HOF TO GBT RESID ENT PARTI CIPATION wor ke d so ho. r d vvi.th he re ! t: llThis is for the r e si dents J !!!J ~o:~ ~h~~ ~ 16:07, 29 December 2017 (EST)~ ~~ ~ ~ ~~ ~~ ~~ 16:07, 29 December 2017 (EST)T~~ ~ ~~ ~~ ~~ T ~T~T T Stop try~ ng t o be o.bove your n ai ghbor ~ Yes your next doo r neigt bo:-c is hur.10.n, intelligent o..rvl appr eci ate s go od t hings , th 0 3C CTe A bunch of we ll r i pe gr .::i. pc s as you . Don t t try to pc.rt i cl~~ t~ hung hi gh in the br2nchas of a a ll by yourse l f , bc c.:::mse ::-:0u ': c,;1 • t fri end l y t r oco The grO.f CS were nss ocio.te wit h you r n e j_ghbo r u: no 80en by n hungry fox -~ho tri e d to reason for you to d9cide whc..,:::, t l-;.8y leo.p up .::i.nd pick thorn . But the W .'.:'. nt o Bc·noi ghborly enc u.;h t o ge t grapes wore s.::i.fcly beyond his w:i .. th them, if you wo.nt 1:o si. drmt;, r ea ch. Finnlly the fox gave upo He t r i ed to case h i .s di s appoi~ ~ment p2rtic i p2tion . There is 2 la t y,yxr neighbor c.::.n offer , th::.t you by saying; 11 The grD.pc~ were p:,.·oCc.' nnot,, bo.bly sour o.nyway., n c.0 .: :v ,ps f 2.!j ~0 ( HEAD-··LIGHTS ) t t il TH INK ! ! l ! ~ t ! ! ! THINK ! ! ! ! ~ ! ! t ! ~"**********************************~*********** �.. . , I ' . --= ' f UNITED STATES Mr . Dan Swea t Ci t y Ha l l -·' At l a nta, Ga . 30303 �CITY OF .ATLANTA. Novembe r ,..... 4, 1968 .. 0 1 FIC E O F M O D EL CITIES PROGRAM 673 Capitol AV11nue, S.W. Atlan ta. 61. 30315 404 514-8876 I van Allen Jr., Mayor J. C. Jehn.,n. Director Mr. Edward M o dy Exec ti o·rector Model Neighbor hood , Inc. 241 Doane Street, S . W. Atl a nta, Geor g ia De ar Mr . Mo o d y : I n re sponse to your letter of October 30, 1 9 68 with r egards to the appointment of Mr. Bron Cleveland as techn ical assistant to Model Neighborhood, Inc., t his lette r i s to he r e b y give c oncurrence and approval on th is decis ion . With regards to the mat te r o f b r ing Mr. Tom Burrows down from Philadelphia to talk with your g r o up about certa in matters that may be of common interest to y o u, I also think this is a very splendid idea and suggest that y o u proceed with getting him here. As of my being able to meet with Mr. Burrows n November 12 or 13, I am not sure at this time that I c an agree to those dates inasmuc as our regular Execut i ve Board will be meeting on the 12th. ow ver, I suggest that you contact me at a l ater date regarding n p p o intme nt. Sincer el y, JCJ :v l c cc: Dan Swea t V Ger a ld Horton �4 ~' Ii I / vv O L / // .V I .. . '7 I ' ,,· /, /) (/ . C /\_ ·/t. /..- //' / /) / /( I I /GI ,,-r, I I I,· ~I , ,I , ·-· '- I L '- ' - 0 - - I / L L1' / / /l t r ; ( / !/ /,r) 1 ; 1 / j '//le C /2 Cl I Vol., ] h ,.... Nove111.,~:::/ .' ~e's Free Edlit i on .L 70 ' •. / \ 1 \ / \ I ,. " " " " MODEL rE=: T~ORHOOD , I I,TC v SHARS 02FICE ·:.-ITH E,.D..A •. The Regional Econom:;.c Devel opment 8.::-i'.J. Bu siness Service Ce nte r of At lanta Univ ersity has assi6 r:ed Donald J effe ,$on, Ne i ghborhood, Co --Ordincator t o Mo::!.el Nei ghborhood, I~c ~ The Econo11.ic Develoi)ment, Center will assist Node l Nei'.:; hborhood, Inc n i mplement cur:::e:'.tt pro;;rams for Medel Ne i g horhood DE-7elop:;1ed , ~ he l egislation ·w hich falls w _i_t hjn t :,c sc ope of the yi,clel Cities prL)gr3ms 1Fill 1· :: ,, O- or,~!~.'1E':J~d.- · with the Neighbo1·r:·.Jod ai,J. C,,c:::i·,nmi'c:y r.:- .Jj e cts to aid in getting ,>, ' '. · 2~· par t i. .:: ipation f rom the tot&l c oli.:-m11i_·~y~ In orde~ ".,o z")t, m:i.xl:':1,J1 ·uenefit a!l'.l more orde r l :-,r "..:.ran2 i_-._, i o::i u.:;-,,~e r t'1'3 c-' 2 c :·:r e nt p r og rams for conr:r,trc.'~ - :; ~),,)>2: n r ·s ~ i_i:, is essent ial that each s e:,ct 0.c· c· ~ tho Neighborhood n ork closely wi1.,h e a c h ,~r -ganizational g roup in orde r to ge t .::,_-J equi abl e and orde rly tra nsition '®h8 ~ these chanage s ara unde rta~en in t ho n ,;a r fut ur e o Te c hnical and or ganizational assist anc e will b e provide 1:i. by the e; :-::·,·· ..c. :· ·.. ~1 me rchants, g roup s and indivi.'1L .,--;_J --:}10 are b e ing and 1:•ill be r olu1,;at 2-.: :.:. w ..:.::: r the Mode l Citie s :i:~ogram., f3urvo,rs a nd studies ,Nill oe unde r-.:, Fi ken to 0,::.1-. ·; . ; ~,o needs and t ype of ::cs ::· i 3L J.r.c o 1, 2,., . ':l ';,11 special cases ,, r~o s 2.arch on r ~·11.:.'..c::L~. · , :,:; and or dinance s c onc .3-rn i n<; Ec oY10111le D0 \re lopme nt v1it hi n the c ommunity V!.D.l als v be unde rt2kon ,,, The f o:cog::-~,:~ , as v;all as rrE",ilY other areas cf a ss istanc e wi~l be offer~ ed and made availnbl e to Mode l Ne i g hborhood, Inc,,. by the unive r s ity«The ef f orts in this dire ction are inte nde d to r ef~ '3Ct the ideas and v-1ishe s of t he r e side nts of t he co:11,rnunity in the ov e r all development of t ho Nei g hborhood~ cm1M1JNI TY }:EET I NG STJ1illAY NOV . 10th Ce rtainly ttc r aci:are some citize ns , r e sili.:.:1g in the Me-::hanicsville Corrnnuni ty tila ·;:. do not lmow, or even wants to know, wh.::tr:i·-wlill MODEL CITIES benefit them. ~h8re a r e some that a r e not intereste d ~n v hat eff ect MODEL CITIES ·will do to tl,e m. Sn for e ithe r interest Model' Neighbor0ood, Inc. is s ponsoring a meet ing S1,·.nd3.y Nov . 10th Li:00 p . m. at Peter 0 ames Br yant school . It will be ve ry wise il ev e ry r e side nts living in Mechani~sville atte nded this meeting. 1 MODEL NEIGHSORHOOD MFG . TO OPEN NOVEMBER 12 The r e will b e jobs for approxima tly 13 v1ome n a rour1d Nov . 1 2th, the date the.rt. IL~; oHo is schedul ed to open .. ~:.'..' ye,u a:i.-e YJal king or driving ea st on Ge org i a Avenue . S.E ., l e t your eye s J )Ok ove r the building at 55 Ge orgia Ave ., hC.<..G c~, ,r to Sum- Me e Cente r , E . O. A. This bu.i lcting will house the fir s t of its k mu in Atlanta , long wa nte d by the c 0nrnun:i ty. Anonymous friends that wish t:::> b e kor t in the backgr ound a r e to be t ;-1::.11\,.'3d for helping to make this possible , M. N .r~. ·Nould like to tha nk the Atlanta J ayc ea s along with the a n onymous fr i011ds ~ BOIS ./\ND GIRLS PROJECT A SUCCESS The Me cha niesvill e Boys and the Girls Clubs got tog e the r a nd sponsore d a C3 r :r.ash all day Saturda y, and r a ise d (c ontt page 2) �(PAGE 2) LITTLE BIRD LIT~D ON MECHANICSVTILE MACI:INE AND SAil) _ _.:;:,,- .,,.,-:-..,...,-. '£~-=--·- ~,, Dont Le t Mr-·o Ni.."'{on get you a ll rouaed up, the Democr a ts a r e the ma jority in the even with the Di.."'{ iocrats' 11 (housG: ) Flie s off MECF.ANICSVILLE COMMUNITY CENTEJ !.'lEHBERS i'.~T II See you n ext v eek 11 ( Boys and Gir l s ) f ro111 page one some money~ Satur day night t hey h::.d a hiplino pa rt y . i'.11 tot a l t h(; y r e. i s e d ~~25,.00 for t he ir sepe r £tt e clu'::.>s , y;l,cn d i v ided o The c2.r--rrash is a Y'..::c k-c nd bllfdness c a rs ,··ashe d (n 25 ···2. sh &. ~-·a-x: ~~ 3 000 Saturda y night Nov emb e r 2 r esidents of Bass str eet, Ira street , Smith Street. a nd Gar iba ldi street, met a t the Sa int J ame s Spiritua l Church where Bishop Arnold is the Dire ctor. Mr T. M. Parham, Mrs. S F .. crank, a nd x,sr. Bill Allison all of E. Oo A wa s the re to expl a in the ~7 , 000 •.00 grant tha t was g ive n to the community. i"[odel Ne i ghbor hood Inc. was a sked to he l p the community get some money for operstion purpos es for the cente r. The node l Ne i ghborhood Boc:,r d una nimous agrees. to assist , a nd being rt delicat e agency ~as funde d the proposa l The proposal provide s for a full t i me Su~e rvisor at a weekly s al a r y . The Supe rvisor will b e hir e d soon . This pe rson will live in t he Mechanicsville Com- munitye -:HH:-JHHHHH:- O Ha:· TO GET RESILEllT P~'i.;"l.TICIPA.TION EDIT OTIIAL This c e rta inl y c.:-m not b e 2.chiev e d by From its v e ry first b eg inning , The Maics itting down a t R desk dr2.fting a pl an hine h2s continuEi:.d to emphasis , t ,he imfor the peopl e s tha t a r e expe cts2d to b e port a.nts of bott om to top c ommunic2.t ion, pa rticipa te:es , a int no vJay for ar..y p ro . or hc1 s to b e a nd is a must , whe n it comes to a dministrator to prope rly a nd sounclJy p1 a mling fo r peopl e s . Rapid Transit is a orga nize a group with out f i nding out if need . Model Cities i s a must . Self-Help the p e opl e s will or will not pE: rt:: c i p::t8 c i s ~ e order of to- da y, a nd to get a ny or Get a pla in sheet of pape r Emd pencU J ~1 1 of this there hav e got t o b e a contact and get your s e lf out into t he c ornmunn y i:tom the community l ev e l. and a llow the r es ide nt to he lr d.,.·:1w up It is good to hear p eoples finally athe drafts a nd t ry not to put a n y thing g r ee to this . ~-re hope tha t in the furur e ove r on the m. tha t when a plan that will eff e c t the tot a l Metropolis i s in the prelimina ry ( TRANSEITTION ) s t age it should include p e ople s from Ril ,1alks of life tha t will inevitable will ~: :::::H::::::::::: H: ':::::::::i: ~:::::::::N::::: :: pa y for all the cost. usually it is -1:-he homeovmers , or property ownerg) ,~~-,~\-inf GO TO THE MODEL GITIF.S ~·TI~-Tii\:G AND the t axes .. ASK QUESTIONS AND GET ANS1 ·'E:cS" \I\IH " \l \ l \ l.j.t\l \ l ,. " " " , . " " ",\;h �- r;-- - - · - ' MODEL NEIGHBORHOOD, INC. . 700 McDANIEL ST., S. W. . ;A.TLANTA,· Glo'RGIA 30310 · . .' .. -· --:- ·. ··.. . ~'$'""-... ~ -. -::-.,...:., ,._:..,,_ - . -. . ... .. Mr. Dan Sweat Atlanta Ci ty Hall At l a nt a , Georgia 30303 . .. . -. -,. , ' . -< ·. ::.~ .: .. . : ··. . ': ~ · ' .: ......~. ._ .-". ~- . __ �SELECT GROUP VISITS CHICAGO A selected group of residents, including Edward . Moody, Model Neighborhood Inc. Executive Dire ctor will visit Chicago, Illinois, by plane.• Leaving VJ'edne sday Nov. 13th and stay for three days. The visitors will get a chance to s ee Neighborhood ~ projects similar to ones that are being planned fot Atlanta's Model Cities Program. RESIDENTS OF MECHANIC SVILLE MET ON MODEL CITIES Over fifty int e rest ed and conc erned ci t i zens met at Pet er James Bryant School, Sunda y, November 10th , to f ind out wha t effects -Mode l Citi es will have on t hem , a nd the benef i ts tha t will be ava i lab l e fo r t he residents of Model Citi e s. Model Neighborhood was sponsorer of the informa l forum, was c ommended f or ha ving a me eting of that nature . It was unusua l f or a cha nge t o he ~ questions asked and a nswe rs. given that satisfi ed mor e than confused. NOTICE The Mechanicsville Machine will change it's name this Sa turday and in the future will be Model Neighborhoon We ekly Machine. We are proud that the popularity is covering a large area a s well as the former. The Machine is a weekly report and information s e rvice supplied free to the Community. If you have articles and news, or announcements of; clubs, schools, churches, civic or youth, bring it to Mode l Neighborhood Inc., offi ce 700 McDani el Street, befo re Thursda y of ea ch week e II HOW TO GE'~ RESID.ti:NT PARTICIPA'r ION" Al ways a llow t he peopl e a --, chance to ask quest ions$ Und er s t anding i s the be st po l icy in t h world. A person tha t unde rstands will sure l y participate. When they unders t and the suggestion, that is the answer. Exhaust Pipe 11 �MECHANICSVILLE ~\"F.EKLY LIT7LE BI RD :LITED ON KECHltNICSVILLE i,'.LI-\.C HI NE AND SAI D / __.,,,..- :/ .,,..-- --~ .,,..- " ... /_ _ -. ---.........______ .. ---.... . ' '1 .-' ~ ,___ /7,r).. ,::---- . - _./,I \ ' ·-\- I se e Sum-:[l.io c has hired two, to itVs Ce n ter's Sta ff. Both a r e Ext ension Ma. na ge r ' s. Sa y. I a l ways wonde red v._rha t a r e thei r jobs? 11 Fl.,I ED A' TAY 1'-1ACH I NE (Page 2 ) ,:, ::;, :::, ::,~' :::, :::, ::, :::, ~' r-~CI-IAN:!::CSVILLE COMIJfilNITY CiNTER HEEDS DIRECTOR The Mechanicsville Community ha s an opening for a Director of i t Ys Ce nt e r. Applications for thi s position will be made at the Center, 389 Bass Street on Tuesday Novembe r 24, 19u8, from 9: AJ.Vi until 12: 00 PM. All interested, qual-;_fi r pe rsons are asked to come by t h a Ce nte r during these hours a nd make applica tion. ***** ***** ***** ***** MODEL NEIGHBORHOOD CUESTIONS AND ANSt 1ERS Q. What i s Model Cities? A. Mode l Cities is a Govermenta l pr ogr am , t hat c ombines a ll Fede ral Agencie s and Loca l agencies together t o r ehabi l it a te, s lum a rea s a t a vast s ca le, in s e lec te d Citi e s throughout the U. S . A. Q. VI'n at Fede r a l Agencies are c ombi ned ? A. Urba n Renewa l, Hea lth, Educ ation We l fare , Dept . of La bor , Dept o of Commerc:e~ Offi ce of Ec on omic Opprotunity , Small Busi ness Admi nstrati6n . Federa l Housing Autho r ity and all the ir sub agencies . Q. What pa rt Does Atlanta Consist of? A. The City had to b e t he appl i cant. After appl ying, the city put s up 10% of the planning funds for the f Lrst year. Federa l 90% . The City 20% the next and 801/o Federal. Q. How long is the program? A. It is to be pl anned for a fi v e (5) year period. ivwill y ou t e ll me next weok? ·1 . . ... ,..........,.. . .,... .., ... ...1....... ...... ..,._ EDITORI AL Mode l Nei ghborho od I n c., is in t he s i xt h month of planning the de ve l opment of a Shoppi n g Centerc It is pathetic to kn ow that there are cit i z ens pu l ling for f ai lur e of this p:roj o~t a s hc::,1-J as ther e a r e those pulling for its suc cess, Th e pu zzle is why shou l d 2nycne wal .. t to see i t not su cco ~d . Tt is is t he huma n na ture of ma n • .Lt h~ s to be . A s1.1:cessfull pro j ·:.<,-~. like this can be the ei ght wond-.,:; _,_. of ma nkind~ Let t ~ ~ ~ e th~t p~ll against ;. F'-~-- l fo r~ and _j :~·c, r · ;:; -;:tc assista nc.; c ~ Suprisingl v C '.1 '.1::::h inst ead of six months i ~ wi l ~. be unde r c onstruction in six wc Gks . ._,. . ,.. . .,......,....... ***** ***** ***** ,.l ' t ' 'l"I' ,,._ (Cont i nued Next Week) ~* �1,,. , ·.... -, ; J r ,. ~ \::· l. ,; {. ' Mr. Dan Sweat ~ (J y ' City Hall ·' .' •' ,· ..... . At~~-n ta, Ga: : 303'03 ,, .,;. •1 ~ f. :•. r,r- .f-' L 7 I C.- +:J.· ~I crc- JG~., :, : ~ _,l)J\~ q • :.v 7';- -• 1. ' t~ l TT l ~ C u,.., ' .. r I . 'J' ~:t! - l-.,,I I t ' "' ' ·" i, J •;._.I_; . , -· _..... ' -- ·---- ........_,, ......,.,.....: ·~ o _ } 'I .. '.J ( I . ,. .. .J �i ·1.>Y/; c:./ d . el ' ' /-2, ' \..,:_. 1 1 -t ,/t,/ I e I //./ //·tS~ I " .· \:. ,. ~ . /.i,·- ·.. l .· .. ' . .:. ··' · ' .• ..J ....... •, . :, . :... ;. ,;,. ...·.... ... . . .........;.· -·... ;. .. . .... " i · ·· .. , , · ·::,.;/ " "'1' ' 1° "'l" <) .,, ,. \ . ,j ( , ( I . .... .... .......... ,... .... . ..·... ·. , ·. ' "' I, J . ... . . ' ..... -.... ... ...; .-·.... ."I .. ..• . .... •.... ... ... .,_ ' ... ....... .. '" ("' , , , ' ; "' _.,., , , .., "'i'""I " • .. , .. •, . ,' • • . •1 •,.. • '1., 'I •- ~· .. , . ' . . ...... 'o' , ,, '1 ' •1 • , , -• . , .. _. -. , , , "': ' • , • , , • " 1"1 . , , . .,,.,, Vol. 1 ~ _(.\ ) _,~ . : r;~ T:~..:;J i~--~J. C.... GO TOM BURRESSll . ' PHILADELPHIA DEVELOPING CONSULTANT I NV:tTED BY hODEL NEIGHBORHOOD, INC "! 11 . .. Tom Bur r r~ .~~s formerly with th e Gr6atar Phi J.~l 0 l~hi a Enterprises. This .group iia s b er ·;1 a bl e to build shopping centbrs i n t hat city, housing and industrial development. Nm,1 O1,mar of a Consulting Firm of which he orga nized, was invited t.o Atla nta to offer guidi a nce and .. s1.1gge stions to Model Neighborhood, Inc. ·.... j' Ql. -~ -: -n ! . )'_ ,.· . ,.. ~. -, -·-; ' ,. .lJ Mr. Burr'"'.SS mr,t ,bri'efly wi' th ..:.. ;, c.-.•, 1.. U, J. . \.. . ;L,_ _ . .,_ ,. )'" J. .. V . .1.. 1 1.=' c 0 t > 2 ·:., 1"~.p · '..:o ro ; .. L :.; s :~oso · tho Mayor nnd was welcomed by the =- r io :J·i>:.:·.. c.r'.:.: ~.:c. L y.:.11 Scot~ , Honorable Ivan Allen to the e v e r ··oo d 3 :- · -...,• .,.,'"' · "··::· · - -.~1.., . . ,. _J-· ·1 , --~ r os s1· n g c 1· t y. r~r · -, •.J_Toh·1 Is -.L• . i . \ ' -:,.,;· ·r__1"...,, p_ogr '1 . Burress . ~-rs., ._..::-'vt i o . .i1S~ c y , ~ .1.1. .5 0 ~ :t.'Q oxpc r i a nc c s was a gr1.;a t success to ·~c:.:1Jc1"'.s : of . .,.: do l C:: : .:,i.}S• • .1.0 . l'-lodo l ·Naighborhood, Inc. He gave Lo c~:c'Gt;,, - -~" G, P: l".: s, ~ .i."'S o :'.:.c :::, t he org,:mizD.tion th e kind of ~-1· ;: . · ~:::~:cs'.:. r::.1. r , j :·,;,lo yoos . - ,.1.. inspiro.tion thnt thoy will surely -:· ,· ',..,-,,. ) i· · c·1°y ,L' " · ,rr ... . , . o:, ...1·-'"'(~ • - • l ~ c .L J" - ' ._; __ .,_o COnSl d o r pr.l coloss · • ~ ·. , · :;,: 11o s i 1-, : i:.C C:. { 'G fi r s t , ~)u t Model N oighborhood, Inc., call ,_c c:;..<'.c c~ ·;.:, .; t t ··_·.:J tr:i.~J , !·Jt·.lcl in ·oa Pross Confcrcmc o ctnd · Mr. Burress b:-.bJ.y .::, 0 .:."!C s::> . .c v:~. ll-:..c -~o ~.o(·.0 1 gavo a news rc1aaso of the Philade l , ~:ol ~:~1·:orho ocl l ;,c., :.. :·· u '-:.i : e Co. n c1i-phia De v e loping Program. Ed;wC1.rd 'c y . -;:-::, ·i. s :.'it :-: t, >c 1,:·.t.t s.;r :::::t,cr:.t firo ody, Modal Neighborhood's Exec. .:-:: 'c t. >.;.s r i~'..:. i c l u is· :J e; :;. ~-;. ~; ·,)t:_-J lisi1:Jd . Dire ctor :1 lso gavo a Mod e l · 8dne sday _ni ght, we we!';.t to a Ne i ghborh ood, Inc., n ows rolea,;30. neighborhood ca lled HQld ' T0 v;n ';. On o n ows i tom wns tho open ing of a ·: This s e ction of . Chicago is a roGec rmcnt Mec nufacturing Co., commu_ri.it : he.bilit a t od st retc h , ~imiEtr· to owned an,d emp l oye d. This is on·e of Atlanta's plan to redovc l opc the Modal Beighborhood' s Inc ., industric viaduct b eneath downtown Atlant a . dov o lo pmonts in Mode l Citi e s Aron. It cont a ins somo v ory crontivc · designs. Somo of the old id e a s wero r estorod ~:i:n·ct· Old Town is quite an att r active site. It is CENTER 3UPJ RVISOR WANTED now a tourist and rosidenta l neighb orhood ; all located 1rithin a few Mocho.nicsvillo Community Cant or bloc k s . 389 Ba ss St ; , is advurtising . for Thursday-morning we visit e d a Supe rvi sor~ to cond~ct the va r i ou r 11 Lm·wr North " , our firs t stop was acti viti es n nd programs of tho Cc nt r the Olivott Community Cantor. Mrsointorvi ows will bo ho l d on Tucsdn y · Lilli a n Kimiro, the director wo. s Nove mber 2 4.th , from 9 : AM to 12:PM ~ v e ry hospitable n nd a wond e rful (cont 1 d po. go 2) I y! I 'r f y ' I YT JO BS ' ' ' I I I ' f ' t ' ey l.J _ _ .._,,._ , ....,. "."1 .. ,A . V V ~ • • 0 ~ O O O O • • A O O • • 9 0 0 0 O O �-- - T-iCDRL NEIGH:c30P.HOOD 1JEF.KLY l IA CHINE ( pci.go 2) ~~***********'·*************************** 11 CI-I I c ;i.GO Ii IiOD~L NEIG HBOPJ-IOOD' S Q's itND A r s hostosso Tho Cente r rec e ive s va rious moans of suppo~t in being · Q; Is Mode l Cities n cloo..rnnco funded. 0no is thu United Appea l. tho oth e r, lon g est.:: b li s hed ur.;c.. - · n izations. · It w.::s ti1rou13h this A,. No~ It is c1 rchn bilitation c antor tha t, T . U. F ., (T ho program. Re build and r oho.biUnited Fri'oridE:) w~"'. s - gr2nt ed lito..tc minium aoounts of p 67, 000 ( no string s) for noighbo r- . ~treat~ 'and block s a t a ti me . hood d e v e lopments~ I will toll a bout it l 2t c r ,, Olivott Community Contor displa yed to me 1 what c a n bo LI' !'7:' ~ ~ BIRD progr.::1.mod ,,-;::.th tho proper fund s. LIGHTS ON 1 .- ~~ ii,~' :,~c MACHINE li ND SAYS : How c1 community c ente r cc.n bo offottivo W::!..th enough funds. A nei g hborhood c ont ur in Atl.::nta t h2 t i s c'.l community s upport e d nnd community s :~r = 1ed , co..n do t he s ame id e ntic a l thi ngo Le. t o r Thu rsdny uorning wo wont t o t he T. U . ? . , c a nt o r~ Mr. :Michae l Hollis is t.hc TUF c o - ord i n.:: to:c ., lt wo.s v e ry int e r1'Sinc o you c o. nnot to ll mo esting to l o::i ::.~".l of thei r invo lve oant . They hc.. ve opt i one d some what the Extensi on's Ma n 2ga rs jobs prope rt y and plan to build clov e n a r c suppos e to be, I wi ll l e t units of hous ing i n thu COii':iE1Uni ty. you in on somc thing.• 1 Tho r a is n Credi t Uni on 2nd th e Th o St ee ring Comr.1ittcc of Housi ng Dcvu l opmcnt COiill"Ji t t cc , t o the Model Ci ti c s Mas s Conv-.; ntion n o.r;10 et f ov:o One t h i ng I r 01:101-r.ba r is b e ing prc s (.) nt c d in th e Mode l of i mpo rt .::1.ncc w2 s 1.·.1hc. t Mr. Ho llis Citi e s pl.::m c. s the Orgo.nizo.tion2.. l s .:,, i d; ,; In this city wo uso the Cor;mn.mi t y · Dc valopr:10nt CorporQtion Poli tici .'.:'..ns fo r a ll th ey .:t r c No rth. of t he J.l:iodc l Ci ti c s Arc o. . ·1 Who.t l!c app l y prassur q nnd i n t i rac we do you t hink of tha t ? Be tt e r find got r esults ". Thi s is n go oJ out if it rs trug • . r ocooncndat i on fo r o. 11 Atl2rtta votcrso FLIES AHAY Thursd2.. y o.ft ~rnoon w0 visited SEE YOU NEXT VEEK TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT~TTTTTTT ii Lowc r North Co~.L[;llnity C-:mt o r o·' Ve t ou r cd tho c enter, wh c r cj_n we s c:w; do.y c .::•.r c cln s t,o s, o. poo l room ! !! n ! ! ! l ! ! ! JOI2'3 l ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! n ! ! ! !! o.nd o. TV- Ro. dio r opo. ir. A dny care class on the-second f l oo~? Jobs------ ov o ry Tua sda y from I n Gcorgio. t h is is prohibited . 9: AM unti l 12 :PM- ---Mcchani csvi llc Th o c ·mt c r is pa rt of a highCommunity C0ntc r, 389 Bnss Stro ot ri so pub lic housing pro j ac to South Ho st. Twenty one stories with forty e i ght unit s pe r f l oo r. In the 1.::-.tc c,fto rn o on we wont to the Moda l Citi e s offic a , Vo lis tanod to soLlc rcno.rks thnt we h n vc hcarad ~apa at od ag3 in · ~nd s n id before nnd now a g~ in~ 11 16:07, 29 December 2017 (EST)16:07, 29 December 2017 (EST)16:07, 29 December 2017 (EST)16:07, 29 December 2017 (EST)16:07, 29 December 2017 (EST)~ ( c ont 1 d pDgc 3) -- - �LO:J E~""' rrnIGH J~r "'.".' EOOD 1 J~ETf!_.y MA CHI NE ,.f<"'.! 1 ",o•:.,+ a_J,~ _. •;<·,~. ".I., -J u-1. •"11" ~:: •: • :.- ·-: ~ .: ' , , :-; : --_;:; . ,-,I( . .. • 'f• .:;:- •'l• :..:: :,• -::" -.:": ~: ( page 3) I : • 1-; .•;( :-;-., ;;'.~ ,., • .,.; ,: :;: :-: .: ; -: ;-;~ :-:-;:;::: ::::~ :-;,: ::;,, ; , , :-::: , :, ,: .:::::, ~ , , : , ,;;. , : , , :, ,:, ;.;, , ~ ,:, :::: , :::;:::::;, ,;,::::;:: , : , ;:;, ,:, 11 Chl Ci\GO" Thursda y cv,:mi ng wo t ov.r cd su,ro ra l ••EXPLO RER NElJSi 1 slum comnuniti os , 1'0 snw nod o l town apc1. rt E10 nts. (r.pc.:-..~·,:.r.10nt s cor.1M0 chr.mi.c s vi ll e explore rs will plotoly furnis hed. , fou r bod ro c:ns ) .. go to Fort, Benning for the we ek e nd UG returned to Oli v ott corI1r.1u n i t. 1 of Do c Gmbo r 15t h. Approximat e ly c ont o r Fridn y morni n g n nd :r.ict wit h t on b oys f rom a cross s e c t ion of a Lincoln Pa r k r o pro s ont at i 7a c. nd tho a r ea will ntt c nd. ho expla ine d t he ir c ommunit y plans to us. TJ o r c turn od to Old Tovm n nd hG: d dinn e r. Aft c r wc.rd, :wo c ho ck od ou t a nd boc.rd od th o home bou nd pla ne a t 4: 10 Pi-I, wo V·TC' r o one hour g ot ting . .... ..,.. ·- . ' ... . ............ . ,. . ,. a irborne ~ Ho a rri v od in J\tL::: nta 1 a t 7: 30 PI 1, Mod a l Nei ghb orho od, Inc., will sha. ro 1,,1r, i t h th e Co~:muj:ti. ty or gc.n i zci.tion o1 G-IRLS CLU B\' in Chic a go t h a pro g rams it propc s o so Mochc.. nicsvillo Girls Club hc.. s . .........,. . .....,....,. . ..,.. . .,....... . ,. b e e n invited to Roos e v e lt Ho.11 on Fc..ir Stroot. The y ho.ve o. lso b een EDI'l' OHI ·•L 2 s ked by The Gra dy Hom o s Girls •1 BLACK E!·ITRBPHEN BGJ.SH:::P · t:ILL FORK 11 Club to Qttcnd o. Tha nks giving ~-Iodo l Noi :"('1b or hood., I n c ., i s Bc.. nquot on Fridci.y , Novcmb ur 22 nd, n n ox.:t mpl e 0 1· hc A; to got b::..o. ck from 6 :Pivi until $ :PM involve d i n e c ui1 0:;1i c ow::-icrs hip . With t he c. s s i st .7.nc o of s or:1-; bus i nes sme n of I'fo tro l'. t l .::nt2, o. G::,.r1:1ent M.:mufc. cturing Co . , wi ll opon c.t 55 Ge orgi a Av e ., ss ; soon~ This is r e l a ti v e ly s raci. 11 ~ · The p l .:t no THOUGHT FOR THE HEEK will oo p l oy 13 l a di e s, upli f t th e incono of s or:10 of t h e m. This is " I'i1\K E NO LI TTLE PLitNS, THEY HAVE 11 Ent r e pr c n ourshi p·i ; ,:m d it's NO MA GIC TO STIR MEN'S BLOOD. blo. ck ownod , b l L1 c k opor c.tod ,.:n d f1Li.IC E BI G PLAHS ; AI M HIGH I N HO PE 'G r eon ii r etur ns . Ii.ND 1:JORIL LET YOUR \Jj.TCH1JORD BE It is g rc o.t to know t h .:- t tho ro ORD ER AND YOUR BEi1.CON , BE1rn TY\ i c.ro Ex chc. n go h ous e s in ist l cintn d2ni e l burnh.'.lm willi ng t o l oo..n a t ].00% r i.':: l: , r.1onoy t o promote this ontr opr oncur con cept. Th o Mc. c hine would l i b) to 2 sk; c r o they goi ng t o produce action? In Ph:.l :·:d ol phi n o. g r oup of BQnks ar c joi nt l y l endin g mon e y t o those o conor:1i c de v e l opme nt corpora tions" Is t his wha t 1\tlQnt a b c..nks arc going to d o ? Tho I!i.:: chine · f ee ls tho. t r.lodo l rJo i ghborhoo:}; Inc., is by fa r, t he best qu Cl. li fi< '<:'. iJon P r ofi t Org,:m izo. tio n i n i.t ::..,..1:.;t,:1 awa iting t hi s o. s s i st 2n cc . .. , ..... , .... , .. ... .. . , .. ._1 • .. , ... ... , ... _,,. .. , ... .. , .. .. , ... ... , ... .. , ... ..........!'...., ... , . y • -- .... ... ...... ..... ... ,.. ..... ............... .. "11'• ( • I' " I ' , , .. .-, • • I " 1· • ,, "' l"' "l"'.-1' ... , .. f t),:,;i~ ... , .. ........, ...., .. ....... .. , . ¥~*************************************************** �_______1 ,... ~ . ,f.IT I [ }' t:" ,rt-' f ,. MODEL NEIGHBORHooi, IN~ \ 700 McDANIEL ST., S. V{ . ~TLANTA, GEORGIA 30310 -._,.,J:,~ ~-- - $ s " MR , DAN SvlEA T CITY HALL ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 -- J • l1 I ----:J t.-,- ,i--...,_ _ _ �'r f The Machine would like to do semething, to ~ you the Vet.ers mad enough to gc- to the polls Tµesday, November 5th and vote PITTSBURGH COMUUNITY Bu; it 8 rea(J..ly up to you. l'fhat a person HOMEO'-"NERS MET wants and gets is the soul respons i bilities of the indivual. YJbat you wanted Monday, Approximatly 350 residents attended a you may ~o+, get Tuesday, and having it is meeting held at Hinsley Temple Church Of strictly up to the voters. God in the Pittsburgh Community Monday October 28. Johnny Johnson, Executive Director of Hodel Cities tried to explain the clearMODEL NEIGHBORHOOD INC. ance area and answer questions . There was SPONSORS COMMUNITY-PIDE MEF.T s everal raised, and he answered them very well. Model Neighborhood Inc. is undertaking Norris Currington a resident and the the necessary avenues to disseminate inunsuccessful candidate in the race for formation neglected before to as many of Repres entative of the 99 Dist r ict in the the residents a s possible. September Primary, also a resident and Tenants, Homeowner s, Bus ine ssmen, and busine ssman living in Pittsburgh, also Mer chants will attend this meet i ng , to the pers on that coordinat ed the call ing of be bet ter i nformed of the Model Cities the meeting wa s given five minute s t o Program. speak . He stat ed bef ore he began t hat it' Pl anners from the Model Cit ie s off ice 11 t ake more five minute s , and would not have been invi te d, to meet with the r es i - l ike to be cut off. dents , Sunday November 10 1968, 4.oo P. M. Mr. Curr ington s a id t hey ha d no gripe Peter James Bryant School 252 Ge org i a Ave. with Model Cit i es only what Model Citi es s. vr . was forc i ng dovm:the community 1 s throat. ~f*-'BHHHHHH~ 1HHHH8HHHH~ ~~HHHHHHH~ Mr. J ohnson had previousl y asked how many had attende d, or was on Model Cities comMechanic svill e Boys Cl ub mi ttees. Not a singl e hand was raised. AlSponsors Car -Yrash though t here was about seven there that att ends and are on every thing in Pitts"Then the need come t o raise some fast burgh. change, the Mechanicsville Boys Club can Mr. Currington addressed his remarks bring up some good ideas. Every week-end on what he called facts, and according they will wash autos, for $1.25 per car. to the applauses of the crowd, they apnash and wax auto, .oo. Mass production proved the statement. In part the residents is what they will be looking for, and at wanted to be a part of the total plans. It that price that is exactly what they will was the consensus of the group that this geto Bring the cars to the Mechanicsville ( continued on page'2 col. 1) Center 389 Bass Street S .. '" . 8 A.M to 5 ,3 �April 30, 1971 Mr . Johnny Johnson Director of Model Cities Atlanta, G orgia Dear johnny: In order that :this office i fully informed of Model Cities papers to go before the Board of Aldermen. please see that they are discussed with me prior to their submission to a committee or the full Board. Sincerely, Dan Eo Swe t, Jr. DESJr:sm �MECHJ\.NICSVILL"S TEEKLY r-rACHI NE , C-,. " , , i""" \l \ 10 ' ', " "" I\ I \ (page 2) I' A nominating committee was appointed by Little Bird Lite s On Machine And her to nominat e a new slat e of officers to s ucceed the out going adm1nistration 11 I thought I was me ssed up enough in I wa s a sked if I would like t o accept the office of Pres ident to be in the t he traffic problem t hat we are having. nomination. I accepted F hen the P. T .A. met I wa s elected. Narrow Street s , Congested Expre ssways and In the 1963 Bond Issue funds wa s voted NCT' /. on t o acquire adja cent property to build Ri!pid Transit. Vihy can •t ,{ /_ ffi new Pryor st. School. In the acquisit:in proces s 24 f amilies had to give up the·ir t hes e planners ever // , , /;/ homes. Some of these homes were almost pa id f or. So the se f amilie s had t o go in f inish anything .,,,<~:'- , . debt all over aga in. This was a stra in m most of them bec ause of the ir age. t hey start E•" It was a skedof t hat P.T.A. of 1965 that '/ ' \ l t he school board be forc ed t o carry out \ '- l'Flying away this committment. rt was noted by s ever al 11 Oh, Oh see you next week. 11 ·>-· of the owners that Thomasville h€ld a nh"""" " " " " ool in the 1957, and 63 bond issue and (Pittsburgh continued from page 1) even t oday t hat s chool has not been builit Having the t wo s chool previously been community r emains r es ident al. They appla - listed in t wo bond proposals the f eeling uded very l oud aga in. was that the board would likely do the fl.mot ion was made to t ell Model Cit i es s ame thing, plan but not build. and t he City Of Atlanta t o r ehibilitate The f amilies that had to move, pledged Pittsburgh, and to br ing all t he servic es t o make the board build a new s chool on i nt o t he communi ty. The gr ant f or t he pe o- t he l and they had tr'l give up. ,·,ith a deple s , et c. The motion was se conded and l eg at i on of par ents I a s t he Pres iden~ unamiousl y car r i ed . Ass i sted by t he Principl e sta rted a v 1gMr J ohnson asked the group to el ect irous approach upon the board at each of s ome r epre s ent at ive s to f orm a committ ee i ts meetings . Our appear ence befor e the and he will meet wi t h t hem at any t i me , board caused t he boar d to adopt a policy They agr eed t o do t hi s . t hat i s i n eff ect now. Aft er cont inuing t hi s for some time Pr yor st. School got seni ori ty promise s and w~s among the f i rst school f our to be built, in the 19 11 HCJi1 PRYOR STREET SCHOOL GOT BUILT " 66 bond is sue appr oval . r t t ake s more then a new building to -Sunday Oct. 27. Pryor s t. School Dedi cat - e ducat e our chil d~ens. It t ake s the inion Progr amMr. Edward Moody t he past te r est of the t eachers, the principle s, P. T.A. Pr e sident at Pryor St. School wa s the ~dmini st ration , and the pr2.ents. I t , bn the progr am, and he preceded Dr. John is the kind of cirriculnm t hat t he school ,;-• Letson the guest speaker. Mr Moody sa id ha s that make s i t educational or dis - inhe chose t he s ubj ect, in order t hat t he teresting. Put all of the se ingredient s rec or d will be st r a i ght. He spoke , together and you will have [', c ompound I would like to t ake you back to the yea r combin8tion. This s chool should not be +965. The Parent s at t hat time was having dedicated to crn y individual, or t o any a f airl y good P.T.A. with t he t eachers group , but tothe educat i on of the chiland Princ i pl e at Pryor st. School . JM.r$ dren, t hats what it shoul d be dedi cated r~eed was t he patrol - l ady , and al so ~11 .1 to . 9erved as the President of the P.T .A~ Let t his combination dedicate themsSa id: / <' ·f ·>·~,\1\ I ii \ I\ 1 \ / \ I \/ \ . I\ 1•/ \ ' ~,HH143.215.248.55-. l~ I . . pt 4:li2 ,_ ~ ~~.. C-~i (see Pryor Street page 3) COLUMJ\J 2 �.,. ~ .................. _ __ _ ,1- '. · · • , • -P-t- , -H+ · , • • , MECHANICSVILLES WEEKLY MACHii\iE ( Fag", j: ++-1---+-;,++-H I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1-1 I H I I +H-H--H-1'"'--, '-',+ ·t -H ~ ,,·r l lN" +A , F-Ortress~_Ave - -. j' ___ _ ; _ C, m __ _.·;~___,_.,_~ ,_ - " - 0 Resj_d_e11.t to-·M-eet _ ..r-:--_COMMUNJ.TY. GETS. ..E .. . . .O • .-1,..., __G.RAfJT ~FOR $7,000,00 -1 1c.: v " 111 ,, N . Thomas and -SB3le.ral .. resident -l \ 11' t ri g ?n For.tr.e s1,L..Alie.- are organizing The-.Mechanics-u:ille--Community: --Ce:n~e.i> .l-:1 >~ r i~ ,) ___.,t oo -r-·-neighbor dri V?, to urge·has .-recj..e.ved a gr1:1-nt to ?pera t8 o:L. t o ~-· 3n,1. 1:nvi te every- person 11 v }l;l.g · at thesine year after whic~ 1 t J_s expt: c t , t.r, n~d. ,;-- ?ss es to attend a meeting Thursday ec?me self-s:1-pporting through-J 1-lt - t i1 ::= n :,.(;L·c No v8mber 7, 8.0Q_p-,m, at the Galilw.ire COI!lillt}nity. Bapt1s ~ Chur ~. :1 O!.l..Fo'.rtress Ave. The funds·wa.s _made ava"lab1e ·;-•:i ·,~h 1 _ ' [·-! :i:J, t _be ef_YcI(.you in the Model _Ci tieJiodsl Neighborhood Inc _.__ The :,:-es i .u e.n t s. t'?'~)s:r-2.r:' , -and '" T 1J'.!1at effects you in t:he-and Board. Mernbe.r_s__o .f M. N , I , h s.Y s l ;:~·=,1 PL:tns ~1 '.· · ,;JJ.J. I be ;.:, he seminal forum. , seeking for six months .to g et [< Cl t,fi L1 }. T e oi d P.n L., in Mechanicsville are money to cary out a p:ro g_:::-.'.:.l.ll1-o:' -<;;..J.;_,l ,:, ·,' . .L·,.11.:.tc~ to E.i t t c r,6_ too. ment, social, recreat:"Lon. h o :m.8 Ea.:-,:\.:J;·J .. , ment and other comrn.llllity acti v- i t.'...c:E. · ~: 'Y'./ _ t ·+-r-1·H--',---:--i--+·-t---++ i--l-+;- t·i-H I I I I I I I I I I I I \ I I I I ~-e chanics:v~ lie...- --- -- . --· 0 ,~. A boys Club _, and _a Girls---Clu~c, -- .L; rapidly progressing along with tL~ ·.:i..i -- ~---fferent volunt-eered. . servic e s p l 2:r·,:., .1_-,, -: _ . ___? .i na.l )1a~s to open in the-city -- of The funds will be used for-e:::Lf·L:i2
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 5, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 15, Folder 12, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_012.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 12, Complete Folder
  • Text: C~TY 4-' 7r·~ OF I-\~ Li-\ ~ DEPARTMENT OF LAW 2614 FIR ST NATIONAL BAN K BUILDING Atlanta, Georgia 30303 April 5, 1968 HENRY L. BO WDEN CIT Y ATTORNEY ROBERTS. WIGGINS MARTIN MCFAR L AND EDWIN L. STERNE RALPH C . JENKINS JOH N E. DOUGHERTY CHARLE S M. LO KEY THOMAS F . CHO YCE JAMES 8. PILCHE R FERRIN Y. MATHEWS ASSISTANT CIT Y ATTORNEY A SSOCIATE CIT Y ATTORNEYS RO BERT A. H ARR IS HENR YM . MURFF CL A IM S A TTO RNEYS Hon. Ivan All en, Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia JAME S 8. HENDERSON SPECIAL ASSOCIATE CITY ATTORN E Y Dear Mayor Allen: Enclosed is a copy of the report that this Office recommen ds in the matter of riot control work for the City. HLB:jc Encl. �THE RESPONSE OF THE CITY ATTORNEY TO THE INQUIRY OF THE HONORABLE IVAN ALLEN, JR o, MAYOR OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA UNDER DATE OF MARCH 19, 1968, WITH RESPECT TO HIS INQUIRY CONCERNING REQUESTED ACTION TO BE TAKEN BY CITY DEPARTMENTS AND PUBLIC AGENCIES. .! / Following the ~ormat adopted by Mayor Allen in his communique to all depar tment heads dated March 19, . 1968, please be advised that no report ~as filed with respect to Paragraph 1 thereof inasmuch as the Law Departmen t of the City of Atlanta is nf the type of department which would be involved in the type oi activity set forth therein. · Consequently, no report is made lorn this d~partment concerning that feature of the letter. With respect to Paragraph 2 of the report dealing with Chapter 10 of Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, please be advised that the following represents a report of that chapter as the same is broken dO'wn in the book itself. The chapter is broken into two phases which shall be discussed in seritam fashion. · The first phase concerns short range work which should be done and after each suggestion, a comment will be made concerning how the Law Department may aid in the implementation thereof. (a) Establish neighborh9od action task force - it is the opinion of this department that we might do nothing effective with respect to the implementation of this: · (b) Establish effective grievance - response mechanism - it is the opinion of th e Law Departi:lent that we would be in a position " �I to assist h ere in that should such grievance - response hearings be held, an Associ a te City Attorney could be present in order to det ermine whether or not any proposed action taken would be legally - .., permissible. (c) I . Expand lega l services f0r the poor - inasmuch as the function of the City Attorney's Office is to represent the Mayor and Board of Aldermen, it is our opinion that this matter should be best be left to the Atlanta Bar Association and related agencies, such as, but not limited to, The Emory University School of Law. (s:l) Financial · assistance - we do not feel we could be of any assistance here. (e) Hearing ghetto problems and enacting appropriate local legislation - we could be of assistance here as indicated under (b) ( a&:tl-n=b o-l] above. (f) residents - Expand employment by City Governrrent of ghetto this_ department would not be able to assist in this part"icular function. - - -- with respect to the long term recommendations set forth in Chapter 10, and adopting the same format above set forth, this is our response to those. (a) Establish neighborhood city halls · - the Law De- -~ par t ment would in all prob ability not be of any assistance in this r e sp ect. (b) Deve lop mult i - service c ent ers - this appears ., to deal with such thi ngs as parks and rec reationa l faciliti es �. and the Law Dep ar tment ·would in all probability not be in a posi t ion to be of any assistance here. (c) Improve political rep r esentation~ _jt has long beeri the opinion of this department, as the sami has been · . . expressed thr ough the City Attorney, that the disproportionate representation cr eated by malapportioned wards is, if not unconstitutiona l, a bad practice. This is even though all aldermen are elect e d. on a city-wide .basis. Admittedly, the law's present posture se~ms to . be. city-wide elections are sufficient to take this situation out of any constitutionally infirm probl_em ·areas; however, a recent case in the Supreme ·, Court of the United States, coming out of Texas, and which we have not had an opportunity to digest, might indicate that opposition is not as sound as it was prior to the opinion set forth in the case. In any event, this department stands ready, willing and able to assist in such legisiation as is necessary to cure malapportioned . . wards. (d) More effective community participation - it is doubtful that the Law Department could serve in this particular function. With respect to the specific questions asked in Para~ graph 2, we feel that ' (a), (b) and (c) have already been answered in the analysis and as to estimating the probable _cos·t involved, we deem that the functions which we would do, as the same are set fo r th a bove, would be done without any incr eased cost to the City of At l ant a over and abov e the retainer s curr ently being paid to t he sever a l a t to r neys conne c ted with the Law Depart ment . ., �With respect to the third paragraph of the letter of Mar ch 19, 196 8 from Mayor Allen to the several department heads, the follo wing constitutes our response as the same concerns itself with Chapt e r 13 of the report of the National Advisory Commission on Civi l Disorder s. A work is necessar y with respect to some of ·the considerat ion s rais e d in this chapter and how the same has been analyz e d by this department. In all probability the report pretty well hits the nail on the head when it indicates in Chapter 13 that the handling and prosecution under a mass arrest situation is t _o tally diff~r ent from any normal type of operation that obtains in the several courts that would have jurisdi ction over the type of offenses tha t are normally committed during times of riot and violence. Also, the report seems to hit the nail on the head when it indicates tha~ the administration of justice is an incomplete function when primary emphasis is placed on the quelling of the riots and virtually no emphasis is placed upon the prosecu~ tion and conviction· of people who -i;-1ere involved in the riots. The repor-t of this department will primarily concern itself with these two featu r es of Chapter 13. It is the feeling of this department that the City of Atlanta have on a st?ndby b a sis, certain members of the local bar to act as both pro haec vice judg es and prosecutors. The r eason no recommendation is being made with respect. to defense coun s e l is that it is our f ee ling that the public de fender syst em now e st ablished by the Fulton Sup erior Court is sufficient to take c are o f :,th i s feat ur e of the administration of justice. c It is our • thinking tha t the lo cal b ar would ri se to the oc c as i on and tha t �these services would be furnished the City of Atlania at no cost to the City of Atlanta. Inasmuch as· the cry goes up concerning police brutality during post arrests, thi~ department · feels ' that responsible members of the negro coITLmunity should have access to detention areas of the city jail for the purp·ose of assuring the negro_ public that no abuse of prisoners is taking _place. As a concomitant of this, of course, the police would not abuse prisoners. Also, a matter ·which should be considered is the p ssibility _of holding neighborhood courts for bendable and I •. . recognisance offenses in an effort to keep the jails to a normal population. The implementation of this recommendation would be difficult; however, we might even go so far as to have the basements of schools utilized during periods of crisis for the purpose of having a judge set bond and for the pu~pose of having representatives of the several bonding companies present. In addition to schools, perhaps other public buildings located near the areas would be permissible for this type of situation. As above set forth, one of the grave problems concerning the aftermath of riots is that in very few instances have prosecutions which ensued as the resul:t of riots been successfully carried forward to conviction. We feel that this shortcoming might in part be attributable to lack on the part of policemen of knowing what state or local laws are violated in a riot situation. To this end, it is our thinking that a representative of the SolicitorGeneral!s office, the Solicitor of the Criminal Court of Fulton -· , " County and the City Attorney, acting as a team, make lectures or talk s to the polic e force in ord er to refamiliarize th em with �what does in fact constitute criminal activity in this area. Also, it is respectfully requested that the poiice begin using photographic equipment a~d motion _pictures in order that proper demonstrative evidence might be used by the prosecution for the conviction of people who violate the law in this type of situation. No recommendation is made with respect to bonding inasmuch as it is our opinion that the criterion rlready est~b1ished by the several judges of the Municipal Court are sufficient. . �I· t..-'-,.-·--f-{ ~-~ . ..._- 1 ,t-P.. r.' , . . ,!-.:... - ~ _.,___ ~ '--,.l. . I· • • ._,_ • i /'. -~--C- -'- \ - .. ~ • C ITY HAL L April 1, 1 968 .I A T LANTA , G A. 3030 3 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLE N, JR ., MAYOR CEC IL A. ALE XANDER , Chairma n Housi ng Resources Committee MA LCO LM D. JON ES Housing Coo rd inator The Honorable I van Al len, J r., Nayor City of A tla.rita Ci ty Hall Atlanta , Georgi a 30303 Dear Mayor Allen : Pursuant to y our directive of I-:arch 1 9, 1968 pertaining to a ction to be t aken by City Departr;-icnts and Public A3encies in implementation of the U. s. Riot Cor,rrnission a.ep ort , ui th special emphasis on Chapters 10 and 1 7 , t he p ortion on " Housini' , specifically assigned to the Housing Resources Committee i s hereuith subr:!i tts d , for file Hi th the Ea;;-or 1 s Office and the Advis0ry Cormnittee on Civil :Gisorclers . Attention is call ed to my initial l etter report of Earch 22 , 1 96~ copy a ttached (r.ncl.l) . A more detail ed report uor::...Ced up by the Housing Coorclinator and r eviewed by t his Corr!IT'i t t ee ' s Consultant, and with whi ch I 6 enerally concur is attached ( Encl.2). Sincerely , p / .. //,J / 0 .,,;'.,. · .---:':,-: .:-· . =// • /l_ ,-_e " / v (Jv ,'d . .·-~·-;::- cfl #: i,.-k ,• '° · v' , r. Cecil A. Alexander , C'nairman Housing ~es ourcc.s Cor.unitte e En els: Co:;:iy of l etter c:.ate d Var ch 22 , 1968 Repor t de veloped by- rfous ing Coordinator ,,. -1 • .4~ ;_;.; -~- ---143.215.248.55"':-- .._~-- �. Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal lfo.rch 22» 1968 The Honorable Iv.-.n Allen, Jr., tayor COPY City of Atlanta AtlDnta , Georg i2 Dec:r Ivan : In c:innecti.c•n with th e foplcmenta.tion of th e hous i ng phase of t he Riot I,cpol:·t, \ :e sug3est tl-;e foJ.loi:ing: 1 . A p e rt;onal le:ttr~x' frorn you to all developcr•s w!io 1:c::ve not hro}~en grour,G UP5 i r,s; th c,rn to get r.10ving . Colone l Jon es c an supp ly you ,-: i t h tLe m :~-;C:s . COPY 2. Call en tte Al~c1~1~nic Loar~ to r evise th e City Buildi~f Coc.e to confor·;:i .:ith t ~e Fc:t ion.J. l ?uildinz CoJ 0, t~iw; u ,ablh'ig les s expt:1:sivc co1~:-;tructi c n. 3. As k th e Atla nt« Eousin?, Autho~'ity to t c-iKG 1, 000 of tr:e unit s 110 ;1 to b;:: c:ev'9l o;-i"'d l:,y t r,c turi"iL'-"Y proc ess and r ev8:i:'t to the old m€:thod of buildinr, t nc.:i u t1i;,z, t ;-,e Autho1·it:y. It is in t1~e a!'~a of pu::ilic Lous inz vnit.:; t~:at ;.;e .rirc behinc. your s c~1·2dule . 12nd u ~c :112.n to '"irlcluTell as distribution on s:,-:c?J_ler scattered sites , is ver-J i-iOrth)' of' encoura:;er:1ent , in or der to 6et a·.·ay fro::: the i nstitutional i l'la ;; e of Publ i c Housing_. In f a ct it :,roulc. be verf hel?ful i .f t he Housine AuttJri ty ,,ould elininate all of i ts si gns a t the entrances to projects advertizing to the public in e ffe ct t hat "this ._is a l ow r ent ?e derall:r subs i di zed housing proj ect". Emph2.sis in t he rep ort on applic ation of the Hou~i ng Code in subs tandard and depress ed aTea s is ver~: a ppropriate , however ·the f eatur e that could be most effective, and which has b een most n e ~lecte d in Atlanta, is not r:ient ioned; that is tenant r esponsi bility . Thi.s shou ld and must be s tressed conti nous1..,v J in order to ge t more ef.fe c ti ve r es ults fro :-1 the Housir\ :; Cocie . All 1~0A 1'-~ei ghborhood Centers should pronote classes i n hous e~eeI)ing wd propert y maintenance by occupants of r ental housing , Instruction in this f i eld s hould b e ins ti tuted J perhaps at ni ght , to -,::1ich class e s t he Housing Court c oal.cl , senten ce minor offen de rs to att end a :orescriced n umber of s ess ions ) in l J.eu of monetary fi nes or jail sentences f or co de viola t i ons , in a sir-,2.l ar r;-iari..ner to the procedure no:r being practi ced i n Traffic Court of sentencing minor offe nder s to attend sessfor.s in Tra.f.;'.'i c 3chool. �.) T\1e cle anup of premis es, effe ct ing commer cial and indus tr i a l, as uell a s r esi dential proper t i es , i s a nother i mporta nt factor in improving tho ghe t t os . The condition of premis e s should g o hand in ha.nd ui th Hous ing Code enforcement, · whe t her it is dire cte d b? the Sanit ary Dep ar t ment or the Eousing Code Insp ectors. It is quite futile to i mprove the living conditions of a di,ielling unit a nd not require the i mmediate pr elfliscs and surroundin~ areas to b e cle an e d up and kept clean., ·espe cially in the gh_ettos . Similarly , it is usel~ss to improve a res idential property and l eave t he commercial or industrial p1·ope-;ties· in the same vicinity in I a dis;:;raceful and di sreput nbl e condition. Atlanta n eeds badly a Commercial and Industrial CocJ.e, just as it I1as a Housing Code. Some of the mor e pro~ressive citi e s have s uch code s today. The enablinr; . legi s l a tion r e cen t l y a douted which author i z ed Atlanta'°s "In Hem" Ordinance .· providing for moving directly a ga inst dilapidate d re s idential properties i nstead of, in the traditional manner, a gainst the owners, for violation of the Hou.sine Code, also authoriz e s such action a gainst· poorly ina i ntai necl comrnercial and indust rial e s tablis hments ·as , rell. . ' All tha t is n e eded i s a local irnpler,1enting Or dinan ce • In order to pr ovide and encourage much de s ired home ovm ershi p among low-income famili e s, a spe cial singl e family z oning district should be adopted 1-:hich would p er mit con struc tion of .s i n ~l e f amily home s of 720 squar e f eet or larger on lots having a maximum area of .S ,000 square feet, i-rith a minimum front ~a:::e of 50 1 • This would provide ample ar ea. tor lm-r-int..;OH18 sin;:;l e f amily hous es and would provide incr e a s e i n t he density by 50~; and r e duce the cos t of lots by 33 author iz e d by the Cllr r er.t applicable =t-5 1/y; fr or,1 that now single family r esidential zoning district. It is r e qormnended tha t some neH loi,r-income developme nt be iniated as s oon a s possi bl e t :ti s su.'Tu",1er in the l-1odel Ci ties area , by s el e cting a t l eas t one limited area ( pe rhaps four city bl ocks ) in the he ar t of the mos t dilapidat e d p ortion of the area and obtaining authority fr om the Fe deral governm,,nt to acquire the land t hrough an a dvance a cquisit i on proces s, s imilar to the manner in whi ch lci.nd for t he Audit or ium and Civic Center . Fas acquired, and t urning it ove r to the Housin g Authori t y, or thr oueh expedite d s ale to private enterprise to·cl.ev elop . It is a l s o r e commended tha t i niati on of devel opment o f' a t l e a s t . a por t i on of t he Feder a.l Prison s i t e be e:x:pe di t ed f or s t art i ng cons tru ction t his ·s urmrier of l owi ncone housing by pri vate enter pri se . I' I �SllI'u'-:ER YOl.:TH OPPOl~Tlf?HTY OGR.AH . ---·---·----·-----... --.- --Pt~ - ---------- VIN~ CITY FOUNDATION J r oi~_ct Re cre.:i t i on Pl ug_- I _J2 Thi s i s a pi l o t er,1 p l oy.-..-1ent p rogram des i gne d t o u t ili ze 11 ind i genous te e nage youth age s 16-2 0 t o se r ve as con~ unit y r ecreetion organ i zers . Th e you th Re crea tion Orga,1izcrs will recruit ; organize , p l an , 2n d supervise 10 othe r teenagers e a ch t o prov id e . pl anned s urr:rne r r ecreat i on on a 24 h our bas i s . Th e pro j ec t wi l l l as t for 11 weeks . $13,718 Budge t Re quest ~-- ( , J j C; ; OF L lBRARlANSllIP Stor_____ y Te ll_ _____ i ng. - Courses ___ - ----- - -·- . Thi s edu cat i ona l p ro gr am i s de s i gne d to pr ov id e e ff ec i cncy fo r S tor y Te ll er to be u se d duri ng th e s un~e r i n v a ri ous r e cr ea tio n pr og r ams . Th e pro j e ct will prov i de 12 cours es u t ili z i ng 20 enro ll ees f or a 8 \,Jee k pe riod . Du r a tio n - 8 wee k s . Budget Reques t ., $2 ,9 79.50 �I - -7BUTLER STREET Y1'-!CA The pr ogram p:i,· oposes to emp loy 5 youth in suarne r r es ident c amp as ca bin c ounselors , kitche n h e l pers and as main ten an ce pe rs onne l. The program will p rovide camp exper i ence f or 300 youth be t we en t he ages of 7-1 6 . Ac tiv i ty will include mus ic, paint i ng , dr ama , and a tutori a l progr am . Durati on - 3 week s . Bud ge t Request $19 , 352.72 Edu cat i on and Eme.l oyr::e nt A work- study s eminar to be c onducted at r es i dent c amp f or 12 h igh schoo l graduates fro ~1 poverty b ackgr ounds. The act i v i ty of t he s eminars wi ll consi s t of i nforma ti on that wou ld be app li cable to college e ntrance , d i scuss i on on curr en t socia l events , e t c . Duration o f pr oj e ct - 12 weeks . Budge t Reques t $1 2 , M9 . 82 Work In.c e nt ive Demons t r at i.on_ Progr am Thi s pro j e ct i s des igned t o serve 100 men bet,,;een t he ages of 16-21 in a work i ncent i v e p r ogran wi th the hope o f emp l oymen t a fter c ompl et i on of t he pro j e ct . Dura ti on - 2 weeks . Budge t Re quest $11 ,0 18 . 59 Camp __I mprove::1e nt Pro j e c t Th is e mp loy1,1en t progr am is d es i gned t o u t il i ze 90 you t h between the ages of 16- 21. The youth wi ll be i mrn l ve d i n 3· weeks of c amps it e i mprover.,ent of the Butler StreE;t Y.'·iCA ' s Lake All a toona Campsite . Activ iti es will in c lude wi11t e riz a tion of existins c amp structures , l ands ca pi ng a nd water front i mproveMen t . Eudgct Requ e st $17, 780 . 9 2 __ ___ _____ _ _______ .. e_ nd e d _S,~fr,_min,; Ext , ....:. To prov ide s ,.-1irn,'.ling activHi es fo r some 19 5 boys and g irls be t,,:ee n th e ages of 7··16. Durat i on 12 week s . $I:., 12 9 . 8 0 Bud get R2que s t So c-------i a l Re cr ea -Te--e nage - -- -·--- tion Thi s p ro g r a:n wi ll a tt empt t:o ful f ill th e rec r e a ti o n nee d s o f 60 0 youth b.2t1-,-?C' n tl e 2gcs of ] !'.;- 1 8 . Ac ti.vi t i.e s c o,1s i st.i.ng o f sw i ;ii.mi.n g , d ~c :i_r,2. ) orts C: cr 2 fl~, s ] ic:!c pr c-sc .: 1_r1.li 0n s :: s i n ~~ i il~~, c1 21:.c in.~~ :: r~L~ d · t a l cnt sllo·.-~s ·..' i U be c a r r i C'Cl on f or 12 1-;c"ks . �-8- DEKALB Yi·:CA . Kirkwo od Swj rnrn ing Cl as s This pr ogra,n will pr ov i de s wi n-~n in g act i viti es for 50 you t h ag e s 7-12 in scho o l. Du ra tion - approx i ma t e ly 12 we eks. Bud get Requ e s t $607 . 50 WORKSHOPS n :C:OR? ORATED This proj ect will pr ov i de a numbe r of plays for r e c r ea t ion a l prog r ams thro ughou t th e city. Budge t Re qu e st ACADEHY THEATRE Circu s This pro z r am i s des i gn e d to provi de s m:1.e of th e r e c re a tion a l n ee ds of Atl a nt a you th be twee n th e ages 5-11. The Ac a de,.ry wil 1 I pro du c e fi ve s h ows (Ci r c us ) pe r we ek for a si x we ek pe ri od. The Theat r e c a n h and l e 180 kids pe r performan ce . Bud ge t Req ue s t $39,361 ROYAL KNI GHTS FOliN DATIO~~ Thi s pr ogram h op e s to prov id e tu to ri a l, and cu l t u r a l e nr i chmen t pro g r ams in c lu ding ty ping , r e a d in g , b ase ba ll, f a s h i on s hows and et c. f or 600-700 yout h age s 5- 20 . Budg e t Re que s t $9,000 SUN-·HEC NEIGHBORH OOD EO.\ CE)lTER He cli c>.n_i_c sv il_l c_ Sti r:s7e r Pr o i ec t - Edu cc'.t io n;:i.1. Thi s pr ogram wil l be ope r a t e d ou t of t he Pry o r Str eet Sch oo l. Re c reat io n 2.nJ educ a tio n n 2eds dur i ng t he sur,I,12r mon th s . Large amo unt of yout h to be hi red . Ci t y Scho o l s do i ng about t he same . The pro j ec t will ru n 3 mo n t hs . Bu dget Req uest �- 9,- NASH HAS!-!INCTO,~ NEIGH nORl[OOD, EOA CE~iTER Keen Teens Program t o Hor k wi th h a rd core yout h . Youth work ing wi t h you t h. Clean u p c rews , r e cruit i ng for othe r pr oj ec t s , etc . Good proj ect - h igh emp l oyme n t . Budget Re ques t YOUNG HEN' s CI VIC LEAGUE, n ic, Thi s u niqu e \-!Ork-rec r ea t i on pro j e c t wi ll u t ili ze 200 youth a nd young adu l t s , ma l e and f ema le a ges 16~21 in a prog r am t o u pg r a de t he ir COiT'muni ty . Act i v i t i e s will i n c l ude cl e an ing stree t s , al l e ys , empt y l ots , an d r oden t c ont ro l. Budge t Re ques t Ui'1- MEC NEI GHBORHOOD EO.-\ CE~TER A c on preh ens i ve enp loyme n t , r ecrcc1.t i on, e duc a t i on , and cu lt u ra l pro j e c t t o serve 20, 000 you t h 1.1a l e a nd fema l e of a ll a ge s i n th e Sur.-,Me c Area . Activiti es will i ncl ude t u tor i a l, t yping , fi l mst rip s , dr ama , •couns e l i ng , fie l d ·t r ip s , etc . Bud ge t Re ques t NORTJ-ll·JE ST YOU;\;G HEi'l CIVIC AS SOCIATION Th i s p rog r am i s des i gne d t o serve s ome 7, 000 t eenage an d young adu lt s age s 13- 25 in a mu lti-purpos e you t h pr ogr am . Th e pro gr am wi ll e~ pl oy a number of i ncli ge nou r youth and young adu lts . Act i vi ti e s wi ll i n c l ud e l e ctu r es , t ou r s , youth foru ms , deve l o~~e nt o f you t h bus i n ess , gene r a l sp or t s ( i n doo r a nd out o f doo rs , a nd creat ive games . Bud ge t Re ques t . NORTH~EST P~RRY EOA CE~TER " Sock It To He " An e;npl oyi,1e;1t pro j e ct des i gnc,d t o serve 1,000 ma l e a nd fema l e age s 13- 25 in a n i n ten s i ve pr ogram of tr a i ning and c oun3e l ing . Lead t eenaiers and profc ~;s i or,2. l s ,.-::i 11 1-.' ork wit h t eenagers ,-.,ho h c>.ve no work histo ry as " peer Group Coui, se l or s . Du r a t i on of p ro j ect -ap pr ox i mate l y 12 wee ks . Budge t R e ques t �-10 WEST CENTRAL EOA NEIG!lBO Rl IOOD CENTER Summe r Activjt i es Pr o~am .j A r e cr e a tiona l, educa t i onal , cultural enr ichme nt pro gram will serve appi:ox ima t e l y 5,400 persons of all ages . Emp lo yi ng - ~ ---·youth in divers ifi e d jo bs . Activi t i es for thi s pro gr am will i n c lud e indo or and ou t of door r ec r ea tion , arts and cr afts , h eads t ar t , trip s to int erest in g p l aces , nei[:;hbor hood cl ean up s . Dur ation - app rox ima tely 11 weeks. Bud get Req ues t COLLEGE PARK CIVI C At\lD ED"' CAT IONAL CLll B, IN C. Thi s r ec r e at i ona l and educat iona l will serve a pproximate l y 9,000 youth both ma l e a nd f ema l e of al l a ges who r es ide i n l ow-income communiti es . The proj e ct: wi ll uti li ze 60 poor youth as yo uth ass istan t s and 9 young ad ults. Ac ti viti es for th e proj ec t: will in c lud e spor ts , a rts and cr afts , d ai ly persona l grooming , tri ps and excur s ion s , ce rami cs and divers i fied pl ayground progr aas . Durat i on - 12 weeks . Bud ge t Request EAST POINT 'RECREATION DEPARTNENT Thi s pr oj ec t will cove r th e fou r t ar ge t areas in th e city . It i s des i gned t o mee t .th e r ec r eat i ona l n eeds o f 5,000 pe r so ns of a ll ages . Th e p r oj e ct wil l employ 8 you th and young adu lt s fr om each of th e are a blo cks . Activiti es wi ll in clude sports , pl aygroun d activit i es , arts and .c rafts , .cer am i cs , sewing , pers on a l h ygiene and gro omi ng , trip s and excusio ns , te e n programs , s enior citi zen pr ogram , s wi nnn i ng and prE' ·· :,choo l pro~;:- 2ms . Du rati on 8 weeks Bt1d ge t Reques t EDGEWOOD KEIGHBOilllOOD EOA CENTER . Sun1rre r Cr::is.1 Re crt.:a l:io n Pr o j qct Thi s u nique pilot pr o j ec t wil l utili ze six youth fro m the ar e a t o work with n2 nt a l1.y r e t arde d ch i l dren . The pro j ect wi ll ser ve 24 me nt a ll y retard e d chi 1.cl ren by p1·oviding d a iJ y rne nt.a l and physic a l a ct i vit i es . Dura t ion - 9 wects . Bud g e t Rcq tie s t .... �-11 - H. R. BUTLER SQ!OOL A compr e he nsive employme nt , re c r eat iona l, edu cat iona l and cul t ural program des i gne d to emp loy a numbe r of youth and young a du l ts for the pur po se of supe rvising g roup activiti e s . The program will serv e a t otal of 500 pe rs ons ages 6-25 . Activ i t i es fo r t his program will include tu t or i a l in r ead i ng and gr ade i mprove me nt , arts and cr afts , Negro hi s tor y , s t ory hou rs , d ance instruction, s port s , playground activities , t r ips and swinrn ing . Duration 10 weeks . Budge t Requ es t EMMAUS HOUSE A unique program de s i gne d to t ak e 100 boy s and gir l s in th e Peop l estm-m-SurrJnerhill area to J e ky l l Is l and for one week i n an at tempt to r ep l ace a slum setting wi t h a ne,nor a b l e experience of a wor l d th e y h a ve never kn 01-m . Act i v iti e s fo r t h is prog ram ui l l inc lude r e cre a tion and couns e ling . After r e turn ing , t hese youth wil l be eng ijgcd in a 7 we ek r eme di a l r eading p ro g r am. Duration - 8 we eks . Bud g et Re ques t GWINNETT COUNTY EOA A compre he ns i ve emp l oyment, r e c r ea t i on , educat i on and cultur a l e ~ richment prog r a m to s e r ve about 6 7 000 youn g chil dr e n , both ma l e and f ema l e . Th e pr o j e c t wi ll empl oy 20 t e e n l eade r s to be di vid e d arnoung t11 e four ce nters. Prnj ec t activi ti es wi ll in c lud e field trips , pers ona l hy g i e ne , s ewing classes , cl as s e s in water and hun ti ng s afety , fir s t aid , body c are , dr a na , a nd mu sic a l g~o up s . Dur a tion ap prox i ma t e l y 10 wee ks : Bud ge. t Reques t WEST END r; EJGf·!RORH OOD EOA CENTER. Thi s e mpl oyrac n t , r e crea t i on a l a nd cul t u ra l e nr i chn~ n t program i s de s i gne d t o se r ve a nuITilie r o f y outh in th e 2i ea . TI~ p ro j ec t will e mp loy a numbe r o f yout h to d oordin a tc and s u pe r v i s e r e cre ationa l a nd enr i chme nt prog ra-s1s ( ages 17 -1 8 ) . Activ ities wil l i nc l ud e base b a 11 , bas k e l" b t! 11 , v o 1 1 y ~1 a l. J , s o c c e r , s t o r y h o u r s , a n cl t r i. p s . ·Dur a ti on - 13 ,,1ee ks . Bud ge t Re ques t ~-. �-1 2JOHN HOPE SCHOOL " Proj ect l:!_R li ft The p roject ~ill provi de education and recreationa l activities for 300 youth , young ad ults, and Sen i or Citi zens . The proj ec t will employ 15 j unior l eade rs (1 6-21) fr om th e area to provide l eade rship for child ren , yout h and Se nio r Citi zens . Activ iti es wi ll inc l ude Negro hi s t ory , bas ic educat i on i mproveme nt, tours , arts and c rafts , d ance , S':-Jiff,ming , sports, movi es , tr ack a nd fi e ld even ts , and i n s tru mcnta l musi c . Durat ion - 8 weeks Bud ge t Req ues t EDGE~OOD NEIGHBOfillOOD EOA CENTER Ed___gewoocl - _East Lake Youth SuCT'~, 1er_ Recrea t ion P~g,2::am Thi s summe r r ecreat io na l progr am wi ll serve ab ou t 500 youth o f all a ges . Act j v itie s will i nc lude - s ewi ng , crafts, stamp co ll ecting , guit ar l ess i ons , pi ano l cssions , d ~nce , wood work , and sports . Dur ation - ap prox i ma t e l y 9 weeks . I Bud get RL:: J-!..c'.}p_ f' ;_~SY.I-~:!.:' -· S-urn:ner scl;c,cls w i 11 be c.-::nduc-t-ecc; .~LP1_::,ib l,c-m..., $ t:-u~.!.St~.· TttE. Yc.-uth C uncil, v : tT: ..;:;u s Bo a r ds o f Education a n d o t Ler c- ,:Y:nmu;iit:y g r·uu ps w:i. 1 1 a n d a re W{(T.'k:~_r,g n p rojects that will h e lp s chc .:, ls deal wi.t.h s u:-h pn-'bl ems as absent:E:e.sm, :i.• corri.gi bi.lity, over age prc,moti c.:: , dr.::pc,1.1ts, p r:"'s:na't?cies, emo ti onal dis t:urbances , ment al health, a n d te ach Er- pu p Jl r e lati onships, Pre s ently , the Youth C unc il is c o op n .at:i::1 g w it__ Arhm ta Uni.versit:y , EOA, Fa.m:i.ly Counseling Center , the Cc·v:n ~·y Wel f B.te, The AtJ.a r,te. Board o f Educa ti on and several oth er' groups i n _a pl.l · ,t: ab sE•.:-Ltf:e.ism p ro j e.ct, T'he Atla:r1ta Board of Educa.t:i.cr:1 :i.s pl anc.i.ng s ever-a l pn:,j e e:ts with var:L c us grou ps that wi.11 h a ve a si.g::-;_ i.f:.i.ca.r,t i.:np:3.c t: ---·n the.:i. r p r oblems. 7. Ed uc a tj.s.n..,2~1.b- ~ . The May ·Jr ' s Co nc:i.l n Ye; 1th Opportunity has orga nize d a sub-c ornm:U_:t 8e •-n edu cation . This c omra:i. t: tee i.s chaired by Mrs. Be t:Ly Cant c,::1 . Recreat ion, S9c i ~ C:.i l t:ura l Pr·c_g ra:ms A. Intr due:ti0n ~ Th ere. axe. appr0xLma ;·e l y 500,000 c hi. ldrE.:1 and youth i n. Greater Atlan ta. Most of thes e w:i.11 b e s e.e.ld.ng wa ys t: .:, sp e n d their s urrcr.e r leisure. time, Unfortunately, th e. L i.ck c,f r·ecrE::1.·.1~·:_.a.J a:1d i.:1 f o rmal e du ca.tic,:1.::1.l programs are most ac-ut:e 1.n the. p cvc> r.·ty c i.::rrrnu::d.t:i.es . Rea l :L zing th e g t ·eat nee d and shortage of whc· 1es ome r-ec re.at:i.0:-~:3. L a ct '.vit::i.e s year:-rou:.'J.d , t he va.ni. ·.i s Parks and Recreation De.p a.rtme'.1.t , The p1:ibl ic scho_ ls an d l i b rari es, t he arts group , the EOA Neighb orh ood Se r" .ice Ccr te r s, t~.e Che s t a.gencies and s eyeral youth groups have pl 3.nne d a ppr·cnd:ma. t: ely 68 p n .j ec t·s. The s e pro j ects c.c:nb :i.ne recr eation, edue:ati oa and e.wp l0yrrten t. Ma..'.'·. y ,f the s e wi 11 b e y ~-u t:h ma·ri.a.ge d and operated. �1. To provide me aningfu l recreat ional l eis ur e time and cultura l activities for n e edy children and· youth. 2. to 3. To pr-c-vi d e a we ll r. ou:td e d , well organized, and very inclusive rec- re aU o:-;&°!. pr-:-gr af!l. 4. T0 p r ·, i. d e. p rc,g r o.m3' t :1at significantly involve youth in plann ing, · opera.'.:i..::,:1 &r:d .,,-.,alu at i oo1 proces s es . pr ovide such a c tiviti e s at hours and places suitab l e to the n ee d s, int erest, a n d c onvi e nt to the youth to b e served . Th e g oa l is ·o pro v ide available recrea tional and /or l ei.sure. t i:'le ac u .,.1it l.e s i.~1 a~n:-1:ict of f requency and di.stance. I t wou ld b e i 1. '.: ~re s : .L:'. 3 t o l1 rie fly summa r i ze th e recreation a l asp e cts o f the Youth Op p ortu ~ i..ty Pr,, g ra=i. A t r,.,; 1 of 35 proposa l s wil 1 b e p r opose d. Th e f e d era l budge t requ e st on ~h e se pr0 p c s al s to tal $600,000. An i n t e gr al pa r t of t h e r ecre a t i ona l-cultural aspect · o f th e p r ogram wi ll b e resid en t a.~ d d cty c. cc 1p :..i:1.g p r u gr-a-,-ns. Effor t was mad e to incre ase the numbe r of day an d r e sid en t c amp sl ts c1·: a ~.l al:::l2 t o p o or c hild ren and youth. Pres e n t ly s l o ts are a v a i l abl e fo r 2 , 538 y :..:t.'~; L r e s i d e-::1t a ~ d d ay c amp ac tivities . in thi s p r o g r ara . Ma r,y· a g e n-· ci.e s a r e r:iaki.n g ;ra·: :y , f t1)c>. ir r egu l a r s umme r _ c amp s lots a v a il a bl e to poo r y outh . Thes e include t h e Bey SccrJ s , G:f.r l Sc ou ts, Camp Fire Girls, YMCA and YWCA, Be thl ehem Cen te r s, etc. Thes e orgaci. za ::i -,r;s wi l l provide d a y and r e sident camp for non~memb e rs . In addit ion the City f Ad ci:-, ·_-:1 Re cre a t ion De p ar t ment will operate c a mp i n g p r o g r am . The J ewis h C-::,:n:.-nu n ily Ce :: t c r wi ll m~ke its d a y c amp faciliti e s ava ila ble t o gro ps o f poor y o".ltli ::t.r. .:;·· gh ·-- t·. t h e s :.i.:rr..i .e r . 1: 1 a Ma n y yovhi wl ll s p e e d ~~ek a n d c e~p i ng t r ips at the State a n d Na tio na l Pa k s. Equa lly a s Li,p _.., r.t· ::i:,--; t: i s t he f a ct t h a t th e se proj ec ts will e mploy app roxi ma t e l y 1,000 poor tE. e :;:i~c. -:-·s a ·::d y c,:: .. g a du l t s. B. Qee. a :: i :ri a. 1 Or i9::· ~- 2-2. t Lc--:1s Th e C.:. " y 0 f Atl.s\'l ta Ps:ir.-k s, Re crea tion and Sc ho o l De p artmen t s wi ll carry t he rr.a j c r re sp ..:i-:.s :.::i.l i t y f o r the re c reat iona l p rogram . I n a dd it i on , t h e ci t i e s u:f Ea.s t l1clnt, a ;:1d R::is ewl l will pr ovi d e s p e cia l r e creati ona l p r g r a::i.s. The U::-d t e. d App ea l Age;;.cie s, t h e EOA Neighb orh ood Se r v i ce Ce n ter s, ,;,ri.d seve r. a l c cr:!f'.,U.'.1 -i t_y b a se d y ou t h a nd young adu l t gr oup s wi ll p r ovi d e s p e ci a l p r og r a:::,s . -5~ �The :;,':::m:'.' ers 2.:-.d ass c•ci at E -.:1e ..-:1::iets o f t:l: e Ar cs C'c•U'::.c .U wl.1 1 p r o v:f.. dE me.a:1 :: 1.-:gful a r·t a.n d cu l t u. ra. l p r c g r :in~ s. r-,: c r-d er c<· s :1 pp lE:::..e:1 :: t he se p r · 6 ra::.:s, s e·,·e. r d l b ..rn::.:-..e ss:r.E.·; c a-:: d wc,2e n &s well as s t. '/ E: ~3. l c. l u : • gr ou ps wi l l p r --v~.d•:. s p e c. ia. 1. p :cagr.a:'.1!s o f recr e a ti c' .. , f,:: r ·r.ee d e d c:~11.ld r e~~ a:-Jd y cu t h . C. kg,u1pldc. Spr e a d Ir~ a dd i.c.L.::,n to p l a-:.1 ::,1 6 c ri2 at:;_ve .s..r1.d ~,,::,.:;•;-,:i t Lv2 p r vg r-::1.:::is ? e,--.::,r y eff r t w.i'. 11 b e ma d e t o s p r E-a ~ i. he prc•j ects ge:..0 g r s.pr, f. c a i l y . Fr o je c ·: s a r:e h e 1.'::.g pl ann e d t .:, bE d ::.s ~.r :;.b· · te: d as f 11 ws t:1:.r ,:,:.igb :.,u ;: t~te ~:a rgct: a. r c':8. S : l- •o Se~~ r"·-'. r-e -, (:--....0 ·--,1. •i..- t:.L - ._ '" S N ""l ._g1-1bor . - u· u.:/... ~ c 0 0 _....,- Cent ra l Ci.t y Cc~t er East Cen t r a So t.h F\lJl t c ::1. Ea s t P0 i ~ t RE cr e ition C ile 6 e P::ir k Rec re.at i. a n Ce ~ te r Are a Bl ck " E" Cab" a 6 e Tew•• You th DE:: ,1 e 1 .:-pme-n t Ce , .te.r t Sum~M1:c c CE~ '- e r Young Me·2, 0 s Ci v ".c le a.g;u.e M2 ch aLi c s v~. 1 1 e P r ~j e c t Ed g ew o o d Ce:1t:e r M b -U e Vay Ca.:~,p NLr t hwe s t PEr: r ~/ Iic:ne s CE:_. te r Young Me ~ 0 s C~v ! c Ass o cia t i n Men ~a ] ly Retard e d DeKa lb " Y11 We.s t Ce n t'ral Ce·2t- e. .r Na s h - Wa s :11.::-.'.5 tc: Ce r. t e r We s i: Er d Ce:; t.c- :: North Fu l t0. Cent e r Gw l n!le t t C0u~ t J Pi ttsh · r g Ce1 t~ r Price Ce r. t er Ce 1t.r :1 l YMCA Sa l vat i.c , . A n r,y ( See Ct, 1t ra l Cit y ) B:u. tl er S tn:, E. t" " _' ! At ] n l 3 Gi rls ° Cl u b Gr a d y H.::-.:nEs , 1. rls ' Cl t; b At: l an. t.:,. Ur b3.:1 L"·ag e Boy Sc i_: t: s Met1·0po l i t a ~ B· y s ° C"ub We sl ey C ;r.;nt: n 1.t y Ce·:. t er- s Gir l Sc cu cs ... , -6 ~ �N. W. Perry Area - 17 sep ara t e Youth Oppor tunity Pr ogr am activiti e s; t wo are pr iva tely sponsored (Viking , Ne i ghborhood Serv ice Center) and the other fif t e en are sponsored by the City. These include five schools and ten rec r ea tiona l projects,including play1e t s and school grounds. West Central - Ther e will be 21 : sep arate a ctivities planned. Two are private ( Neighborhood Service Center and Chur ch of Master s), and 19 are city-sponsor ed projects - seven school and 12 rec r ea tiona l activ ities. Na sh Washing ton - There wi ll be 21 separat e activities, five being pr iva te (Neighbor hood Se r vic e Center, Roya l Kn i gh t , Vine City, Ralph Robinson Boys' Club, Ge orge Washing ton Carve r Boys ' c i ub). Six teen are sponsor ed py s even schools and nine rec reationa l activities. Central City - The r e are eleven separa te activities pl ann ed, four privately sponsore d (Centra l City Neighborhood Ser vice Center, Bellwood Sa lva tion Army Boys' Club, Centra l YMCA, Central YWCA). Seven a r e city sponsor ed - fiv e school and two recrea tion. East Centra l - Ther e a r e 38 separa te activities planned, nine pr ivate and 29 city. The public activities represent ten schools and 19 recreat iona l activiti e s. The priva te pr ojects a r e the Atlanta Youth Development Center, Area Block 11 E11 , Mennonite House, Gra dy Homes Girls' Club, Grady Home s Boys' Club, Butler Street YMCA, Cabbage Town, Vista, and S. E. Branch Girls Club . • Edgewood Area - Ther e a r e t wenty s epa rate a ct i vities. Seven are priva t e ly spons or ed, thes e by Ne ighbor hood Service Cen t er , DeKalb YWCA, Ea stside Boys' Club and Eastside YMCA. The public are seven school s and six r e creation centers. Sum-Me e - The r e are 23 s e pa r a te activities, fou r are priva tely sponsor ed, (Neighbo r hood Se rv ice Center, Young Men 's Civ ic Lea gue, Mechanics ville Adv i sory Boa rd and Wa r r en Memor i a l Boys' Club). Ther e are 19 pub lic pr oj e ctssix schools and 13 rec r e a t i ona l pr oj e cts : Price - The r e a r e t wenty pr ojects, fou r priva te. They are Emaus Ne i ghbor hood Serv ice Center , Be thl ehem Center and Grady Homes Girls' Club (Carve r Unit). There are 16 city -- seven schools and nine rec reationa l activiti es. Pit ts bu rgh - In the Pi ttsburgh area , th ere are f ive s epara t e act ivi t ies , one being pr i va t e (Neighb orhood Servic e Center), four by city - one s chool and three re creati on centers. South Ful ton - There are six pr oj e c ts , f ive private ly spons ored and one pub l i c . The private are t wo Neighborhood Service Centers , Coll ege Park Civi c Club , South Fu l t on Boys ' Cl ub, and Tr i - City Girls ' Club. The pub lic proj ec t recreation program i s spons ored by t he City of East Point. North Fulton - There are two activities, one private and one public. The private is Neighborhood Service Center and the publ ic is by t he City of Roswe l l. Rockdale County Area~ One activity s ponsor ed by the Rockdale Neighborhood Service Center. ., �e ,,-,,.)---e /'\,v . Pub l i. c ~Ag1:.nc L!=~S: · V:i~e Cit.y f o:rn d ::i.t:i c,n E:mm,E,U S H::,use Royal K!,igh t s Ra d io S tat fo:·, WACK An i.nt.e g r·al p a r t .:;f t·h c Y ·u t h Opp c n ud t y Pr ;:;gr""!I' wi ll be t o m::i.ke 3 v ery· specia l eff._,rt: t c, get E.\·e r y ycti. Lh pos s -:.ble , xegarole s s f whether or r,o '.: they are w,_'r ~·- ·:rig, gc.in g ~:c sch col , or j u s t i dl -Lng t:hi s s ·;~rnr,er, t s en: E: h i s c o:r:q1.;:1. i.: y . You t:h Wt.11 b e ur g Ed t. 0 j .... i.,1 th e Summe r "Swi r-gers " Prog r a-:n . Th e y u th will b e u rge d to p artL c t pate a.s volunteer pE,rso,,ne l in a.genc· ie s ffer i.r::g re c- r e ::t ~i.,J:.1, e.d 1.1ca. t ion, emp l oyzient a:.1 d c>th e r se rvi c es. You. th wi.11 a l so b e urge d t o for:n you t h ac: t i.cn 5 r r,u p s 1.n t h eir ne i ghbor h o d s. They wi l l be inc l u de d in se ve-ra.l c. c:r:n.rn i t t (.e·s a nd g r. o'Jp s. Tee na ge rs a :•.d y c,ung ad •J lt~s will a l so b e. i :nc: l ud e d ,.,, t·'le m,;-, rt.:,r i ng a r.d eva l uati.c:i. staff of the p rog1. 3:'Jl. 3/· ~r ~ Pla.71s _ 8:nd Act:J:;,~sLe s Re s.:r.EJ:l9l~2.£ · Eff'ort' s w-U 1 b e rn':ld e t o re c r uit s E.vcra l lvJcd r e d vol 1Jnteers through s c h,__..:,1 , c- h urc~1E:s, r:.eigh b o r h ood g rcv ps a r:d 01:ga .0.i. z a.ti c~ s . Re cruit: = ment wi ll be by p e r scnal a pp ea.rac1ce , lE:,tter, b r o ch ures , r 3.:H o a::-td T. \T . app ea l s. Orie r:•.:a ti c_:9...,a nd Tr_g. i ·:1_: n_g,. I r:. l ate April, ar1 orie r~at?: t: 1.oa prcg r a m will b e s t:art.e d f o r all youth s i r:d:i.c G.t~ h g intere s t J n v-:.lu.'1.teE-::ri.-~1~,;, s crv: .1g on ccm~i.ttees, etc. Trainin g c f t hese p o ter,tial volu ::.cee:r:s wi.11 b e g i.ci u ear l y May . Tb€ ;.is e r a gencies will train the v o l un.reers. I":>e.y w.C 11 be a ssist:ed by t be Re d Cre ss , VlSIA, and ther similar crgan ·i za.U. ·:. s . .El~E:!E.tri.t • The p "i a c eme·, t. pr ocess w.Lll b e un der t a ke,·1 lJy the Yu th Opp o rt:•.ml.ty c, [f.i:.e:e , EOA, in c. .... t,pe r at i c n w· .th s eve r a. l ot 1e r age·.:-" tc'.es. Attempts wil l be made t o f L:1d s i.1 i.L B.ble place :uer:~ s 1.·o a ger c'ies where t:hey migh t have p oss-L b 1e v c c a ti'. ona l ch i- i. ··e s o r i a t e r e s t.. 0 A~ s . a. ,d _Inc e -~ l 1..' ;!'- S_. A very c ar·ef 11:y worke d cu t: awa rd s a rid :i nce~ti.ve p rc,g r 3:m wd l be de ve 1c pe d st c".d i.rr.plerr:ent.e d . Th ese wil1 i r;c1:.:;de ex~ cu rsion, an award di :1:-te t er r..i 6 ht, 11A volunt eer of t he. su::.mc r ' ' a.wa rd, a.:id a t e a. Eac h u s e.r. age~,cy will be u rged t:o pr ovid e s ·•.1i. table i · 1c e-r1U\-e p r o ~ grams f er t:h eir volurite:ers. =lrl �Public Sprons ored Pr o jec ts The publicly-spons ored projects cons is t of 62 schools (50 elementary schools and 12 high schools ), which wi ll be open twelve hour s daily and six days each week, concentrating on bas ic education ancl · educational programs. · It is estimated that approximately 30,000 children and youths will be involved in various types of remedial, advanced and specia l educational programs, including fo rma l surrrrner school. Upwards of 50,000 dis advantaged children and_youths will part icipa te in the 255 recreational pr ograms , The Atlanta Public Library is als o increasing its pr ogram activities. Program Activities Planned I. II. Public Agencies (a) City of Atlanta Parks, Recreation and Schools (1) Par ks , Playgrounds and Playlots - 31,000; (2) School Center s - 11,000; (3) Swimming (Re creationa l) - 15,800; (4) Evening Dances - 800; (5) Trips and Excursions - 15,300; (6) Athletics - 20,000 (b) Other Cities and Counties (1) Eas t Point; (2) Roswell; (3) Rockdale; (4) College Park Private Non-Prcfit Organiza~ions (a) (b) (c) (d) ( e) (f) (g) (h) (i) (j) (k) ( 1) III. General rec reation pr ogram - 24,585; Swimming ( recreational ) - 6,950 ; Trips and Excursions - 650; Teen Program ( evening) - 10,000; Cul tural and Arts Programs - 6,060; Game rooms (day) - 10,000; Record Hops and dances - 10,000; Day camps and resident camps - 1,608; Residen t camps fo r t eens - 300; Small group recrea tiona l activities - 312; Informal educationa l activities - 200; Community Impr ovement - 90 Neighborhood Ser vice Cen t ers , Citizens Groups, etc. (a ) (b) (c) (d) ( e) ( £) (g) Coupled recreation , work etc. pr ogram - 33,870; Swinnning instruction - 50; Trips - 1,000; Connnunity Impr ovement - 7,400; Dancing - 400; Tutorials - 291; Arts and Crafts - 1300 �IV. Special Re crea tion Programs Relating to All Groups (Participa tion Events Only) (a) Dance Mobile, WAOK -- 10,000; (b) Bookmobile -- 10,000; (c). Junior Olympics -- 200; (d) · City-wide tra ck Recreation Committee A sub-committee on recreation is now in operation. Chairman . . ~, Mr. Henr y Helton is �Summary There is a total of 184 projects concentrated in these twelve poverty areas. In addition to these 184, there are fourteen agencies offering services in some or all of the area. These are the Atlanta Singers, the Urban League, Academy Thea ter, the School of Ballet, the Emory University Story-Telling Project, Actors' Workshop, the Girl Scouts, the Ruth Mitchell Dance, Theater - Atlanta , WAOK Jr. D.J. Project, the Fun Bowl, Butler Street YNCA. This means that if at lea st one pr ogram activity is opera ted in the ten target areas weekly, it· , .;ill give each ar ea fo';lrteen additional programs. -· �Employment A. Approximately ~-0,000 Youth Opportunity Campaign pre-job registration forms were sent to schools, neighborhood service centers, social agencies and churches. From these job applications, approxima tely 6,000 jobs . will be filled. The following agencies, projects and/or organizations will furnish jobs: National Alliance of Businessmen The Summer Recrea tion Proposals The Federal Agencies The State Agencies The Subsidized Jobs (Neighborhood Youth Corps, Vocational Education, Title I, Etc.) Miscellaneous Pla cement - Youth Opportunity Campaign Total Committed 3,300. 1,000 700 7 600 500 6,100 The Youth Employment Center, Georgia State Employment Service, will be responsible for screenipg, counseling, and pla cement in the youth employment phase of this program. f The Atlanta Transit System h a s been appr oa ched about a ssisting in the transpor t ation of youths to jobs, As a pa rt of its work, the Youth Opportunity Program Staff will follow up on youths placed in this program and help them (1) (2) (3) Fine pa rt-time jobs after the summer is over; Obta in pl a cement in a ppr opria t e work expe rience and/or trai ning programs such a s the Ne i ghbor hood Youth Corps , Mcinpower Development and Training Act, Job Corps, JOBS, New Careers, etc.; Return to regular , voca tional or othe r spe cial scho~_ls. Severa l agencie s and organiza tions will be giving a ssistanc e to the you t h emp loymen t a spect of the Youth Oppor t unity Program . Thes e includ e the National All i ance o f Bus i nes smen , a ll Federa l Agenc ies , Economi c Opportun ity Atlanta , the Atlanta Board of Educa tion, Unite d Appeal Agencies , the Ci ty of Atlan t a , the Merit Emp loyment Ass ocia tion, various t rade as socia tions , and the Georg i a Sta t e Emp loymen t Servic e s (You th Employment Cente r ). �ADULT VOLUNTEER PROGRAM I. . Introduction A key to succ ess of the entire youth opportunity program will be the number of volunteers recruit e d. The manpower needed to carry out the many activi-ties in this pro gram is too numerous to be obtained from the limited funds available. Effort will be made to recruit, train and place a total of 500 full: iujd part time volunteers. These volunteers will serve in a variety of ways: Camp counselors, employ- . ment interviewers, game room supervisors, gym instructors, coaches, tµtors, bus supervisors, homemake teachers, arts and crafts instructors, and hundreds of other types of l eaders. II. Recruitment Recruitment of volunteers will be prima rily through public media, speaking engagements, brochures, and flyers. A full page ad will be placed in the three major n ews papers. The Federal Government, Labor Unions, several trade associatiops, professional organizations, churches, and religious groups will be solicited for volunteer services. The Federal agencies are asking all of its 27,000 volunteers to work in this program. III. Training Training of the volunteers will be don e by VISTA, the American Red Cross, and the us er agencies. IV. Plac ements A special volunte er placement connnittee is presently at work and will ptace the volunteers . Spe cial Even ts An import ant part of the Youth Opportunity Program will be special events . Severa l special events will be planned and implemented by the individual agencies and organi zations . The Sch ool and Recreation Department are now planning sp ec ial events such as J r. Olympics, Field Days, Chattanooga-At lanta Games and other similar events. In addition, arrangements are being made to obtain tickets and admission to movies, theaters , athletic events, and cultural activiti es. Bus ,·~-_p lane, train . ,., - 8= �and boat trips are b~ing arrang e d . Picnics, outings, and special sight - seeing tours are be ing arranged. The Special Events Sub-Committee is being chaired by Mr. st·eve Fox . TRANSPORTATION One of the most crucial and critical problems to be solved in the youth Opportunity program is transportation. Ninety-five per cent of all the proposals submitted requires transport~tion. The pr e s ent plan is to centralize all transportation and dispatch by request and re gular routing . The buses will be obtaine d from the following sources: The Atlanta Transit Company The/ Third Army and Other Military . The Fulton County Schools The DeKalb County Schools Fri ate owners of buse s us ed by the Counties Chu ch owned buses Th~ Greyhound Bus Th Trailways Bus Th Continental Trailways Bus Th'e major Rail Companies State National Guard An estimate of the transportation needs is illustrate d by the requests made in submitted projects. An estimated $158,000 is needed to provide th e need e d transportation for: ( Resident Camps Day Camps Trips Tours - 9- �GOAL: To recruit 100 Junior Volunteers for recrea tion; To recruit 50 .Jun.ior Volunteers for education; To recruit 50 Jun i or Volunteers for health; To recruit 100 Junior Voluntee rs for cultural enr ichmen.t; To recruit 100 Junior Volun t eers for tutoring; To recruit 100 Junior Volunteers for big pals; To recruit 100 Junior Volunteers for buddy program; To recruit 100 Junior Volunteers for day camp counselor; To recruit 100 Junior Volunteers for resident c &-nping; ' To recruit 100 Junior Volunteers for bus supervis ors; To recruit 100 Junior Volunteers for crafts and hobbies �INDIVIDUAL AND CASEWORK SERVICES This par t of the Youth Opportunity Program will attempt to accelerate services to individua ls or groups requiring specia l attention. The individua l and casework services wi ll deal with such pr oblems as unwed mothers, truancies, absenteeism, emotional disturb ances, delinquent b ehavior and VD. Most of its work will be done th r ough group services and recreational and religi ous agencies. Objectives: A. To augment and i ncrease needed individual and casework services to members of casework and hea lth agencies fo r child ren and youths. B. To h e lp poor youths more effectively, utili ze the services refe rred to above. C. To more tho r oughly familiarize poor fam ilies with avail ab le ser vic es in the community to serve thei r child r en and youth. D. Tb suppor t other pr ograms and staffs in their work with troubled and/or troubling children and youths . E. To undertake small demonstr a tion projects in the hope that they will become the r egular par t of the agencies' programs . A. To conduct a sma ll pi lot project aimed at some follow- up work with pregnan t g1.r1.s and unwed mothers. This project will involve 200 girls. B. To condu ct a pilot back-to-s chool and follow-up effort. C. To conduct pilot out-rea ch or street pr ograms in sel ected areas of the c ity . D. To conduc t a specia l counse l ing and small - group t reatment with s ome selected youths refe rred by agencies. E. To pr ovide some assistance to the Fult on and Dekalb Juven ile Courts in dealing with youths tha t are wards of the Cour ts. Goals: Program Activiti~ s Planned: A. Multi - agency proj ects to follow up on gir l s trea ted in the Grady Hospita l's unwed teena ge mo t h er projects. B. A ma jor ba ck- to - school effo rt in the f a ll of 1968; C. A limi ted oµ t -rea ch. s t r ee t workers pr oj ec t; D. A re l easee program f or youth returning f rom Youth Developmen t Center. �Committees on individual and casework services and juvenile delinquency have been organized. The chairmen are Mrs. Mar ian Ford and Edith Hambrick for casework and individual services, and Mr. J ames McGovern for delinquency. �A BHIEJ? PRO:-:trss Kr-;ro;.u · 07.,! ·nm YODTII o: J?O j,'((EU'. .'/ Pi:OGR',H ·--------· ........... ---··-·l. oxr;nn :i. z,l t i on' A. The M;.1y o1~ upp oin t 0d th~ Jlortr d of the Atl o.nl.:a Ch:i.ld:ccn a ncl Youth Ser vices Coun ciJ. as the Pr ozra m' s Ex ecutive Co:1l.rn:i.tte c. B. The Council established an Advi s o r y Con~ittee composed of soms 85 fci)C, i: t u r,ity P ro?;.·2m, /is n r e;su J.t , "/ 3 i n :i. t.:i.c: l. p 1.op 8::-.:t1.s were r cc2ivccl . t h e C0~-~ c i l r cc0 i v 0d pr o~oG~ J s f ro~ cul t~rn l nrt gro,1ps , Un :i_t cd t p;·, -::2 ls E. 0. A . l : d .shbc,::lic -::iJ Sc;:vJ.cic: C e~1 tc\ 1: [ ; ctt·1 d i ncl.i.~e no~i.':: r.;1:0~1pc::. }~. The Yoi.:t:h Oj, j,ortunj_ t y C, ,::r1 2 :i. ~n OfJ :i.c e h d.p sd t o d civ c J. o i1 tli c;c p1·opo s;: l s a l ong th e f c d cr2 l f,uid 2J.inc s . n. j)-~'(:!";C',, U .,, 3 p i·cz;:r.~11:-:: \ :.--:,: c CcJ] cc1 :i ri j1.:.:1.i_.,-f,1,.1:- ll y , [l J:c1 l ! 1~i.:1_· p i.... Oj (. C~~[_'. \ ~2 ).'C c~ i ,:-:ct.1 ~ S(. ~1 L;: :: p.:-. 11 t.; l ( J >: :,·,o:. . .:~} of }." \:;, r c :-<.: 1t::·. t :t, ·c. r3 f rc;:n t h e st.::.ff: o f E . 0 . I .. [·.nd th ,:,, SUlif c,,!c! };c, ::;·c1 o f: l.:112 /1t: l ::t,L1 C1d.J.cLcn inc1 Yoc:. t·l1 Sc :.: v:U:(:~~ C0._::-. c: .U . f .!_.<:o , tl1c, / . t.J. o.;_1t: r, T'.:-'.·. d:s ,:n0. Ec: c:rc:0 U .cu J);, lJ:l !~lJ::2-n · : :1 CY:::·!" J_..__ ••. ,· ...L n.:.(.) l·,O,. . _/'\ ,K · · .~ r ->· ., ., Ji).1n ...- "~:. ,/'") . .__ - 1 7 :-i"'· . .c ,.,.1,i.. ·t .l. e I C urnpU ::, (:.,'lp .l 0 .)"r.: r...on + .. ..n ,. U,t.) , ,). ,d , ""-' L /. ~ ). 8-:-; .. ..• OC c L J.on 0 1. Tht2 De p a:0trn e nt of Inte:d.or i s offer ing \. .· 1.-'• c . ._ , . _ _ ~ ~. Se1'v ices i s offeri ng fiJ.ms ) · t .l " fun ds ~ th e cw,d.l.a bi.l:ity of v oc~tiorw J. eclnc2t i o:1 wod:-study p r og;ra i:i and tl,e r;xpan ~; 5.on Grant Pi>og1··21:1, T:-: e PubJ..i.c Rc).a-:.: ions V-2p2tr·t ;:ic:nt o f llE1.·/ will a. l s o off er fp ee 111<::_il ir:;-; c1ncl pub.Uc i ty , 6. De na...rtmcnt o f La bo~ , Cont~cts we re made with th e LaLor Depart-nwU, nt:S,-,..,..~·.... to ma ke Ck'c-, Ll.e e s of ti,c 1/e ighborliood Yout h Co~' ps ccn d oth e1' prODi'.:E· ..... ,._ s J.ot:s c1va :i.l2bl~ to t h e ne e dy, f .s a r es ult I th e re h 2 s b c!cm 2.n inc1'c2,;e in inu·school slot ~ f m.' th is C.i. t y. The Labor Dq1:". r ti;1ent is ezp .lo:L'i n3; th e spe c.i.0,l i1,1? a ct p r og r"&r:1 for r:io:,ey ava ila b l e to th e pi.'og r,1m , 7. The Srn:.\J.l Bud .ness 1-.crn i nistra ·i: i o n i s circulari z i ng 27s0 00 e ~?loyces t o obt 2i n volunt ~crss s upp lies 2nd transport e.tion , 'l'h~iy 1:il). coe>rc1. i.na t c th.i. s pr·0i::·cn . 8. For t t!cPhc l.' son In~;t c1 .l).<1 t 5.or,, For·t l-icPh e;rs o n i s pl2.nni ng c'.nd c1.cve l opi nz c amping c:ctivitic::; for c1 chooscn 2.rcc1 , Co .l.oric J. Cc\ J J.oi·:,:y i s d5.scu ss .ir:z this info:r:;:1at5.on witli us and 1-: c ,:3. J..l. h 2:ve fu:e th e l' 5.n:~ol.'iil.:l t ion on th5.s at a l ater tir,·,e , 9, Sr1c1 l~, Bu.s:~nc s s Ac:m 5.n:i.~;t:•'cl t ioil . Th e Co~.;~ner ce De p2rtnc nt is e: onsid2:d.113 th E! t ,·.kePS for c'. S?ed.2 ]. cen s u s pPoz;l'cl::t . This o f f ice ha s 2.lre 2dy se;1t 7 00 y out h to c?.pply for s2.i d j ots . The Co ~!1111crc e Dc p "rt r.·,e n t i s iiOl'~ .i.n i •,;5. th th E: l::;-:p J. oy;r.e nt Co ,,,:~.i. t t ce s Pt1~Jlicity Co;,11,,itt c e as ,;E:ll 2.s SBt ~o pr·o:ilot e th i s p roz;r·c,:11 , 'i'il i s will 2.ls o U. S, De pe>.r t ;~e1~t of Co:-;1:,,erce , ~fiTi,J.·1~i····o'f--i:!-;·c;:~~-:rn:=I c:cf c:;i1st1s inc lude j obs eiven i f SBA so des i r es , B. S c,,_ t e 1. J.l.:-1 t .i o rw .1. Gi..' cll' d , Th e Nett 5.or.=1 J. G".lc.!.'d c:c,,·;tEtc:.: h 2 s b -2,:- ;, r0:~ .d c with Gcncl'c"'. l I C:c.l. n , 1-:l' , Bc.c:c-us i s h i ~; ,:0 cnt , Th (: N21 t.i.o:-:,:; l GL~.rd 1-;.U .J. r.,,d: G n s c o f t h e: !/cit 5.o ;,.=-:.l c~12r cl :'.:r,,-,0~··:: c s , 0 1 2, Gcor.-.~ 5.u _~·l:ctt o. _ D0 r:~~r.·t1.c. n t _ 0 f _ Fc,::: 5.)·Y... cln~1_Chi.l.C~:."::; ~-:_ SC!:·'v 54cc_~; ,. rfh is Jlcpc.1:i.'t f.1(?. llt i s 1:0:c·U.nJ 1-::i th tli ::o Cour:c i..7. 1 s Of f i ce t o try t o 6 c;t t he: Gov c:i.··,1-0!.' to c:p:::r-0i_)i.'.1.2tc~ $ :,0 ~ 00 to thi s p1·,c,.~;r' ~~,-1, Th e: D8j,.JC:'.'.' ~:;:H:n t o f Farn i.ly 2.1:d Cii .i.l clr-8n Se F ,' .i.c,) s i s c: J.s o s c2.:cc hL~g t o s c,e 11h 2, ,c fu rds i t c 2,n p i~o -..- i d e i' ll this l' (.~ .!)t.: C t , 3, St;,.t e lf ighi :2y lh~p21~·l_. ::1c nt h ~.s ag :-··c ;:,d t o to poo:,.' y o~1th tl"i.1.S su:::!TJ(.: P , 'i'h5 :. cr,~=~---~i tt er! j E; 0£ £·0:.• i n.:; 2..ss i st 143.215.248.55·ii:;c; . ......, .. --· -- ··- -· -~--- -- ., - -, _,. . _.,._ . . t o J_(;.::~ J. i>i... (;t·x, :1 5 11 c 0s i st i 1·1z; J.l'..-·:. :·)r·i!:-1·1$ c.. r:cl ~ J:c .::.Y / i c~ j_:-.,..: t E.. c L·ri i c-:t.l 0.ss.i.f: t unc-:: f>Cr··,i .lc ~;; 5, o .0 c:0:r~t.:_:~t --~\J·:·~~-~--~ ?:·,~·~:~-143.215.248.55;} _c..:,1_~11 Er , J; ,::c:tt 3. r:: i ~I r.:::.}~.l n~: sp0:c:chr.: s c~n cl h e .1- s c1.l r: o 1:·,2 ki ns cl }) ~)j_... t .i.o i-l or tl ie: t~:~-:·t:~; COi!,;,~5.f;s j Oi l ft~ !·!dS c.va.-:..1~~ b.l C! t o t h.i r; p r oi:..'.J::1 by cJ u,-,c~_in3 c1 f;psc .i :C ic p ::: c.j ect . ., �.., 6. St a t:e Pcerk s Dcp2 :,.:tn'. ~i1 t:. Th e St a t c P ,•.;_·ks De: p,1r t mc n t k l G b een c on t i"lC t c d ab out th e u ~;e ~f p a1{"s--fo1·h iking nn d c-::mping ( r e sid en t c1n d d t y ). 7. .Q.£9-D?; i a St~ t e He .:i. l th Dc pa· t me nt. Th :i. s Dep m: l me n t h o.s b e e n wo:.:k:i.ng wi t h t hi s o ff ice i n d e vt!l op i n g a r:.ocl e.n t: Contro l Prog ra m ,m(l e. l so o ff er ing i t s ass i sUm c c i n m;:i_ n y o t h er t y pe s o f p r.og1:,c:ms app ;:·op1:i <1 t. e £0 1· th is a ge ncy . 1. : Personn e l D~-~~rt r.1t>11 t, Th e Ci t y of Atl nn t a Pei: sonn e l Dcp.'.).rtment i s h e lping NYC enro ll ees obt a i n c op loym~n t in t h e City ' s p r ogrnms . The De p a rtme n t i s a l so d eve l op in g a sp2cia l ki n d o[ pro gram to h e l p ap prox :i.r.w. te l y l"/ 5 n eedy a ncl cUs a i.' S . 3. VIST!\ · ,-:.i. .l.l h!:,l p t rc!.5 n th e v c,J.unt c.:i.',; . Th e VIS'C/\ Cou;,ciJ. ·,,:i.l.J. als o~ hc .1.p t o finc1 tl'a isportic;.tio:1 r cso t1 rcc:s s c spcd .c1 J.ly 2.r.10:~::; the church,2s , 4. Some of th e pl' iv~t e s ubl\)."·l n n ~choo.1.s ,:.-i..l.l p r ovic1c sc!.olc:i.r:s}iips fo r su;;-1m-:::1.' p i.'0 2) -'C:,i:ls f m.' p oor · yoFth , On0. ( T:i. ini.ty ) 1.15.cht b e: ,:! blc t o ma.k c ~; on:c . of it s tc.:i d w :i.··s e1vd.J. 21hle fo:i.' tu tc,~.--,.i.rig .i.n th e 5.rrnc:r- -0 city. G. l\(: d Cr·os.,_; II, !j,., c35_c ;:,.l. /,s,,oc i c~ i.:3. oi1 Tli ~, FultC>:l , rnr1 D:::: ~~2, J b J-'. c:d j c<~ l /,·;c;()C 5at i.ons 1-1.U ..l. v e-:,,,1:i ck: 11:·:, d :i.c.,:J. c x~nn 5.n,~ t io1is fo:-.·· c,1rnp . I. A~t ~ Counc i l s ., Th e t.-c- ·e:; Counc :iJ. -~ 1:i ll Li.id «ri rJ t r~d 11 v o .1.ll ntc c-:,.'s f o ;: 5.t :; c1rt:·: ,me] 1 Cl.ll'l.L: /', ..1 r•1 ·,,:'.-,_,_-,,,,:"' , -., �1. Georg i a Stc1tc Coll ege wi.l..l 2ssist with vo.lunt ec1°s f or ar.t an·~> . I . ' 600 5 00 •' Total Conmittcd - - ----·--- - --- - -------- - -·-------~·100 The Youth Employment Center, Geo1·gia St a te E,nployi112nt Scrvj'_ce , will be respons:i.b le f or screen ing, c ounse ling ~n. tecl by th:: reques t s mc1de in submitted pr oj e cts. An estima t ed $158,000 is needed to prov ide the neede d trans po r t at ion fo r r es id ent camps , day c a:·,1 ps, tri ps anc1 tours . ,, -l;-· . �r J CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 April 8, 1968 JACK C. DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER Mr. Dan sweat Director, Governmental Liaison Mayor's Office City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Dan: I attach hereto our proposal to E.O.A. for summer Recreation, Employment and Enrichment Program. You will note that the cash requested exceeds $1,300,000. On April 5, 1968 we were advised by Mr. Jim Parham, Director of E.O.A., that only $590,000 would be available to fund all proposals from private, as well as public agencies. We are asking to receive 100% of all cash available, but even if this is done, we will need supplemental financing by City funds. The attached proposal is submitted to your attention relative to the recently passed Ordinance requiring a review of all proposals by the Review Application Board, the Finance Corrnnittee, and the Department's respective Committee . The Parks Committee of the Board of Aldermen on March 22, 1968 approved the submission o f the attached. ncerely, C ~ .J Enclosure JCD:jw ck c. Delius eral Manager of ks and Recreation �March 29, 1968 DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION CITY OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA (In Conjunction With Atlanta Public Schools) I. TITLE OF PROJECT: Duration: II. III. IV. Recreation, Employment and Enrichment Program From June 1, 1968, to September 2, 1968 (With certain programs extending to December 31, 1968). (a) Department of Parks and Recreation, City of Atlanta, Georgia, (In conjunction with Atlanta Public Schools), City Hall Annex, 260 Central Avenue, S. W., Atlanta, Georgia, 30303 (Public). Ja. 2-4463, Ext. 311. (b) Jack C. Delius, General Manager, Parks & Recreation, and Alan Koth, School Department. (c) Stanley T. Ma rtin, Jr., J a ck C. Delius. (d) Charles L. Davis, Comptroller The geographic area to be covered is that portion of the City of Atlanta designated by E. O. A. as Tar ge t Area ; plus, Fringe Areas which are borderline in respect to economic and social cla ssi f ications. The persons to be s erved are f ive years of a ge to s e nior citizens; both s exes, in-school a nd out-of -school. V. It is estimated that 150 participa nts each day will us e ea ch location. Plans ca ll f or 140 loca tions to be s erved. Thus, 21,000 persons each day wi ll be served. This f i gure doe s not i nc lude a c tiv iti e s such a s Award Day, audien.ces f or band concerts, e tc., and other s pec tator a ctivities . VI . Many a r eas of the city a r e deficien t i n park and recreati on fa cili ties . This f a ct had been clearly noted by the just comp l e t e d 1968-1983 Parks and Recrea tion Pl an . Staf f of E. O. A. , Community Council, Ci ty Pl anning and Department of Parks conducted t he study. The need f or the pr ogram covered by this proposal i s clear ly e v i dent in the total a b sence of park and recreation fa c ili ties in many targe t areas and t h e inadequa cy of facilities where they do exis t . In resp onse t o these deficiencies , s ome 40 playlo ts have been cons tructed and s taffed, u s i ng f or the most part , E. O. A. f unds. These playlots f a il t o pr ovide full y ade~uate physical faci lities . Thus, s ome 62 school s wil l be u sed dur i ng the summer. The report Opportuni t y For Urban Excellence cites a c lose corre l ation between a bsence of fac i lities and incident of juveni l e delinquency. VII. A coordinator of summer activities will be employed by May 1, 1968. His duties wi ll be to ·.initi~lly locate and recruit l eaders of ALL age levels in ALL target areas to serve a s an Adv isory Counci l f or planning and development. The Coordinator will be assisted in recruitment by school counci l ors �at 62 elementary and high school locations; by E. O. A. Neighborhood Service Center Personnel; by the Community Council and by staff of Parks and Recreation Department, Leaders representing not only their age group but their respective neighborhoods will be asked to assist the staff in planning the summer program. It is intended that each location (be it school, park or public housing project) will have local preferences as to types of programs. However, it is assumed that some identifiable basic list of prepared activities will emerge and utilized as a base to insure "equal" programs on a city-wide basis. The program will initially be developed on a .pilot basis with constant evaluation by neighborhood leaders. Once assured of our acceptability and desirability of a given activity, it will be offered city-wide for the duration of the summer, Heavy emphasis will be placed on employing disadvantaged citizens in the operation of the program, Assignments of employment will range from actually operational, such as Recreation Aides to Advisory and Representation Roles in the various communities. It is planned that distinctive shirts will be suppl:•.ed to teenagers wlu:- will serve as cadre on a voluntary basis, approximately 100 teenagers and young adults will be transported to Atlanta Wilderness Camp each week to assist in its development while at camp. The young people will be taught swimming, canoeing, camping, nature interpretation, etc, VIII. IX. The project will have an overall Director, Assistant Director, Clerical Staff, Recreation Leaders, Recreation Supervisors, Camp Directors, Enrichment Personnel (Dance, Drama, Music, Arts and Craft). The number of poor youth , employed will be 336. Volunteers will exceed 100. The program will cover all areas within the defined boundries of E. O. A's. target zones. Some 140 locations will be staffed, using 62 schools and 78 parks and playlot locations. The hours of operation will be 9 A.M. - 9 P.M., Monday through Saturday. There will be a Central Headquarters located at Central Junior High School, 232 Pryor Street, S. E. The central office will coo r din,::i.te all Pa r k and Rec r eation Department and Atlanta Public School Department's summer activites related to recreation, employment and cultural enrichment for the disadvantaged. The Program Director will be in ove r all charge of the project and will answer to a committee made up of School and Parks personnel as well as advisory committee of citizens. Al l supplies, e uipment, travel and transportaion, payroll, etc., will be handled a t the Central Office, The City of Atlanta Purchasing Department will handle pu rchase transactions when requisitioned by the Central Office. The Central Office will maintain account records in order to h ave available current data. The Da t a Processing Division of Atlanta Public Schools will be utilized if needed to analyze problems, expenditures, p articipation, etc. It is imperative th at the Central Office be staffed by May 1, 1968 in order to establish procedures, communications with the neighborhood's recruitment and supply channels. This Parks/Schools joint venture will carefully supplement and mesh with (1) regular City recreation problems, (2) Community Schools, (3) work - study and vocational education, (4) Title I Pro gr ams, (5) Neighborhood Youth Corps InSchool Enrollees, (6) contributing private agencies, (7) Academic Summer Schoo l Pr ogram (8) Head Start, (9) individual contributions, (10) other public agenc y c ontribu tions. The At l anta Children and You t h Council will s erve as overall �coordinator acting for and with Mayor's Council on Youth Opportunity to see that all other support agencies are carefully coordinated with the City's program. This project will not pre-emp, but rather supplement r egular City programs. Without Federa l Funds, much, if not all, of the planned activities for disadvantaged areas would be curtailed, Thus, this Community Action Program complements the total City program. Youth, young adults, adults and senior citizens will assist in planning the program, its operation, and evaluation. Of special emphasis will be a ge group 5-25 years with the greatest attention directed to the teenager and young adult. The school drop-out, the potentia l drop-out, those wi t h no immediate source of income, those with no positive contacts with Social Service Agencies, and those with no consistent work history on marketable skills will be located and employed by Central Office as an initial step in structuring and planning the program. Allocation of job slots will be based on geographical distribution and population so that all target areas wi l l contribute. The Neighborhood Service Center, School Counselors and Soci a l Agencies will be invited to assist in locating and screening applicant s. A police record will not necessarily preclude employment, but the Director's judgement will prevail in cases involving morals, and in particular, s exua l offenses. There will be no formal Civil Service Examination; selection will be based on (1) need for employment as outlined above, (2) neighborhood identification, (3) leadership a bility, and (4) skills that can contr i but e t o the progr am. The Pro gr am Dir ector will name fin a l selection and a s s i gnment. Arrangements will be made for medical physicals to be given each applicant. Medical problems will be reported to Fulton County Medical Department for follow-up. Medical prot lems will not necessarily bar employment, but rather serve as a guide in a ssignments. Five recreation districts will be established and supe rvis ed by re gular Park/School personnel. Youth will be u sed a s Aide s in e a ch dis t rict office (as well as Control Office), each school and each park area. Activities to be offe red: Crea t i ve Rhytmics Outdoor Games Quiet Garnes Folk Dancing So f tba ll Volleyba ll Camp Craft s Sewi ng Ceramics Photography Mu sic Apprec iation Team Spo rts Weight Training Day and Overnight Camping Wood Wor k i ng Ba ton Lessons Cheer leading Swimming Tra ck and Fie ld Puppetr y Tumblin g Typing Fie ld Tr ips Teen Ch arm Jewe l ry Making Modern a nd Tap Dancing Judo �Obviously, not all of the above activities can be offered at each location. The Citizens 1 Advisory gr oups may delete and/or add to the list. As to frequency, in the c a se of field trips, these will be scheduled for at least once a week per location. Definite schedules and programs wil l be distributed thru schools (before they recess for summer) Neighb orh ood Se rvice Centers, and. news media. Already, one television station has agreed to publicize the program on a continuing daily basis. X. ; · Atlanta Youth Council. Coordination of private and public agencies in youth opportunity program. Ga. Arts Commission. Contribution of technical assistance in arts and drama. Production of neighborhood movies and plays. Atlanta Braves and Atlanta Chie fs . to stadium events. Sports clinics, donated tickets Atlanta School System. Full partnership with Parks Department in summer program. Program will use some 62 schools. Army Corp 1 s of Engineers. Full utilization of Lake Allatoona property, namely, Atlanta Wilderness Camp s and Atlanta Recreation Camps. At lanta University Cen te r . Supply some 50 students majoring in Phs . Ed . and Recreation to serve internship in summer. Childrens' Academy Theatr e . Public Library. Plays in t a rget areas. Readin g clinics. Band of Atlanta . At least two concer ts in disadvantaged areas. Th eater Atlanta. Series of free productions. Buckhead Men 1 s Ga rd en Club . etc. " Mag ic o f Growing ". Mr. George Meyer. Private Theater Group - Mr. Eugene Moor e . Individual. Farm". Douglasville , Ga. Junior League. Children gar den p lots, Plays in Pi edmont Park. Large es tate - apple orchard . "Day at the Individu al participation. Possible Donor - Wegner Showmobile. XI . All facilities of the Department o f Parks and The Atlanta School Sy ste m which are needed to have a successful program will be used. The l oca tion of schools is as follows: �TENTATIVE LIST OF SCHOOLS WITH A COMPLETE SUMMER PROGRAM AREA I Elementary High School English Avenue, 1., 2., 3. Craddock, 1. Bethune, 1., 2., 3. Ware, 1., 2., 3, Couch, 1., 3. Fowler, 1. Haygood, 1. Hardnett, 1., 2. Harris, 3. M.A. Jones, 1., 2., 3. Ragsdale Herndon, 1. E. R. Carter Brown, 1., 2. Washington, 1. O'Keefe Central (Office) AREA II Harper, 1. Parks . Jr. High, 1. Gilbert, 3. Benteen Blair Village, 2., 3. Price, 1. , 2. Fulton AREA III Scott, 1., 3. Bolton Mt. Vernon Finch, 1. Hill, 1., 2., 3. Forre st, 1. Butler, 1. John Hope, 1. Inman Park, 1. Archer, 1. Grady, 2. AREA IV Mayson, 1. Towns Fain Williams, 1., 2., 3 . Carey, 1. West Haven White Clement, 1. We st Fulton, 1. Turner, 1., 2. Harper �AREA V Reynolds, 1. Lin Pryor, 1. Cooper, 1. Capitol Avenue, 1., 2., 3. Slaton, 1., 3. Cook, 1., 3. E. P. Johnson, 1. Daniel Stanton, 1. Hubert, 1. Coan, 1. Wesley, 1., 2., 3. Toomer Bass Roosevelt, 1., 2. Murphy, 1. ELIMINATED DUE TO CONSTRUCTION IMPROVEMENTS Chattahoochee Highland Bryant Howard - Hope CODE 1. 2. 3, Title I Academic Program Head Start PARKS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10 . 11 . 12. 13, 14. 15 . 16 . 1 7. 18. 19. 20 . 21 . 22 . Chattahoochee (undeveloped) Gun Club English Parks - supplement Adamsville (use Fain playground) - supplement Cen t er Hill Gr ove ·- suppl ement Ande rs on Pa r k - supplemen t Mozley - supplement Maddox Park Wa shing t on Park Universi ty Park Cou ch Park Home Park - s upplement Te chwood (Housing Pro j e c t ) Piedmont Pa rk Bed f or d-Pine (Hill Sch ool) But l er Park Bass - s upplemen t Sava nna h Stree t Oa kla nd Ci ty Park Adair Pa rk - supplement Pi t t man - supplement �PARKS (Cont'd) 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32, 33. 34. 35. 36. Joyla nd - extended Carver - exte nded Rawson-Washington - supplement Thomasville - supplement Walker Park Wesley Park Branham Park - supplement 71 Little Stre et 253 Dodd Avenue 666 Parkway Drive Haynes Street Vine City Kni ght Park Harper Park (4 Senior Hi gh Rise) BLOCK PARKS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11 . 12 . 13 . 14. 15 . 16 . 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24, 25 . 26, 27. 28, 29. 30. Auburn Avenue - Boulevard, N. E. Forres t & For t Avenue , N. E. Angier - Parkway , N. E. Merri tts & Bedf or d St ., N. E. Blvd, Pl. & Glen Iris Dr., N. E. Samp son - East Avenue , N. E. Wylie & Tye St., S. E. Ver non St r ee t, N. E. Hanover & Renfr oe St., S. E. Conley St ., S . E. Atl anta Sta dium Wind sor St., S. W. I r a St ., S. W. Eugenia-Rawson St. , S. W. McDanie l St. & Georgia Avenue Ashby Circ l e Harris Homes Rhodes St . - Suns et Blvd. 3 73 Thurmond St. , S , W. Vanier & Cap i tal Hubbard & University Park Avenue & Lansing Haygood & Crew La dd St., S. W. Wilson Dr., N. W. Verbena St., N. W. Ha bshal & Il=rry Blvd., N. w. Perry Blvd. & Lively, N. W. Arlington Circle, N. W. Daniel Stree t, N. E. �XII. XIII. Constant monitoring and evaluation by Citizens' Advisory Committee as well as staff of School Board and Parks Department. This project compliments and extends normal agency program and fills gaps and deficiencies existing in disadvantaged areas. In addition to service to the .poor, the program will clearly illustrate to the city and its citizens what can be done with sufficient financing. It can not be stated a t this time what part of this program will be continued once federal funding is completed. However, on two previous occasions, the ~City has continued parts of O.E.O. financed funding. �CITY OF ATLANTA -RECREATION, EMPLOYMENT , AJ.~D ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR SUMMER , 1968 BUDGET RECAP FE DERAL SHARE i; . II. III. I V. v. VI . VII . PERSONNEL $ 873,367 NON-FEDERAL SH.ll.RE $ 101 , 6 00 CONSULTANTS & CONTRACT .SERVICES , 3,000 None TRAVEL 90, 4 10 1, 7 35 2 ,0 25 261,1 8 0 28 2,29 7 9,000 8 0, 55 0 62 , 880 7, 130 51,295 SPACE COSTS & RENTALS CONSUMABLE SUPPLI ES RENTAL/LEASE/ PURCHASE OF EQUIPMENT OTHER COSTS $1 , 338,779 FEDERAL SHARE: $ 1 , 338 ,779 NON- FEDERAL SHARE: $ 487, 690 TOTAL COST OF PROJECT: · $ 1 , 826 , 469 $ 487,(59(? I f �CITY OF ATLANTA RECREATION, EMPLOYMENT, AND ENRICHMENT PROGRAM SUMMER, 1968 BUDGET - FEDERAL SHARE . FEDERAL SHARE I i I I I. t PERSONNEL I I i I I ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF: I Dil:RECTOR - 4 MONTHS@ $1,000.00/MO. $ 4 ,000.00 ASSISTANT DIRECTOR - 4 MONTHS@ $754.00/MO. 3,016.00 · BUSINESS MANAGER - 4 MONTHS @ $612.00/MO 2, 4 4 8 .00 ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT - 4 MONTHS @ $ 497.00/MO. 1, 988.00 PAYROLL CLERK - 1 , 260.00 3 MONTHS@ $ 420.00/MO. PRINCIPAL STENOGRAPHER - 4 MONTHS @ $457.00/MO. 1, 828.00 GENERAL CLERK - 4 MONTHS@ $326.00/MO. 1,304 .. 00 YOUTH ASSISTANTS (3) - 4 MONTHS@ $1.40/HOUR EACH 2,688.00 REGIONAL OFFICES: AREA RECREATION SUPERVISORS ( 5) - 15 DAYS @ $ 32. 00/DAY EACH AREA SCHOOL SUPERVISORS (5) - 80 DAYS @ $ 32. 00/DAY EACH 2, ,4 0 0 .00 12, 8 00.00 I I I ASSISTANT RECREATION SUPERVISORS (5) - 3 MONTHS @ $438.00/MO. EACH 6,570.00 TYPIST CLERKS (5) - 3 MONTHS@ $326.00/MO . EACH 4 , 8 90 .. 00 YOUTH ASSISTANTS (10) - 3 MONTHS @ $1.40/HR. EACE 6 ,7 20 . 00 I I I PARKS/SCHOOLS/ BLOCK PARKS: COMMUNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS (13) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $ 20. 25/DAY 21,060 . 00 COMMUNITY RECREATI ON LEADERS ( 5 7) - 8 0 DAYS EACH @ $16.40/DAY 74,784 .. 00 ENRICHMENT SPECI.ALISTS ( 36) - 560 HOURS EACH @ $4.00/HR. 80 ,640 . 00 �PERSONNEL - Continued YOUTH ASSIST ANTS ( 336) - 12 WEEKS EACH @ $56.00/WEEK 225,792.00 i . BLOCK PARK LEADERS ( 60) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $16 .. 40/DAY 78,720 .. 00 SENIOR CITIZEN LEADERS (8) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $16. 4 0/DAY 10, 49 6.00 , SPECIALISTS (8) - 40 DAYS EACH@ $20.00?DAY ASSISTANT POOL SUPERVISOR - 13 WEEKS@ $100.00/WEEK WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTORS (22) - 280 HOURS EACH @ $2.25/HOUR WATER SAFETY ASSISTANTS (11) - 280 HOURS EACH @ $1.75/HOUR WATER SAFETY AIDES (11) 280 HOURS EACH @ $1.40/HOUR 6, 4 00 ... 00 1,300.00 13,860.00 5,390.00 4,312.00 AREA RECREATION DIRECTORS (12) - 60 DAYS EACH @ $22.95/DAY 16,5 24.00 COMMUNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS (62) DAYS EACH @ $ 20. 25/DAY 75, 32.0.00 COMMUNITY RECREATION LEADERS (56) - 60 DAYS EACH @ $16.4_0 /DAY 55,104 .00 INSTRUCTORS (124) - 15 HOURS PER WEEK EACH @ $ 4 .00/HOUR FOR 10 WEEKS 7 4 , 4-00.00 WILDERNESS CAMP: PROJECT DIRECTOR - 48 DAYS @ $26.00/DAY ASSISTANT PROJECT DIRECTOR - 48 DAYS@ $24.95/DAY PROGRAM DIRECTOR - 48@ $2 4 .95/DAY 1,197.00 COUNSELORS ( 6 ) - 48 DAYS EACH @ $16.40/DAY 4,723.00 COOK - 48 DAYS@ $20.00/DAY 9 6 0.00 . ASSISTANT COOK - 48 DAYS @ $12.50/DAY 600.00 ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP: CAMP DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $26.00/DAY 2,08 0.00 ASSISTANT CAMP DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $20.25/DAY 1, 620 .00 PROGRJ..M DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $16. 40/DAY 1, 312 .00 i· �PERSONNEL - Continued COUNSELORS (6) - 80 DAYS @ $15.00/DAY EACH 7., 200 .00 REGISTERED NURSE - 80 DAYS @ $26.00/DAY DIETITIAN - 80 DKYS@ $20.00/DAY 1., 6 00 .. 0 0 COOK - 80 DAYS@ $20.00/DAY 1, 6 0 0 .00 ASSISTh~T COOK - 80 DAYS @ $12.50/DKY 1.,000.00 INSTANT RECREATION TASK FORCE: PROJECT DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $20.25/DAY I I 1,6 20 . 00 RECREATION LEADERS (20) - 80 DAYS EACH@ $16. 40/DAY 26, 240.00 II ROVING YlA.INTENANCE CREWS: i GROUNDS FOREMEN (5) - 26 DAYS EACH@ $29.45/DAY 3,828 . 0 0 LABOR FOREMEN (10) - 26 DAYS EACH@ $21.10/DAY 5, 486.00 EQUIPMENT OPERATORS (10) - 26 DAYS EA. @ $1 6 . 40/DAY 4 , 26 ~ w00 LABORERS (20) - 26 DAYS EACH@ $1 4 . 40/DAY 7, 488.00 TOTAL PERSONNEL I .I I $ 87 3 , 367.00 FEDERAL SHARE II. CONSULTANTS AND CONTRACT SERVICES CONSULTANTS FEES FOR FINAL EVALUATION TOTAL III. $ 3,000 .. 00 $ 3 , 000.00 TRAVEL i RENTAL OF BUSES FOR FIELD TRIPS INSIDE CITY 1250 TRIPS@ $41. 0 0 EACH RENTAL OF BUSES FOR FIELD TRIPS OUT OF CITY 200 TRIPS@ $45.00 EACH ALL DAY RENTAL OF BUSES 420 BUSES@ $68,00 PER DAY EACH ·CAR ALLOWANCES: DIRECTOR= 4 MONTHS@ $80000/MOo $ 51,250. 00 9,000 .. 00 I �TRAVEL - Continued ASSISTANT DIRECTOR - 4 MONTHS@ $80.00/MO. 320.00 PAYROLL CLERK - 3 MONTHS @ $50.00/MO. 150 .. 00 RECREATION DISTRICT SUPERVISORS (5) 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO• · , . SCHOOL DISTRICT SUPERVISORS (5) - 3 MONTHS __@ $ 5 0 • 0 0 /MO • 150 .. 00 COMMUNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS (5) 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 150 .. 00 I I r I I I I ASSISTANT POOL SUPERVISOR - 3 MONTHS @ $20.00/MO. 60.00 I I I PROJECT DIRECTORS (2)- 2 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 100.00 ASSISTANT PROJECT DIRECTORS (2) - 2 MONTHS @ $50.00/MO. 100 .. 00 PROGRAM DIRECTORS (2) - 2 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 100 . 00 TOTAL $ 90, 410.00 II i IV. SPACE COSTS AND RENTALS INDOOR FACILITIES FOR TEMPORARY RECREATION CENTERS - 3 HOUSES@ $120.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS .,.~·$ BLOCK PARKS - 45 RENTALS @ $7 .00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS TOTAL 1,080 . 00 9 4 5 .. 00 $ 2,025.00 FEDERAL SHARE V. CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES CENTRAL OFFICE : OFFICE SUPPLIES - $250.00/ MO. FOR 4 MONTHS $ ·1 , 000 .oo �CO NSUMABLE SUPPL I ES - Co n t inued REGIONAL OFFICES: OFFICE SUPPLIES - 5 LOCATIONS @ $35.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 525 .. 0 0 PARKS/SCHOOLS/BLOCK PA...qK s : RECREATION SUPPLIES - BALLS, G.AlvIES, ARTS . & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, ATHLETI C SUPPLIES FOR 140 LOCATIONS @ $ 500. 00/LOCATIONS 70,000 . 00 FOOD FOR LUNCHES - 100 CHILDREN PER DAY @ $.20/CHILD AT 140 LOCATIONS FOR 60 DAYS 168,000.00 WILDERNESS CAMP: ATHLETIC SUPPLIES, SHELLS, A...1:ffiOWS, ARTS & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, GAMES, BLANKETS, SHEETS, FIRST AID SUPPLIES, CAMPING SUPPLIES FOOD FOR 4 8 DAYS FOR 111 TEENAGERS AND STAFF @ $4.00/DAY EACH ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP: ATHLETIC SUPPLIES, ARTS & CRAF TS SUPPLIES, GAMES, BLANKETS, SHEETS, F I RST AID SUPPLIES FOOD FOR 80 DAYS FOR 5 3 CHILDREN AND STAFF @ $ 4 .00/DAY EACH TOTAL VI . $ 2 8 :2, 29 7 . 00 RENTAL/LE ASE/PURCHASE OF EQUIPMENT PARKS/SCHOOLS/BLOCK PARK S : 1 8 POOL TABLES @ $ 35 0 . 00 EACH 6,300 . 00 $ PARALLEL BAR S & RELATED PHYSICAL FITNESS EQUIPMENT - 120 ITEMS @ 1 00.00 EACH 12,000 . 0 0 WEI GHT LI FTING EQUIPMENT & BENCH 10 SETS@ $ 5 0 . 0 0 EACH 500 . 00 MATS FOR 10 AREAS@ $2 00 . 00/AREA 25 BASKETBALL GOALS BACKBOARDS @ $50 . 00 EACH 5 SETS OF SOCCER GOAL S @ $15 0 . 00/SET & 1, 2 50 . 0 0 7 5 0 . 00 ...... ·--~. ... -· �RENTAL/LE ASE/PURCHASE OF EQUIPMENT - Continued I L0,000 .. 00 BASEBALL GLOVES FOR 100 TEAMS@ $100.00/TEAM 1,500 . 00 100 TENNIS RACKETS@ $15.00 EACH I I I .,.Ii . !! I I I VOLLEY BALL STANDARDS - 100 PAIRS @ $25.00/PAIR 2,500 .00 300 ARCHERY BOWS@ $12.00 EACH 3,600.00 100 ARCHERY TARGETS @ $20.00 EACH 2,000.00 i i I I PORTABLE TOILET RENTALS FOR 50 LOCATIONS @ $45.00/MONTH EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 6,750 .. 00 MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPJVlENT RENTALS & PURCHASES - . FILM RENTALS, RECORD PLAYERS, ETC. FOR 140 LOCATIONS@ $100.00/LOCATION 14,000.00 WILDERNESS CAMP: STOVE , ELECTRIC GENERATOR, COOKING SHELTER, STORAGE SHED, COTS, TOILETS, TOOLS, ETC. ESTIMATED BY CITY 10,000.00 2,000.00 ELECTRIC PUMP AND WATER TANK RENTAL OF PICKUP TRUCKS - 2 TRUCKS @ $150.00/MO. FOR 3 MONTHS 900.00 ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP: BOATS, PADDLES, BUOYS, CHAIRS, DISHES, UTENSILS AND MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS ESTIMATED BY CITY 2 ,500.00 ELECTRIC PUMP & WATER TANK TOTAL VII. $ 80,550.00 $ 3,500 .. 00 OTHER COSTS PHYSICAL EXAMS FOR APPROXIMATELY 350 YOUTH EMPLOYED @ $10.00/EMPLOYEE ADVERTISING EXPENSE 2 , 00 0 .. 00 ADMISSION TICKETS FOR SPECIAL EVENTS 7 ADDITI ONAL TELEPHONES @ $3 0 . 00/MOo FOR 3 MONTHS 1 ,0 00.00 TOTAL TOTAL FEDERAL SHARE $ 7 , ·13 0 .. oo $ 1, 338,7 79.00 II �SUM.L'1ER RECREATION PROGRAM ., JUNE 1, 1968 - SEPT. 1, 1968 '• ,· ·: :,. .: I I  : ' . ii TOTAL BUDGET - NON-FEDERAL SHARE I. PERSONNEL GENERAL MAL~AGER OF PARKS & RECREATION ONE MONTH @ $17,628.00 Al.~NUAL $ P.SSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER OF PARKS TWO . WEEKS@ $12,116.00 ANNUAL 1,469.00 \ . 466.00 ' . II DIRECTOR OF RECREATION - ONE MONTH @ $12,116.00 Al.'lliUAL Ii 1,009.00 ADMIN ISTRATIVE .ASSISTANT - ONE MONTH @ $9,841.00 ANNUAL 820.00 ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF RECREATIO N ONE MONTH@ $9,048.00 ANNUAL 75 4 •.00 RECREATION SUPERVISORS (8) - TWO WEEKS EACH @ $7,345.00 ANNUAL ' I I I I I I. 2,260.00 OFFICE MANAGER - TWO WEEKS@ $9,048.00 ANNUAL 348 .00 ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT - TWO WEEKS @ $5,967.00 ANNUAL 229.50 PRINCIPAL STENOGRAPHER - TWO WEEKS @ $5,486.00 ANNUAL 211.00 SENIOR TYPIST CLERK - ONE WEEK@ $4,641.00 . · '89. 25 ·, . ! STENO CLERK - ONE WEEK@ $ 4/264. 00 ANNUAL 82.00 I TYPIST CLERK - ONE WEEK@ $ 3 ,913 . 00 ANNUAL 75 .25 i PARKS ENGINEER - TWO WEEKS@ $11,15 4. 00 ANNUAL 429.00 DRAFTSMAN - TWO WEEKS@ $5,720.00 ANNUAL 220.00 I I I I . i· !. I I I PARKS MAINTENANCE SUPERINTENDENT - ONE MONTH @ $10,257.00 ANNUAL ~54.00 ENGINEERING ASSISTANT - ONE MONTH @ $8,671.00 ANNUAL 722 . 00 .I I. I· ENGINEERING AI DE II ( 2) - ONE MONTH EACH @ $4,836.00 ANNUAL 806.00 GROUNDS FOREMA..~ II - ONE WEEK @ $7,657.00 ANNUAL 147.25 LABOR FOREMAN = TWO MONTHS @ $5,486 .. 00 ANNUAL 914.00 i I �PERSONNEL - Continued LABORERS - 1,800 HOURS @ $1. 80/HOUR -CARPENTERS - 40 HOURS@ $3.25/HOUR 3,240.00 130 .. 00 GENERAL MAINTENANCE JV.LECHANIC II - TWO WEEKS @ $7,345.00 ANNUAL 282.50 EQUIPMENT OPERATOR I - 8 HOURS @ $2.05/HOUR 16. 4 0 .. FORESTRY FOREMAN - 8 HOURS @ $3.25/HOUR 26.00 TREE TRIMMER II - 24 HOURS @ $2.13/HOUR 51.12 TREE TRIMMER I - 24 HOURS 45.12 I @ $1. 88/HOUR ELECTRICIAN FOREMAN - 16 ;HOURS@ $3.68/HOUR 58. 88 ELECTRICIANS - 32 HOURS@ $3.11/HOUR 99.52 I ASSOCIATE CITY ATTORNEY - ONE WEEK@ $11.154.00 ANNUAL SENIOR BUDGET ANALYST - TWO WEEKS @ $9,841.00 ANNUAL COMPTROLLER - ONE DAY@ $76.85/DAY j. !: ' ' 378 .. 50 i 76. 85 I. 1- l I CITY CLERK - ONE DAY @ $ 57 .40/DAY 57. 4 0 I II II DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENTAL LIAISON - ONE WEEK @ $17,628.00 ANNUAL 339.00 DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL - TWO WEEKS@ $IS~82.00 ANNUAL 707.00 DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL - ONE MONTH @ $12, 116 .. 00 Af-..TNUAL 1,009 . 00 PERSONNEL TECHNICIANS (3) - ONE MONTH EACH @ $7,34 5.00 ANNUAL 1, 836.00 RIGHT- OF-WAY AGENT - TWO WEEKS@ $7,046 .00 ANNUAL 271.00 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS - ONE WEEK @ $32,000.00 ANNUAL, 615.00 \ I I ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR INSTRUCTION TWO WEEKS@ $20,000.00 ANNUAL 769.00 ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR SCHOOL PLANT & PLANNING - TWO DAYS@ $75.00/ DAY 150.00 ' i I I I I 't DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY SCHOOLS - TWO MONTHS @ $15,360.00 ANNUAL COORDINATORS (4) - ONE WEEK EACH @ $10,000.00 ANNUAL II ' 769.20 �E~RSONNEL - Continued A.."CIBA SUPERINTENDENTS (5) - ONE WEEK EACH @ $18,000.00 ANNUAL ACCOUNTANT - ONE WEEK @ $,7, 982. 00 Al.~NUAL SCHOOL ATTORNEY i. 76 .. 85 SCHOOL COYlPTROLLER - ONE DAY@ $76.85/DAY i 153 .. 50 ONE DAY@ $76.00/DAY 75.00 ' I PRINCIPALS (62) - THREE WEEKS EACH@ $12,000.00 ANNUAL . l'I 42,921.36 I I 'CUSTODIANS (62) - ONE MONTH EACH @ $3,900.00' ANNUAL I I 20,150 ... 00 I I !' , I SUB TOTAL $ 90,714.70 ! iI. I EMPLOYEE BENEFITS AT 12% OF GROSS SALARIES OF ABOVE INDIVIDUALS (12% x $90,71 4 .70). IT IS THE CITY'S EXPERIENCE THAT TEE COST OF EMPLOYEE BENEFITS AVERAGE 12% OF THE COST OF DIRECT SALARIES. THE CITY MATCHES EMPLOYEESi CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PENSION FUND, WHICH IS 6% OF THEIR GROSS SALARIES. TI-IE CITY ALSO PARTICIPATES IN THE CQST OF HEALT"d AND LIFE INSURANCE. THE EXACT AMOUNT DEPENDING UPON THE PARTICULAR POLICY AND THE NUMBER OF 10,885 07 6 DEPENDENTS. i I' I .I II I , I TOTAL II. III . $ .I 101,600. 46 I NONE CONSULTANTS AND CONTRACT SERVICES I I I TRAVEL .I USE OF ONE CI TY OWNED BUS AND TWO STATION WAGONS FOR SUMMER ' j. $ II 1, 300.00 5 AREA SUPERINTENDENTS @ $ 15. 00/MO. FOR 3 MONTHS J 1 8 0 .00 4 COORDINATORS @ $15.00/MO. FOR 3 MONTHS i I I , I TOTAL I 300 0 0 l SUPERINTENDENT@ $10.00/MO . FOR 3 MONTHS $ .I 1.,735 .00 I I Vo l . I SPACE COSTS AND RENTAL S ' ! , I WI LDERNESS CAMl?., 47 3 ACRE1 TRACT ON L.AKE ALLATOONA $ ..,.. .. _., ,.. �'· SPACE COSTS AND RENTAL S - Continued 'iI ATLAL\"l'TA RECREATION CAMP, LAKE ALLATOONA 47 DAYS@ $100.00/DAY $', SWIMMING POOLS - 5 POOLS FOR 5 DAYS @ $200.00/DAY PER POOL z90 300.00 3 MONTHS @ $100. 00/MO. 300.00 , 71 LITTLE STREET - 3 MONTHS @ $100.00/MO. , 300.00 4 0 P~AYLOTS - 3 MONTHS@ $60.00/MO. 7,200.00 RENTAL VALUE OF TWELVE COMi"lUNITY CENTE RS OPEN AN ADDITIONAL 234 HOURS FOR SUMMER @ $10.00 PER HOUR - $2,3 4 0 EACH X 12 CENTERS 28,080.00 12 HIGH SCHOOL GROUNDS @ $200.00 EACH FOR SUMMER 2,400 .. 00 50 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GROUNDS @ $100.00 EACH FOR SUMMER 5,000 .00 396 CLASSROOMS - 118,800. 00 60 DAYS @ $5.00 PER DAY EACH 12 SCHOOL GYMS - 60 DAYS @ $20.00 PER DAY EACH 1 4 , 4 00.00 30 DAYS @ $15.00 PER DAY EACH 5,400. 00 25 AUDITORIUMS - 30 DAYS @ $10.00 PER DAY EACH 7,500.00 12 AUDITORIUMS 2 STADIUMS - 10 TIMES EACH@ $500.00 PER OCCASION 10,000.00 62 CAFETERIAS - 50 DAYS @ $15.00 PER DAY EACH CENTRAL OFFICE - 4 MONTHS · @ $200.00 PER MO. 8 00 .00 5 AREA OFFICES - 3 ~ONTHS @ $100.00 PER MO. 1,500 . 00 TOTAL V. $ 261,180.00 $ 1,000.00 CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES SWIMMING POOL SUPPLIES - CHLORINE, SODA ASH, KICKBOARDS, WASHBASINS, CLIP BOARDS, ETC. RECREATI ON SUPPLIES - ARTS, & CRAFTS, GAMES, ETC. TO BE PROVIDED BY CITY FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS AT 12 RECREATION CENTERS@ $100.00 PER CENTER FOR SUMMER ' i 5,.000.00 CLASSROOM - 3 MONTHS@ $100.00/MO. SAVAL'lliAH STREET MJ.=SSION - '4,700.00 . 1,200 . 00 ' I �CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES - Continued SAJ.~D, LUMBER, PAINT, CONCRETE BLOCKS, AND OTHER MATER~ALS INCLUDING COST OF HAL~DLING PURCHASE ORDERS - ESTIMATE BASED ON PAST EXPERIENCE OF CITY ' VI. TOTAL I $ i 9,000.00 I i RENTAL/LEASE/PURCHASE OF EQUIPMENT ·II ONE PORTABLE SWIMMING POOL TO BE PURCHASED AND INSTALLED BY CITY $ I 7,.125.00 j RENTAL VALUE OF 4 EXISTING PORTABLE SWIMMING POOLS@ $500.00 EACH FOR SUMMER 2, ·ooo .oo RECREATION EQUIPMENT PROVIDED BY CITY FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS AT 12 RECREATION CENTERS @ $200.00 PER CENTER FOR SUIVli~ ER 2,. 4 00.00 EXISTING EQUI PMENT AT ATLAL~TA RECREATION CAMP RENTAL VALUE OF $200.00/WEEK FOR 8 WEEKS 1,600.00 iI 22,000 .. 00 .I LOADERS - 500 HOURS@ $17.50/HOUR 8,750.00 I' GRADERS - 500 HOURS @ $15.00/HOUR 7,500.00 STATION WAGON (ENGINEER) - 4 00 HOURS@ $9.00/HOUR 3,600.00 5 0 F I RE HYDRANT WRENCHES - 90 DAYS @ $1.00/DAY EA. 4,50 0.00 I' TRUCKS - 2,000 HOURS@ $11.00/HOUR I I I 1 4 TYPEWRITERS @ $20.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 8 4 0 .00 6 CALCULATORS@ $20.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 36 0 . 0 0 6 M!MEOGRAPH MACHINES @ $ 30. 00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 5 40 .00 6 DITTO MACHINES@ $30.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 540 . 00 25 DESKS & CHAIRS @ ,125 000 $ 1 5.00/MO . EACH FOR 3 MONTHS _ _ _1=....;::.; TOTAL $ 62,. 880 . 0 0 . I I I , l �I . VII. OTHER COSTS FREE ADMISSIONS TO CYCLORAMA - 3000 CHILDREN @ $. 50 .Ai."il'D 500 ADULTS @ $1. 00 EACH I $ 2,000.00 i. .i i 'i·' FREE ADMISSION TO ATLAl."il'TA BRAVES GAMES AND ATLANTA CHIEFS GAMES - 30,000 TICKETS @ $.50 EACH i. 15,.000.00 'JET RIDE ON SOUTP.i.ERN AIRWAYS PLANE ; ,· 1,000 CHILDREN@ $10.00 EACH 10,000.00 ,.y I LECTURES BY CURATOR OF REPTILES, ZOO FOREMAN, ETC. 1,000 .. 00 UTILITIES (ELECTRICITY, GAS, WATER & TELEPHONES) 62 SCHOOLS@ $100.00/MONTH EACH FOR 3 MONTHS UTILITIES - ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP@ $100.00/MO. FOR 2 MONTHS UTILITIES - LIGHTS FOR 7 PLAYLOTS, WATER FOR 25 PLAYLOTS AND 50 FIRE HYDRANT SPRINKLERS, UTILITIES FOR 4 HOUSES I ! i' 18,600.00 I !· ! 200.00 2,000 .. 00 UTILITIES FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS IN 12 RECREATION CENTERS - 3 MONTHS@ $20.00/MO. X 12 CENTERS WATER AND OT"dER UTILITIES FOR 5 PORTABLE SWIMMING POOLS - 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. EACH 750.00 WATER AND OTHER UTILITIES FOR 5 MAJOR SWIMMING . POOLS FOR EXTENDED SWIMMING PROGRAM 5 DAYS @ $5.00 PER DAY X 5 POOLS 125.00 I I UTILITIES AND TELEPHONES FOR CENTRAL OFFICE AND 5 AREA OFFICES - 6 LOCATIONS@ $50.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 ~.ONTHS TOTAL ' I , I $ I 900.00 51,295.00 • t j. TOTAL NON-FEDERAL SnAKE $ 487,690. 4 6 I �CITY OF ATLANTA OFFICE OF COMPTROLLER CITY HALL Atlanta, Georgia 30303 April 25, 1968 CHARLES L. DAVIS COMPTROLLER EDGAR A. VAUGHN, JR, DEPUTY COMPTROLLER MEmRANDUM TO: Finance Committee FROM: Charles L. Davis //fl_ I am enclosing a copy of a Sunnner Recreation Program which has been developed jointly by the Parks Department, Sch:>ol Department, and others. This application has been approved by the Grant Review Board and has been submitted to EOA for funding. You will note in your review of the program that the total program amounts to $1,826,469 with $487,690 being made up of non-cash grants-in-aid which are being furnished by the city and/or the Atlanta Board of Education. Funds for most of the items have already been appropriated, and there will be little additional need to undertake the program if the federal government allocates their $1,338,779 through EOA. Correspondence and discussions with Mr. Delius indicate that the total available funds from EOA for the entire metropolitan region will amount to $590,000 which indicates that the program must be considerably curtailed if it is to be kept within the present appropriations. We should have an answer from EOA very shortly so a decision may be made as to the funding of this program. I am also enclosing a copy of a letter dated April 21, 1968, to Mayor Allen from Mr. Delius regarding the sununer program for your further information. C.L.D. CLD:dhf Enclosure �March 29, 1968 DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION . CITY OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA (In Conjunction With Atlanta Public Schools) I. TITLE OF PROJECT: , Duration: II. III. IV. Recreation, Employment and Enrichment Program From June 1, 1968, to September 2, 1968 (W~th certain programs extending to December 31, 1968). (a) Department of Parks and Recreation, City of Atlanta, Georgia, (In conjunction with Atlanta Public Schools), City Hall Annex, 260 Central Avenue, S. W., Atlanta, Georgia , 30303 (Public). Ja. 2-4463, Ext. 311. (b) Jack C. Delius, General Manager, Parks & Recreation, and Alan Koth, School Department. (c) Stanley T. Martin, Jr., Jack C. Delius. (d) Charles L. Davis, Comptroller The geographic are a to be cover ed is tha t portion of the City of Atlan t a designated by E. O. A. as Target Area ; plus , Fringe Areas which are borderline in respect to economic and social class ifica tions . The persons to be served are five years of age to s enior c i tizens ; both sexes, in-school and out-of-school. v. It · is estima t e d tha t 150 participants each day will use each location. Plans ca ll for 140 loca tions to be s erved. Thus, 21,000 persons each day wi ll be s erved. This figure does no t inc lude activi ties such as Award Day, aud i ei'J.ces for band concer ts, etc., and other spectator activi ties . VI. Many areas of the city are deficient in park and recreation faci lities . This fact ha d been clear ly noted by the just comp l eted 1968- 1983 Parks and Recreation Plan. Staff of E. O. A., Community Council, City Planning and Departmen t of Parks conduc ted the study . The need for the program covered by this proposal is clearly evident in the total absence of park and recreation facilities in many target areas and the inadequacy of faciliti es where they do exist. In response to these deficienci es , some 40 playlo ts have been constructed and staffed, using for t he most par t, E. O. A; funds. These playlots fail to provide fully ade~uate physical faci li ties . Thus, some 62 schools will be used during the summer. The report Opportunity For Urban Exce llence cites a close correlation be tween absence of facilities and incident of juvenile de linquency. VII. \ A coordinator of SUITu~er activities will be emp loyed by May 1, 1968. His duties will be to'.initi~lly locate and recruit leader s of ALL age leve ls in ALL target areas to serve as an Advisory _C ouncil for planning and deve lop ment. The Coordinator will be assisted in recruitment by school councilors �- I at 62 elementary and high school locations; by E. O. A. Neighborhood Service Center Personnel; by the Community Council and by staff of Parks and Recreation Department. Leaders repre sen ting not only their age group but their respective neighborhoods will be a sked to assist the staff in planning the sumi~ er program. It is intended that each location (be it school, park or public housing project) will have local preferences as to types of programs. However, it is assumed that some identifiable basic list of prepared activities will emerge and U;tilized as a base to insure "equal" programs on a · city-wide basis. The program will initially be developed on 'a .pilot basis with constant evaluation by neighborhood leaders. Once assured of our acceptability and desirability of a given activity, it will be offered city-wide for the duration of the summer. Heavy emphasis will be placed on employing disadvantaged citizens in the operation of the program. Assignme nts of employment will range from actually operational, such as Recrea tion Aides to Advisory and Repre sentation Roles in the various communities. It is planned that distinctive · shirts wiil be suppl5.ed to teenagers wlH-:- will serve as cadre on a voluntary basis, approximately 1100 teenagers and young adults will be transported to Atlanta Wilderness Camp each week to assist in its development while at camp. The young people will be taught swimming, canoeing, camping, nature interpretation, etc, VIII. IX. \ The . project will have an overall Dire ctor, Assistant Director, Clerical Staff, Recreation Leaders, Recreation Supervisors, Camp Directors, Enrichment Personnel (Dance, Drama, Music, Arts and Craft). The number of poor youth, employed will be 336. Volunteers will exceed 100. The program will cover all areas within the defined boundries of E. O. A's. target zone s. Some 140 loc a tions will be st a ff ed, using 62 schools and 78 parks and pl aylot locations. The hours of ope r a tion will be 9 A.M. - 9 P.M., Monday through Saturday. There will be a Central Headquarters located at Central Junior High School, 232 Pryor Street, S. E. The central office will coo:r.din.<1.te all Par k and Re cT.eation Department and Atlant a Public School De partment's ~ummer activites rel a t e d to r e cre a tion, employment and cultur al enrichment for the dis advan taged, The Pro gr am Director will be in ove r a li ch arge of the project and will an swer to a commi t t ee made up o f School and Parks pe rsonne l as well a s adviso r y committee of citi zens. All supplies , e uipment, travel and transportaion, payroll, etc., will be handled at the Central Office. The City of Atlanta Purch asing Department will handl e purchase transactions when requisitioned by the Ce nt r a l Of fice. The Ce nt ral Off ice will maintain account reco r d s in order to h ave av a il able current d a t a . The Da t a Proce ssing Divi s ion of At lant a Public Schools will be u t ili zed if ne eded to ana ly ze pr obl ems , expenditu re s, parti cipation, etc, I t i s impe r a tive th a t the Central Off ice be staffed by May 1, 19 68 in order to establish pr ocedures, communications with the neighborhood's recruitme nt and supply channe l s. This Parks/Schools joint venture will c arefully s uppleme nt and mesh wi t h (1) r egu l ar Ci t y r e creat i on p r obl ems , (2) Community Schoo l s , ( 3) work-study and voca tional educ a t ion , (4) Ti t l e I Pro gr ams, ( 5) Ne i gh borhood Youth Corp s InSchool Enrol l ee s , (6) con tri bu ti ng pr iva t e age ncies , ( 7) Ac ademic Summer School. Pr o gram ( 8) Head Start , ( 9) i nd ividua l contributions , ( 10) o t he r publ ic agency contri bu tions . The Atl an t a Children and Youth Counc il wi ll serve as ove rall �coordinator acting for and with Mayor's Council on Youth Opportunity to see that all other support agencies are carefully coordinated with the City's program. This project will not pre-emp, but rather supplement regular City programs. Without Federal Funds, much, if not all, of the planned activities for disadvantaged areas would be curtailed. Thus, this Community Action Program complements the total City program. Youth, young adults, adults and senior citizens will assist in planning the program, its operation, and evaluation. Of special emphasis will be age ·group 5-25 years with the greatest attention directed to the teenager and young adult. The school drop-out, the potential drop-out, those with no immediate source of income, those with no positive contacts with Social Service Agencies, and those with no consistent work history on marketable skills will be located and employed by Central Office as an initial step in structuring and planning the program. Allocation of job slots will be based on geographical distrtbution and population so that all target areas will contribute. The Neighborhood Service Center, School Counselors and Social Agencies will be invited to assist in locating and screening applicants. A police record will not necessarily preclude employment, but the Director's judgement will prevail in cases involving morals, and in particular, sexual offenses. There will be no formal Civil Service Examination; selection will be based on (1) need for employ,ne.nt as outlined above, (2) neighborhood identification, (3) leadership ability, and (4) skills that can contribute to the program. The Program Director will name final selection and assignment. Arrangements will be made for medical physicals to be given each applicant. Medical problems will be reported to Fulton County Medical Department for follow-up. Medical pro;;, lems will not necessarily bar employment, but rather serve as a guide in assignments. Five recreation districts will be established and supervised by regular Park/School personnel. Youth will be used as Aides in each district office (as well as Control Office), each school and each park area. Activities to be offered: Creative Rhytmics Outdoor Games Quiet Games Folk Dancing Softball Volleyball Camp Crafts Sewing Ceramics Photography Music Appreciation Team Sports Weight Tr aining Day and Overnight Camping Wood Working Baton Lessons Cheer leading Swimming Track and Field Puppetry Tumbling Typing Field Trips Te e n Charm Jewelry Making Modern and Tap Dancing Judo �Obviously, not all of the above activities can be offered at each location. The Citizens ' AdvisoTy groups may delete and/or add to the list. As to frequency, in the case of field trips, these will be scheduled for at least once a week per loca tion. Definite schedules and programs will be distributed thru schools (before they recess for summer) Neighborhood Service Centers, and. news media. Already, one television station has agreed to publicize the program on a continuing daily basis. X. , · Atlanta Youth Council. Coordination of private and public agencies in youth opportunity program. Ga. Arts Commission. Contribution of technical assistance in arts and drama. Production of neighborhood movies and plays. Atianta Braves and Atlanta Chiefs. to stadium events. Sports clinics, donated tickets Atlanta School System. Full partnership with Parks Department in summer program. Program will use some 62 schools. Army Corp's of Engineers. Full utilization of Lake Allatoona proper ty, namely, Atlanta Wilderness Camps and Atlanta Recreation Camp s. Atlanta University Center . Supply some 50 students majoring in Phs. Ed. and Recreation to serve internship in summer. Childrens' Academy Theatre. Public Library . Plays in target areas. Reading clinics. Band of Atlanta. At least two concerts in disadvantaged areas. Theater Atlanta. Series of free productions. Buckhead Men 's Garden Club. etc. " Magic of Growing". Mr. George Meyer. Private Theater Group - Mr. Eugene Moore, Individual. Farm". Douglasville, Ga. Junior League . Children garden plots, Plays in Piedmont Park. Large estate - apple orchard. "Day at the Individua l participation. Possible Donor - Wegner Showmobile. XI. All faciliti e s of the Department of Parks and The Atlanta School System which a r e ne eded to have a succes sful progr am will be used, Th e location of school s is a s follows : �r TENTATIVE LIST OF SCHOOLS WITH A COMPLETE SUMMER PROGRAM AREA ·I El ementary Hi gh School English Avenue , 1.' 2.' 3. Cra ddoc k , 1. Bethune , 1.' 2. ' 3. War e , 1.' 2.' 3_. Couch, 1.' 3. Fowl er, 1. Haygood, 1. Hardnett , 1.' 2 . Harri s, 3. M, A. Jones, 1. ,. 2. , 3 . Ragsda l e Herndon , 1. E. R. Carter Brown , 1.' 2. Wash ingt on , 1. O' Keefe Centra l (Off ice ) AREA II Harp er, 1. Parks . J r, Hi gh, 1. Gilb er t , 3. Bente en Bla ir Villa ge , 2. , 3. Price, 1.' 2. Fulton AREA I II Scott , 1., 3. Bolton Mt . Vernon Finch , 1. Archer, 1. Gra dy , 2. Hill, 1., 2 . , 3. Forres t, 1. Bu t l er, 1. John Hope , 1. I nman Park, 1. AREA IV May s on, 1. Towns Fain Williams, 1., 2., 3. Carey, 1. West Haven White Clement, 1. Wes t Fulton, 1. Turner, 1. , . 2 . Har per �·' AREA V Reyno1ds, 1. Lin Pryor, 1. Cooper, 1. Capitol Avenue, 1., 2., 3. Slaton, 1., 3. Cook, 1., 3. E. P. Johnson, 1. Daniel Stanton, 1. Hubert, 1. Coan, 1. Wesley, 1., 2., 3. Toomer Bass Roosevelt, 1., 2. Murphy, 1. ELIMINATED DUE TO CONSTRUCTION IMPROVKMENTS Chattahoochee Highland Bryant Howard - Hope CODE 1. 2. 3. Title I Academic Program Head Start PARKS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10, 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21 . \ 22, Chattahoochee (undeve lop ed) Gun Club English Parks - supplemen t Adamsville (us e Fa in playground) - supplemen t Center Hill Grove ·- supplement Anderson Park - supp lement Mozle y - supplement Maddox Park Wa shington Park Univers ity Park Couch Park Home Park - supp l ement Techwood (Housing Project) Piedmont Park Bedford-Pine (Hill School ) But l er Park Bass - supplement Savannah Stree t Oakland City Park Adair Park - supp l ement Pittman - supplement �·I PARKS (Cont'd) 23. · Joyland - ext ended 24. Carver - extended 25. Rawson-Wa shington - supplement 26. Thomasville - supplement 27r Walker Park 28. Wesley Park 29. Branham Park - supplement 30. 71 Little Street 31. 253 Dodd Avenue 32. 666 Parkway Drive 33. Haynes Street 34. Vine City 35. Knight Park 36. . Harper Park (4 Senior High Rise) BLOCK PARKS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17 . 18. 19 . 20 . 21. 22 . 23 . 24 . 25 . 26 . 27. 28 . 29. 30 . Auburn Avenue - Boulevard, N. E. Forrest & Fort Ave nue , N. E. Angier-Parkway, N. E. Merritts & Be dford St., N. E. Blvd. Pl. & Glen Iris Dr., N. E. Sampson - East Avenue , N. E. Wylie & Tye St., S. E. Vernon Street, N. E. Hanover & Renfroe St., S, E. Conley St., S. E. Atlanta Stadium Windsor St., S. W. Ira St., S. W. Eu geni a -Rawson St., S. W. McDani e l St. & Georgia Avenue Ashby Circle Harris Home s Rhod e s St. - Sunset Blvd. 373 Thurmond St., S. W. Va ni er & Capita l Hubbard & University Park Avenue & Lansing Haygood & Cr ew Ladd St . , S. W. Wils on Dr., N. W. Verbena St . , N. W. Hab sha l & Berr y Blvd . , N. w. Perry Bl vd. & Live ly, N. W. Arlington Circ l e, N. w. Daniel Street, N. E. �XII. XIII. Constant monitoring and evaluation by Citizens' Advisory Committee as well as staff of School Board and Parks Department. This project compliments and extends normal agency program and fills gaps and deficiencies existing in disadvantaged areas. In addition to service to the .poor, the program will clearly illustrate to the city and its citizens what can be done with sufficient financing. It can not be stated ~t this time what part of this program will be continued once federal funding is completed. However, on two previous occasions, the _·_city has continued parts of O,E. 0, financed funding. �CITY OF ATLJi.NTA -RECREATION, EMPLOY~.!.ENT, .AND ENRICP.....,\IBNT PROGR.AJ.\1 BUDGET RECAP i ,. ' /· FEDERAL SHARE i;. II. III. IV. V. VI .. VII. PERSONNEL $ CONSULTANTS & CONTRACT .SERVICES 873,367 NON-FEDER.';L SHJI.RE $ , 3,000 TRAVEL SPACE COSTS & RENTALS CONSUMABLE SUPPLI ES RENTAL/LEASE/PURCHASE OF - EQUIPMENT OTHER COSTS $ 1,338,779 NON-FEDERAL SHARE: $ 487,690 TOTAL COST OF PROJECT: · $ 1,826,469 None . 90,410 1,735 2,025 261,180 282,297 9,000 80,550 62,880 7ll30 51,295 $1,338,779 . FEDERAL SHARE: lOl,600 $ 487,090 ., ' �CITY OF ATLANTA RECREATION., E~,.PLOYMENT., AND ENRICHMENT PROGRAM SUIV.i.MER., 1968 BUDGET FEDERAL SHARE . FEDERAL s:-=J.. .J'Cll . I. PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF: DIRECTOR - 4 MONTHS@ $1,000.00/MO. $ 4,000.00 ASSISTANT DIRECTOR - 4 MONTHS@ $754.00/MO. 3,016.00 · BUSINESS MANAGER - 4 MONTHS@ $612.00/MO 2,/248.00 ACCOUNTING ASSISTAJ.~T - 4 MONTHS@ $497.00/MO. 1,988.00 PAYROLL CLERK - 1;260.00 3 MONTHS @ $420.00/MO. PRINCIPAL STENOGRAPHER - 4 MONTHS@ $457.00/MO. 1,828.00 . 1., 30 4 .00 GENERAL CLERK - 4 MONTHS@ $326.00/MO. YOUTH ASSISTANTS (3) - 4 MONTHS@ $1.40/HOUR EACH 2.,688.00 REGIONAL OFFICES: AREA RECREATION SUPERVISORS (5) - 15 DAYS @ $32.00/DAY EACH 2., ,400. 00 AREA SCHOOL SUPERVISORS (5) - 80 DAYS @ $ 32.00/DAY EACH 12.,800.00 ASSISTANT RECREATION SUPERVISORS (5) - 3 MONTHS @ $438.00/MO. EACH 6.,570 . 00 TYPIST CLERKS (5) - 3 MONTHS@ $326 . 00/MO. EACH YOUTH ASSISTANTS (10) - 3 MONTHS@ $1 . 40/HR. EACE ~ 6,7 20 . 00 PARKS/SCHOOLS/BLOCK PARKS: COV.IMUNITY RECREATION DI RECTORS (13) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $ 2 0 . 25/ DAY 21, 0 6 0 . 00 COMMUNITY RECREATION LEADERS (57) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $ 16.40/DAY 74., 78-1-.. 00 ENRI CHMENT SPECIALISTS ( 36 ) - 5 60 HOURS EACH @ $4 .. 00/BR .. ., 80,6 4 0 . 00 . �PERSONNEL - Coutinued 12 WEEKS EACH @ $ 56. 00/WEEK 225,792.00 BLOCK PA...-qrz LEADERS ( 60) - 80 DAYS EJI.CH @ $16 .. 4-0/DAY 78,720.00 YOUTH ASSISTlu~TS (336) SENIOR CITIZEN LEADERS (8) ; S~ECIALISTS (8) ~ 80 DAYS EACH @ $16. 40/DAY . 40 DAYS EACH@ $20.00~DAY ASSISTANT POOL SUPERVISOR - 13 WEEKS@ $100.00/WEEK WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTORS (22) WATER SAFETY ASSISTANTS (11) WATER SAFETY AIDES (11) - 280 HOURS EACH @ $ 2. 25/tlOUR 280 HOURS EACH @ $1.75/HOUR 280 HOURS EACH . @ $1. 40/HOUR !· ' 10,496.00 I 6,. 400 ... 00 I 1,.300 .. 00 J,.3,.860.00 5,390 .. 00 4,.312.00 A...~A RECREATION DIRECTORS (12) - 60 DAYS EACH @ $22.95/DAY 16,. 52-1-.. 00 COMMUNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS (62) DAY S EACH @ $ 20. 25/DAY 75,330.00 COMi.'\filNITY RECREAT I ON LEADERS (56) - 60 DAY S EACH @ $16. 4.0/DAY 55,10 4 .00 INSTRUCTORS (124) - 15 HOURS PER WEEK EACH @ $ 4. 00/HOUR FOR 10 WEEKS 74,400.00 . i WILTIERNESS CAMP: PROJECT DIRECTOR - 48 DAYS@ $26 .. 00/DAY 1 , 2 48 ... 00 ASSISTANT PROJECT DIRECTOR - 48 DAYS@ $24. 95/DAY 1,.197.00 PROGRAM DIRECTOR - 48 @ $ 24 .. 95/DAY 1,.197.00 COUNSELORS (6) - 48 DAYS EACH @ $16 .40/DAY 4,.723.00 COOK - 48 DAYS @ $20.00/DAY 960.00 . ASSISTANT COOK - 48 DAYS@ $12.50/DAY 600.00 ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP: CAMP DIRECTO R - \I 80 DAYS @ $26 . 00/DAY ASSI STANT CAMP DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $20 .. 25/DAY PROGRAM DIRECTOR - 8 0 DAYS@ $16~ 4 0/DAY 1 , 6 2 0 . 00 1,.31 2~ 00 ' · �,. PERSONNEL - Continued COUNSELORS (6) - 80 DAYS @ $15.00/DAY EACH REGISTERED NURSE - 80 DAYS @ 7,200.00 $ 26. 00/DAr DIETITIAN - 80 DAYS @ $20.00/DAY 1,600 .. 00 COOK - 80 DAYS@ $20.00/DAY 1,600.00 . 1.,000.00 ASSISTANT COOK - - 80 DAYS @ $12 . 50/DAY INSTANT RECREATION TASK FORCE: PROJECT DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS@ $20.25/DAY 1,620.00 RECREATION LEADERS (20) - 80 DAYS EACH@ $16.40/DAY 26,2 40.00 ROVING MAINTENANCE CREWS: 3,828.00 GROUNDS FOREMEN (5) - 26 DAYS EACH @ $29.45/DAY LABOR FORE.t-1..EN (10) - 26 DAYS EACH @ $ 21.10/DAY EQUIPV...ENT OPERATORS (10) - 26 DAYS EA.@ $16.40/DAY LABORERS (20) 26 DAYS EACH @ $14.40/DAY TOTAL PERSONNEL $ 873,367.00 FEDERAL SEA.qE II. CONSULTANTS AND CONTRACT SERVICES CONSULTANTS FEES FOR FIN PL EVALUATION TOTAL III. $ · 3,000.00 TRAVEL RENTAL OF BUSES FOR FIELD TRIPS I NSIDE CITY 1250 TRIPS@ $41.00 EACH RENTAL OF BUSES FOR FIELD TRIPS OUT OF CITY 200 TRIPS@ $45.00 EACH ALL DAY RENTAL OF BUSES - 420 BUSES@ $68 ,. 00 PER DAY EACH ·CAR ALLOWANCES: DIRECTOR - 4 MONT"dS@ $80~00/MO~ $ 51,250.00 9,000.00 �TRAVEL - Continued ASSISTANT DIRECTOR - 4 MONTES@ $80.00/MO. 320.00 PAYROLL CLERK - 150.00 3 MON7BS @ $50.00/MO. ! RECrt.EATION DISTRICT SUPERVISORS (5) 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. . SCHOOL DISTRICT SUPERVISORS (5) __ @ $ 50. 00/MO. I ' .' 150 .. 00 3 MONTHS 150.00 COM.J.\filNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS (5) 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 150 .. 00 ASSISTANT POOL SUPERVISOR - 3 MONTHS @ $20.00/MO. 60.00 PROJECT DIRECTORS (2)- 2 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 100.00 ASSISTANT PROJECT DIRECTORS (2) - 2 MONTHS @ $ 5 0. 0 0 /MO • 100 .. 00 PROGRAM DIRECTORS (2) - 100~00 2 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. TOTAL $ 90.,410 .. 00 I IV. SPACE COSTS AND RENTALS INDOOR FACILITIES FOR TEMPORARY RECREATION CENTERS - 3 HOUSES@ $120.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS ~$ .,. BLOCK PARKS - 45 RENTALS@ $7.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS TOTAL 1.,080 .. 00 9 4 5 .. 00 $ 2.,025.00 FEDERAL SHARE V. CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES CENTRAL OFFICE : OFFICE SUPPLIE S - $ 25 0 . 00/MO. FOR 4 MONTHS $ ·1 , 000 .. 00 �l CONSU~.i..ABLE SUPPLIES - Continued REGIONAL OFFICES: OFFICE SUPPLIES - 5 LOCATIONS@ $35.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS PARKS/SCHOOLS/BLOCK PA..q.Ks: RECREATION SUPPLIES - BALLS, GA1'1ES, ARTS · . & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, ATHLETIC SUPPLIES FOR 140 LOC.zi.TIONS@ $500.00/LOCATIONS 70,000 .. 00 FOOD FOR LUNCHES - 100 CHILDREN PER DAY $.20/CHILD AT 140 LOCATIONS FOR . 60 DAYS 168,000.00 @ WILDERi~ESS CAMP: ATHLETIC -SUPPLIES, SHELLS, A..'ffi.OWS, ARTS & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, GA1'1ES, BL~. NKETS, SHEETS, FIRST AID SUPPLIES, CA.l.'1PIHG SUPPLIES FOOD FOR 48 DAYS FOR 111 TEENAGERS AND STAFF @ $4.00/DAY EACH fl,312 .. 00 ATLANTA RECREATION CA.J.'1P: ATHLETIC SUPPLIES, A._qTs & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, GAMES, BLANKETS, SHEETS, FIRST AID SUPPLIES 2,500.00 FOOD FOR 80 DAYS FOR 53 CHILDREN Al.~D STAFF @ $ 4. 00/DAY EACH 16,960.00 TOTAL VI. $ 282,297 .. 00 RENTAL/LEASE/PURCHASE OF EQUI PMENT PARKS/SCHOOLS/BLOCK PA..-qJNCE SUPERINTENDENT - ONE MONTH @ $10,257.00 ANNUAL \\GROUNDS FOREMAN I I - ONE WEEK@ $7,657.,00 ANNUAL LABOR FOREMAN - TWO MONTHS @ $5,486., 00 ANNUAL I I ,; I f.?54.00 ENGINEERING ASSISTANT - ONE MONTH @ $8,671.,00 ANNUAL ENGINEERING AIDE II ( 2) - ONE MONTH EACI1 @ $4,836a00 ANNUAL . ·, . !" PARKS ENGINEER - TWO WEEKS@ $11,154 . 00 ANNUAL . 806.,00 147 .. 25 914.,00 . I. 1.,009.00 820.00 RECREATION SUPERVISORS (8) - TWO WEEKS EACH @ $7,345.00 ANNUAL I 'II 1'.DMINISTRATIVE ASSISTA!.'\/T - ONE MONTH @ $9,841.00 ANNUAL .. I ' !. .I i I �PERSONNEL Continued LPBORERS - 1, 8 00 HOURS@ $1.80/HOUR . cp~q,pENTERS - 4 0 HOURS @ $3.25/EOUR 3,240.00 130 .. 00 '; GENERAL MAINTENAi.~CE ViECHANIC II - TWO WEEKS @ $7i345.00 ANNUAL 282.50 EQUIPMENT OPERATOR I - 8 HOURS@ $2.05/HOUR 16.40 .I 26.00 i . ' - FORESTRY FOREMAN - 8 HOURS @ $3.25/HOUR TREE TRIMMER I I - 24 HOURS @ $ 2 .13/HOUR 51.12 TREE TRIM.V.i.ER I - 24 HOURS@ $1.88/HOUR 45 .12 ELECTRICIAN FOREMAN - 16 :HOURS© $3.68/HOUR 58.88 ELECTRICIANS - 32 HOURS @ $ 3 .11/HOUR 21L'.;: .50 SENIOR BUDGET ANALYST - TWO WEEKS@ $9,841.00 Af...1NUAL 378~50 COMPTROLLER - ONE DAY@ $76.85/DAY 76.85 CITY CLERK - ONE DAY @ $57 .40/DAY 57.40 DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENTAL LIAISON - ONE WEEK @ $17,628.00 A..~NUAL 339.00 DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL - TWO WEEKS@ $1$~82.00 ANNUAL 707.00 DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL - ONE MONTH @ $12,116.00 Af...TNUAL 1,009.00 PERSONNEL TECHNICIANS (3) - ONE MONT:--I EACH @ $7,34 5.00 ANNUAL 1,836.00 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS - ONE WEEK @ $3 2 ,000 . 00 Af...TNUAL, , 615 .00 I 769 .. 00 ASSISTANT SUPERI NTENDENT FOR SCHOOL PLANT & PLANNING - TWO DAYS@ $ 7 5. 00/DAY 15 0 . 00 COORDINATORS ( 4 ) - ONE WEEK EACH @ $10,000o00 ANNUAL I ! 271.00 ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR INSTRUCTION TWO WEEKS @ $20,000 . 00 ANNUAL DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY SCHOOLS - TWO MONTHS @ $15,360 ~00 ANNUAL i I 99.52 ASSOCIATE CITY ATTORl~EY - ONE WEEK@ $11.154.00 ANNUAL · RIGHT-OF- WAY AGENT - TWO WEEKS@ $7,046.00 ANNUAL i 2,560000 769 .. 20 ' �P~RSONNEL - Continued AI·GA SUPERINTENDENTS (5) ONE WE:SK EACH @ $18,000.00 Ai~NUAL SCHOOL COivlPTROLLER - ONE DAY @ $ 7 6., 85/DAY .i 76.85 I ' ACCOUNTANT - 01'.~ WEEK SCHOOL - ATTORNEY @ $,7, 982 .. 00 Al.~NUAL ONE DAY @ 153.50 $76.00/DAY 75.00 I PRINCIPALS (62) - THREE WEEKS EACH @ $12,000.00 ANNUAL . j- 42,921.36 1 I ·CUSTODIANS (62) - ONE MONTH EACH @ I $3,900.00' ANNUAL I 20,150 .. 00 I i ' I I SUB TOTAL $ 90,-714. 70 , II ' I I • j EV..PLOYEE BENEFITS AT 12¾ OF GROSS SALARIES OF ABOVE INDIVIDUALS (12¾ x $90,714.70). IT IS THE CITY'S EXPERI ENCE THAT TEE COST OF EMPLOYEE BENEFITS AVERAGE 12% OF THE COST OF DIRECT SALARIES. THE CITY MJI..TCHES EMPLOYEES' CONTRIBUTIONS TO WE PENSION FUND, WHICH IS 6¾ OF WEIR GROSS SALARIES. THE CITY ALSO PARTICI PATES IN THE CQST OF HEALIB AND LIFE INSURA.."I\TCE . THE EXACT .Ai."'10UNT DEPENDING UPON THE PARTICULAR POLICY AND THE NUMBER OF DEPENDENTS. 10,885.76 TOTAL II. III. $ ·i 101,600. 4 6 NONE CONSULTANTS AND CONTRACT SERVICES TRZI.VEL USE OF ONE CI TY OWNED BUS AND TWO STATION WAGONS FOR SUMMER $· 1,300.00 5 AREA SUPERINTENDENTS @ $ 1 5 . 00/MO. FOR 3 MONWS 2 25 .. 00 4 COORDI NATORS@ $ 1 5 . 00/MO. FOR 3 MONTHS 180 . 00 l SUPERINTENDENT@ $10 . 00/MO. FOR 3 MONWS TOTAL IV. \ SPACE 1WI $ COSTS AND RENTALS LDERJ.'IBSS CAJ1P, 47 3 ACRE1 TRACT ON LAKE Af..LATOONA $ 1,735. 00 .. ' �' SPJI.CE COSTS AND RENTALS - Con'cin"C.ed J. ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP , LAKE ALLATOONA 47 DAYS@ $100.00/DAY SWI143.215.248.55ING POOLS - 5 POOLS FOR 5 DAYS @ $200.00/DAY PER POOL z90 CLASSROOM - 5,.000.00 300 .. 00 3 MONTHS@ $100.00/Mo. SAVAf...'NAH STREET MJ.=SSION - 3 MONT'"dS @ 300 .. 00 $100.00/MO .. . 300.00 . 71 LITTLE STREET - 3 MONTHS@ $100 .. 00/MO. 40 P~AYLOTS - 7,200.00 3 MONTHS@ $60.00/MO. RENTAL VALUE OF TWELVE CO!v".J.vlUNITY CENTERS OPEN AN ADDITIONAL 23 4 EOURS FOR SUMMER @ $10.00 PER HOUR $2/340 EACH X 12 CENTERS 28,080.00 12 HIGH SCHOOL GROUNDS@ $200.00 EACH FOR SUM.L'1.ER 2,400 .. 00 50 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GROUNDS@ $100 .. 00 EACH FOR Sill-'.i.MER 5,000.00 118,800.00 396 CLASSROOMS - 60 DAYS@ $5.00 PER DAY EACH 12 SCHOOL GYMS 60 DAYS @ $20.00 PER DAY EACH 14,400 .. 00 12 AUDITORIUMS 30 DAYS@ $15.00 PER DAY EACH 5,400.00 25 AUDITORIUMS - 30 DAYS @ $10.00 PER DAY EACH 7,500 .. 00 2 STADIUMS - 10 TIMES EACH @ $500 .. 00 PER OCCASION 62 CAFETERIAS - 50 DAYS @ $15. 00 PER DAY EACII CENTRAL OFFI CE - 4 MONTHS · @ $200.00 PER MO. 800.00 5 AIIBA OFFICES - 3 MONTHS @ $100 . 00 PER MO~ 1,500 .00 TOTAL V. 10,000 . 00 $ 261,180.00 CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES SWIMMING POOL SUPPLIES - CHLORINE, SODA ASH, KICKBOARDS, WASHBASINS, CLIP BOARDS, ETC. RECREATION SUPPLIES - ARTS, & CRAFTS, GAMES, ETC . TO BE PROVIDED BY CITY FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS AT 12 REC REATION CENTERS@ $100000 PER CENTER FOR S~.IER ~ $ l,000 .. 00 . 1, 200 . 00 �CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES - Continued S.AJ.~D, LUMBER, PAINT, CONCRETE BLOCKS; AND OT3ER V.lA~E~~ALS INCLUDING COST OF EANDLING PURCHASE ORDERS - ESTIV.lATE BASED ON PAST EXPERIENCE OF CITY I VI. TOTAL • , $ 9,000.00 $ 7,125.00 RENTAL/LEASE/PURCHASE OF. EQUIPMENT ONE PORTABLE SWIMMING POOL TO BE PURCHASED AND INSTALLED BY CITY RENTAL VALUE OF 4 EXISTING PORTABLE SWIMMING POOLS@ $500.00 EACH FOR SU1,llV1'...ER 2,·000.00 RECREATION EQUIPMENT PROVIDED BY CITY FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS AT 12 RECREATION CENTERS @ $ 200 .. 00 PER CENTER FOR SUM.'1ER . 2, 4 00.00 EXISTING EQUIPMENT AT ATLA!.~TA RECREATION CAMP RENTAL VALUE OF $ 200. 00/wEE~Z FOR 8 WEEKS 1,600.00 22,000.00 TRUCKS - 2,000 HOURS@ $11.00/HOUR LOADERS 500 HOURS@ $17.50/HOUR 8,750.00 GRADERS 500 HOURS@ $15.00/HOUR 7,500.00 STATION WAGON (ENGINEER) - 400 HOURS@ $9.00/HOUR 3,600.00 50 FIRE HYDRAl.'\l"T WRENCHES - ·90 DAYS @ $1. 00/DAY EA .. 4,500.00 14 TYPEWRITERS@ $20.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 84-0 . 00 6 CALCULATORS@ $20.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 360.00 6 Ml~...EOGRAPH MAC.HINES@ $30.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 540.00 6 DITTO MACHINES@ $30.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 540.00 25 DESKS & CHAIRS @ ~ 1 , 125000 $15.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS ----"-'-.;;......;... TOTAL $ 62,88 0 .. 00 • I i ' �VII. OTHER COSTS FREE AD~ISSIONS TO CYCLORAM.A - 3000 CHILDREN @ $. 50 J~D 500 ADULTS @ $1. 00 EACH $ FREE AD.MISSION TO ATLAl.'-JTA BRAVES GA.L'\f.SS AND ATLANTA CHIEFS GAV.!.ES @ $ .50 EACH 30,000 TICKETS 1s.,900 .. oo 'JET RIDE ON SOUTHERN AIRWAYS PLAl.'qE ,· 1,000 CHILDREN@ $10.00 EACH 10,000.00 LECTURES BY CURATOR OF REPTILES, ZOO FOREMAN, ETC. 1,000 .. 00 UTILITIES (ELECTRICITY, GAS, WATER & TELEPHONES) .62 SCHOOLS@ $100.00/MONTH EACH FOR 3 MONTHS UTILITIES - ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP@ $100.00/MO. FOR 2 MONTHS UTILITIES - LIGHTS fOR 7 PLAYLOTS, WATER FOR 25 PLAYLOTS AND 50 FIRE HYDRAJ.'qT SPRINKLERS, UTILITIES FOR 4 HOUSES 18,600.00 200.00 2,000~00 UTILITIES FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS IN 12 RECREATION CENTERS - 3 MONTHS@ $20.00/MO. X 12 CENTERS 720.00 WATER AND OT"dER UTILITIES FOR 5 POR'I'ABLE SWIMMING POOLS - 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. EACH 750.00 WATER AND OTHER UTILITIES FOR 5 MAJOR SWIMMING . POOLS FOR EXTENDED SWIMMI NG PROGRAM 5 DAYS @ $.5. 00 PER DAY X 5 POOLS 125.00 UTILITIES AND TELEPHONES FOR CENTRAL OFFICE AND 5 AREA OFFICES - 6 LOCATIONS .@ $50.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 Y.DNTHS 900.00 I TOTAL TOTAL NON- FEDERAL Sn .ARE ' . ! $ . 51,295.00 $ 487,690.46 ~ . ... I �C~TY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 .April 21., 1968 . JACK C . DELIUS GEN ER.AL MANAGER Honorable Ivan Allen., Jrb Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta~ Georgia 30303 Subject: Summer Program of Recreation., Employment and Enrichment for the Disadvantaged Citizens of the City of Atlanta Dear Mr. Allen: ' As you know, we have presented to E.O.A., Inc. our proposal., in cooperation with the Atlanta School System, to conduct a special program ot recreation, employment and enrichment for the disadvantaged citizens of the City of Atlanta. We propose to begin the project June 1 and terminate it around Labor Day. In the next few days we intend to select and employ a coordinator/dire ctor for the program so that the central o ffice for this program can be fully functioning well before June 1. Mr. John Cox , of the Atlanta Youth Council~ has agreed with the undersigned to supply funds for the purppse of employing the coordinator/director and basic staff for the central office. The selection of a director and other personnel will be a cooperative venture on the part of the Departme nt of Parks and the Atlanta School system. , I Our proposal to E.O.A. exceeds $1.,300.,000 and calls for the operation of a total . of 140 locations within the target areas as defined by E.O.A. Some 62 of the locations are elementary and high school sites. On April 19, 1968, we were advised by Mr. Dan sweat of your office that the total funds available for this project including E.O.A. grant s and spe cial appropriations from City Hall would amount to $600,000 o Mr. sweat r equ est e d at that- time hat we b egin to scale down our budget to come within this figure . Accordingly, we are developing a new budge to It is my understanding that the City of Atlanta Department of Parks will not be able to receive substantially all of the funds made avai l able to E~O.A. for summer projects. In other words, other agencies (private and semi- public) will b e funde d for various types of programso \ \ �Honorable Ivan Allen, Jro I! - 2 - April 21, 1968 ~s soon as our new budget is completed, I will supply copies to your office, the Parks Committee, the .Application Review Board, the Finance Committee, the Advisory Committee on Civil Disorders, the Atlanta Youth Council~ and officials of the Atlanta School system. Sincerely, ck C~ Delius neral Manager of arks and Recreation Enclosure: Resolution, April 17, 1968 JCD:JW CC: Alderman Charlie Leftwich, Chairman, Parks Committee ·Alderman Buddy Fowlkes, Vice Chairman, Parks Committee Alderman G. Everett Millican, Member Parks Committee and .Advisory Committee on Civil Disorders Alderman Rodney Cook, Member Parks Committee and Advisory Committee on Civil Disorders Mr. Jim Parham, Director, E.O.A., Inc. Mr. Charles L. Davis, Comptroller, City of Atlanta ~ (Finance Committee) Mr. Dan sweat, Mayor's Office (Advisory Review Board) Dr. John Letson, Superintendent, Atlanta Schools Dr. John Martin, Deputy·supt. of Atlanta Schools Mr. John Cox, Director, Atlanta Youth Council Mr • .Al Koth, Director of Community Schools . Miss Virginia Carmichael, Director of Recreation Mr. Stan Martin, Administrative Assistant • I �.... ··. ,.. -~.., ; ·. / . .., / ·l _,...::-_,_~ , I FOR:,! 2Sr-S - 12 A T L A:,;TA , G:\. _ __ .· Apr:i..l' 15 6r> - 19---~ RESCI..0TIO~ : oy PARKS COl-'iL"lITTEE .•.:, •:I..- · -•.• ,"'. .' RESOLVED J3Y T HE \fAYOR ,~ND BOARD Of ALDER\iEN OF Tl!E CITY OF :\TLAS:rA !... , , :..;_:. that. 1-TI-JEREAS for t he third c onsGcut i ve year t.11e C:i_t.y o:c A-c.lant. c1 ·a.esirc.s ·co apply -c.o Economic Oppo:c-cuni ty A·i:.lan t.a , Inc., for a g-rc1n-i:. ·to cond.u c·c. 2. sp8ci 2l prog-rarn 6-.Z recreat.,ion , e ,n:::)loyr.1en-i:. and enrid1J.Tl<:mt. f:or - the di s2c\10.n-i:.29cd c i t izens o:c 'che Ci·cy of A-c.lan 'i.:.c: .. 2nd -·l.CIEREJ.\S; such a p ro gram i s decl ared v:L·cal and n e c essary by t he M2yor and .. --,, ·.. . Boa:r.:-d o f Al denn2n o;: the Ci'cy o :c Atl2n'ca,. and j . iilH:S?.K%1.S J . the Dspar-cment of Par}cs ,-;ill conduct -c.he p;:-09-ram in - co n jt:nc-c.im1 witn. the Ji:clan'ca School System"' 'i'H:SR:2£ORE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE Jv'iAYOR _i\ l,: D BOl',RD OF P..LD:8R.1Vi.EN OF 'THE CI'IY 01 .Es'I·LJ..NT A tha t: · t.he Depa.rtnx.mt of P2:cks is aut1'10rized t:.o- ._s1..1b::-n i·t., a }YCO}?:> sal to 'E·~o. A. Inc~ , said pro pos2 l h a ving })eJ:)i1 revi~i;!C_c1 ,by t.hs Pc:r"k.s CoinhitJ:.ee of the Board of Alde:c;ne.n , t~1.c A-o-olic,x i:..ion Rcvie\·: Boa:cd. ; the Finance Commi'ci:ce · of the: Boc.rd o:: .Z1,ld.err110n , • ~na~ :~he A9'y:Lsor~7 Commi<::.·co e on· Civil· Di s oro.ers ; c,nd , iur'dier -·t.hat: the Mayo r · b e and h e au,c.-'nori '-o s ..L..;JJ.l ~ a·'"' an .-:,c·re;,, ..,..,-=--.,., ,_ 'D \,,,.-:: ""'-··,T th ~ ""· ..C-i· ·'·y o.c -=--, -!-"" • s hr:,rr.-.by J. ~-t,; -- ·' Z"'a:i V l.C. _j 1,,._;..h1v.-L L-\ 1 er.:-·n ~... l..L ....,,,_ ....l L 1 -1_ C .J.-\...-U a nd I:conornic Opporcunit .y Atlant a , Inc. cove ring- a program of· ·r .ecr2: a t . ion 1 em:•_) loyment , · and enrichment for t'he disc1dvan'cag-ed ·ci'd . zens of the .. , Ci ty of At:l an ta. ..L l -· �April 6, 1968 'M r. Jim Parham Executiv Director Economic Opportunity Atlanta , Inc o 101 M riett street Atlanta, Georgi Dear Mr . Parham: ttaah h r to two copies of thi dep rtm nt ' s propo al for Surraner Recreation, Employment nd Enrichment Program. The project is in conjunction with th Atlant Public Schools and it repre nt requ t for feder 1 ssi t nee in the amount of $1,338,779. The in- kind contribution on th part of thi dep rtm nt nd School Department · unts to $487,6900 Thus, the totel budget is $1,826,469. I Siner ly, Jack c. G P Enclo ur liu ral Manag r of ks end Recreation JCD:jw CCI Honor bl Iv n All n, Jr., M yor, City of Atl nta Aldermanio Parks Committe Member Mr. Ch rl L. Devis, Comptroller, City of Atlant (for Finance Committ e) nt l Liai n (for Applic tion R vi Board) Mr. Dans~ t, Dir ctor Gov r �CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 April 8, 1968 JACK C . DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER Mr. Charles L. Davis Comptroller City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Charles: I am enclosing our proposal to E . O.A. for summer Recreation, Employment and Enrichment Program. You will note that the federal cash requested is in excess of $1,300,000. We were advised on April 5, 1968 by Mr. Jim Parham, the Director of E .o .A., that only $.~~ 0 , 000 would be available for all agency f unding. Thus, if we were to receive 100°/o of all available E.O.A. cash (we are making such a request), we would still be deficient many thousands o f dollars. I am assuming that the City of Atlanta can supplement our E.O.A. grant to some extent. Obviously, some items can be reduced or perhaps eliminated in the attached proposal. The proposal is sent to your attention per the recent ordinance requiring a review o f proposals by the Finance Committee, my Department's Committee, and the Application Review Board. incerely, Enclosure JCD: jw ck c. Delius eneral Manager of Parks and Recreation RECEIVE .. .. .., 1968 REh.:.hkED TO �, l. D~,s March 29, 1968 DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION CITY OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA (In Conjunction With Atlanta Public Schools) I. TITLE OF PROJECT: Duration: II. III. IV . Recreation, Employment and Enrichment Program From June 1, 1968, to September 2, 1968 (With certain programs ex tending to Dec ember 31, 1968). (a) Department of Parks and Recreation, City of Atlanta, Georgia, (In conjunction with Atlanta Public Schools), City Ha ll Annex , 260 Central Avenue , S. W., Atlanta, Georgia, 30303 (Public). Ja. 2-4463, Ex t. 311. (b) Jack C. Delius, General Manager, Pa r ks & Recreation, and Alan Koth, School Department. (c) Stanley T. Martin, Jr., Jack C. Delius. (d) Charles L. Davis, Comptroller Th e geographic area to be cover ed is tha t portion of the City of Atlanta desi gnated by E. O. A. as Tar ge t Ar ea; plus, Fringe Areas which are borde rline in respect to economic and social classifications. The persons to be serve d are f ive years of age to senior citizens; both s exe s, in-school and out-o f -school. V. I t is estima ted that 150 participants each da y will us e each location. Plans ca ll for 140 locations to be s erve d. Thus, 21,000 persons each day wi ll be s erved. Th is f i gure does not i nclude a cti vit ie s such as Award Day, audience s f or band concerts, e tc., and ot her spe ctator a ctivitie s. VI. Many a r eas of the city are def ici ent i n pa rk and recrea tion fa c i litie s . This fa c t had been clearly noted by the just comple t e d 1968 -1 983 Parks and Re creati on Plan . Sta ff of E. 0. A., Community Council, Ci ty Planning and Departmen t of Pa r ks conducted t he s t udy, The need f or th e pr ogram cover ed by th i s pr opos a l is c lear ly evid ent i n the t otal abs ~~ce of park a nd re crea tion fa c il i ties in many t arge t areas and t he i na de qua cy of fa ci l i ties where they do ex i st . I n re spons e to the s e defi c ienc ie s , some 40 p laylots have been c onstruc ted a nd s taf f ed, us i ng f or the mos t part, E. O. A. fund s . These playlo ts fail t o pr ovide f ul ly ade~uate phys i cal fa ci li t ies. Thus, s ome 62 s ch oo l s will be used dur i ng t he summer. The repor t Opportunity For Ur ban Excellence c i t e s a cl os e correlation between abs ence of f a cilities and incident of j uvenile de l inquency. VII. A coordinat or of summer activiti e s will be emp l oyed by May 1, 1968 . His duties will be to ·.initi? lly locate and r ecruit leaders of ALL a ge level s i n ALL t arget a r eas t o serve as an Advisor y Council f or planning and develop- , ment. The Coordinator wi l l be assisted in r ecr uitment by s choo l c ouncilors �at 62 elementary and high school locations; by E. O. A. Neighborhood Service Center Personnel; by the Community Council and by staff of Parks and Recreation Department. Leaders representing not only their age group but their respective neighborhoods will be asked to assist the staff in planning the surrnner pro gram . It is intended that each location (be it school, park or public housing project) will have local preferences as to types of programs. However, it is assumed that some identifiable basic list of prepared activities will emerge and 1.1:tilized as a base to insure "equal" programs on a city-wide basis. The program will initially be developed on ·a .pilot basis with constant evaluation by neighborhood leaders. Once assured of our acceptability and desirability of a given activity, it will be offered city-wide for the duration of the summer. Heavy emphasis will be placed on employing disadvantaged citizens in the operation of the program. Assignments of employment will range from actually operational, such as Recreation Aides to Advisory and Representation Roles in the various communities. It is planned that distinctive shirts will be supplied to teenagers ~10 will serve as cadre on a voluntary basis, approximately 1lOO teenagers and young adults will be transported to Atlanta Wilderness Camp each week to assist in its development while at camp. The young people will be taught swimming, canoeing, camping, nature interpretation, etc. VIII. IX. The project will have an overall Director, Assistant Director, Clerical Staff, Recreation Leaders, Recreation Supervisors, Camp Directors, Enrichment Personnel (Dance, Drama, Music, Arts and Craft). The number of poor youth , employed will be 336. Volunteers will exceed 100. The program will cover all areas within the defined boundries of E. O. A's. target zones. Some 140 locations will be staffed, using 62 schools and 78 parks and playlot locations. The hours of operation will be 9 A.M. - 9 P.M., Monday through Saturday. There will be a Central Headquarters located at Central Junior High School, 232 Pryor Street, S. E. The central office will coo:r.dirni.te all Pa r k and Recreation Department and Atlanta Public School Department's summer activites related to recreation, employment and cultural enrichment for the disadvantaged. The Program Director will be in overall charge of the project and wil l answer to a committee made up of School and Parks personnel as well as advisory committee of citizens. All supplies, e uipment, travel and transportaion, payroll, etc., will be handled at the Central Office. The City of Atlanta Purchasing Department will handle purchase transactions when requisitioned by the Central Office. The Central Office will maintain account records in order to have available current data. The Data Processing Division of Atlanta Public School s ,·;ri ll be utili zed if needed to analyze problems, expenditures, participation, etc. It is imperative that the Central Office be staffed by May 1, 1968 in order to establish procedures, communications with the neighborhood's recruitment and supply channels. This Parks/Schools joint venture will carefull y supplement and mesh with (1) regular City recreation problems, (2) Community Schools, (3) work-study and vocational education, (4) Title I Programs, (5) Neighborhood Youth Corps InSchool Enrollees, (6) contributing private agencies, (7) Academic Summer School. Program (8) Head Start, (9) individual contributions, (10) other public agency contributions . The Atlanta Children and Youth Council will serve as overall �coordinator acting for and with Mayor's Council on Youth Opportunity to see that all other support agencies are c arefully coordinated with the City's pro gram. This project will not pre-emp, but rather supplement regular City programs. Without Federal Funds, much, if not all, of the planned activities for disadvantaged areas would be curtailed. Thus, this Community Action Program complements the total City program. Youth, young adults, adults and senior citizens will assist in planning the program, its operation, and evaluation. Of special emphasis will be age group 5-25 years with the greatest attention directed to the teenager and young adult. The school drop-out, the potential drop-out, those with no immediate source of income, those with no positive cont a cts with Social Service Agencies, and those with no consistent work history on marketable skills will be located and employed by Central Office as an initial step in structuring and planning the program. Allocation of job slots will be based on geographical distribution and population so that all target areas will contribute. The Neighborhood Service Center, School Counselors and Social Agencies will be invited to assist in locating and screening applic ants . A police record will not necessarily preclude employment, but the Direc tor's judgement will prevail in cases involving morals, and in particular, sexual offenses. There will be no formal Civil Service Examination; selection will be based on (1) need for employillent as outlined above, (2) neighborhood identification, (3) le adership ability, and (4) skills tha t c an contribute to the program. The Pro gram Director will name final selection and assignment. Arrangements will be made for medical physicals to be given each applicant. Medical problems will be reported to Fulton County Medical Department for follow-up. Medical pro;.?lems will not necessarily bar employment, but rather serve as a guide in assignments. Five recreation districts will be established and supervised by r egular Park /School personnel. Youth will be used as Aides in each district office (as well as Control Office), each school and each park area. Activities to be offered: Crea tive Rhytmics Outdoor Games Quiet Games Folk Dancing Softball Volleyball Camp Crafts Sewing Ceramics Photography Musi c Appreciation Team Sports Weight Training Day and Overnight Camping Wood Working Ba ton Lessons Cheer leading Swimming Tr ack and Field Pu ppe try Tumbling Typing Fie ld Tr ips Teen Char m Jewelry Making Modern and Tap Dancing Judo �Obviously, not all of the a bove a ctivi t ies can be offered at each location. The Citizens' Advisoyy groups may delete a nd/or add to the list. As to freque ncy, i n t he c a s e of field trips, t hese wi ll be scheduled for at l e ast once a we e k per location. Definite schedules and programs wil l b e dis t ributed thru schools (before they recess for summer) Nei ghborhood Se rvice Centers, and. news media. Already, one tel e vision sta tion has agreed to publicize t he program on a continuing da ily basis. X. · Atlanta Youth Council. Coordination o f private and public agencie s in you t h opportunity progr am. Ga. Arts Commission. Contribution of technical assistance in arts and drama. Production of neighborhood movies and plays. Atla nta Braves and Atla nta Chie fs. to sta dium eve nts. Sports clinics, donated ticke ts Atlanta School System. Full partnership with Parks Department in summer program. Program will use some 62 schools. Army Corp's of En gi n eers. Full utiliz at ion of Lake Allatoon a proper t y, n amely, Atla nta Wilderne ss Camp s and At l a nta Re crea tion Camps. Atla nta Un ive rsity Cen t er . Su pp l y s ome 50 stude n t s ma joring in Phs . Ed . and Re creation to serve internship in summer. Childrens' Ac a d emy Thea tre . Publ ic Li bra ry. Pla ys in tar ge t areas. Read i n g clini cs. Band o f At l anta . At l e as t t wo con c erts in dis adv antaged areas. Theater At lanta . Se ri e s o f f re e pr o ductions. Buckhe a d Me n ' s Ga rde n Club . etc. " Ma g ic o f Growing " . Mr . Ge or ge Me y e r. Pr i vate Thea ter Gr oup - Mr . Eu gene Moore . Indiv i dua l . Farm". Dougla svi lle , Ga . Juni or Le agu e . Childr en ga rde n plots, Pla ys in Piedmont Park. Lar ge e sta te - appl e or char d. ' 'Day a t the Indivi dua l p ar tic ipation . P o ssible Donor - Wegn er Showmobile . XI. Al l fa ci l iti e s of t he De p a rtme nt o f Parks and The Atlanta Schoo l Sy stem which a re n eed e d to have a s u c c e s s f ul program will b e used, Th e loca ti on o f s chools is as f ollows: �TENTATIVE LIST OF SCHOOLS WITH A COMPLETE SUMMER PROGRAM AREA I Elementary High School English Avenue, 1., 2., 3. Craddock, 1. Bethune, 1., 2., 3. Ware, 1., 2., 3. Couch, 1., 3. Fowler, 1. Haygood, 1. Hardnett, 1., 2. Harris, 3. M. . A. Jones, 1., 2., 3. Ragsdale Herndon, 1. E. R. Carter Brown, 1. , 2. Washington, 1. O'Keefe Central (Office) AREA II Harper, 1. Parks ., Jr. High, 1. Gilbert, 3. Benteen Blair Village, 2., 3. Price, 1. , 2. Fulton AREA III Scott, 1., 3. Bolton Mt. Vernon Finch, 1. Hi ll, 1., 2., 3. F,orres t, 1. Butl er , 1. John Hope , 1. Inman Park, 1. Archer, 1. Grady, 2. AREA IV Mays on , 1 . Towns Fain Williams, 1., 2 . , 3. Carey , 1. Wes t Haven White Clement , 1. We s t Fu lton, 1. Turner , 1. , 2 . Harper �AREA V Reynolds, 1. Lin Pryor, 1. Cooper, 1. Capitol Avenue, 1., 2., 3. Slaton, 1. , 3. Cook , 1., 3. E. P. Johnson, 1. Daniel Stanton, 1. Hubert, 1. Coan, 1. Wesley, 1., 2., 3. Toomer Bass Roos eve l t , 1., 2. Murphy, 1. ELIMI NATED DUE TO CONSTRUCTION IMPROVEMENTS Chattahoochee Highland Bryant Howard - Hope CODE 1. 2. 3. Titl e I Academic Program Head Start PARKS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16, 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. Chattahoochee (undeve l oped) Gun Club Engli sh Par ks - supp l emen t Adamsvil le (us e Fain playground)_ - supp l ement Center Hi ll Grove ·- supplement Ande rson Park - supplement Mozley - supplemen t Maddox Park Washington Park University Park Couch Park Horne Park - supp l ement Te chwood (Housing Project) Piedmont Park Bedford-Pine (Hill School ) Butler Park Bass - supplement Savannah Street Oakland City Park Adair Park - supplement Pittman - supplement �PARKS (Cont'd) 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. Joyland - extended Carver - extended Rawson-Washington - supplement Thomasville - supplement Walker Park Wesley Park Branham Park - supplement 71 Little Street 253 Dodd Avenue 666 Parkway Drive Haynes Street Vine City Knight Park Harper Park (4 Senior High Rise) BLOCK PARKS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12 . 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19 . 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25 . 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. Aubur n Avenue - Boulevard, N. E. Forre st & Fort Avenue , N. E. An gi er-Parkway , N. E. Merritts & Bedf ord St ., N. E. Blvd. Pl. & Glen Iris Dr., N. E. Sampson - East Avenue , N. E. Wylie & Tye St ., S. E. Vernon Stree t, N. E. Hanover & Renfroe St., S . E. Con l ey St., S . E. Atlanta Stadium Windsor St., S. W. I r a St., S. W. Eu genia-Rawson St ., S. W. McDani e l St . & Ge orgi a Avenue Ashby Circ l e Harris Hornes Rhode s St. - Sunset Blvd. 3 73 Thurmond S t. , S . W• Vanier & Cap ita l Hubbard & University Park Avenue & Lansing Haygood & Crew Ladd St., S . W. Wi ls on Dr. , N. W. Verbena St., N. W. Habshal & Perry Bl vd., N. W. Perry Blvd, & Lively, N. W. Arlington Circle, N. W. Daniel Street, N. E. �XII. XIII. Constant monitoring and evaluation by Citizens' Advisory Corrnnittee as well as staff of School Board and Parks Department. This project compliments and extends normal agency program and fills gaps and deficiencies existing in disadvantaged areas. In addition to service to the .poor, the pro gram will clearly illustrate to the city and its citizens what can be done with sufficient financin g . It can not be stated a t this time what part of this program will be continued once federal funding is completed. However, on two previous occasi6ns, the j:;ity has continued parts of O.E.O. financed funding. �CITY OF ATLAl."\J'TA RECREATION, E}'f..PLOYV.lENT, AND ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR SU.MMER, 1968 BUDGET RECAP I FEDERAL SHARE ~II. III. IV. v. VI. VII. PERSONNEL $ 873,367 $ 101,.600 CONSULTANTS & CONTRACT .SERVICES , 3,000 None TRAVEL 90,410 1,735 2,025 261,180 282,297 9 ,0 00 80,550 62, 880 7,130 51,2 95 SPACE COSTS & RENTALS CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES RENTAL/LEASE/PURCHASE OF · EOUIPMENT OTHER COSTS $1,338,779 FEDERAL SHARE: $ 1,338,779 NON-FEDERAL SHARE: $ 48 7,690 TOTAL COST OF PROJECT: · $ 1,826,469 .,. I NON-FEDERAL SHARE $ 487 , f.>90 I I �CITY OF ATLANTA I RECREATION, EMPLOYMENT , AND ENRI CHMENT PROGRAM i' I 'I ' SUMMER, 1 968 I I BUDGET - FEDERAL SHARE I . FEDERAL SHA.t:IB I. II·:. i . I ! PERSO NNEL i I ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF : I I Dil:RECTOR - 4 MONTHS @ $1,000.00/MO. $ I 4 , 00 0 .0 0 I ASSISTANT DIRECTOR - 4 MONTHS @ $75 4 .00/MO. 3,016.00 · I BUSINESS MANAGER - 4 MONTHS @ $ 612 . 00/MO 2, 448 . 00 I, 1, 9 88 . 00 1· i I I• ACCOUNTING ~SISTANT - 4 MONTHS @ $497.00/MO. PAYROLL CLERK - 3 MONTHS @ $4 20.00/MO. i I·i 1 , 26 0 .. 00 I PRI NCIPAL STENOGRAPHER - 4 MONTHS@ $ 457.00/MO. l , 823 u0 0 I GENERAL CLERK - 4 MONTHS@ $3 26 .00/MO. 1 , 30 4. 00 I ! I I YOUTH ASSISTANTS (3) - 4 MONTHS @ $1. 4 0/HOUR EACH I I 2,6 8 8. 00 I REGI ONAL OFFI CES : AREA RECREATION SUPERVISORS (5) - 1 5 DAYS @ $ 3 2 . 00/DAY EACH AREA SCHOOL SUPERVI SORS ( 5 ) - 8 0 DAYS @ $32. 00/DAY EACH · ASSISTANT RECREATION SUPERVISORS. / ~ . ) - 3 MONTHS $ 438. 00/MO. EACH TYPIST CLERKS ( 5 ) - 3 MONTHS@ $3 2 b .00/MO. EACH I ' I ' I I 2, ,4 00 . oo 12, 8 00.00 6,570 . 00 4 , 89 0 .0 0 I YOUTH ASSISTANTS ( 10) - 3 MONTHS@ $1.40/HR. EACH 6 ,7 20 .0 0 PARKS/SCHOOLS/ BLOCK PARKS : COMMUNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS (1 3) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $ 20 . 2 5/DAY 21,060.00 COMMUNITY RECREATION LEADERS ( 5 7 ) - 8 0 DAYS EACH @ $ 16.40/DAY 74 ,7 84. 00 ENRICHMENT SPECIALISTS ( 36 ) - 560 HOURS EACH @ $ 4. 00/HR. 80,640.00 -~ �P~RSOm:J'EL - Co ntinue d YOUTH ASSISTANTS (336) - 12 WEEK S EACH @ $56.00/wEEK 225,79 2. 00 BLOCK PARK LEADERS (60) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $16 .40/DAY 78 , 7 20 .. 00 SENIOR CITIZEN LEADERS ( 8 ) - 8 0 DAYS EACH @ $16. 4 0/DAY 10, 496 . 0 0 SPECIALISTS (8) - 40 DAYS EACH @ $20.00?DAY ASSISTANT POOL SUPERVISOR - 13 WEEKS@ $100.00/WEEK WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTORS (22) - 280 HOURS EACH @ $2.25/HOUR ,. 6, 4 00 ... 0 0 1,300 . 00 13, 86 0 .0 0 II I ! WATER SAFETY ASSISTANTS (11) - 28 0 HOURS EACH @ $1. 751.tlOUR 5,390.00 WATER SAFETY AIDES (11) - 28 0 HOURS EACH @ $1. 4 0/HOUR 4 , 31 2 .. 00 AREA RECREATION DIRECTORS (12) - 60 DAYS EACH @ $22.95/DAY I iI II I· I,. I 16,5 2 4-.00 i ' I· COMMUNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS ( 62 ) DAYS EACH @ $ 20. 25/DAY 75,3 30.00 COMMUNITY RECREATION LEADERS (5 6 ) - 6 0 DAYS EACH @ $ 16. 4 0/DAY 55, 104 .00 INSTRUCTORS (12 4 ) - 15 HOURS PER WEEK EACH @ $ 4 .00/HOUR FOR 10 WEEKS 7 4 , 400.00 ·I I ' WILTIERNE SS CAMP: PROJECT DI RECTOR - 48 DAYS@ $26.00/DAY 1 , 2 48. 00 ASSISTANT PROJE CT DI RECTOR - 4 8 DAYS @ $2 4. 95/DAY 1,1 9 7 . 00 PROGRAM DIRECTOR - 48@ $24.95/ DAY 1,197.00 COUNSELORS ( 6 ) - 48 DAYS EACH @ $16.40/DAY 4,7 2 3 . 00 COOK - 48 DAYS@ $20. 00/DAY 9 6 0 .. 00 ASSISTANT COOK - 48 DAYS@ $12.50/ DAY 6 00 . 00 ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP: CAMP DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $26 . 00/DAY 2, 0 8 0. 0 0 I ASSISTANT CAMP DIRECTOR - 8 0 DAYS @ $ 20 . 2 5/DAY 1,620.00 PROGRAM DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $ 16.4 0/DAY 1,312 .. 00 ' I . I �PERSONNEL - Continued COUNSELORS (6) - 80 DAYS @ $15.00/DAY EACH 7,200 . 00 REGISTERED NURSE - 80 DAYS 2,0 80.00 @ $26 . 00/DAY DIETITIAJ.'\J - 80 DAYS @ $20 . 00/DAY 1,600 .. 00 COOK - 8 0 DAYS@ $20.00/DAY 1,600. 00 ASSISTANT COOK - 80 DAYS 1,000.00 @ $12.50/DAY ,I I I ! INSTANT RECREATION TASK FORCE: PROJECT DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $20.25/DAY 1,620 . 00 RECREATION LEADERS (20) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $16.40/DAY 26, 24 0 .. 00 ROVING MAINTENANCE CREWS: GROUNDS FOREMEN (5) - 26 DAYS EACH @ $29 .. 45/DAY 3, 828 . 00 LABOR FOREMEN (10) - 26 DAYS EACH @ $21.10/DAY 5, 486.00 EQUIPMENT OPERATORS (10) - 26 DAYS EA.@ $16. 4 0/DAY 4 ,2 6 4 .00 LABORERS (20) - 26 DAYS EACH@ $1 4 . 4 0/DAY 7, 4-88. 00 TOTAL PERSONNEL $ 873, 367.00 FEDERAL SHA."<.E II. CONSULTANTS AND CONTRACT SERVI CES CONSULTANTS FEES FOR FINAL EVALUATION TOTAL III. $ · 3, 000 .. 00 TRAVEL RENTAL OF BUSE S FOR FIELD TRIPS INSI DE CITY 1250 TRIPS@ $41.0 0 EACH $ 51,250.00 I I I, RENTAL OF BUSES FOR FIELD TR I PS OUT OF CITY 200 TRIPS@ $45.00 EACH 9,000 . 00 ALL DAY RENTAL OF BUSES - 420 BUSES@ $68,00 PER DAY EACH. 28 , 5 60.0 0 CAR ALLOWANCES: DIRECTOR - 4 MONTHS@ $80 .. 00/MOo 320 . 00 ' �TRAVEL - Continued · , ASSISTANT DIRECTOR - 4 MONTHS@ $80.00/MO. 320.00 PAYROLL CLERK - 3 MONT'"dS @ $50.00/MO .. 150 .00 RECREATION DISTRICT SUPERVISORS (5) 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 150 .00 . SCHOOL DISTRICT SUPERVISORS (5) - 3 MONTHS _@ $50.00/MO . 150.00 COMMUNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS (5) 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 150.00 ASSISTANT POOL SUPERVISOR - 3 MONTHS @ $ 2 0 • 0 0 /MO .. IV. 60 .. 00 PROJECT DIRECTORS (2)- 2 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 100.00 ASSISTANT PROJECT DIRECTORS (2) - 2 MONTHS @ $ 5 0. 0 0 / MO • 10 0.00 PROGRAM DIRECTORS (2) - 2 MONTHS@ $50 .. 00/MO .. 1 00.00 TOTAL I L $ 90, 410.00 i I, q ,,I SPACE COSTS AND RENTALS INOOOR FACILITIES FOR TEMPORARY RECREATION I I CENTERS - 3 HOUSES@ $120.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS I I i' BLOCK PARKS - 45 RENTALS @ $ 7. 00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS TOTAL 9 4 5 .. 00 $ 2,025.00 FEDERAL SHARE V. CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES CENTRAL OFFICE: OFFICE SUPPLIES - $250.00/MO. FOR 4 MONTHS $ ·1 , 00 0 .. 00 �CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES - Continue d REGIONAL OFFICES: OFFICE SUPPLIES - 5 LOCATIONS @ $35.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 525 . 00 PARIZS/SCHOOLS/BLOCK PARKS: RECREATION SUPPLIES - BALLS, GAJ.'\IB S, ARTS . & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, ATHLETIC SUPPLIES  ; , FOR 140 LOC_ATIONS @ $ 500. 00/LOCATIONS 70,000 . 00 FOOD FOR LUNCHES - 100 CHILDREN PER DAY @ $.20/CHILD AT 140 LOCATIONS FOR . 60 DAYS 168,000.00 WILDER.1.~ESS CAMP: ATHLETIC -SUPPLIES, SHELLS, ARROWS, ARTS & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, GAMES, BLANKETS, SHEETS, FIRST AID SUPPLIES, CAMPING SUPPLIES 2,000 .. 00 FOOD FOR 48 DAYS FOR 111 TEENAGERS AND STAFF @ $ 4 .00/DAY EACH fl,31 2 .. 0 0 ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP: ATHLETIC SUPPLIES, ARTS & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, GAMES, BLANKETS, SHEETS, FIRST AID SUPPLIES 2,5 00.00 FOOD FOR 80 DAYS FOR 5 3 CHILDREN .AND . STAFF @ $4.00/DAY EACH TOTAL VI . $ 282, 297.00 RENTAL/ LEASE/ PURCHASE OF EQUIPMENT PARKS/ SCHOOLS/BLOCK PARKS: 18 POOL TABLES @ $350 . 00 EACH PARALLEL BARS & RELATED PHYSICAL FITNESS EQUIPMENT - 120 ITEMS @ 1 00 . 00 EACH WEIGHT LI FTING EQUIPMENT 10 SETS@ $5 0 . 0 0 EACH & $ 6 , 300.00 1 2 ,000 . 00 BENCH 50 0. 00 MATS FOR 1 0 AREAS @ $ 20 0 .00/AREA 2 , 000.00 25 BASKETBALL GOALS & BACKBOARDS@ $5 0 . 00 EACH 5 SETS OF SOCCER GOALS @ $ 1 5 0 000/SET 1, 25 0.00 7 5 0 .. 00 �RENTAL/LEASE/PURCHASE OF EQUIPMENT - Continued BASEBALL GLOVES FOR 100 TEh"-'.:S 100 TENNIS RACKETS @ @ J.,O,. 000 .,00 $100.00/TEAM $15.00 EACH . 1,.500.00 · I· i I . 1· i VOLLEY BALL STANDARDS - 100 PAIRS @ $25.00/PAIR 2,500 .. 00 300 ARCHERY BOWS@ $12.00 EACH 3,.600.00 100 ARCHERY TARGETS @ $ 20. 00 EACH 2,000.00 PORTABLE TOILET RENTALS FOR 50 LOCATIONS @ $45.00/MONTH EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 6,.750 .. 00 MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPJV.l.ENT RENTALS & PURCHASES - . FILM RENTALS, RECORD PLAYERS, ETC. FOR 140 LOCATIONS@ $100.00/LOCATION 14,.000 . 00 WILDERNESS CAMP: STOVE, ELECTRIC GENERATOR, COOKING SHELTER, STORAGE SHED, COTS, TOILETS, TOOLS, ETC. ESTIMATED BY CITY 10,000. 0 0 I I 2.,000.00 ELECTRIC PUMP AJ.~D WATER TANK !1 RENTAL OF PICKUP TRUCKS - 2 TRUCKS @ $150.00/MO. FOR 3 MONTHS 900 . 00 ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP: BOATS, PADDLES, BUOYS, CHAIRS, DISHES, UTENSILS AND MI SCELLANEOUS ITEMS ESTIMATED BY CITY 2, 50 0 .00 ELECTRI C PUMP & WATER TANK TOTAL VII. $ 80., 550.00 $ 3,500 . 0 0 OTHER COSTS PHYSICAL EXAMS FOR APPROXIMATELY 350 YOUTH EMPLOYE D @ $ 1 0 . 00/EMPLOYEE ADVERTISING EXPENSE 2 .,0 0 0 . 00 ADMISSION TICKETS FOR SPECIAL EVENTS 7 .ADDITI ONAL TELEPHONES@ $3 0.00/ MO. FOR 3 MONTHS 1,. 0 0 0 .00 TOTAL TOTAL FEDERAL SHARE 630.00 $ 7,130.00 $ 1,338,7 79 .. 00 J �SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM ., JUNE 1, 1968 - SEPT. 1, 1968 I .' TOTAL BUDGET - NON-FEDERAL SHARE I. PERSONNEL GENERAL MANAGER OF PARKS & RECREATION ONE MONTH @ $17,628.00 Al.~NUAL I' I, $ I ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER OF PARKS TWO . WEEKS@ $12,116.00 ANNUAL ' 46q.OO DIRECTOR OF RECREATION - ONE MONTH @ $12,116.00 ANNUAL I 820.00 ASSI STANT DIRECTOR OF RECREATION ONE MONTH @ $9,048.00 ANNUAL 75 4 •.00 I I. 1 2,260.00 OFFICE MANAGER - TWO WEEKS @ $9,048.00 ANNUAL 348.00 ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT - TWO WEEKS @ $5,967.00 ANNUAL 229.50 PRINCIPAL STENOGRAPHER - TWO WEEKS @ $5,486.00 ANNUAL 211.00 . '! SENIOR TYPIST CLERK - ONE WEEK @ $4,641.00 . STENO CLERK - ONE WEEK @ $ 4 ,264 .00 ANNUAL 82.00 TYPIST CLERK - ONE WEEK@ $3,913.00 ANNUAL 75. 25 PARKS ENGINEER - TWO WEEKS @ $11,154.00 ANNUAL 429. 00 DRAFTSMAN - TWO WEEKS @ $5 ,720 . 00 ANNUAL 220.00 I /' I PARKS MAINTENANCE SUPERINTENDENT - ONE MONTH @ $10,257.00 ANNUAL ~54.00 II ENGINEERING ASSISTANT - ONE MONTH @ $8,671. 00 ANNUAL 722.00 I ENGINEERING AIDE II ( 2) - ONE MONTH EACH @ $4,836.00 ANNUAL I I i i ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT - ONE MONTH @ $9,841.00 ANNUAL RECREATION SUPERVISORS (8) - TWO WEEKS EACH @ $7,345.00 ANNUAL I I: 806.00 I I I GROUNDS FOREMAN II .... ONE WEEK@ $7,657.00 ANNUAL 147 .. 25 LABOR FOREMAN - TWO MONTHS @ $5,486.00 ANNUAL 91 4,.00 I �PERSONNEL - Continued LABORERS - 1,800 HOURS@ $1. 80/HOUR 3,:240.00 130 .00 -CA.-qpENTERS - 4 0 HOURS @ $3.25/f-IOUR GENERAL MAINTENANCE Y.iECHANIC II - TWO WEEKS @ $7,345.00 ANNUAL 282 . 50 EQUI PMENT OPERATOR I - 8 HOURS @ $ 2 . 0 5/HOUR 1 6 . t.1: 0 FORE STRY FOREMAN - 8 HOURS @ $ 3 .. 25/HOUR I ! Ij \ /. 2 6 . 00 I TREE TRIMiv'.iER II - 24 HOURS @ $2.13/HOUR TREE TRI M:MER I - 24 HOURS ELECTRICIAN FOREMAN ELECTRICIANS - @ $ 1 . 8 8 / HOUR 1 6 : HOURS @ $ 3 . 68/HOUR . 4 5.12 i 58.88 I! I I $11.154.00 ANNUAL SENI OR BUDGET ANALYST I \I 99 . 52 32 HOURS@ $3.11/ HOUR AS SOCIATE CITY ATTORNEY - ONE WEEK @ I 51. 12 21 4 . 5 0 TWO WEEKS@ $9 , 841 . 00 ANNUAL COMPTROLLER - ONE DAY @ $7 6 . 85/DAY 7 6 .85 CITY CLERK - ONE DAY@ $57. 4 0/DAY 57. 40 DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENTAL LI AI SON - ONE WEEK @ $1 7, 628 .00 ANNUAL 339 . 00 DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL - TWO WEEKS @ $1S~8 2.00 ANNUAL 707-.00 DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL - ONE MONTH @ $ 1 2 ,116. 00 ANNUAL 1,009 .00 PERSONNEL TECHNICIANS ( 3) - ONE MONTH EACH @ $ 7 ,345. 00 ANNUAL 1,836.00 RIGHT- OF- WAY AGENT - Ti:rJO WEEKS @ $7 , 046. 00 ANNUAL 271 . 00 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS - ONE WEEK @ $ 32 ,000.00 ANNUAL, 615 . 00 I ! i ASSI STANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR INSTRUCTI ON TWO WEEKS @ $ 20, 000 . 0 0 ANNUAL . II 769.00 i J I ASSISTANT SUPERI NTENDENT FOR SCHOOL PLANT & PLANNING - TWO DAYS@ $7 5. 00/DAY I 150.00 I I I I I DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY SCHOOLS - TWO MONTHS @ $ 15,360. 00 ANNUAL COORDINATORS ( 4 ) = ONE WEEI( EACH @ $10,000 .. 00 ANNUAL 2,560000 769.20 �P2 RSONNEL - Continued AREA SUPERINTENDENTS (5) ONE WEEK E2\CH @ $18,000.00 ANNUAL I, SCHOOL COV.LPTROLLER - ONE DAY @ I 153.50 ACCOUNTANT - ONE WEEK @ $,7, 982. 00 Al.~NUAL 75.00 SCHOOL ATTORNEY - ONE DAY@ $76.00/DAY PRINCIPALS (62) - THREE WEEKS EACH@ $12,000.00 ANNUAL . ,, 42,921.36 ·CUSTODIANS (62) - ONE MONTH EACH @ $3,900.00' Al'"\J'NUAL SUB TOTAL I 76 .. 85 $ 7 6. 85/DAY 20, 150 •.00 $ 90,714.70 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS AT 12¾ OF GROSS SALARIES OF ABOVE INDIVIDUALS (12¾ x $90,71 4 .70) .. IT IS THE CITY'S EXPERIENCE THAT 'YriE COST OF EMPLOYEE BENEFITS AVERAGE 12¾ OF THE COST OF DIRECT SALARIES. THE CITY MATCHES EMPLOYEES' CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PENSION FUND, WHICH IS 6¾ OF THEIR GROSS SALARIES. THE CITY ALSO PARTICIPATES IN THE CQST OF HEALTH AND LIFE INSURA!.'"\J'CE. THE EXACT AMOUNT DEPENDING UPON THE PARTICULAR POLICY AND THE NUMBER OF DEPENDENTS. 10 1 885.7 6 TOTAL II. $ 101,600. 4 6 ,' II I NONE CONSULTANTS AND CONTRACT SERVICES i .I III. TRAVEL 'i USE OF ONE CI TY OWNED BUS AND TWO STATION WAGONS FOR SUMMER $ 5 AREA SUPERINTENDENTS@ $15.00/MO. FOR 3 MONTHS 225.00 4 COORDINATORS@ $15.00/MO. FOR 3 MONTHS 180.00 30.00 l SUPERINTENDENT@ $10.00/MO. FOR 3 MON'YrlS TOTAL IV., 1,300 .00 I I I . I I I I $ .l SPACE COSTS AND RENTALS WILDERNESS CAMl?, 473 ACRE\ TRACT ON LAKE ALLATOONA $ 3,000 .. 00 ' ! I �,_ SPACE COSTS AND RENTALS - Continued I ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP, LAKE ALLATOONA 47 DAYS@ $100.00/DAY i $', ·4, 700 .. 00 . ! I I I I SWIMJ.\1ING POOLS - 5 POOLS FOR 5 DAYS @ $200.00/DAY PER POOL z90 5,000.00 I I I CLASSROOM - 3 MONTHS@ $100.00/MO. 300.00 SAVANNAH STREET MISSION - 3 MONT'"dS @ $100.00/MO. 300.00 71 LITTLE STREET - 3 MONTHS@ $100.00/MO. 300.00 4 0 PLAYLOTS - 3 MONTHS@ $60.00/MO. 7,200.00 RENTAL VALUE OF TWELVE COMJ.vlUNITY CENTERS OPEN AN ADDITIONAL 23 4- HOURS FOR SUMMER @ $10.00 PER HOUR - $2,340 EACH X 12 CENTERS . 28,080.00 12 HIGH SCHOOL GROUNDS@ $200.00 EACH FOR SUMMER 2,400 .. 00 50 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GROUNDS@ $100.00 EACH FOR SUMMER 5,000.00 396 CLASSROOMS - 60 DAYS @ $5.00 PER DAY EACH 118,800. 00 12 SCHOOL GYMS - 60 DAYS @ $20.00 PER DAY EACH 14, 4 00 .. 00 12 AUDITORIUMS - 30 DAYS@ $15.00 PER DAY EACH 5,400.00 25 AUDITORIUMS - 30 DAYS@ $10.00 PER DAY EACH 7,500.00 2 STADIUMS - 10 TIMES EACH@ $500.00 PER OCCASION 10,000.00 62 CAFETERIAS - 50 DAYS @ $15.00 PER DAY EACH 4 6 ., 500 ... 0 0 CENTRAL OFFICE - 4 MONTHS· @ $200.00 PER MO. 8 00. 0 0 5 AREA OFFICES - 3 MONTHS@ $100 . 00 PER MO. 1,500.00 TOTAL V. I $ 261, 180 .00 $ 1,000.00 CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES SWI MMI NG POOL SUPPLI ES - CHLORI NE, SODA ASH, KICKBOARDS, WASHBASINS, . CLIP BOARDS , ETC . RECREATION SUPPLIE S - ARTS , & CRAFTS , GAME S, ETC. TO BE PROVIDED BY CITY FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS AT 12 RECREATION CENTERS@ $100.00 PER CENTER FOR SUMMER . 1,200 .. 00 I -I �' CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES - Continued S P..ND, LUMBER, PAINT, CONCRETE BLOCKS, AND OTiiSR V.lATERIALS INCLUDING COST OF HANDLING !?URCHASE ORDERS - ESTIMATE BASED ON PAST EXPERIENCE OF CITY 6,800 00 0 TOTAL $ ·1 9,000.00 I I VI. II RENTAL/LEASE/PURCHASE OF EQUIPMENT ONE PORTABLE SWIMMING POOL TO BE PURCHASED AND INSTALLED BY CITY $ 7,125.00 RENTAL VALUE OF 4 EXISTING PORTABLE SWIMMING POOLS@ $500.00 EACH FOR SUMMER 2, ·0 00 .. 00 RECREATION EQUIPMENT PROVIDED BY CITY FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS AT 12 RECREATION CENTERS @ $200 .. 00 PER CENTER FOR SUJY'l.MER 2,400.00 EXISTING EQUIPMENT AT ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP RENTAL VALUE OF $200 .. 00/WEEK FOR 8 WEEKS 1,600.00 22,000.00 .I LOADERS - 5 00 HOURS@ $17.50/HOUR 8 , 750.00 I GRADERS - 500 HOURS@ $15.00/HOUR 7,500.00 STATION WAGON (ENGINEER) - 400 HOURS@ $9 .. 00/HOUR 3,600.00 5 0 FIRE HYDRANT WRENCHES - 90 DAYS @ $1.00/DAY EA .. 4,500.00 II 1 4 TYPEWRITERS @ $20.00/MO. EACH FOR 3· MONTHS 8 4 0. 0 0 ! 6 CALCULATORS@ $20 .. 00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 3 6 0 . 00 6 M!MEOGRAPH MACHINES @ $30.00/ MO. EACH EOR .+°'10 NTHS 5 4 0.00 6 DITTO MACHINE S@ $ 30.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 5 4 0.00 TRUCKS - 2,000 HOURS@ $11.00/HOUR II I I I I I 25 DESKS & CHAIRS @ $15.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS _ _ _1__._,1_2_5_o_O_O I TOTAL $ 62,88 0 . 00 I I �VII. OTHER COSTS FREE ADMISSIONS TO CYCLOR.AlvIA - 3000 CHILDREN @ $.50 Al.~D 500 ADULTS@ $1.00 EACH $ 2,000.00 'l' FREE ADMISSION TO ATLAl.~TA BRAVES G.Al.'1ES AND ATLANTA CHIEFS GAMES - 30 1 000 TICKETS @ $.50 EACH ' ' . I / 15,000.00 'J.ET RIDE ON SOUTHERN AIRWAYS PLAl.~E , 1,000 CHILDREN@ $10.00 EACH '; 10,000.00 I I I LECTURES BY CURATOR OF REPTILES, ZOO FOREMAN 1 ETC. UTILITIES (ELECTRICITY, GAS, WATER & TELEPHONES) 62 SCHOOLS@ $100.00/MONTH EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 1,000.00 r 18,600.00 I, ! I I.I I I UTILITIES - ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP@ $100.00/MO. FOR 2 MONTHS UTILITIES - LIGHTS fOR 7 PLAYLOTS, WATER FOR 25 PLAYLOTS AND 50 FIRE HYDRANT SPRINKLERS, UTILITIES FOR 4 HOUSES I I 200.00 · 2,000 ~00 I· ' UTILITIES FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS IN 12 RECREATION CENTERS - 3 MONTHS@ $20.00/MO. X 12 CENTERS 720.00 WATER AND OT"tlER UTILITIES FOR 5 PORTABLE SWIMMING POOLS - 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. EACH 750.00 WATER AND OTHER UTILITIES FOR 5 MAJOR SWIMMING . POOLS FOR EXTENDED SWIMMING PROGRAM 5 DAYS @ $.5. 00 PER DAY X 5 POOLS 125.00 UTILITIES AND TELEPHONES FOR CENTRAL OFFICE AND 5 AREA OFFICES - 6 LOCATIONS@ $50.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 ~.ONTHS 900 .. 0 0 TOTAL NON-FEDERAL Sh .Ai:ill . I I TOTAL I 'l I I i I I $ 51,295 . 00 $ 487,690 .46 I �/. Sillh'.lER YOUTH OPPORTillJITY PROGRA.1."'1 VINE CITY FOUNDATION Proiect Recr e ation Plug-In This is a pilot employment progr ~ n·designed to utilize 11 indigenous teenage youth age s 16-20 to serve as coTTuu unity recr e ation organiz e rs. The youth Recreation Organizers will recruit> organi ze, plan, and supe rvise 10 other teenag~rs each to provide planned sumne r r e creation on a 24 hour b a sis. The project will last for 11 weeks. Budg e t Req1:1 e st $13,718 WAOK RADIO STAT ION, EOA, ~O~frflJNITY SCHOOLS Junior D. J. P~r am An employme nt, cultural, and communications program utilizing 10 Juri.ior ., D. J. 's from high dens ity to be trained in use of P~A o equipme nt to provide r e cord hops for about 10,000 high school and young adults age s 16-25 during th e evening hours (7:30-10;00 P. M.)~ These hops will be giVe n in all of the 14 Neighborhood Se r v ice Ce nter areas. The proj e ct will last 4 months. , tHt : l, •. ,!..l fr\Ai:: E (',- ) ~ t=\ (,:, '" ,c~ 1 ·r3 -J .-1 c"' r- r J33 cc c: 1 : :_: ,.. .::. u 1 Budget Re ques t ir 1 3 ~i: \ CENTRAL CITY, EOA pperation Youth This is an employme nt, r e cre ation, cultural, and ed_u cation a l progra~ . Se rving 500 ma l es a~d f ema l e s ages 5-25 in and out of s c hoo l in a compr eh e ns i v e program of recre a tion and cultural acti v it ies including d ive rs ifi ed p layg r ound pr ograms , field trips, craft s , dr a::12. tics , dance , gr ou p 4i s cu ss i on , e tc. The pr oj e ct will la s t 11 we eks . Budge t Request $3,070.12 CABBAGE TOWN RECREATIOX/ WORK YOUTH CENTER This is a pro g r am des i gne d t o invol ve 50-100 ma l es a nd f ema l e s in and out o f schoo l age s 12-21 in a pr og r am of r ecr e at i on , empl oy me nt, e du ca t ion , a c d cul tural e n r ic hme nt acti v iti es . The youth in th e pr o j e ct wi ll work s i x ho ur s p~r d a y in such ac t i v i ti e s as f iel d trip s , c avp i ng , t ut o ria l , e t c. Th e pro j ect will l ast for 12 wee ks . Budg e t Req ues t $15,0 00 �-2- THE CHURCH OF THE HA.STER , UN I TED PRESBYTERI AN USA Su1inne r Enr i chmen t P·L·ogram ' I This p rog r am ·{ s a r ec r e ation, edu ca tion and cultural enr .i c hment pr ogram serv i ng ________ __ youth age s · to · in art s · and cra f t, Lect ur1=:s ( spor t s , .socia l to p ic s , curre nt ~ t s ) , fi e ld tri ps , tu tor ial programs , d an cing ,- games , sports,. and coun se ling serv i ces . The project will last a pprox i ma t e ly 8 we e ks . $10,982 Budge t Re ques t EKALB YWCA V/ Job Prepara ti ori Yro gr am An emp l oyment program designe d t o ser v e 25 teenage g irls 16-18 years of age an d t r a{ni ng and c ouns e ling i n going ab out ge tting a job. The pr og r am will l as t for 7 mon th s . $5ll - Bud ge t Req ue st BOHL ANriEoA , rnc. Re cr ea ti on a l ( Bow l ing ) Pr ogram This r e cr e at i on , cultur a l, an d educat i on program wi ll s e r v e an d spo r t mansh ip, t eam an d i ndiv i dual pri de . The p rogram will l ast 12 weeks . 1200 yout h age a 7-1 8 in limit e d s k ill s in bowl i ng , f a ir pl a y Bud ge t Request $13,800 ACADEHY THEATRE Pr o je c t Cir cus A r ecr ea tiona l, ed uc a tio na l, a nd cul t u r a l program des igne d t o u ti l iz e s ome Sb youth t h r ougho ut Atl an t a , who wi l l be traine d in theat r e and dr ama tic t ec h n i ques . The y wi ll work with younger chil dr en i nvo l ve d i n see in g Cir cus '. Bu dg e t Re ques t $1 6 ,737 .2 0 RUTH MITC HELL DA.c\'CE COHPA.1\;Y Dan ce I ns tr uct i on i n Eocern J azz Ba ll e t A r ec r eationa l, e duc a ti ona l , and cu l tura l program des i gned to utili ze _ __ y ou th , ages 9- 15 in pr ovi d ing cl asses i n ~ode r n J azz Ball et in pr eparat i on f or a pro gram t o be pr esented-by t he Yo ut h . This p ro j ect wi ll l a st f or 10 we eks. Bu dget Reques t $975 �-3- Lawso n Apaitments A recreational and e4ucational program designed to serve 75-100 teenage boys and girls ages 7-12 (r esidents of the Apartments) in a recr-; ational and education progr a~ five .days a week, 9:00-5:30 which will includ e club pro gram , service project, dr amat ics, trips, for teen age girls and sports, game s, arts and cr afts, pond play activity for younger bo ys and girls . The proj ect wil l last for ap~r oximately 2 months. Budget Request ATLAi."JT A YWCA .. $3,028 The Originals An e xper i men tal ·p ilot· project designed to use social group work method, community org anizat ion and a historical approach in organizing a t een dr ama g roup to pre sent special programs f6r th e commun :i:.1 ty . The proj ect will utilize 50-500 poor youth between th e ages of 15-21. The yout h activ ity wil l includ e dance, dr ama , music , ~tc. The viewing audi ence will ran ge from 100-1000. Dur ~tion of project - 14 weeks. Budget Re quest $21,550 ATLA.l~TA YWCA \ Teen Partners This comprehensive education, emplo:yme nt, coun·seling, cultur a l and recre ation program is d esigned to help in th e developme nt of attitude s, goals , motivation, 'knm-, led ge and skill of 24-30 youth within a thr e-e ~ile ra dius of th e Cent r al 'fl-[CA . The youth along with th e training will be provided a compr ehensive r e creational pro gram. Dur~ tion of proj ect - 8 week s . Budge t Re quest $6,94 7.11 CENTRAL YWCA Job Exo lor ation for Teen Teams This empl oyme nt, ed ucation and r ecreat ional prog ram ,,, ill utili ze 40- 50 youth in a six week train ing pr ogram to wo rk with v ar i o us childre n prog r aas ( ages 5-11) in c l uding pl ayg r ounds , tutoring , story t elling etc . _ A group of 10 t eens (ages 15-17) and a young adu l t l eader ui ll work as a t ei.'\i:1 in areas. _The· pr o j ect w.ill ·last for ap proximate l y 7 ~ eeks . Bu dger Re qu 2s t $10, ir6 7. 28 �-4- CE NTRAL YWCA PR0GRAfl "Hi Ne ighbor" An inte r cultur a l, recr ea tional, educ a tion program designed for 60 children age s 6-12 fr om low cost h ou s ing with wo rk i,ng par ents. Specific activity includ es : group g ame s, folk dancin g , hikes, nature exporation, cook outs, and day camp. Duration of proj e ct - 5 weeks . Budg e t Re qu e st $9,551.80 PHYLLIS WHEATLEY YWCA Project A - Twili ght Enrichmen t Program This cultural, recr e ational, educational, group guidance and leadership de ve lo r,:irr:e nt project is des igne d to h e lp y outh enrich their social and spiritual lives in the Vine city, Simpson, Beckwith, Fair and Walnut Stree t area s . The project will attempt to help 45 prete ens (6-12) and 35 te ~nagers (13-16). The specific activity will include day camp activity. Dur ation of program - approximately 8 , weeks . Budiet Requ e st $6, 400 Project B - Teenag e Job Pr e par atio~ Clinic at Pe rr v Home s Thi s pilot project is desin J ed for 50-60 females, 13-16 years o f age. The activiti e s will includ e intensive leadership training in pr e pa ration for j obs; how to apply; job inter v iews, and holding a job. ~he y will also be g i ve n a s si s tanc e in findin g job pla ce ments. Duration of proj e ct Budget Requ e st $9,3 20 WESLE Y C0~Q.illNITY CENTERS Exp a nd ed and Nei:-1 Se r v i ces This edu q itiona l, emp lo yu1e nt, r e cre ation a l, and cultu r al pr og r am - is d es i gne d t o mee t th e ne e ds of bo ys and g irls 6 - 21. Pr ogram acti v iti es inc lu de s a s i x week t rai ni ng pr og r a~ f or 11th and 12th grade s, inc l ud i ng c raft sk ill s , c amp sk ills, so as to be · abl e · to wo rk with s ma ll e r ch il dr e n i n c a~p si tuat i ons. Dur 2. ti on - 10 weeks . Bud ge t Re que st $6,851.95 �\ -5- . GRADY HOHES COi-1:NUNITY GIRLS CLUB , me. Summer Day Ca~ and Teenage E~ployme nt Program This is a reGre ationa l, cultural and educatiori~l projec t designe d to utili ze 20 girls ages 16-21 to become day c amp Junior Counselor s for younger g irls ages 6-14. The proj ect will serve approx i mately 558 gir l s in th e Kirbv·ood Area by providing home maker training, singing , dancing , craft~, field trips, swimming, and evening r ecreation programs for older girls. Budge t Request $14,113 NORTHWEST GEORGIA GIRL SCOUTS COUNC IL This pr oj ect is designed to meet some of the employment, recreational, educational and cultural needs of 412 gir l s scouts ages 7-17 in day c amp activities. The project will last about 11 weeks. Budget Request $3,569 SOUTHEASTERN Yr!CA , ·. . Kirkwood Are a Day Camp This proj ec t is design to prov ide r ecrea t ion for app roximately 550 boys and gir l s ages 6 -12 wi th day camp activities. These activitie s will include crafts, archery , nature s tudy , swirnrning and movies. The project will l a st about 12 we e ks . 0 Budget Re ques t $10, 852 NORTH FULTON EOA CENTER A 12 week progr am de sign_e d to prov ide r e creat ional a ctivitie s for s ome 500- 600 you t h of both s exe s age s 8-18. The proj ec t will al so hire one youth work er in each local conmmnity t o work und e r the l oc a l su pe rv i s or . Activ iti e s for the project wi ll consist of softba ll , h or sesh oe , baske tb a ll, badmi nton , ba s eba ll, voll ey ball, and croque t. Budge t Re qu es t i $4 , 602 . 20 �-6ATLANTA YOUTH DEVELOPNENT CENTER SuwJ,,e r Cu l t ur a l Enr i chme nt Program Program des i g ned to prov i de emp l oymen t, e du ca ti on , a nd recre ationa l a ct i v i ties · i n t he f or m o f d ay c am~s fo r 300 - 400 youth ( ages 7~12) pe r d ay . The pro j ec t wi l l u t ili ze indigenous t eenagers age 16 a nd above to s u perv i se the ac t~vi ty. Duration - approx i mate l y 11 weeks. Budge t Reque st __ $35,53 3 . 49 PITTSBURG NE I GHBORHOOD EOA CENTER Pitts burg Corm.,unit y ' s Work, Educ a tion, Recrea tion Program Th is pilo t progr a~ i s des i gned t o ut i li ze you t h in a commun i ty beauti f i cat i on p rogram as we ll as prov ide manpower fo r e x i sting r e crea tiona l f ac iliti es . The pr oj e ct will emp l oy 20 ma l e s age d 15-20 in the Beau t if ic at i on Program, six fema l e t eam managers age 14- 20 and t hree ma l e l eag~e planne rs wil l be employed t o c arry on Li t tle Le ague Activi t i e s . The pro j e ct wil l a l so prov i de h omemaker training for girl s 9-1 7. Duration - 12 weeks . . Budge t Reque s t METROPOLITA'! ATL-\J."\!TA BOYS ' CLUB , INC. Th is c omp r ehe nsive empl oyment a nd r e c reat i on pro j e ct wi ll attemp t to mee t the n ee ds tif 10 , 000 boys in seve r a l Boys ' Cl ubs in the c ity age s 6- 18 : The pro j ec t will empl oy a numbe r o f youth age s 16- 21 to plan a nd de ve l op p ro g r ar.1s f or areas s e r ved. Summe r ac tiv it ies wi ll inc lude group clubs , d a nc i ng , cook ing , music apprecia t i on , pu ppe try , photogr aphy art , des k he lp , h a ndi cr af t , drama , ceramt .cs , and wood work . Dura tion - appro x i ma t e l y 12 weel(s. Bu dge t Re qu e s t $103 , 609 . 92 EMORY UNI VERS ITY - DIVI Srm; OF LI BRARIANSH IP St or v Te ll in2 Courses Th i s educ a tiona l progr am i s de s i g ne d t o pr ov id e e ff ec i ency for Stor y Te l l e r to be u sed dcr i ng t he surrr.T,e r in variou s r ec r eatio2 prbg r ams. The pro j ect wil l prov i de 12 cour s es ut i li z ing 20 en r o ll ees f or a 8 week pe riod . Du rat i on - 8 we eks . Budge t · Reques t J $2 ,9 79 . 50 �.-7- BUTLER STREET YNCA SuTirrne r Resident Camp The program propos es to e.:1p ioy 5 youth in summe r resident camp as cabin c ounse lo rs , kitchen he lp ers and as ma int enanc e pe rsonne l. The progr am wi ll prov ide c amp experience for 300 youth be t ween the ages of 7-16. Activi ty will incl~de mu~ic, painting, ~r ama , and a tuto ria l prog r am . Dur a tion - 3 weeks . $19,352.72 Budget Re quest Educ a t ion and E.np lo vrr:e nt A work-study _seminar-_to be conducted at resident camp for 12 high school grad~ates from poverty back~rounds. The activity of t he seminars wil l consist of information tha t would be applicab l e to college entrance, discu ss ion on cur rent social events, etc. Duration of project - 12 weeks. $12,649.82 Budge t Reque st Work Iri5entive De mons trat ion Progy:E! This proj ec t is designed to s erve 100 men between the' a ge s o f 16-21 in a work incentive program wi th th e hope of emp l oyment after complet ion of the project. Duration - 2 weeks. Budge t Request $11,01 8 . 59 Camp I mp r ove~ent Pr o iect This emp lOyment progri3.rn is designed to u t ilize 90 youth between the a ges of 16-21. The youth wi ll be involved in 3 ~eeks of camp s ite imp roverr,e nt o f the Butler Stre e t Y:'ICA ' s Lake All atoon2. Campsit e . Ac tiviti e s wil 1 includ e wint e r i•z a tion of exi s ting camp stru cture s , l andscaping a~d water f ront imp r ov ement . $17,7 80 . 92 Bud get Re que s t Ext ended S•,1i c!'£Li.. ng To prov i de swim...,.1i ng activ i t i es f or s o~e 195 boy s be·t wee-n th e age s of 7-1 6 . Duration 12 wee ks . Budge t Reques t 2. .:-id gir l s $4 ,129 . 80 T'l--1 i s pr(,gra.:-rr ~: i l 1- ~tte:r::pc to fulfill t>~ r e c r ~ =. tion n-~·2(:s o:E 6G0 b et:~-.'2 :~:1 the 2~g:::: s o f 14 -1 8 . P._c t i1.-itles c onsisting oE s~·/ i :-r-r:1 i ng , 1 you t h d anc ing , a r ts & c ra f t s , s l id2 pr esentat i ons , sin~ing, danci ng , and tal ent s:t:.-1 .~: ::, 04 i l l t.e ca.1-·(-Led rr for ~2 ~-:e2k.s . 1: 1 $ 14 , 2Sl! . 9 5 �-8- j. DE!l ALB YWCA ., Kirkwood Swi mming Cl ass . This pr ogram will pro vid e sHim.ming activities for 50 youth ages Dur a tion - approxi mate l y 12 weeks . 7-12 in school. Budget Request $607.50 WORKSHOPS rn c oRP OR..A.TE D This proj ect will provide a number of plays for recr eat ional programs throu ghout the cit y . . Budget Request ACADEMY THEATRE Circus This pro gram is designed to p rov i de some of the recreational ne e d s oi"Atlanta youth between t he age s 5-11. The Acade my wi ll prod uce fi ve shows (Circ us ) per we ek jor a s i x we e k pe rio d. The Th e atr e c a n handle 180 kids pe r performance . Bud get Requ e st · $39,3 61 ROYAL KNIG HTS .FOUi'WATIO ~; This p r ogr am ho pe s to provi ae tut ori a l, and cultural enrichmen t prog r a1t1s including t y pi ng, re ad i ng , bas eb al 1, fa s hio n shows anci e cc. for 600-7 00 yout h age s 5-20. -· Bud get Re que st $9,000 SlJH-:-lEC ~EIGHBORHOOD EO:\ CE:'iTE: R Ne chan i csv i l l e· Sur,·u--:1-.: r Pro i e c t - Edu cat i o~J Thi s pr og r ara wil l b e ope r at e d ou t of t he Pryo r St r e et Sch oo l. Re c r ea t i on and ed uc a t i o n ne ed s during th e suaae r mon t hs . La r ge a~o~ n t o f youth t o be h i red . Cit y Sc hoo ls doin g a bo u t th e s a ~e. The ~i o j ect will ru n 3 mont h s . Bud ge t Req ue s:: �-9- NASH HASHINGTO;~ NEIGH BORHOOD EOA CE NTER Keen Teens Progr am to work wit h hard co re youth . Youth working with youth. Cl ean up cr ews , r ec ruiting for other projects, etc. Good project - hi gh employment. Budg e t Reques t YOUl'J"G HEN 'S .CI VIC LEAClE, I NC. This uniqu e work-r ecreation proj e ct will utiliz e 2OO · youth and young adults, male and fe male ages 16-21 in a. program to u pgrade their conmunity . Activities will include cl ean ing streets, alleys, empty lots, and rodent control . Budg et Requ e s t SUH-NEC -NEIGHBORHOOD EOA CENTER A compr ehensi ve employ111e nt, r ecreat ion, education, and cultur a l ~reject to serve 20 , 000 youth ma l e an d female of all ages in th e SumMee Area . Activities will include tutorial, t y ping~ filmstrips, drama , ·~o uns e 1 ing , field trip s , etc. Budg e t Re quest NORTHWEST YOl'NG ~[E N CIVI C ASSOCI ATION Operation Ti ~ht e n Up This pr ogram i s designed to s e r v e s ome 7,00 0 te e n age a nd y oung adults ages 13- 25 in a mu lti- pur pos e youth progr am . The p~=gram will emp l oy a numbe r of ind ige nour youth a nd young adults . Activities will include l ectur e s , tour s , you th f orums, developr,1 e nt of youth busine ss, gene ral sports (in do or an d out of doors , and cr e a ti ve games . Bud ge t Reque s t NORTHWE ST PERRY EOA CE~TER "S ock It To ~-,e" - ··· An er;,pl oyue nt pro j e c t d~s i gr: 2 d to s e r ve 1,00 0 ma l e a n d f em.2. le a ge s 13- 25 i n a n i nte ns i v e p r ogr a~ of tr ai ni ng and counse li ng . Lead t e e n age r s a~d pr o fes s io nal s will wor ~ 3i t h t eenage r s who h a ve no wo r k h i sto ::- / a s "p ee r Gr oup Coun se l or s. Du ra t io n of pr o j e c t a pp r o~i~a te l y 12 wee k s . �.. -10- WEST CENTRAL EOA NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER Surmner Activiti es Prog r am A r ecreational , educational , cultural enrichment progrcun will s erve approximatel-y 5,400 persons of all ages. Employing _____ youth in di versif i ed jobs: Act i v iti es f or this pro gram wi ll include ind oor and out of door recreation, arts and crafts, h ead start, trips to int erest i ng pl a ces,· neighborhood cle§=m tips. Duration - a pproxima t e l y 11 weeks . Budget Request COLLEGE PAR.""1( Cl VIC Afm :C:DUCATIONAL CLUB , IN C. This r ecreationa l and educational will serve approximately 9,000 youth both male · encl f e;;,a ie of al l ages who r es i de in l ow-i ncome· com.m unities . The pr o ject will utili ze 60 poor youth as you th assis tant s and 9 young adults. Activities for the project wi ll include sports, arts and crafts, daily personal grooming , tri ps and excurs i ons , ceramics and diversified "playground progr ams . Dura t i on - 12 weeks . Budget Reques t . ·. EAST PO INT RECREATION DEPARTI!ENT This project wi ll co ver t he four target areas in the city. It is designed to meet the r e creational needs of 5,000 pe rsons of all ages . The proj ect wil l employ 8 youth and young adu lt s from each of th e area blbcks. Ac ti v ities will inc lude sports , playground acti v i Ei~s, arts and crafts, cer anics , sewing , personal hygiene and grooming , trips and e xcusions , t een pr ograras , s en ior citizen progr am , sw i ITl!-ning and pre- schoo l pr ograms . Durat i on 8 weeks Budget Request EDG E\-100D ;,.;EIGHBORHOOD EO.--\ CEN"TER Sumne r Cr ash Recr eat ion Proj_ect Thi s uniqu e pi l ot project will utiliz e six youth from th e area The proj ect wi ll ser ve 24 mentally r e t ar ded childr en by providing daily mental and ph ys ical acti v iti es . Duration - 9 weeks . t o work with mentally r e tard e d children . Budgel Request ., �\ -11- H. R. BUTLER SCHOOL A comprehensive erap loyment , recre at iona l, educ,a tional and cultural prog ra:-:i des i gned to employ a number of youth and young adults for the purpos e of supe rvising group activ ities. The program wi ll s erve a total of 500 persons ages 6-25. Activities for this program wil l includ e tutoria l in reading and gr ade improvement , ___arts and cra f ts, Neg ro history, story h~urs , dan ce instruction, sport s·, playg round activities, trips and swirrrrning. Duration 10 weeks. Budget Request ENNAUS HOUSE A unique program designe d to take 100 boys and gir l s in the Peopl estown - Sur:-.;,1erh ill area to J e kyll Isl a nd for one week in an attempt to replace a slum se tt ing with a memorable experience of a world the y have neve r known. Activities for this program will include recreation and counse ling . Af ter returning, these youth will be engaged in a 7 week remedial re ad ing progr am . Du r ation - 8 weeks . • Budget Request GWINNETT COU}ITY EOA A comprehe nsive emp loyme n t, r ec r ea t ion, e duc ation and cultural enri chmen t program to serve about 6,000 yo ung children , both mal e and f emal e . The project will emp loy 20 tee n l eaders to be divid ed amoung the four ce n ters . Pr6j ec t act i vit i es will i nclude field trips , pers ona l hygiene , sewing class e s; clas se s in water and hunting safety , fir st aid , body care , drana, and nrusical gr oups . Dur ation approx i raate l y 10 we e ks . Bud get Re'1 uest WEST E~D NEIGHBOR.HOOD EOA CENTER Thi s e:nr loyrr.-2 nt , r e cre8.tion2 l and cu l tural enr i chmen t pro gra~,,_ i s designed to se rve a numb2r of youth i n t he are2 _ T~ pro j ect ~i ill--e ~!) l oy a nu mber of youth t o d oo rdic12te and super,,eise r ecreati.ona l a nd e nriclcen t pr ogra:-o·,s ( ages 17-1 8 ). Act i vities wil l incl ude base ba ll, basketba l l , volly~a ll, soccer , s tory hours, 2nd t rips . Du r at ion · - 1 3 ,-~eeks . Bud ge t R2ques l �-12JOHN HOPE SCHOOL "Project Uplift " The project will provide educ a tion and recreafion a l acti~ities for 300 youth , young adult s , a nd Se nior Citiz e ns . The pro j ect will employ 15 junior lead e rs (16-21) fro m the area t o provi de lead e r s hip for children, youth and Se nior Citizens. Aciivities will include Negro history, basic edu,:: a t ion i mpr ovem·e nt, tours, arts and cr a fts , dance , s,-, im..u ing, sports, movi e s, track and field events , and instrumental music . Duration - 3 we eks Budget Requ e st EDG EWOOD NEIGHB ORl-ICOD EOA CENTER Edgewo od - East Lake You t h Summe r Re cr ea tion Program This summer recr e a tional prog r am will serve about 500 youth of all age s . Activities wiil includ e - s ewing, crafts, stamp collecting , guitar l e ssions , piano les s ion s , d anc e , wood work, and sports. Duration - approxima tely 9 wee k s . , . Budget Requ es t Edgewo od - Kir b -rn od Skati n$ Proi e ct A pr ogram to prov id e s k a tin g activitie s for 200 you th and young adult s a ge s 6-25. The pr o j e ct will e mploy 12 young ad u lts fro m th e co1rnnuni ty. Du rat ion appr ox ima t e ly 10 wee ks. ', Bud get Re qu e st ROCKDALE C01..:YIY EOA Ai'iD RECR?.:ATIO;; c o:,.rr i'I SSI ON The proj e ct will pr ov i d~ r e cr eat i ona l, ed ucati ona l~ a nd cultu ra l activi t i e s for s ome 600 you t h and young adults . The p ro j e c t will e mp lo y 30 t a r ge t area yo u th t o su pe r v i s e t he ac ti v iti es as t ea che r aid e s, g r ound ke epers , eq ui pme n t ma na ge r s an d con c essio n wor ke r s . Ac ti v iti e s will in c lud e s ports , art s a nd cr af ts, dr a ma , an d a c ti ng . Du ra ti on - 12 wee ks . Budge t Req ues t THE AT RE ATL\.:·;IA Thi s pr oj e c t wi ll pr od uce thr ee or r;.or- e p l a :,'s to be prese n t e d on a r.10 '.Ji l e t he at re fa c ili t y t o f: ot'r EO~\ t 2:..-ge t a rea s . The pro j ect ·wi ll s e r ·,1 e. _ _ _ _ a du l t s i r~ t he ~ l a.~~.n i~tg 1 G.L I t v.:o u l d c m~ loy - --·-- - - --- y out ft a od y ct..:ng p r~) j 2C t . D::;r.:;.t i c n - S ~-1,2 eks . �I. -13- PRICE NEIGHBORHOOD EOA CENTER PAT Y (Pr{c e Aid to Ybuth) This project will attempt to prepare 100 yout h ages 14 -24 for employment . . Its activities wil l i nc lu de r ecreation , counseling, tutoring, and recrui tment a ctivi ti es. Duration 12 weeks. Budge t Request . CITY OF ATLA2·1 TA, DEPARnlENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION Recr eatioE~ Er.1plo v:nent and Enrichmen t Program The Cit y 's ·programs ~vil l provide a diversity of recreational and enrichment programs for youth and .Senior Cit izens through out th~ metropolitan area. It will se rve approximately 21,000 persons during th e sumn,er. It will employ 336 poor youth. Activities to be off e r ed : C~e a tive Rhytmics {)iJt.door games . Softb a ll Vally Ball Camp Cr afts Sew:i.ng Ceramics Pho tography Music Appreciation Team Sports Weight Training Day Camp Wood work Baton Less on Cheer. Leading s~~imming Tract & Field Pupp etry Tumblin Typing Field Trip s Te en Dances Modern and Tap dance Judo Dur a tio n - 12 weeks Budget Request FOLLOW UP SERV ICE TQ LOH- DICO~fE Ut,'c·T.-iRRI.W This progr am will b2 t o fin d and h e l? young girls in findi ng work - c ar ing for youth, etc . This is only proj ect working with u nwed mot he rs. Bud ge t Req uest �
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 12, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 15, Folder 13, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 13, Complete Folder
  • Text: Department of Planning MEMO FR OM: - ---==-------""'----=-""'-'-- - - --Pt--- TO: _ _ __:.__:==>====---- D For your information D Please make nece D _.:==~ ~ - ,o1~--.w 1--.~-1- �ATLANTA,GEORCillA ROUTE SLIP TO : _h -----'.--- ~~ FROM: Dan E. Sweat, - ~ ~ ~ ~ ....L__ ,1 _ Jr. 0 For your information D Please refer to the attached correspondence and -make the necessary reply. O Advise me the status of the attached. FORM 25- 4-S �DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING 700 CITY HALL ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303 D~Sw~ -v'\A.~ 'S Cfft c <. �ATLANTA,GEORGIA PHONE 522-4463 Faye Yarbrough ~ ~ T M{)., J / PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT EXPANSION COO-FERENCE Atlant a- American Motor Hotel Atlanta, Georgia December 13, 1967 .. 8:30 Registration - Atlanta-Ame r ican Motor Hotel, Atlanta, Georgia 9:30 Opening General Session: Gran d Ballroom Presiding: David Su llivan, Pre sident Building Se r v ice Empl oyee s Intern a t i o na l Unio n AF L-CIO Gr ee tings : Honorabl e Iv a n All en , Jr. Mayor, City o f Atlant a Remarks: Willi am Flynn, Dir ecto r Step Pr ogr a m, Na ti onal As sociation of Manufacture r s Dr. Lawrenc e D. Reddick, Exe cutive Di re ctor Oppor tun i ti es I n du s triali zation Center Institute Augu stus H. St ern e , President Chamber of Commer c e Atl a n ta , Ge o rgia 30 Expanding Pr ivate Employment Oppo r t u nities Work shops Five concurrent workshops will be held , all dea l i ng with the same topics. Morning Session : Film: Employment Programs , City of Atlant Organizing local employment committees an d possible structures Recruiting , training and placement of hard-core unemployed 12:15 Luncheon Session: Presiding: Address: Georgia Ballroom John Wheeler, President Mechani cs and Farmers Bank Durham, North Carolina President, Southern Regional Council Gerald L. Phillippe, Chairman of the Board General Electric Company �PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT EXPANSION CONFERENCE 2:00 Page 2 Expanding Private Employment Opportunities Workshops Afternoon Session: Job Development and upward mobility Entrepreneurship - Promotion of economic growth in the ghetto, 3:30 Adjournment �r The Urban Coalition / Steering Committee Co-chairmen: Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randoiph November 15, 1967 Dear Friend: On August 24, 1967, 1,200 leaders of American life met in Washington at an Emergency Convocation called by The Urban Coalition. The Coalition, representing business and the professions, organized labor, religion, civil rights groups and local government, was established in response to the · urgent ne ed for action in behalf of the nation's citi es . The enclosed Statement of Principles, Goals, and Commitments adopted by The Urban Coalition identifies specific problem areas and appeals to both the public and pr ivate sector for action to meet these needs. The Coalition has cre a ted Task Forces--one o f which is th e Task Force on Private Employment-to focus on the individual probl em areas. Expanding employment opportunities for the hard-core unemployed has been given top priority by the Coalition. The Task Force on Private Employment is holding a series of Re gional Planning Confere nces to discuss this difficult a nd compl e x problem. The first conference is scheduled to be held at the AtlantaAmerican Motor Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia on December 13, 1967. Mayor Iva n Allen, Jr. and the Chamber of Commerce of Atlanta will be the hosts. We hope y ou r schedul e will permit you t o join u s in this most import ant proj e ct. Other conferen ces are planned for Pho e nix , Arizona on January 17, 1968 and Kansas City, Missouri on Janu ary 24, 1968. We are enclosing a list o f state s covere d b y e ach of the conf e re nce s. It would b e most helpful if you woul d supply us with th e name s a nd a dd res s es of appropri a t e a ffili a t e s in these s t a t es s o we ma y ext e nd an invit a tion to them. In the meantime, we hope y ou will communicate your interest and support o f this endeavor to these offici als. National Coordinators : John Feild/ Ron M. Linton Telephone 293 -1530 �November 15, 1967 Page Two We would appreciate your notifying this office no later than December 4, 1967 if you will be able to join us in Atlanta; also, if you desire accommodations for the evening of December 12, 1967. We expect to forward further details on the program in the near future. Cordially, o;2-~;11,,~ Ron M. Linton National Coordinator Enclosures f3c*-{);:}) John Feild National Coordinator �CI Y OF A.TLANTA CITY HALL November 20, 1967 ATLA1TA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison MEMORANDUM To: Messrs. Cecil Alexander, Brad Currey, Jr., Curtis Driskell, James Furniss, Don Gareis, Collier Gladin, Richard Hicks, Boisfeuillet Jones, James Parham, and John Wilson From: Subject: Dan Sweat Urban Coalition Task Force on Private Employment meeting in Atlanta, December 13 The Task Force on Private Employment of the National Urban Coalition will hold a one-day seminar on problems of unemployment and expanding employment opportunities for low-income groups in the private sector at the American Motor H otel, December 13. Workshop sessions will be keyed to reaction on our Human Resources Development group slide presentation on employment and unemployment. The Mayor and the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce are cooperating with the National Urban C o alition to produce this Atlanta meeting. We will need the help of all of the Human Resources Development group members, partic uii.anly in the narration of the film in workshop sessions and in the case of two or three people to act as workshop leaders. I hop e that you will all mark your calendars on this day from 9:00 a. m . until 3: 30 p. m. and hold it for participation in this meeting. Curtis Driske ll and I are as sis ting the National Urban Coalition and will be in touch with you very shortly as to specific participation we would like to get from particular individuals. DS :fy �TO: DAN FROM: M~ Attached is a brief summary of the major points that the Task Force hopes to accomplish at the meeting in Atlanta. I am also enclosing a few e x amples of the type of people that will be invited. others. Time did not permit me to send y ou Hopefully, this will serve to indicate that national leadership will be invited. MC/ jc Enclosur e �The format of the conference will be designed to encourage max imum discussion on how to e xpand employment opportunities for the hard-core unemploy ed . Representation from national business leadership will be attending. A general session with prominent speakers will be held and workshops on the subject will be formed. It is planned that three specific topics would be discussed: (1) Specific e x amples on how the private sector has participated in programs which e xpand employment opportunities for the hard-core unemploy ed on a local level. (2) Formation of local employment committees to perform specific tasks: a. Assess local employment problems and manpower programs. b. Develop programs that are specific and action oriented. c. Continue to evaluate the employment problems and programs, and issue recommendations to o v ercome local employment problems. (3) Th e r e lationship between local employme nt committees and the Task Force on Pri v ate Employment and how the Task Fo r ce can a ssist the local committees. �Atlanta Chamber of Commerc e P, O, BOX 1740 - ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30301 - PHONE !121°084!1 November 7, 1967 Mr. A. H. Sterne, Jr. Trust Company of Georgia P.O. Box 4418 Atlanta, Georgia 30302 Dear Mr. Sterne: Enclosed for your information is a copy of a memorandum to Opie L. Shelton, relative to last Friday' s meeting of the Human Resources Development Group. Mr. Shelton suggested a copy be forwarded to you. ~ This organization is made up of representatives of five agencies : Our Atlanta Chamber, the City of Atlanta, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, the Community Chest, and the Community Council of the Atlanta Area. John C. Wilson and I rep~esent the Chamber. The slide presentation referred to was developed over a period of time in which the Group has discussed in some detail ways of meeting the problems of unemployment and underemployment. We think the presentation could be useful in planning the program for the meeting of the Urban Coalition group here on December 13. Please let me know when I can be of help. Cordially, ~ Curtis H. Driskell Metropolitan Affairs Director CHD/rnb v ~l. -tH_;: Mr. Dan Sweat ~ F'Yl..:0 "'"-loi-:tt... 143.215.248.55 .Mi o~, J.:L-~~ ~ -~ ~?M. ~ . ) ~ J . ~ - # . t ~. ~ �. ' MEMORANDUM 'l I At a meeting of the Human Resources Development Group on Friday (Nov. 3), ideas were discussed and some decisions made as to how the group should proceed in development and use of the slide presentation dealing with unemployment and underemployment. These were the main points of agreement: 1. The presentation is being screened for Mayor Allen and a few others in a meeting at City Hall on Wednesday afternoon (Nov. 8) at 3 p. m. The presentation will be evaluated as to its usefulness for showing to the Urban Coalition meeting here on December 13. 2. Provided there is agreement, the presentation would be shown following lunch at the Coalition meeting, and it would be critiqued by the group afterwards. Ideas, conclusions and ways to improve and refine the presentation would be sought. )l I I I I ~ ~ 3. Meanwhile, as a member of the Group, I will see that ·the presentation is brought to other local groups and individuals, as indicated (advisory groups and committees of Economic Opportunity, etc.) and will seek the same thing: Ways of refining it and filling in some of the gaps. Dan Sweat and I will later bring recommendations back to the group, as to possible changes and/or expansion of the presentation itself, and as to its future use in our community. Members of the Human Resources Development Group recognize the presentation for what it is: A beginning effort in need of some answers and conclusions. It would be presented to the Coalition in that manner, in hopes of accomplishing two purposes: To serve as an illustration of one effort against this problem, as well as a laboratory exercise for the Coalition group; and to seek fresh insight and ideas from the critique. i Respectfully submitted, ·l J Curtis H. Driskell !l November 7, 1967 I!!· I:fil I �November 6, 1967 Mr. Mel Cotton The Urban C oalition 1819 H Street , N . W . Suite 220 Washington ,_ D . C . 20006 Dear Mel : I am submitting a few of my thoughts on what the Private Employment T sk Force meeting might look like in Atlanta on December 13 . I would hope that w would be able to complete worksbop sessions in the rning a.nd end in a general session with late lunch without reconv ning for workshop sessions in the aftel'tloon. With ev ry workshop conference I have attended-, including the recent Coalition me ting in Chicago, we have alw ys lost oux udience in the fternoon and I believe this would b the case in Atlanta wh re you re involving key bu inessmen. I would suggest st ;r,tin bout 9; 30 with gen r ae ion with welcome remni,ks by the M yor nd a keynote stage setting addr as by Phillippe, H nry F ord 011 someone ot thl order . Woi-kshop sessions would convene bout 10:30 or 11:00 nd run until 12: 30. These might be broken into two workshop periods for each rticipant. Luncheon would b gin bout 12:45 with the progr m to commence bout 1:30 or 1:45. l would Uk to see th Atlant colot slide pre ntation on rn power p:ro ,:am.s, pl'oblem • tc. pr ,sented by th key Chamb r of Com.me c official with m ybe time £or a few qu stlon or comments from th fiooi- £ollo lng this. Thi would t e about 45 minutes total. We might w nt to pass out sorn c::ritiqu he ts to b filled out and _tu1tned glvln a ch nee for expJ- • lons Ol' comment on the film pr s ntation. �Mr.· Cotton Page Two November· 6, 1967 The conference could close with a hard-hitting speech by Phillippe or Ford. Possibly the keynote speech in the morning should be designed to tell · bout some of the things that al"e happening in private industry in connection with Coalition efforts throughout the counh.·y. l would also like to see diocussion of the Step Pi-ogram of the National Assad tion of ManufactureJ:'e wo.rked into the pt'og:ram. This possibly could be done in the workshops . Ple se let us know what steps you want us to take next. Sincer ly yours, D n Sweat I'.6:fy �~ 7 . / .. ·_ r~ _!:-- __ . • __.J J ~-- November 6, 1967 • J. CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR MEMORANDUM R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison To: Urban Coalition Steering Committe e From: Dan Sweat The Private Employment Task Force of the National Urban Coalition has scheduled a regional conference on expanding private employment in Atlanta on December 13. The conference will last for the better part of the day and will involve nationally known business officials and others who will discuss ways their companies have helped to reduce unemployment or provide additional job opportunities and advancement for the low-income people. As part of our local contribution to the program, it has been suggested that the slide program on employment developed by the Human Resources group be presented to the Coalition meeting. This Human Resources group is made up of representatives of the C ity of Atlanta, Community Council, Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, and Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. The slide program has been developed over the last eighteen months period and is designed to present to the private businessman of Atlanta the picture on unemployment and programs designed to combat the problem. A preview of the slide program has been scheduled for 3:00 p. m., Wednesday, November 8, in Committee Room 1 of City Hall. The Mayor and other members of the Local Coalition Steering Committee are being invi_ted to attend to critique the presentation along with Bob Wood of the Meri-t Employers Association and one or two other concerned individuals. I hope that your schedule will permit your attending this preview. should last about an hour. DS :fy It �CITY OF ATLANTA November 6, 1967 CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR MEMORANDUM To: R, EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS, ANN M, MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR,, Director of Governmental Liaison Urban Coalition Steering Committee From: Dan Sweat The Private Employment Task Force of the National Urban Coalition has scheduled a regional conference on expanding private employment in Atlanta on December 13. The conference will last for the better part of the day and will involve nationally known business officials and others who will discuss ways their companies have helped to reduce unemployment or provide additional job opportunities and advancement for the low-income people. As part of our local contribution to the program, it has be en suggested that the s lide program on employment developed by the Human R esources group b e pr esented to the Coalition meeting. This Human Resources group is made up of representatives of the City of Atlanta, Community Council, Atlanta Chamber of C omme rce, and Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. The slide program has been developed over the last e ighteen months period and is de signed to pr esent to the private businessman of Atlanta the picture on unemployment and programs designed to combat the problem. A preview of the slide program has b een scheduled for 3:00 p. m., Wednesday, November 8, in Committee Room 1 of City Hall. The Mayor and othe r members of the Local Coalition Steering Committee ar e b eing invited to attend to critique the presentation along with B ob Wood of the Mer i-t Employe rs A s sociation and one or t wo other concerned individuals. I hope tha t your schedule will p ermit your attendin g this preview. s hould l as t a bout an hour . DS :fy It �M1· . Spal ding Page Two December 6 , 1967 situation in Atlanta. It addresses itself to the problem of people who need jobs and a l so to the employer ' s problem of jobs whi ch need people . Attached is a copy of the narrative script which accompanies the slides . I hope you will have time to review this narrative and find the opportunity to comment on next Wednesday ' s meeting before that time . Editorial support would seem j ustified in a meeting of this importance . I hope you can also attend the conference . Sincerely yours, Dan Sweat DStfy �I THE URB.7:\N COALITION EASTERN REGIONAL ACTION CONFERFJ\,JCE: EXPANDING EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES December 13, 1967 Atlanta, Georgia TASK FORCE ON PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT Co-Chairme n Gerald L. Phillippe Chair~an of the Boa rd GeneLal Electric Company New York David Sullivan Preside nt Building Service Employees Internationa l Union AFL-CIO Washin g ton John Wheeler President Mechanics & Farmers Bank Durha m, North Ca rolin a WORKSHOP A (Augu s t a Room) Cha irman: John L. De nma n, Ma n a g e r, De pt. of Urban Aff a irs , F ~rd Mo t o r Co. Rs s 0 urc e Pers ons ; Willi a m Downs , Associa t e Se rvi ce s, Inc .; Da ytrm Ha rwick , Empl oyee a n d Commun i t y Re J.a tions , Ge n era l F:7 e ct r ic Co.; Dr. Lawrence D. Re ddick, Exec utive Director, Opportuniti e s Industriali za ti o n Ce nt 0 ~ In s titut e WORKS HO P B (Br un swi ck Room ) Chairman : Harold Shepard : W. E. Upj ohn In s t.i. t ute f or Employ:-,,,2i1:.:. Research Resourc e Persons: Pa ul R. Thoms on, Ma nage r, Em.[)loyee & Communit y Re lation s , General El ec tri c Co.; Sam u e l Danie ls, Associ a t e Director, Council fo r Eq u a l Bus i n ess Oppor tun i ty; Don Gar~ is, Vi c2 Pres id e n t , Se ars Ro e buck Fo un da tion WORKSHOP C (Columb u s Room) Chairman: Dr. He n ry Bre nne r, Pe r s onn e l Manag e r , Xerox Corpo rati o n Re s 0 u rce Pe r s ons : Cec il Al e xa nde r, F i nch , Al e xa nd e r , Bar n es , Roth s child & Pasch a l, Ar c h ite c t s ; Berk e l e y G. Bu rre ll, Presid e nt, Na t ion a l Bu sin e ss Le ag u e ; Ke n rrowa rd , I nd u s tri a l Re lations, Eastman Kodak Co . WORKSHOP D (S ec t i o n A Co n v e n tio n Hal l) Chairman: Rod n ey Au s ti n , Pe r s o n n e l Ma nager, Re y n olds Tobacco Co . Resourc e Person s : Dr . Loui s Ki s hk una s , Ass i sta nt Supe rinte n de n t , OVT Educa tio n , Pitt sburgh; Ado l ph Holme s, As s ista nt Di rector , -Economi c Deve lopme n t and Employmen t Na tional Urba n Leag u e , In c . ; J ame s J. Forth, Ma r.c.-i g e ~ Employee and Community Re lati o n s , Ge n e r a l El e c tri c Co. �\, " - 2 WORKSHOP E (Section B Conven tion Ha ll) Chairman: William Flynn, Director, STEP Progr?m Na tional Associatiort of Manufacturers Resource Persons: Earl Redwin e , Con s ult a nt, ES R; Richard Lyle, Assistant Director, Ur b a n Leag u e , So uth Reg ional Office; John Wilson, Pr es id e nt, Horne-Wil s on Co.; E. L. Klein, Mana s·~:r RCA I . �,[ , CITY OF .ATLANTA CITY HALL December 7, 1967 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR MEMORANDUM To: Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. From: R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental liaison Cecil Alexander Duane Beck Bradley Currey, Jr. Curtis Driskell James Furniss Don Gareis Collier Gladin Richard Hicks Boisfeuillet Jones T. M. (Jim) Parham John Wilson Dan Sweat Attached is a copy of the Workshop line -ups for the Eastern Regional Action C o nference of the Urban C o alition on Wednesday. Y o u will note that we have scheduled Don Gareis, Cecil Ale x ander and John Wilson to be local resource persons on the Workshop pane ls. We have also scheduled several members of our group to narrate the employment slide presentation. These are Clint Rodgers of EOA for Workshop A; Don Gareis - Workshop B; Duane Beck - Workshop C; Johnny R obinson of the Mayor's Office for Workshop D; and Curtis Driskell - Workshop E. Curtis Driskell has revised the narrative script along the lines we have discussed. A copy of the revised script is attached so that the narrators might review it over the weekend and before the me e ting . Copies of the �Page Two December 7, 1967 visual slide presentation will be available Friday and those who might want to obtain a copy of the presentation to run through can call Curtis at the Chamber office at 521-0845. Attached is another copy of the program so that you will know the time table. Slide projectors will be furnished by the Chamber, EOA, Don Gareis, the Community Council, and the City. The City has two so that we will have an extra one in case we have technical difficulty with one. We will be in touch with the people who have offered their projectors on Tuesday so that we might collect them and have them ready for Wednesday morning's meeting. If those persons furnishing projectors also have screens, it will be appreciated if we could borrow those at the same time. Pleas e call me or my secretary, Miss Faye Yarbrough, if any ques tions or problems arise. DS:fy �THE URBAN COALITION EASTERN REGIONAL ACTION CONFERENCE: EXPANDING EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES December 13 , 1967 Atlanta , Ge org i a TASK FORCE ON PR I VATE EMPLOYMENT Co - Cha irme n Gera ld L. Phillippe Chairman of the Boa rd General El e ctr i c Company New York David Su l liva n Presid e n t Building Se r vice Emp l oye e s I nt er n ati o na l Unio n AF L- CI O Washing ton John Whe e l e r Preside nt Me c h a nics & Farmers Ba nk Durha m, North Car o l ina WORKSHOP A (Augus t a Room) chairman: John L. De nma n, Manage r , De pt . of Urban Affai rs, Ford Motor Co . Resource Persons: Will iam Down s , Assoc i a t e Se r v i c e s, I n c.; Dayton Harwi ck , Emp l o yee a nd Community Re la tions , Ge n eral El e ctric Co.; Dr . Lawre nc e D. Re d d ick, Exe cutive Di re ctor, Opportuni t ies I nd u s t ria l i z ation Ce nt e r I n s titut e WORKSHOP B (Brun s wi c k Room) Cha irman : Harold Shepa r d : W. E . Upjohn In s t i tu t e for Employme nt Res earch Res o u rce Pe r s o ns : Paul R. Thomson , Manager , Employee & Community Re lations, Ge neral El ec t ric Co . ; Samuel Da ni e l s, As s ociate Directo r, Counc i l for Eq ua l Bus i ness Oppor tun i ty; Don Gar~is, Vi ce President , Sears Roe buck Foun d ation WORKSHOP C (Columbus Room) Chairman : Dr. He n ry Bre nne r, Personnel Manager , Xe r ox Corporation Resourc e Persons: Ce c i l Al exa nder , Finch , Al exande r, Bar n es , Roth s child & - Paschal , Ar c hitects ; Berkeley G. Burre l l , Pr eside nt, Na t iona l Bu s i ness League ; Ken Howa rd , I ndust rial Re lation s , Ea s tman Kodak Co . WORKS HOP D (Sect i on A Conve nti on Hall) Chai r man : Rodney Aus t in , Personnel Manager , Reynolds Tobacco Co . Re s our ce Persons : Dr . Louis Kishkunas , Assistant Superintendent, OVT Educa t ion , Pit tsburgh; Adolph Holmes, Assistant Director , Eco nomi c Development and Employment National Urban League , Inc . ; James J . Forth, Ma1~ge~ Employee and Commu n ity Relations, General Electric Co. �Mr . M oore Page Two Decembe r 6 ; 1967 situation in Atlanta . It addresses itself to the pr oble m of people who need jobs and also to the employer ' s prob lem of jobs which need pe ople . Attached is a copy of the narrative script which accompanies the slides . I hope you will have time to review this narrative and find the opportunity to comment on next Wednesd y ' s meeting before that time . Editorial support would seem justified iin a meeting of thi importance . 1 hope you can also attend the conference . Sincerely yours , Dan Swe at DS :fy �THE ATLANTA DAILY WORLD Friday, Decemb e r 15, 1967 . ;--r:; • I .._ ~- ~• • I,:_ ' ., . . . The Urbe.!! C~~ Et!cn h e1d B.!!. ~11 ln n c hc:.o n d.9..y· ::E~stern R egion~.! Action Con - key nate feren ce - ExpandL11g Employmen t. Opportc!nities·· at t.he Atlanta Americen _ rotor Hotel Wednesday, Dec: ! 3. The p!anning conference Jointly Bponsored by the Vrban Coalition·s T f.!.Sk · Force on · Private Employment, T h e At!ante1. Cham ber , of Commerce .and M,i'yor Allerr's Offic?.!!Y. This is the third conferen ce a t tended by l\/T..r. Phil!iooe i n the oa.st two weeks '9.S the UrbE!n Coalition co!1tinues.t o fo cus attentiorr arr the ·natiorr's u_r1employment problems. He noted that the traditiorra.l attit ude of the business ,;,;or!d wit.h regard:; to job qualifications can no longer orevail if th .American Mayor I rnn Allen . ,Jr. greeted th e bu:;iness and indus try Ls to concielegat~s to Atlan ta. d ur ing t he ein ue to pr 0 sp<;r ?nd ,;xpanr!. opening gen eral ;;e·33ion !n the grand ba llroom . David Sulli,·an, He further sta ted tha t the Urpresident Building S0rvicc Em - ban Coalitiou h as scheduled other .ployee:c; , Interna.tiona l Union AFL·· r egiona l action pla nning conference CIO. presided over t,he opening; to take the m e:;s;i,ge direct to t he session which also h earer remar k.Ii business m en everywhere. Co-cha irman o[ the conference from, Aui; ustus H. Sterne. presi-· ·ctent Atlanta C.!1amber of Com- were Mr. PhiUippe, Mr. Sullivan merce, Dr. Law rence D . Redd ick and Mr. John Wheeler, presiden t : exP.cnti ve director; Opport11 nil;ies Mechanics and F'armers Bank, Dur[ndus trializ:i. tion Cen ter Instit11te ham , N. C. There were five work(Philacfelphia ), and William Flynn, shops. Wor kshop A. included: Director STEP Program of the Na tional Association of ManufacturChairman : John L. Denman. Manager, Dept. of Urban Affairs, ers. Vernon J ordon. project director Pnrd Co. Resource P ersons: Wilof. voter registra tion: southern Re- liam Downs, Associate Services, gioua! Council, presided ove!'. the Inc.; Dayton . Harwick, · ·Employee -,--- .. ' _,' R~dd!ck, E:::ecutive D!!'ector, Opportu!lities Industrialization Ccn- . t~! !r1stitute . . Work.shop B !..'lcluded: C hw irrn ~ n - fi',::arolri Sh c:.p -::1rrl • VI . E. Upjo!L'l I!lstitute for Emp!oymerrt Res each Resource Fersorrs: Pe.ul R. Tho!!lsoD. ::r-.1!ane.ger, Employee & Con1mu_11ity R ela tions. Gerrer>?._ 11 Ele{; tric Co.; GP~muel D~nleLs, _.\sso- cia te D!!'ector, Counc!! for Eaua.l Bt.LSi.nES3 Opportu..11iLy ; Don G a rr is, · Vice Fresident. S ears · Roebuck Foundation. Workshop C. included : Cha!rm:!.n : D r . Eeruy Brermer, Per3onnel Manager . Xerox Corpo~ation Resource Persons: Cecil Aiexander, Pinch, Alexand0;r, Barnes, Rothschild a n Pascha l, Archi- . tee ts: Berkeley G . Burrell. President. National Business League; 'Ken Howard, Industrial iRela tians, Eastman Kodak Co. Workshop D included: Chairman: Rodney t1Ustl.n, P erstmn el Manager, Reynolds Tobacco 1:;o. Resonrce . Persons : Dr. Louis K\&'1kunas. Assistant Superin.tender.t, I OVT Education. Pittsburgh : Adolph · HoLrnets. Assistant Director, Economic Development and Employment Nationa l Urban Le>?.gue. rno.; J ame5 J . F or th . Manager Employee and Community Re!:?.ticns, Genera l Electric Co.; Berij_arnin Goldstein . Director. The Co\L'lcil . for Equal .Busines's o p~ pbrtunit}'.. · ~--~, . ) Yforlrsho·p E includ ed: , -~Cl:iairma n : Willia m ·Flynn . Di~ r ector, STEP. Program Net!onal Association of Ma nufacturers. . · .. . - · · ·: Resource Persons: Ea rl Red i'.'int CQnsultant. ESR ; R!chard Lv!e .Assistant Director, Ur ba n League South Reg!onal Office; J ohn Wll. ~O_!), . President, Horne - Wi!soii ,CQ.~ : E, L. Klein , Manager, '.RC.A:. .7~ - �1 December 111 1967 The Honorable Ivan All , Jr. Mayor of Atlanta City Hall tlanta., Georgia Dear Ivan, Thie ll collf: our cancell tion of the December 13, Hungry CD.ub progr to avoid conflicting th the Urban Coalition Conference ored by- Dan Swe ti · office on this data. To knOlfl dge, only time in the 22- year hi toey of the Hungry Club this ha been done. I have re. chedu:L d your Hungry Club appearan for January 24, 1968. You should know that tbi parti ular Hungry Club essio». will a part of our obsAT"'U·an,~A of tio W • oca �~ ,., . ---- -·---- - - ···· ------··· -- --------3 - '1.si11es§ to Sotve r ties~ 1·1s:, (~;, 200 11siness1111e11 Hea1~ k!.- ; 1 '· 0 ,, e By ALEX COFFIN More tha n 200 top businessmen . most of them from the Soulh casl, gath ered i11 Atl,mta \\'edr.esday and generally agreed that it's simply good business to expand job oppor unities and help soi·,e urban problems. . The rc·gional conference- busi·11 e:ss . rnU er th an "soci al wcJfore' ' or ienled- wns held at the American Motor Hotel by the Nation al lJrh:in Coali tion in coopc rali on with the At l anta C 1amb~r of Commerce and city government. A slide presentation, speeches a:-od vorks 10µ di scussion cen;('red on the words of the keynote speaker , Gerald L. Phil;ippr. cha irman of the board of General -E! ectric Co., who sa id: ' 'Wh :, t th i.s situation boi ls down to is that at a tim e when '.n :si ne~s sees a wide need for a n.ore effective lnbor force , the urbnn labor market will provide us with less than ever in te1111s of quality and quantity." "The cities are going to be his principal market plac e, and, more importantly, the prime source of his labor supply." Rod ney Austin , personnel man;:iger for Reynolds 'l'ob acco Co., sa id. "'l'he point of the Urban Coalition is that you can ch ange thin gs." But, Austin, warned . business should "clea n up, el im ina te dtipl icat.ion, then fill lhe gaps." in the fielcl of employment. Austi n, who headed one of l~e works liop discussions. told of Winston-Salem , N.C. Mayor M. C. Benton's w:ging the bu siness -comm unity to be informed real istically concerned. commi tted ::i nd massive ly involved. Phi l! ippe said it this way : The Urban Coalition " is tryi;1g to see if it can generate more act ion at all levels of the business· community - some- thing tantamount to a national head of steam - to try and turn this ghetto situation around. "If we businessmen are not goi ng to take major role in tackli ng, and eventually solving, -the problems in our cities, then who will? The freq uently hea rd problem of gelling the jobs and t he people together got a full airi ng. Also, the problem of the underemployed. Phillippe said th at effective program must be geared lo the ghetto, even the neighborhood in the ghett.o. And, he said, re;il work opportunities mus.t be provided. "What we should offer is a ha nd-up, not a hand-out," he said. New hiring techniques and practices must be used-taking into consideration the prior experiences and present a t.Litudes of t.he urb an dweller of today, Phillippe said. Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick, executive directo r of Opportunities Industria lization Center Institute in Philadelphia, sa id earlier in the day that employers must be concerned w it h .those unemployed who have given up looki ng, those who work full lime for part-time pay ·and those who work parttime but want to work full time. , Skills that are marketable · must be provided, Reddick said. In some cases, James J. Forti1 of General Electric, said, 1 fL11ns can lessen skill requirements bec ause of recent technological advances. "Also, the Some 2.50 business leaders are Gerald L. Phillippe, chairman skill of the worker can be inexpected at a regional National of the board of General E lectric creased," he added. Urban Coalition job conference Co., at the luncheon. The morning workshops feaon various ph asos nt the Americ::,n Motor Hotel of Workshops lurcr! a fil m prepared by I.he Atemployment opportunity will lanta Chamber of Commerce, Wednesday. be held at morning and afterAtlnnta city government, the The major address will be by noon sessions. Community Council of the Atlanta Area and Economic Opportunity Allanta. The film poi nted lo the paradox of the existence here of "jobs needing p e op I e" and "people needing jobs." . And while while-collar jobs will increase greatly in the years to come, the ·great in- ' crease in the central city popula tion will be among lhe unqualified. "Unemployment can s top growth in its tr a c ks" and 1 "strengthen the market by de- I creasing the tax drain" were · other poi nts made by th e film. ! Severa l expressed concern that not enoug h businessmen involved th emse lves in the operation of the schools-who supply the "most important raw material. accord ing to Eugene Rowen, adm ini strative director of Pla ns for Progress. "They (businessmen) r emain aloof and allow what they wouldn't from other suppliers." Association of JVfanufacturers, r "Alte_nding conferences is not William Flynn, director of t.he warned those in attendance a substitute fo r action followmg STEP program of the Natioilal earlier in the day: . · the conference." Urban Tall{s to ra v ( 1 .- · 25 r/ , / -- / ·/ The National Urban Coalition was formed last fa ll to serve as a sl1pcr lobby fot w·1, a11 tire:.is and to inform 1.hc pub! ic ;ihou,1 w·ban problems. Mayor Ivan Allen fo rmed a local coalition a few weeks ago. I I �December 6 , 1967 Af{y / Mr . L ~ Green WAll Television 1611 West Peachtree Street; N . E. Atlanta , Georgia 30309 Dea,_. Luke : Next Wednesday , Decembe r 13, the National Urban Coalition will sponsor an Eastern Regional Action C onference of great importance to Atlanta. This conference will d al w ith Expanding Employment Opportunities in private industry for unemployed and underemployed individuals. The Atlanta Chambel' o! C ommerce and Mayor Allen are cooper ting with the Task F o rce on Private Employment of the Urban Coalition in this confeJ;"ence. T op business executives from throughout the Ea t 't'n U. S . will p rticipate . S ome of the firms who will take pat't in the workshop discu sions are RCA , Ea tman Kodak , IL J. Reynolds ,, G. E . , and F o rd. There a,r others, along with the National A s sociation of M nu.£ cturers, Urb n L gue and local buein s x cutiv s n d employment p ople . Of k y importance t o the Atl nt people will b the 11 p remi r 11 of U de film present tion rec ntly d veloped on Atlant . 1s mployment plct,ure. This £Um wn pi-oduced by th , City of Atl nta, the Ch mbei of Comm ree, EOA. the Community C ouncil nd C ommunity Chest with fina.nd 1 support of th S ears-R oebuck Found ation. A coupl · of te t .-uns on sev :ral bu in s n.d gov rnment lead re h s pioov n th&t the film produc s re 1 nitty gritty" discus ion of the employm nt �MEMORANDUM To: Members, Human Resources Development Group From: Curtis H. Driskell Subject: Revisions and editing of employment slide narrative As an aid in your comparison of the revised script with the old, the following notes and comments make reference to most of the suggested revisions, with the exception of of some of very minor nature. No attempt has been made to not e every instance of judicious "tightening" or of simple rearrangement of script matter. REFERENCES Page 4 - New thought is injected, acknowledging existence of Merit Employers Association and its purposes. Page 5 - New thought: cooperative effort, exemplified by Employer Workshop on Manpower Resources . _ - Reasonable conclusion is drawn (2nd graf) that "it is apparent ••• something is being done .•. 11 P age 6 - New phraseology (5th graf) : "This may s eem a par adox . • " but it isn't new or peculiar to Atlanta. P age 7 - Reasonable conclusion (3rd graf) that it's "elementar y" em ployment can have a bad effect. - Questions t o ask our s elves (3r d and 4th grafs) are posed in different fashion , but questions are the same. Page 8 - Expansion of a thought : "In shor t , what about tomorrow? " Page 9 - Reasonable conclusion (2nd graf): 11 • • • we cannot afford t o minimize it (unemployment)." Extension of that conclusion t o relate t o an objective of the script: One reason we can't minimize it is because we know there are others : not '·. being counted. �Memorandum Page 2 - Entire 2nd graf has been rewritten as statement, instead of asking three times "what are the causes?" Eliminated from earlier script: "All right. Let's take a look at some of the causes." (The facts which followed that statement were not actually causes. For instance: Population has grown, more people live in cities, easier to get along without a job in rural environment. ) Page 10 - Rephrased reference to causes (2nd graf), with reasonable conclusion that "some of them stem, in part, from the very affluence we have described." Page 12 - Inserted accurate figures on job projections. (Script originally had "corporate city" employment confused with "central business district. ") Page 14 - Tightened drastically suggestion to see what they imply. 11 II put some of the facts together and Page 15 - Rephrasing to get to the point: "Who are the people involved? Page 17 - Reversed order of two case histories. (Woman is more typical, based on facts and conclusions of our narrative, and should come first.) Also tightened descriptions of these two people. Page 18 - Rewrote the relationship of their situations to future prospects. (In the script, they aren't actually unemployed.) Injected reasonable conclusion: that their prospects are poor for getting greatly improved jobs. - Related available jobs more closely to case histories: " ... not the sort of job to be filled by fifth-grade drop-out or untrained domestic." Page 20 - Reasonable conclusion (2nd graf): relating on-the-job training opportunity to "need for workers" and "employer's willingness to help meet the problem." Further reasonable conclusion: that without such efforts, "the gap would be widening even faster." - Tightened considerably introduction of job barriers. Page 22 - Extension of conclusion: "These requirements are realistic standards ••• not arbitrary barriers ... " - Reasonable conclusion: Use of new phrases amounts to "tangible evidence" that employers are removing arbitrary barriers. �Memorandum Page 3 Page 23 - Extension of earlier reasonable conclusion: "you can see that progress is being made .•• 11 Page 24 - Extension of conclusions and broadening of the premise that there is some hope (1st and 2nd grafs): Gains not spectacular ..• can't promise solutions just around corner •.• but it's credit to businessmen... evidence that job is at least begun .•. only through ·business leadership can we find solutions. ;· Page 25 - Additional characteristic of narrative: about our alternatives. 11 December 7, ·1967 < 11 • • • We have tried to be realistic �ANTA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 1300 COMMERCE BUILDING / P.O. BOX 1 740 I ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30 301 MEMORANDUM To: Cecil Alexander Duane Beck Brad Curry, Jr. James Furniss Don Gareis Collier Gladin Richard Hicks Boisfeuillet Jones James Parham Dan Sweat John C. Wilson At the most recent meeting of the Human Resources Development Group , Dan Sweat and I were charged with the responsibility of taking our 11 employment 11 slide presentation in tow, seeking the best possible use of it in weeks to come , and coordinating details of using the presentation in the Regional Action Conference on Expanding Employment Opportunities, scheduled here December 13. Each of you has been kept informed of developments on the conference, thanks to communications from Dan. You are aware that several , if not all , of us will be taking roles of narrators and moderators during workshop sessions of the conference. As we agreed, this opportunity should serve a dual purpose : to provide a meaningful program for the conference , and to allow us additional critique of our product and ideas for its future use. This communication deals mainly with another implied r esponsibility which we accepted with the others : That of getting the production physically ready for use in the workshops. By this time , you probably have received from Dan a letter and a copy of the script, as revised. Considerable thought and effort have gone into the r evision, and I hope the end result justifies t he means. However , I would not pre sume to railroad anything through, without first submitting it to the Group . The revisions, for the most part, are of the tightening kind : "Judicious editing," as I prefer to call it. Narrative time is shorter by some three to five minutes , even though several pertinent new thoughts have been added . Several new slides have been added to reduce prolonged exposure of some original slides . Some inaccuracies (which we had recognized) and at least one erroneous implication (which we hadn't previously spotted) have been corrected or rephrased. �Memorandum Page 2 No wanton liberties have been taken with the basic document, but I urge every member of the Group to review the changes. For your convenience in such a review , I am enclosing a summary of the significant points of departure from the original script, with a reason or explanation in support of each change of more than very minor nature. This may be much ado about nothing. I personally believe you will approve of th~ final result. But I earnestly request that you call me at your earliest convenience to discuss any point on which there remains a shred of doubt or a particle of disagreement. Respectfully submitted , Curtis H. Driskell Metropolitan Affairs Director CHD/rnb December 7, 1967 �ATLANTA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 1300 COMMERCE BUILDING / P . O. BO X 174 0 / ATL AN TA.GEORGIA 303 01 November 28, 1967 Dear Mr. Employer: The National Urban Coalition Task Force on Private-Employment will hold a: · Regional Planning Conference in Atlanta on Wednesday, December 13, to explore the possibilities of expanding employment opportunities for the hard-core unemployed. ~ ~ The Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and the City of Atlanta are cooperating with the Urban Coalition: in this effort. Atlanta's key business executives are being invited to participate because of the special significance of this conference for Atlanta business. ~ Mr. Gerald L. Phillippe, Chairman of the Board of General Electric Company and also Chairman of the Task Force, will keynote the conference. He will discuss programs instituted by private business to provide meaningful and productive jobs for the hard-core unemployed. ~ Another part of the program will be a slide presentation on Atlanta's unemployment problem and its relationship to private business. The presentation was prepared by several Atlanta organizations as a means of stimulating discussion of approaches to our dual problem of people who need jobs and unfilled jobs which need people. ~ The conference will be at the American Motor Hotel, 160 Spring street, N. W. Registration will begin at 8:30 a. m., "followed by a general session, workshops and a luncheon, with adjournment at 3:30 p.m. There is no registration fee; price of the luncheon is $4. 75 . per person. ~ Please make your plans now to attend, and retur n the enclosed card to assure your reservation. Sincerely, ~--143.215.248.55President ~.~~- Mayor �---. .--. . ... - - -·-----·· .. ... ~ . ·, ~ '\ . . . ,I, . ,. , ,' : _: , .... . , ,1, .... i ': A~lonta Ga~ 7..1~;. / .r~o . ,1Y·l;;nta , (.~f: O, q ~ci c . . ···o , Joi· r.- ._ __, .._ '-.. u ..:· ..., T uG Co , ~. n y o :Z ::· .o r, i 36 Edgc w od ... . ·,re ., i'. . : . • A~! , · , G c-o ..-,3 i a ~-Ictb crt Me2ger Vice Propide·1t i/w . L. Ca 11 c-1,a ::r C allo·wo y :R(?al~~/ Cv. 193 , .·.:: •..i::-n !.>..>:,?: ., N. E . Atlan~a, G c.c:-g 1a T.,.. ., • .I.. l 6,... ""' .J, l\', "_ .., "' 1 .Y') _ .,.. l , ., .,.4 f"'!: _, ..,"!1., ,._. .., _ ,_ • • • • U i c.,- .. .. 55 Ma r!c.t:~ '.:t . , i\.t:6ntll , G ,: ;crg! )Ot1J1 1-~ l Lo I i,i, ·. " • . 'f 1 \ l\::,r n < ··, f.~ u Jply ~(t':!t-:.. .i.l e, u it C lGJO P-a h t 'O 11 ~ . Gt. , ;,::~~. . A.... lanta , G Eio gia Hc•:;!.. t Covin';} o n , P rtner P.1c turd ./l. , 3trou:;s , 3•o: .... 7c.: .. c::. ~.c:· J\l::·~on , 1/i!llo, & Gnin.~s Ponco de Leon C · S Not!ono Bank Buildi no Scar3 Ro ='bu ck <':~ C o . G77 ?once clc r,cori .'A.· lento , Cc rgio P,!Lr.1t<1 , Gccro! '1. , r~·. z _ Jomco H . Da.via V1c o Prnol<..lant onct 'l're::rnurcr Doc!· 6. Crooo Co . , 2 '/ l uck!o S . , N . VJ . /\n~ . VicQ Proc. . :Vintn OHkt Fir .... t Nat!oncl Dun!,;. Atlcnta , Gecrg! Atlanta , Gecrgia ,!chard j . Grabowoki Pe. ~onnc ! ~Aoneocr J. M . Tull Met l o Co., Inc. 2 8 5 Y-o'fictto S • , N . VI . P.tlunta , G2-::>rcrio J. R. \/\/Hnon, J • 1' Chorlcn G. ccnc /1.tl n~~ -. fo in !J uro nco Co . l -1:1 l\ubu.n Avo. , N . E . Atlante , Cco::-cria . September, 19 (// H . ·N . (tlo) Whl~mon , Jr. ·wus on & Co . , Rea ! Estctc 905 H~nte:r St., i\7 .Vl . Atl nt , Gcoro!a �'• .. I •l ' ' • •• • I ---"--. . . '\ , 'I / .' . ~ ,- ,.. - . ,-- -- ·- ,· , : . . ,•· . ,• .. ' , , ~ . ·. ' \' . L / . ,.. •\ !: ' 0 I, i .. ' / 1.~·;lor;; J\nrJrc Gcnc . i_, !. Di:.trlct M.::m.:igcr G eorgia o·,,,,cr C o . 2 7 0 Pea c htr e e St ., N . W . At_a nta , G eorg ia . R. F . . C lbyt on Doh)" Pu h.ll, n,d ,1"t10'1 :, O ffi( ·,,r C itiZ Cll$ Ex Sou thc- r::. Xc:l-o! : _.l M a ri etta & Broad Mel ville Smile y D avison 's 1 80 Pcc1'chi:rcc St . , "~ . W . Atlant a, G e o rq- ic). 3 0 3 0 3 l -ug K • • :'.ckenbaker As s t. V . P . Pu b lic Rel a t ion s Life o f Gcorqi11 5 7 3W . Peachtree , N . E . At lanta , G e o rg iu (Ho usi g Committ ee) Ben O' C alla g h an , Presicie :-i t Be n O'C allaghc1n C o . 1 2 79 C olliC'r Rd . ,· :r . "\AT . /\tlcm t.:i , G cor~JJcl (Eo t..:. sing· C omr.iittcc) Ja~ e s W . \I\Tright ; P . 0 . Box ~ -z_~ .; : LJ 7 ;:7 At l anta , G e orgia 3 0 2~0 (La w & Eq u ul Enf ,rce ent John Sm:_th P.dverti s inJ M anag e r Atlanta Inquirer , . Inc . 7 87 Parson s St., S . W Atla nta, G e o r gia William Me rritt 338 L~n c oln St . , S .W . Atla t a , G e orgia 30315 (Emplo yment) Thaddeus Stokes C ity Editor . 2 10 Auburn Ave ., N . E . Atlanta , G eorg i a Mr. Alan H . Gould A. R. · Abrams, I nc. 362 Jones A ve nue , N . W . Atlan t a, G e orgi a R .JO . S utton , Vi c e President Citi z ens Tr ust C o mpany 2i2 Au burn Av e . , I;l" .E . Atlanta , G e orgia Mr. Ben H y man B e n Hyman and Company 715 W e st P e achtree Str eet, N. E . Otis Thorpe Vice President Q. V. \1\/illic:imson & Co . flSS iluntcr[,t. , N .W, .l\.tiuntu; Georgia John W e itna uer V. P . & Personnel Directot' Ri ch's 4 5 I3: ()) d st , I s ,w , I /\tlanta, Georgia,· S, ·pt<· mh c r , 19 G7 , .• j 'I Atla n ta ,_ G eorgia D . T . C ro c kett , Jr . Vice Presid e nt Lo ckh eed - G e orgiu Co. 1a rietta , G e o. gia /\tl. 11 t-:1 D.1 11'/ Wor.l~ B, f\l . J) ~oJL&sa.--15-~ j~~ @Juo.z r~~ . -J/ ~ ' {1--~'fr ,(_ . 4 . ~Uo 4/4 ~Clu.-4-iMITTEES \- - I DEPARTMENTS A Vice-President and a Vice-Chairman respo ns · ble 1\ for each Department. CAMPAIGNING AND ALLOCATI ONS Plans and conducts Annual Campaign ; col e cts and disburses funds; clearing house for fund-raising efforts direc ted at Jewish commun it ~ IIo CatiMUNITY REL~TIONS AND INTERNAL J EWISH AFFAIRS Combats discrimination and promotes ideals of democracy; promotes / general welfare o f the Jewish Community; c onducts Commun ity Calenda~ III. SOCIAL SERVICE Conducts Jewish Famil y and Children s Bu_ eau a genc y, Ben Mas s ell Dental Cli ni c and any social welfare programs assigned to it. IV. COMMUNITY SERVICES AND PLANNI1 G Coordinates and promotes i:..i ter-agenc y cooperation; responsible for community-wide planning, fact - finding and social research in following areas: I GROUP S ERV I CES] AGED CARE7 ! (Jewish Commun ity Center (Youth Serving Or g s.) (Synag o gu e Youth Group s Insti tuti onal Care ( Jewish Home Servi~cs in Commu ity (J • • & C. B .) (J.C.Center ) (Haus ing and other services·) JE\,rSH ED. CAT r c ;\ I I I I Bur. of I 1 ( Cor.1m-i J ,Ed.) unity! I S c . oo l s d y Gr oups l(Sof-t~ 0.dlS.} 7/27/67- �he Ur an Coa/i ion 1 I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. Ill. Washington, D. C. j 20006 · Steering Committee Co-chairmen : Andrew fie iskell / A. Philip Randolph November 24 , 1967 NATIONAL COORDINATORS WEEKLY REPORT LOCAL COALITIONS The third in a series o f regional conferen ces to assist l oca l communities in f o rming the ir own Urban Coalitions will be hel d in San Franc i s co on November 30 in the San Francisco Hilton . The program format will be simila~ to those used for t he previous two successful c onferenc es i n Ch icago and Minneapolis, with emphasis on "h ow-to- cc-~ t " work s h ops. The ·· hree general sess ions will feature remark s by S an Francisco Mayor Shell~y and May o r - Elect Al i oto, The Mo st Reverend J oseph Mc Guck e n, Kenneth Wright, Vic e Pre sident ad Ch ief Economist of t he Life Insurance Assoc iation of America, Cali fornia State Assemblyman John T . Kno x, Bishop Donald Harvey Tippett and Frances Barnes, Vice President of the Cr own Zellerbac h Corp oration and President oyment Opportunity . o f the Management Council f or Bay Area A similar regional confer'"... ,c for eastern cities, originally set for December 11 in New York City, has been p ostp o ned because o f s chedul ing problems to the second week of J anuary . You will shortly be advised of the exact d ate . PUBLIC SERVICE EMPLOYMENT AND URBAN LEGISLATION More than 40 Wash ington representat ives of organ izations which support the program of the Urban Coalition attended a luncheon meeting in the Statler Hilton Hotel on Novembe r 20. Featured speaker Mayor John Lindsay of New Yo rk City stressed the necessity of a united legislativ e effort to mov e bills suppo rted by the Coalition through Congress. Andrew Biemi ller , Legislative Dire c tor o f AFL-C I O, cited a c ase history to illustrate the posit ive v alue of business a nd labor representatives going together to call on Congressmen. Rabbi Richard G. Hirsch of the Union o f Ameri c an Hebrew Congregations described National Coordinators : John Feild / Ron M. Linton Telephone 293-1530 �2 the growing awarene ss o f ch u r ch gro up s o f the need to be active i n publi c affa i rs . PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT On November 21 the Task Fo r c e on Pr i vate Empl oyment met in Detroit with the Emp loyment and Edu c at io n Comm i ttee of the ew Detroit Committee . The meeting was c ha i red by Wi lliam M. Day, president o f Mich i gan Bel l Telepho ne Company . In his remarks to the group, Task Fo r c e - Co-Chai r man Ger~ l d Phillippe , Cha irm an o f the Board o f the Gener a l El e ctric Company , said " As a repres en tative of the Task Force on Pri vate Emp loyment I have been en cou raging bus i nessmen t o ente r i nt o a regular program o f exchanging ideas o n this sub j e c t and pitch i ng in o n useful pro gram s to get at s ome of these u rgent needs . All s e c t o rs o f the s oc iet y need t o help ea ch o ther and we need t o jo in t ogether i n usefu l programs t o c reate new opp o rtunities fo r se l f -re a l i zati o n i n o ur City s l um s." "I n s ome ci ties it wo uld sound strange , but there is a g rowing feeling among b u sinessmen of my acquaintance and among so e of our own General Electri c plant managers that a s ubstan tial measure of our business success in the futu r e is going to depend on our ability to help a good number of these hard -cor e un emp loy ables be c ome pr o du c tive workers and citizen s." HOUSING, RE CONSTRUCTION AND INVESTMENT The Task Fo r c e met in New Yo rk on No vember 21 . Twelve additional members have been re c ruited to wo rk with th i s group . A major working paper is being devel oped t o guide this Task Force in devel oping a l o ng-range program. �... CITY H AL - November 30, 1967 TLA1'TA , GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN AL LEN, J R., MAYO R R. EAR L LANDE RS, Ad minist rative Assi sti nt MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Exe cutive Secretar y DAN E. SWEAT, JR. , Director of Governmenta l lia ison MEMOR ANDUM T o : Members of Urban Co alition Ste er ing Committee r, ( i Fron-i : D an S weat,. \,,_ ·--/ ~· Enclos ed is a letter of invi tat ion and program conc erning the D ecembe r 13 meeting o f the Task Force on Private Employme nt of the National Urb an Co alition . I hope that all of yo u can make your plans to att end t his importa~ t confe r en ce. We might need to ask members o f the S tee rin g C ommittee to actively parti~ipate i n the workshops as part of panel discussion s . If this sho ul d be the c ase, I w i ll notify you at the ea rliest possibl e moment . I am also attachin g a letter from Mr . M . C. G ettinge r, E xe cutive Dir e ctor of the Atlanta Jewish Welfare Federation, Inc., w hich is a newly formed central a ge ncy involving the A t lanta J ewish Co m m unity Coun cil , the J e wi s h W e l fa r e Fun d an d th e J ewish S o ci a l Service Fed e ration . As Mr . Gettin g er' s l e tter states, th e F e d e ration r e pr e s e n t s virtually all th e adult Jewish or gan i zations in Atlan ta and would be the most a p p ro p riat e r e pres e ntative of all the Jewish organizations on the Urban C oalition Ste e rin g Commi ttee . S e v e ral or ganiz a tions a nd m a ny i n dividual s hav e call e d my a t tenti o n to t h e fa ct that t h e Je w ish com1nunity is not repres e nte d o n t he St ee ring Commi ttee and I feel that the Steering Comm ittee s hould g iv e so me thou gh t t o i nvitin g M r. Ab e Goldstein, Pr e side nt o f the A tlanta J e wish W e lfa r e F e d e ration, In c., to serve a s a men-ib e r o f t he Stee ring Com1nitte e. DS: fy �ATLANTA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 1 300 COMMERCE BUIL DIN G / P . 0. BOX 1 740 / ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30301 November 28, 1967 Dear Mr. Employer: The National Urban Coalition Task Force on Private Employment will hold a: Re~onal Planning Conference in Atlanta on Wednesday, December 13, to explore the possibilities of expanding employment opportunities for the hard-core unemployed. ~ ~ The Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and the City of Atlanta are cooperating with the Urban Coalition in this effort. Atlanta's key business executives are being invited to participate because of the special significance of this conference for Atlanta business. ~ Mr. Gerald L. Phillippe, Chairman of the Board of General Electric Company and also Chairman of the Task Force, will keynote the conference. He will discuss programs instituted by private business to provide meaningful and productive jobs for the hard-core unemployed. ~ Another part of the program will be a slide presentation on Atlanta's unemployment problem and its relationship to private business. The presentation was prepared by several Atlanta organizations as a means of stimulating discussion of approaches to our dual problem of people who need jobs and unfilled jobs which need people. ~ The conference will be at the American Motor Hot el , 160 Spring street, N. W. Registration will begin at 8:30 a. m., ·followed by a general session, workshops and a luncheon; with adjournment at 3:30 p. m. There is no registration fee; price of the luncheon is $4. 75 . per person. ~ Please make your plans now to attend, and return the enclosed card to assure your reservation. Sincerely, ~--r~· President ~.~~· Mayor �The n ewly fo rmed central agency m e rg ing th e Atlanta Jewish Ccmmunity Council, Je wish Welfa re Fund ond th e Jewish Social S e rvice Fede ration 41 Exc hange Place, S. E. 0 Atlanta, G eorgi a 30303 0 Ph on e 52 5-48 25 ABE GOLDSTEIN PRE51 DENT M . C. November 29, 1967 GSTTINGER EXECUTIVE D IRE CTO R Mr . Dan Sweat Ci ty Ha ll 68 Mi tchell St . , S . W. At l anta, Ga. 30303 Dear Mr . Sweat: In a ccor dan c e with our telephone con versat io n of last F ri day I wish t o advise y ou that the Atlan ta Jewish We lfare Federati on i s interested i n par ti cipating in the work of the Atlanta Urban Co alition. The Atlanta Jewish Welfare Federation represen ts virtually al l the adult ·J~wish organizations in greate r Atlanta . As the letter head i nd icates this c entral Jewish communal agency is the resu l t of the rece nt m,:?rge r o f the Atlanta Jewish Community Cou ncil, the Welfare Fu nd and the Social Servi ce Federation . I am enclosing a c hart des cribing the structure and program o f the Federat ion. P le ase d o not hesitate to c al l upon u s if we c an be of any as sis tance to the wo rk of the Cit y of Atlanta. Sincer ely you rs, ( .; M. C. Gettinger Executive Direc t or Enclosure MCG:rgf �STl(UCTURE OF ATLANTA JEW ISH WEL •ARE FEDERATION , INC . , MEMBERS:-IIP INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS All adult contributors to Annual Campaiqna ORGANIZATION MEMBERS Jewish organiz a tions wi th minimum membership of 50. CONSTITUEi'lT MD·J BERS Composed 0£ local benef ic iary aqencie s . DELEGATE ASSEMBLr Cor.ip oscd o f representatives o f affiliated organizations and representatives-at-large; acts largely as a forum body. I I I I - BOARD OF DIRECTORS 48 MEMBERS Adm inister s and conduc t s the affairs o f tbe Central Communa l Agen cy. I OFFI CERS I I EXECUT.1.VE DIRECTOR I I EXE CUT IVE CQ'viMITTEE ~- - I S TAND ING CCMMI TTEES I- DEPA~TMENTS A Vice-President and a Vice -Chairman r esp o nsi le for each Department . I l I. CI\MPA IGNING ArID ALLOCATIONS i Plans and conducts Annual Campaign ; col e c ts a :1d di sburs es :funds; ! clearing house for fund-raisi n g efforts directed at Jewi s h comr.. u ni t -Yi, I I IIo C~ViMUN ITY REL~TIONS AND I NTERNA L JEW I SH AFFAIRS Combats dis cr imination and promote s ideals o f democrac y; pro:no·~e s general welfare o f the Jewish Community; conducts Commun.:.ty Ca_endari I I II III. SOC IAL SERVICE Conducts Jewish ~amily and Ch"ldr envs Bureau a g e n cy , Ben Jviassell Dental Clinic and any s ocial welfare progra.i71s assiqned to it. Ii I IV . CO.'YJMUN ITY S ERVICES AND PLANNING I Coordinates and promotes iu ter-agenc y cooperati on; responsible for commun ity-wide planning, fact-finding and s o c ial researc h in followin g areas: I GROUP SERVI CES I II ( II Jewish Corn.muni ty Center (Youth Serving Or g s. (Synag ogue You th Groups AGED CARE7 _ I - ---, Insti S0rvi8GS tuti o nal in Commun i y Care (Jo F o& CQ B . ) (Jewish (J.CoCen ter) Home (Housing an ' o ther ser v i c es I EDUCATIC:.\ Bur, of i J.E d.) I ( Comn - / unityl S c ools '(Study Groups of Orgs.) 7 / 27/ 67 , l I �~I I: I I The ~t.Jrrban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West / 1819 H Street. N. W. Washington, D. C. / 20006 Steering Committee Co-chairmen : Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph November 14, 1967 Mr. Dan Sweat City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Dan: Copies of the letters of invitation to the Atlanta meeting are enclosed. One of the letters is being sent to persons already on our mailing list and the other letter with the Statement of Principles, Goals, and Commitments is being sent to persons not on our mailing list. I think we will need twelve p e ople to assist us on the day of the meeting. This includes registration desk, sell luncheon tickets, pass out literature, take up tickets, answer telephones, and any last minute problem. I am als o enc losing some names of local business leaders which I have come across. The Mayor may want to extend an invitation to some of them. Very truly yours, M Mn Associate Coordinator MC/jc Enclosures National Coordinators . John Feild/ Ron M. Linton Telephone 293 -1530 �,,/ The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. w. Washington , D. C. f20006 Steering Committee Co-chairmen: Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph November 13, 1967 Dear Friend: On August 24, 1967, 1,200 leaders of American life met in Washington at an Emergency Convocation called by the Urban Coalition. The Coalition, representing business and the professions, organized labor, religion, civil rights groups and local government, was established in response to the urgent need for action in behalf of th e nation's cities. The enclosed Statement of Principles , Go als , a-id Commitments was adopted by the Urban Coalition. You will not e th a t the statement identifies specific problem areas and appea ls to both the public and private sector for action to meet these needs. The Coalition has created Task Forces-one of which is the Task Force on Privat e Employment- -to focus on the individual problem areas. Expanding employment opportuniti es for the hard-core un emp loyed has been given top priority by the Coalition. The Task Force on Private Employment is ho ld ing a series of Regional Planning Conferenc es to discuss this difficult and complex problem . The conferences are schedul ed to be h eld in Atlanta, Georgia on December 13, 1967 ; Phoenix, Arizona on J anuary 17 , 1968 and Kansas City , Missouri on January 24, 1968. We hope your schedule will permit you to join us in this most important project. Please complete the attached card indicating t he conference you plan to attend. We are enclosing a list of states covered by each of the conferences. It would be most helpful if you would supply us with the names and addresses of appropriate officials in these states so we may e xtend an invit ation to them. In the meantime, we hope you will communicat e your interest and support of this endeavor to these officials. Nat,oral Coa'd/llat0rs Jc,hri Feild/ R:;n M /. l"t<,, Te/eph ne 293 1::.:10 �November 13, 1967 Pa9= 2 More specific information on the program wil l b e sent to you in the ver y near future. If you have any questions regarding these activities, please contact Mr. Mel Cotton, ~he Urban Coalit i on, 1819 H Street, N. W. , Washington, D. C. Telephone Number: 293-1530. Gera l d L. Phillippe Chai rman of the Board Ge neral Electric Company 570 Lex ington Avenue New Yo r k, New York Enclosures David Sullivan, Preside n t Build ing Se r vice Emp loyee s International Union 900 17th Stree t, N. W. Wa shington, D. C. John Wheel er , President Mech a nics and F a rmers Bank Box 1932 Durham, North Caroli na �./ ' The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street. N. w. Washington, D. C. / 200u6 Steering Committee Co-chairmen: Andrew H eiskell / A. Phi lip Randolph Novembe r 13, 1967 Dear Friend: On August 24, 1967, 1,200 leaders of American life met in Washington a t an Emergency Convocation called by The Urban Co a lition. The Coalit i o n , representing business and the professions, organized labor, religi o n, c ivi l rights groups and local government, was established in respons e t o t h e urgent need for action in behalf of the nation's cities. Th e St a tement of Principles, Goal s , and Commitments adopted by The Urban Coal i t i on identifies specific prob lem areas and appe als to both the publi c a~d private secto r for action to me et these n e eds. The Coalition has cre at ed Task Forces--one o f which is th e Task Fo r ce on Private Employment - to focus on the individ u a l probl em a r e as. Expanding emplo yme nt o pportun ities fo r t he hard-co re u nemp loye d has been given top prio r it y b y the Co a l i t ion . Th e Task Force o n Pr iv a t e Employment is holding a series of Re g i on al Plann i n g Conferences t o di scuss th is difficult and complex problem . The first conferenc e is schedul ed t o be held at the At l anta-American Motor Hotel in At lan t a , Geo rg ia on Decemb er _13 , 1967. Other conferences are planned for Pho enix, Arizo na o n Januar y 24 , 1968 and Kansas City, Missouri on January 24 , 1968 . We hope your schedule will permit you to jo i n us in this most important project. Please complete the attached card indicating the conference you plan to attend . We are enclosing a list of states covered by each of the conferences. It would be most helpful if you would supply us with the nam es and addr e sses of appropriate affiliates i n thes e states so we may extend an invitation to them. In the meantime, we hop e you will communicate your interest and support of this endeavor to these officials. -j Tt· 'p l(l'll "j .- '$ I I' J, ..,, Fe1/tj I R n M i •f ( �November 13, 1967 Pa~ 2 More specific information on the program will be sent to you in the very near future. If you have any questions r egarding these activities, please contact Mr. Mel Cotton, The Urban Coalition, 1819 H Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. Telephone Number: 293-1530. Gerald L. Phillippe Chairman of the Board General Electric Company 570 Lexington Avenue New York, New York Enclosures David Sullivan, President Building Service Employees International Union 900 17th Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. John Wheeler, Pr esident Mechanics and Farmers Bank Box 1932 Durham, North Carolina �r--- --- -------------------------...--- . . . .~~---~------ - - - - - - ---s143.215.248.55-~------------ 2 - WORKSHOP E (Section B Convention Hall) Chairman: William Flynn, Director, S TEP Program National Association of Manufacturers Resource Persons: Earl Redwine, Cons ultant, ES R; Richard Lyle, Assistant Director, Urba n Leagu e , South Re gional Office; John Wilson, Preside nt, Horne - Wilson Co.; E. L. Klein, Manager, RCA �Page i of_·_ _ " SCRIPT VISUAL "'l'!"""""""'-___________________________ When the communit.v welfare is in danger, and when opportunity SLIDE # 1 o;;a_ knocks, it's traditional in Atlanta that businessmen give the most important leadership. Our subject today is loaded with danger and opportunity. SLIDE # 2 This presentation was brought about by five organizations serving our community -- ,mder the leadership of businessmen. Businessmen giv_e intelligent direction toward worthwhile gcals, and they use special abilities to shape effective programs. Their dedication has inspired the support and participation of other vital community elements. ' These organizations are ... SLIDE # SLIDE # SLIDE # .j SLIDE # SLIDE # l: r 'f 5 ' 1 .•. The City of Atlanta .•• ••• The Atlanta Chamber of Commerce ..• ••• The Community Council of the Atlanta Area . • . •.• The Greater Atlanta United Appe al. .. •.• and Economic Opportunit_y Atlanta, Incorporated. _,,,~ �Page 2. of _ _ SCRIPT VISUAL. As Atlanta grows, so grows the need for continued leadership by businessmen. With Atlanta's growth, the very problems these organizations exist to :meet will keep on growing. We want to concentrate on just one of these problem8: JOBS . . . SLIDE# g These organizations are all concerned with jobs. Employment • SLIDE # !J 'f .. ••• and unemployment ... are at the core of their p:rograms • Atlanta's attractiveness as a place to live and do busi.ne s s depends a great deal on the municipal services of the city•.. - schools, water supply, str eets , fire protection and p0lice protection. Local tax funds support the city and fin~.nce these services. Thus, the e}..i :ent and quality of munic~pal ser vices depend on whether ther e i s profitable business activity, and whether our citizens are productively employed •. ! I I ·II SUDE # 0 JQ The Chamber of Commer ce seeks a continually growing busine s s community. It l ooks for growth in industry a.-id jobs .. • which s timul ate trade: And it seeks growth in 'I l I I l community facilities which, . in turn, help bring in more i industry and more jobs. �Page 3 of _ _ SCRIPT VISUAL - The Community Council is a social planning agency. It helps SLIDE # coordinate growth by collecting and analyzing facts, by helping develop programs of community benefit, and by getting sponsorship for needed programs. SLIDE # I? The United Appeal supports agencies with purpo8es related to the social needs of our community ..• in health, rc(:reation, family counseling, and care for children and the agt:J - Filling these social needs is often the key to getting a job, or keeping it. The Urban League and Goodwill Industries are ~ .' o United Appeal agencies with functions directly related to jobs. Si.,IDE # j~ Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Incorporated, br j_r1gs t c:;ether all segments of the city in a concerted effort agai nst p0verty. E-0-A coordinates and channels services to the ·poor, and starts new services for needs which ar en 't being met. E-0-A tries to help people help themselves ••• to make them c ont r ibuting members of s ociety••. and t o break the vicious ···cycle of poverty that becomes m ore serious with each generation. �Page_!j_of _ _ SCRIPT VISUAL There are many other agencies which offer services in the field of employment and unemployment. The organizations ,~ we mentioned work closely with a number of them, sharing information, facilities and ideas. You probably are fa.--niliar with the programs of thes e other agencies, or :1erhaps have I participated in one of the programs. To name just a fP.W of I I· ., I • ,>. SLIDE# II: these agencies ..• ••• The State Employment Servic e of the Georgia Denartment of Labor ... our vocational schools ... Family and Children's Services ... the VocationE.l Rehabilitation Division of the State Department of Education ... the m anpower and apprPriti ce training programs of the U. S. Department of Lc1hor . There are other organizations , mor e recently es tablished, which concentrat e thei r efforts on a particular phase of ' Atlanta' s employment. For example . . • the Atlanta Employers Voluntary Merit Employment Association, which is a group of businessmen with a mutual desire t o halt discrimination practices in employment . �Page of - - - SCRIPT VISUAL ' SIJDE # S /EI Often ~ several of these organizations will pool their resources in a cooperative effort. A recent example was the Employer Workshop on Manpower Resources, held in late November through the efforts of three organizations -the Chamber of Commerce, the Merit Employfoent Association, and the Georgia Department of Labor. Its purpose wa:; to help -. Ii . employers evaluate all the available manpower :::-.:--~ources and employability programs against their own job requh·aments. SLIDE It is obvious, then, that these organizations recoi;n.i"?:e their community responsibilities in employment. It is app3.rent, too, from the programs and activities under v-:2.y, that something is being done tc:r help get our unemployed people on the job. The need for continued business leadership is equally clear. None of these organizations, individually or collectively, claims to have all the answers to unemployment. And no one yet has solved the problems that cause unemployment. I ' 1• �• Pag~_b_or _ __ SCRIPT VJSUA~ We can't promise all the answers, either. But our purpose, during the next few minutes, is to luok at some of the facts •.. raise some questions .•. and provoke some thinking among · this group that, perhaps, will lead us toward some of the answers. SLIDE # ~ I1 Specifically, let's try to determine the extent of the problem in Atlanta. .,I Let's examine the problem as it directly affects businessmen, and arldresses itself to the program s of our i community org::rniz2tions. I i Begin by stating the problem in its simplest t enns : ' -I I ! SIJDE In our community, jobs are goinr; unfilled. At the same time, people are unemployed. This may seem a paradox•.. but we know it i s not a new situation, nor is it peculiar to Atlanta. There've always been people out of work. And, except during depressions, there've always been jobs open for willing, qualified workers. This is true in every economy which provides employment for a great �P a g e l of _ _ I: SCRIPT VISUAL . number of people ... even in a market as healthy as Atlanta's today. So we're looking beyond the normal and commonplace. We want to talk about what we can do after the pool of qualified workers runs out and some of the jobs are still unfilled. W/3 need to consider people who aren't working because of limited education or none at all ... physical handicars . . . not - enough skill or motivation ..• or combinations of' these thi;i.gs. SLIDE# I 'f It's elementary that unemployment can have a bad effect on the economic health of the community. But bring it c1-}ser to home by asking this question: What is my duty, as a citiz~n, to try to cut down the high cost of public maintenance of our people who aren't productively employed? ·, i' ' I I: I' Turn the question around: What is my opportunity, as a businessman, to strengthen our markets and economy by j, helping convert a big tax drain into purchasing power and J' t; SLIDE# 20 t axable income? Suppose we could somehow add 100 dollars a month to the incomes of all the Atlanta families which now �, - -- - --- Page - earn less than 4, 000 dollars a year? This would increase the purchasing power among these pe_ople__Qy more than 95 million 1,,--""' dollars a year. SLIDE# zI But perhaps the most important dimension to be examined is this: Wnat effect will unemployment and underemployment right now have on Atlanta's growth potential? In shcrt, ~hat about tomorrow? SLIDE # i. i. Compared to other parts of the country, Atlanta ha~ :-e!:itively little unemployment. We ofteZJ. brag about our low rate ••• which is officially 2-point-5 per cent , SLIDE# 'Z. 3 Part of the reason for this low rate is Atlanta's key position in the Southeast .• • a region which has had a lion's share of the nation's postwar economic growth. We can also thank pr ograms such as Forward Atlanta, thr ough which Atlanta' s business leade r ship has ' been im aginative and aggres sive in getting the share we des erve · of the nation's growth. �Page of --- SCRIPT VISUAL \e«nZZTi SLIDE# t 'f se P:&?-w.;.:r:n::=:;;;;;;;r:;· - In a full economy, the qualified, willing job-seeker can find work. By almost any standard, 1967 and several years previous have been years of full economy in Atlanta. Retail sales, effective buying income, and other economi0 indicators have been moving steadily up. Certainly, we can't blame unemployment on any lack of health in the Atlanta economy . i !l ., SLIDE ff t,} We said our unemployment is comparatively small .•. by official measurement. Yet, for a number of reasons, we cannot afford to minimize it. For one, we know that there are rr.a11y others who are less than fully employed but who aren't counted with the 2. 5 per cent. They don't fit the statistical definitic:: of unemployed. SIJDE # '2" No one is certain how m:any people are in this category. And we can only wonder how many children are growing up to .Jarry on -f,....,•,\'i traditions of poverty, ignorance, poor health, idleness, and willing •' ' or unwilling dependence on public and private doles . I SLIDE# ,, j 21 Our population has grown. In 1967, the 2. 5 per cent represents thousands more people ·than iCdid ten years ago. �r I [ Page /0 Ii of _ _ .I I SCRIPT . VISUAL More people live in cities today. They are easier to count, put in categories, and observe. In a rural environment, .. there are more ways to subsist without formal emplo~rment. We are familiar with some o~ the c auses of unemployment, and some of them stem, in part, from the very affluence we ! I I . have described. Minimum qualifications for some jobs are rising faster than the aven.ge educational attainment. SLIDE # 2i · There are problems of health, housing and even transportat!on, and there are deserted mothe.rs ti ed to the care of deserted children. No one can say positively how much effect ar..y ~n e of these things is having on unemployment. If we could'be sure, effective solutions might be easier to develop. But these things are certain: I i• �Page J I of -- SCRIPT VISUAL SLIDE#~ Thousands of people in Atlanta don't earn enough to support th~mselves and their families. They are PEOPLE NEEDING JOBS •.• the 2. 5 per cent, others who aren't being counted officially, and some others who have jobs but are underemployed or underpaid. ' Employers in Atlanta's dynamic economy cannot always find all the skilled people they need to help run their businesses. This is the other category... JOBS NEEDING PEOPLE. SLIDE# Ji And .• ~ Unemployment is waste ..• a waste of productive effort ... a waste in terms of unrealized consumption of goods and services. It's a drag on growth, and, under some condition.::; ..• SLIDE# ,, q I ·1 !: 3'? ••• Unemployment can stop growth in its tracks. That is a blunt statement which deserves to be documented. �Page I'2. of -- SCRIPT VISUAL Some alarming facts with a great deal of bearing on our subject were developed by the city's Community Improvement Program ... the C-I-P. Part of the C-I-P study dealt with the number of jobs in certain categories, and projections of i i. whn.t the situation will be in 1983, if present trends continue. SLJ.DE # . SLli.JE # -::, -:::, ~ For example, in 1983, there will be 515,000 jobs in the (\..... City' of Atlanta. j~ Nearly four out of ten of these nev-i jobs in the city will be ~ That's 48 per cent more than in 19G5, in our Central Busi.ncss District. This means 64, 000 more people will be employed in our Central City .•• the downtown ~rea. SLIDE* 3S Most of these new jobs will be in five main categories: GOVERNMENT, FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE, with about 10,000 jobs in each group, and RETAILING, with about 5 , 000 jobs. �Page~of _ _ ' SCRIPT VISUAL None of these new jobs will be in manufacturing, wholesale trade or distribution. The Central City won't gain in this kind of employment. Jobs in GOVERNMENT, FINANCE, INSURAi~CE, REAL ESTATE, AND RETAILING; •• WHITE COLLAR JOBS. Now consider another sE:t of facts from the C-I-P 5tudy••• facts about population, "l SLIDE# J6 By 1983, the Negro population of the City of Atl~ta will increase by 62 per cent .•. the white populatio<" by 4 per cent. SLIDE#~ Forty-five per cent of the Negro population wi11 be in the age group of 20 to 54. MORE THAN HALF will be under 20 i " or over 54. J 1, '. SLlDE # 3~ From another phase of the C-I-P study comes this projection: I In 1983, about 32,000 Negro families living in the city will �Pagej_!f_of _ _ SCRIPT VISUAL have family income of LESS THAN THREE THOUSAND DOLLARS. About 45,000 Atlanta Negro families will have incomes of less than $5,000 a year. Put some of these facts together to see what they imply: SLlDE # j~ FIRST •.• job growth will be in white collar oc:-·, .pations . SECOND ••• our population ""'ill be made up of the pec,ple who, by current standards, are LEAST qualified for white collar jobs. SLIDE# '-fj THIB.D••• downtown retailing will be supported by a preponderance of families with poverty-level incomes . . • families with very little to spend in retail stores. SLIDE# lf? And FINALLY ••• Atlanta's growth potential will be impossible to realize unless established trends are changed. �Page - /~ of -~- SCRIPT VISUAL SLIDE f r ~ Th0se facts make it easier to understand the disturbing statement of a few minutes ago ... that UNEMPLOYMENT CAN STOP GROWTH IN ITS TRACKS. ,Therein lies our challenge ... the challenge to Lezin now _c hanging some of these conditions which, in turn, will help reverse or slow some of the undersirabie, trends. As we begin to realize the size of the problem, ot~er questions demand answers. \Vho are the PEOP::::...E involved? SLIDE# lf"Y Do we need -- or can we get -- an accurate p!"ofiie: of our unemployed population? There is some data available to help us find a s tarting point. SLIDE# lf5 One example of s uch data.. is a study bas ed on interviews with 47,000 people, between 16 and 75 years old , living ,l. . l. �.. Pagej__b_of _ __ SCRIPT VISUAL in poverty neighborhoods. These interviews were conducted about 18 months ago through 12 neighborhood centers of the E-0-A. Here's what the study found out about these 47,000 people: SIJDE # L/ b ••. 77 per cent earned less than $3,000 a year. SIJDE # 'f1 .•• 52 per cent of all households were headeL --:;y women. SLIDE # 4g SIJDE # Lf-~ ..• 57 per cent of the adults did not graduate from !ugh s chool. SLIDE# 50 • .• 5 per cent had a fourth grade education or lc :::; s. SIJDE # SI .• ·• 7 per cent had no form al education at all. SLIDE # S2 ••. 12 per cent needed m edical aid to r emove a wo!'l( handicap. SLIDE # SJ • •. 11 per cent claimed no job skill, or orJy farm wor k as ., .•• 82 per cent were Negroes. exper ience. SIJDE # S'f •.• 2 per cent were 65 or older • . ,... .:. .. Of all those s eeking work, 65 per c ent were Negro women. About two out of three said they would like to have more i .j: I! vocational training in hopes of improving their lot. �Page IJ of _ _ SCRIPT VISUAL A composite would be difficult to draw. But look at two case histories: A typical case ••. A woman, 33, divorced, mother of four children. She has a seventh grade education. Works 2.s a maid and makes 28 dollars a weak. Pays 12 dol14rG of that for a three-room apartment. Her children are left alone while she works because day care would cost two-thL.ds of her weekly salary. SLIDE# .Sb Another case, less typicr.l but just as real. •• A young man, 22. Completed the fifth grade iil a rural school. He is married to a young woman who completed the third grade. They are expecting a child soon. They live with his sister and her five children ••• eight persons in four roo:ms. He has worked as a delivery boy and busboy, averaging a uollar an hour. He has serious p r oblem s with a loan company . j: �Page / 0 of _ _ SCRIPT VISUAL These two have jobs, of sorts, for the time being. But thei:,: future is uncertain and prospects are poor that they ~ \.!Ja\ ever hold jobs at a level much higher. The;y lack the skill and educational attainment to fill some of the vacancies which we know exist. For instance, the ,i . State Employment Service reports a large unfilled demand l for several job skills •.. SLIDE 51 ••• Comptometer operators, stenographers, secretaries, typists, telephone operators, file clerks, cashiers, key I ·I p:!.nch operators, draftsmen ... not the sort of jobs to be I filled by a fifth-grade drop-out, or by an untrained domestic. SlJDZ # sg There are other types of jobs requiring l ess skill, which still have a demand greater than the supply of people to hold them: Food service and preparation, hotels and motels, . building maintenance, and repair and installation work. -· �Page / Cf of --- SCRIPT VISUAL Meanwhile, look what's happening ir. another job · SLIDE 51 category: Common labor. From 1950 to 1960, the number of employed laborers in Atlanta went down by almost 13 per cent, or 2, 600 jobs. The pace of automati on continues to h ave its effect in c0natrudi0n and other industrie s using laborers. SLIDE# fo O , By contrast, in the sd.Ille IO-year-period, clerical workers increas ed by 22, 000, or 43. 5 per cent. SLIDE# ' ! Professional and technical workers went up by 18,000 jobs, or 70 per cent • . SLIDE# ,2. Machine operators -- up by 2 , 000 , or 30 per cent. So the r ecord is one of steady upgrading. It is a r ecor d of pr ogress , and industry c an be proud of it . While employers are t raining and pr om oting workers for m ore demanding, higher paying j obs, vacancies are being created for new employees. �Page Z D of -- SCRIPT VISUAL ,!obs .9.2 exist, and they need to be filled. Some manufacturing jobs, for instance, haven() minimum requirements for education or experience, and the employer bears the expense of training. This not only emphasizes the need for workers, but it is also further evidence of the employer's willingness to help meet the problem ... especially when programs SLIDE# {oJ such as on-the-job trair1ir.g can help an employer match people with the jobs he needs to fill. Without such efforts, the gap would be even greater than it is today, and it would be widening even faster . SLIDE # ~Lf Let's examine our job m arket for other barriers which can s eparate !l. given individual from a given job. Som e of the se bar r ier s will always be ther e . They a re the requirements which r epresent the initial effort by the employer ' j to screen applicants . •• to make ·his i:ecruiting and interviewing ' - - ---- ----·-·--·--- �Page 2 {_ of _ _ SCRIPT VISUAL more efficient. The employer has needs for competence and reliability, skill and stability. For all his generosity, compassion, civic-mindedness or whatever, the employer cannot ignore these needs •.. if he is to stay in business. There are other barriers, leas prevalent today, which are merely extensions of attitudes. You're familiar with the kind of barriers we mean. You've seen them in help wanted ads, in job orders placed with employment services, and in the personnel policies of many business organ:!.::: ativns. SLIDE# ,s ..• Must be 21 or over •• , ••• Experienced only ..• . SLIDE # (.,,{,, .•. White only ••• • • • Colored ••• • • • Must be high school graduate ..• j ! �Page 22 of _ _ SCRIPT VISUAL ••. Men only.. . • • • Not over 50 .. . SLIDE /o 1 ••• Must be free to travel. .• • • • Military duty completed .•• • • • Car necessary•.. And so on, As we suggested earlier, certain jobs will always have requirements that not everyone can meet, particularly jobs which demand a high degree of skill, aptitude , ,)r training. These requirements are realistic standards .•. not arbitrary barriers in the sens~ of others w~ wentioned. We can find tangible evidence of employers taking the lead in removing some of the arbitrary ones. Many jobs today are being literally thrown open by the use of other words and phrases which are becoming more and more familiar: �' I Page 4fo &, g For example .•• Men or women. SLIDE# &'i Equal Opportunity Employer. SLIDE SLIDE# ( 0 No experience necessc!ry. 1 I Disabled person welcome • SLIDE# ~ of - - SCRIPT VISUAL . 2·2..> ... Prefer retired man .•• Will train ... And many others. Keep in mind that tha employer also has barr iers ... legal barriers which discou:;.:age or prevent the hiring of some people for certain joi>s. Women have been given full equality in employment ... as long as they don't have to lift over 30 poum:s. P11ysical canditi 0ns make some persons a bad r:!.sk .. • because the e:mpl.:;yer can't afford to assume the Worlanen's Compensation liability which the law says he must. You can see that progress is being made in meeting Atlanta's SLIDE# 12. problem •••this paradox of shortage on one hand, and surplus on ~e other ••• the puzzle of people and jobs, which don't always match. �2 'i Page of - - - SCRIPT VISUAL The gains haven't been spectacular. We can't promise that the solutions are just around the corner. But it's to the credit of our business leadership that we can cite these signs of progress .•• evidence that the job is at least begun. SLIDE# 73 Only through the continued leadership of our busine~srr.en.:. their ideas, talents, and energies ... channeled through these community organizations and others ..• can we hope to find those solutions. (-PAUS E) We began a few minutes ago on the premise that many people are not working at a time when our economy needs workers. We've seen who these people are, and in gE:ni:>.ral terms, what separates them from self-sufficiency and usefulness. We've presented some facts we all must recognize if this problem is to be met intelligently and with purpose. --· �Page &S of _ _ SCRIPT VISUAL - ----------~""!F"""-------~------------~=~· Ann we have tried to be realistic about our alternatives: That,unless something iE; done, it is possible that there will be no b2sic change in this situation within our generation. SLIDE# 14- If we C:?JU1ot absorb today's parents into the productive side of the economy, what of their children? Can the high school drop-out of 1967 ex--pect a better future than the almost hop.eles.s situation he faces today? Can Atlanta afford to leave him hopeless? (END OF SLIDE NARRATION) IJGHT2 ON ••• MODERATOR TAKES OVER FOR CONCLUSION. �MODERATOR'S REMARKS (Following narration of slide presentation) OPEN WITH INFORMAL, INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. * Gentlemen, one of the main purposes of the presentation you've just seen and heard is to stimulate our thinking about ways to get ·at this problem .... to exchange ideas about new approaches which can be tried, or are b eing tried, in your plant, or Joe's warehouse, right here in Atlanta. We are most concerned with what's happening in Atlanta, of course. Just to give you an idea of the sort of ' n nd assi tance w h d f:rom the local peopl who pitched in to help us get the job don • l would like to person Uy thank you for your great h lp. Sincer ly yours, Dan Sw DS:fy t �LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF GEORGIA ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30305 Telephone 237-2559 3121 Maple Drive, N.E. Suite 2 Affiliated with the league of Women Voters of the United States December 15, 1967 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor, City of Atlanta 204 City Hal 1 Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mayor Allen: Thank you for co-sponsoring the Eastern Regional Action Conference: Expanding Employment Opportunities. I appreciated the invitation to attend and found it very worthwhile. I hope you will follow this conference up by activity on the local level. Please let us know if we can be of help in this endeavor. Sincerely, Mrs. Merlyn E. Richardson President ELR:FS �., ' - ~ . THE URBAN COAL ITION EASTE~~ REGIONAL ACTION CONFEl<.ENCE: LXPAND ING EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES December 13, 1967 Atlanta, Ge orgia TASK FORCE ON PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT Co-Chairme n Gerald L. Phillippe Chairman of the Board General Electric Company New York David Sullivan President Building Service Employees International Union AFL-CIO Washington John Wheeler President Mechanics & Farmers Bank DuLham, North Carolina WORKSHOP A (Augusta Room) Chairman: John L. De nman, Manage r, Dept . cf Urban Affairs , Ford Motor Co. Resource Persons : William Dovms , Assoc i a t e Services , Inc.; Dayton Ha:!'.Wick , EmplC'yee and CO!nm11ni t y Rela b on s , Ge n e r a l El ~c tr ic Co.; Dr. Lawr ence D. Re:'l.dick , Exe cutive Director, Opportunitie s Industria l ization Cente r Institute WORKSHOP B (Bruns wi ck Room ) Chairman : Harold She pard: W. E. U~john In s titute for Employment Research Resource Persons: Pa ul R. Thomson, Man~ge r, Emp loyee & Community Relations , Gene ral El ec tric Co.; Samu e l Danie ls, Associate Director, Council f or Equ a l Busi n ess 09portu nity; Don Gar~is, Vi c e Pre s ide nt, S e a r s Roebuck Fo un da~i on WORKSHOP C (Columb us Room ) Chairman: Dr. He nry Bre nn e r, Personne l Mana g e r , Xe r ox Corporation Re source Pe rson s : Ce cil Al exa nder , Finch , Al exa nder , Barnes, Rothschild Pasch a l, Architer ts ; Be rke l e y G. G~rre ll, Preside nt, Nat ional Busi n ess Lt=~a s u e ; Ke n Howard , Indu str i a l Re l a tions, Eas tma n Kodak Co . & WORKSHOP D (S e ction A Conve nti on Hall ) Chairman: Rodn ey Au s tin, Pe rsonne l Ma na g er , Reyn o lds Tobacco Co. Reso urc e Pers on s : Dr. Loui s Ki s hku na s , Ass i stan t Supe rinte nde nt, OVT Education, Pittsburgh; Adol ph Ho l mes, Assistant Director, · Economic Deve l opme nt and Employmen t National Urban League , Inc.; J ames J. Forth, Ma~age ~ Employee a nd Community Re l ations , Gene r a l El ect ri c Co. �- 2 WORKSHOP E (Section B Convention Ha ll) Chairman: William Flynn, Director, STEP Program National Association of Manufacturers Resource Persons: Earl Redwine, Consultan t, ESR; Richard Lyle, Assis~nt Director, Urban League, South Re gional Office; John Wilson, President, Hor~e-Wilsor. Co.; E. L. Klein, Manager, RCA �December 28 , 1967 Mr . Donal d H . Gareis V ic e President - Southern Area The Sears.R oebuck Foundation 675 Ponce de Leon Avenue , N. E . Atlanta,. Georgia Dear Don: All of the officials and staff peopl e involv d in the Eastern Regional C onfer nc of the Urban C o Ution here on December 13 agree that it w s the most successfully run conference the Urban Coalition has donduct d to date . 1 m sure th t th major r son for this is the cooper tion and ssist nc we had from th loc l peopl who pitched in to h lp u get the job don • I would lik to person lly thank you for youl' g:r · t help. Sincerely yout , D nSw DS:fy t �- 2 WORKSHCt' E (Section B Convention Hall) Chairman: William Flynn, Director, STEP Program National Associatiort of Manufacturers Resource Persons: Earl Redwine, Consultant, ESR; Richard Lyle, Assistant Director, Urban League, South Regional Office; John Wilson, President, Horne-Wilson Co.; E. L. Klein, Manager, RCA �
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 13, Folder topic: Urban Coalition Private Employment Task Force Conference | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 13
  • Text: (Draft) June 6, 1968 Revised June 12, 1968 MEMORANDUM J ' 70: \Local Coalitions THE NATIONAL COALITION PROGRAM OF TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE Responding to the Emergency’ Convocation of August 1967 and to the critical urban crisis of our nation, many cities have formed local coalitions and many are or soon will be in the organizational phase. These local coalitions are becoming a vital forum for communication among different elements in the community. They are a mechanism for assess~- ing community problems, establishing priorities, coordinating efforts and initiating new programs. They are also extremely potent vehicles for members of coalitions to individually and collectively speak out on national issues and to support, propose, or oppose legislation affecting urban problems and the resources needed for their solution. The National Urban Coalition, in an effort to maximize the aims and objectives of local coalitions, will make available through its staff a broad technical assistance program at the request of the local soalition: This program is developed within the limits of resources presently available to the national Coalition to meet needs of local coalitions. It will be expanded and/or modified as those needs change. v % The National Urban Coalition's technical assistance pro- gram will foie from assisting communities to organize and launch local coalitions to concentrated assistance for specific programs. To accomplish this assistance program, the national coalition has divided its staff 17 into four a ates: the Local Coalition Division, the Program Development Division, the Communications Division and the separate Action Council Division. (1) The Local Coalition Division is the operational staff of the national Coalition. Its primary task is to explain the urban coalition concept and assist communities in or- ganizing local coalitions. It will also render general technical assistance on coalition programs and relate national issues to local coalition objectives. (2) The Program Development Division is the program specialist staff of the national Coalition. Its primary task is to provide expert assistance in specific program areas by its staff members and through its consultant resources. It will also be the major channel for the assembly and dissemination of technical program information relative to local coalition activities. (3) The Communications Division (to be filled in by Brian Duff) i x (4) The Urban Coalition Action Council is a separate unit of the national Coalition. The primary functions of its staff will be to promote social improvements in the nation's urban centers through its study of proposed legislation and its mobilization of community leaders across the country to support, propose and oppose legislation affecting urban problems and the resources for their solution. Local coalitions will address requests for all forms of technical assistance to the Local Coalition Division. As the operational staff of the national Coalition, these staff members are assigned to each of the local coalitions throughout the country. They will either respond directly to the request or, if it requires extremely technical problems, refer it to the appropriate specialized division. The Urban Coalition Action Council staff will deal directly with coalitions and coalition members. The national Coalition will provide the following forms of technical assistance upon request: 1. Provide assistance to new communities in identifying and bringing together local leaders who might be interested in the formation of a coalition. (local) 2. Provide assistance to new communities in explaining the philosophy and objectives of The Urban Coalition and in the formation and representative character of organizing and permanent steering committees. (local) - ¥ % 3. “Provide speaker resources through the national +lgcq| ahs Steering Committees to assist in the launching of the local coalition. (communications) local) 4, Provide assistance to existing coalitions on improving the representative character of its steering committee and guidance on the composition, purpose and functioning of its task forces. (local) 5. Provide assistance to coalition on how they organize neighborhood groups for community leadership in coalition planning and policy making and for community generated social action projects which require no funds. (local, program development) 6. Provide guidance on dealing with the diverse elements of the black community. (local, program development) 7. Provide assistance to lucal coalition staffing, funding, administration and program management problems. (local, program development) 8. Provide liaison for local coalitions with Federal agencies on clarification and modification of policy and for their con- sideration of,meritorious applications for grants. (local, ¥ program development) 9. Provide information on sources of local, state, federal and foundation funds to employ staff and to improve existing programs or start new ones to meet community priorities. (?) 10. Provide representation before various national private organizations conducting programs locally to insure that their local counterpart organization cooperate with the coalition in its effort to coordinate all programs. 11. Provide assistance to help local coalitions analyze community problems, inventory existing programs aimed at the solution of those problems and identify gaps or duplication of effort. (program development) 12. Provide a periodic newsletter to include relevant national or local surveys and studies on urban problems, information on new program concepts, Federal program guides, new national Coalition statements and policy, visual materials developed by local coalitions related to coalition goals. (communications, program development) 13. Provide a periodic program memo to include intensive case studies of successful programs of local coalitions. (program development) 14. Provide assistance on a range of specialized programs (ghetto entrepreneurship, youth mobilization, manpower, housing, education, communications, etc. (program development) be 7 15. Provide advice to local coalitions on mechanisms by which they may coordinate existing and new community programs. (local, program development) 16. Provide assistance in the writing of applications for state, federal and foundation funds. (program development) 17. Provide assistance in developing projects and materials on attitudinal change and methods on increasing communication between the black and white community. (communications, program development) 18. Provide advise on the programmatic implementation of the Kerner Commission Report by local coalitions. (communications, program development) 19. Provide information and guidance to aid local coalitions in interpreting local, state and national legislative issues and relating them to the coalitions goals and priorities. (Action Council) 20. Provide periodic legislative reports on the status of pending national legislation of interest to coalitions and to outline significant features of newly passed legislation concerning urban problems. (Action Council) wy a
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_002.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 2
  • Text: October 20, 1967 Mr. Erwin Stevens, President Citizens Central Advisory Council 799 Parsons Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr, Stevens; I am sure that you are aware of the movement at the national level to develop a strong coalition of urban interests in an effort to exert more influence in national programs and priorities for the benefit of our cities, Representatives of business, labor, civil rights, religion, education and Mayors of urban cities have joined together in an Urban Coalition to provide coordinated machinery for getting the story of our big city problems across to the nation. I am attaching some information materials on the Urban Coalition. These will explain the background and goals of the national steering committee. It has been recognized from the beginning that in order to be effective, local counter-part coalitions must be developed in all parts of the country to support these goals. It is my belief that for years Atlanta has been able to grow and prosper through an effective and informal coalition relationship of business and govern- ment and with the support of the other areas of interest which are a part of the national coalition effort. I believe, however, that we need to recognize a little more formally the coalitions which keep our city moving and also to develop a local coalition relation+ ship with the national Urban Coalition, fe] Mr. Stevens Page Two October 20, 1967 It is my thinking that an initial step would be for us to get together the top representatives of these key interest groups to form a local cbalition steering committee and invite the participation by other organized groups. The initial steering committee could be composed of the Mayor, as chief elected official of the city, the President of the Chamber of Commerce, the President of the Atlanta Labor Council, the President of the Atlanta Christian Council, the Co« Chairman of the Summit Leadership Conference, the Superintendent of public education, and the Chairman of the Citizens Central Advisory Council, who is the elected representative of participants in the Economic Opportunity program. I have drafted a statement which might be considered by this group which recognizes the need for a local coalition and endorses the declaration of principles of the national coalition. A copy of the principles of the national coalition is also attached for your consideration, By recognizing the existence of a coalition we will be able to better communicate urban problems and focus maximum resources upon their solutions. In order that we might consider this proposal I have invited the following people to meet with me at my office at City Hall on Wednesday, October 25, at 10:00 a.m.: Mr. A. H. Sterne, President Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Rev. Samuel Williams Co-Chairman Summit Leadership Conference Mr. Robert J. Butler, President Atlanta Labor Council Mr. Stevens Page Three October 20, 1967 Ad rify Rev. Bevel Jones, President Christian Council of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc. Dr. John W. Letson Superintendent Atlanta Public Schools Mr, Erwin Stevens, President Citizens Central Advisory Council Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. Sincerely yours, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 10

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_010.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 10
  • Text: | NATIONAL URBAN COALITION ATLANTA URBAN COALITION i | i | | | a Local - Business Labor] Civil | Education | Religious | Citizen | Civic j Government Rights Participation ETF.on Public ETF on Private ETF on ETF on ETF on ETF on ETF on Service Employ - Employment Educational Reconstruction Equal Communi- Local ment Disparities Investment & Housing cations Coalitions Urban Develop- Opportunity | ment ; | Police practices 4. Inadequate Education 7. Disrespectful 10. Inadequacy of white attitudes municipal services 2. Unemployment and 5. Poor recreation facilities Underemployment and programs 8. Discriminatory ll. Discriminatory administration consumer and : of justice credit practices 3. Inadequate Housing 6. Ineffectiveness of the political structure and grievance mechanisms 9. Inadequacy of federal programs 12, Inadequate wel- fare programs
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 42

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_042.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 42
  • Text: \ 1 LIT. y Se AY POL AN ATLANTA er \— as / 53 SIXTH STREET, NTE.. ATLANTATGEORGiA 303068, PHONE 872-5678 November 3, 1967 Mayor Ivan Allen Attention: Mr. Dan Sweat | City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Sir: The Executive Board of the Christian Council of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc. voted unanimously to participate in the Atlanta Coalition Steering Committee. The Church leaders of the metro- politan area are grateful to the mayor for his dynamic aggressive and imaginative leadership given to this fast growing community. In response to your request for suggestions, | would like to list the Jewish Welfare Federation, 41 Exchange Place S.E., Atlanta, Georgia, 30303. Sincerely yours, = Ub & ; Ad ior! - : Harmon D. Moore Executive Director HDM: msb Offering the Std Dimension to 5 Growing Counties DR. L. BEVEL JONES WELFARE & SOCIAL SERVICES GA. ASSOC. FOR PASTORAL CARE DR. HARMON D. MOORE PRESIDENT 673-2108 523-4711 - EXT. 207 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 872-5678 872-5678 RADIO AND TV 6872-5678 A. R. ABRAMS MILES J. ALEXANDER WILLIAM BREMAN DR. ROBERT L. BUNNEN LOUIS CARROL DAVID CENTER HERBERT B. COHEN MAX,CUBA | JOSEPH EICHBERG ELMO ELLIS HARRY ELSON WASHINGTON FALK, III NORMAN FRANKEL MRS. DeJONGH FRANKLIN J. LESTER FRASER WILLIAM H, FREY JONATHAN GOLDEN MORRIS B, ABRAM, President PHILIP E. HOFFMAN, Chm.,, Executive Board ORIN LEHMAN, Chm., Board of Governors NATHAN APPLEMAN, Chm., Board of Trustees EMERY E, KLINEMAN, Treasurer MRS. SANFORD SAMUEL, Secretary MORRIS H, BERGREEN, Associate Treasurer BERTRAM H. GOLD, Executive Director Executive Committee DR. MARVIN GOLDSTEIN JERRY GOLDWASSER JACK GOREN DR. IRVING L. GREENBERG ELLIOT L. HAAS MRS. LEONARD HAAS ARTHUR L, HARRIS DAVID J. HARRIS MRS. DAVID E, HEIN ARTHUR HEYMAN BERNARD HOWARD SINCLAIR S. JACOBS NIELS JACOBSON I, L. KUNIAN KIEVE LANDESBERG ELLIOTT H. LEVITAS Advisory Committee, Past Chapter Chairmen CECIL A, ALEXANDER HERBERT R. ELSAS DeJONGH FRANKLIN ELLIOTT GOLDSTEIN DAVID GOLDWASSER HERMAN HEYMAN MRS. MARSHALL J. MANTLER ALBERT MAYER LOUIS REGENSTEIN, JR. HERBERT A, RINGEL MORTON L. WEISS Honorary Chapter Chairmen LOUIS ARONSTAM LEONARD HAAS ARMAND MAY A. J, WEINBERG NATIONAL OFFICERS JACOB BLAUSTEIN, Honorary President LOUIS CAPLAN, Honorary President HERBERT B. EHRMANN, Honorary President IRVING M, ENGEL, Honorary President JOSEPH M, PROSKAUER, Honorary President ARTHUR J, GOLDBERG, Honorary Vice-President JOSEPH KLINGENSTEIN, Honorary Vice-President FRED LAZARUS, JR., Honorary Vice-President _ SAMUEL D. LEIDESDORF, Honorary Vice-President JAMES MARSHALL, Honorary Vice-President WILLIAM ROSENWALD, Honorary Vice-President RALPH E, SAMUEL, Honorary Vice-President HORACE STERN, Honorary Vice-President MAURICE GLINERT, Honorary Treasurer JOHN SLAWSON, Executive Vice-President Emeritus DR. THEODORE LEVITAS NATHAN I, LIPSON SAM MASSELL, JR. SYLVAN MEYER ANTHONY MONTAG DONALD OBERDORFER SANFORD H, ORKIN STANLEY RINZLER MENDEL ROMM, JR, MRS. JACOB ROTHSCHILD SIMON-S, SELIG, JR. MARVIN H. SHOOB AARON THAL MRS, MORTON L, WEISS ELIJAH WISEBRAM MRS. NATHAN F. WOLFE, JR. REUBEN W. ASKANASE, Houston, Vice-President QO. ROY CHALK, New York, Vice-President HAROLD SHERMAN GOLDBERG, Boston, Vice-President ANDREW GOODMAN, New York, Vice-President JACK GOREN, Atlanta, Vice-President ARTHUR GROMAN, Los Angeles, Vice-President HENRY L. KOHN, Chicago, Vice-President MARION |, LEVY, Cleveland, Vice-President WILLARD L. LEVY, St. Louis, Vice-President ELMER L. WINTER, Milwaukee, Vice-President ROBERT |. WISHNICK, New York, Vice-President
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_025.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 25
  • Text: ~— a - AMERICAN TLAMWORH Llaatae President LinpsLey F, KIMBALL Senior Vice-President Ramon 8S. ScruGcs Vice-Presidents Joun H. JoHNSON Louis E. MARTIN Martin E. SEGAL Secretary Ersa H. PosTon Treasurer Ivan C. McLeop Assistant Treasurer LEsLiE N. SHAW Executive Director WHITNEY M. Youn, Jr. Deputy Executive Director MaAHuLoNn T. PURYEAR Honorary Trustees WILLIAM H. BALDWIN RosBert W. DowLinG Lioyp K. GaRRIsON THEODORE W. KHEEL HENRY STEEGER Board of Trustees Morris B. Abram Mrs. Max Ascoli Joseph M. Baird Vivian J. Beamon Mrs. Haley Bell Eugene H. Buder Chester Burger Kenneth W. Clement Milton K. Cummings Wendell G. Freeland A. G. Gaston, Sr. John S. Hayes Merritt D. Hill Martin D. Jenkins John H. Johnson Lindsley F. Kimball Mrs. Arthur B. Krim Robert Lazarus, Jr. John G. Lewis, Jr. Inabel B. Lindsay James A. Linen Henry A. Loeb Louis E. Martin Mrs. O. Clay Maxwell, Sr. Ivan C. McLeod Mrs. Leo M. Mervis G. William Miller Joseph J. Morrow Edward C. Myers James F. Oates, Jr. Everett P. O'Neal Frederick O'Neal Henry G. Parks, Jr. The Most Reverend Harold R. Perry, 8. V. D. Ersa H. Poston Samuel D. Proctor Hobson R. Reynolds Henry J. Richardson, Jr. Ramon S$. Scruggs Martin E. Segal Leslie N. Shaw Louis Simon Mrs. Arthur Ochs Sulzberger William J. Trent, jr. Leonard Woodcock Clayton R. Yates Mrs. Bruce Zenkel Dwight R. Zook AMERICAN TEAMWORK WORKS National Urban League, Inc. Southern Regional Office 136 MARIETTA STREET, N.W., ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 « AREA CODE 404 — 688-8778 MEMORANDUM TO: FROM: RE: CLARENCE D, CoLEMAN, Director December Seventh 1967 Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Director of Governmental Liaison Clarence D. Coleman CHANGE OF MAILING ADDRESS oe on oe Please change my mailing address from my home to my office as follows: 136 Marietta Street, N. W. Suite 242 Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Affiliated with National Social Welfare Assembly, National Conference on Social Welfare Contributions to the National Urban League are tax deductible 231
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 28

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_028.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 28
  • Text: ATLANTA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 1300 COMMERCE BUILDING / P. 0. BOX 1740 / ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30301 November 28, 1967 Dear Mr. Employer: Y The National Urban Coalition Task Force on Private Employment will hold a Regional Planning Conference in Atlanta on Wednesday, December 13, to explore the possibilities of expanding employment opportunities for the hard-core unemployed. Y The Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and the City of Atlanta are cooperating with the Urban Coalition in this effort. Atlanta's key business executives are being invited to participate because of the special significance of this conference for Atlanta business. Y Mr. Gerald L. Phillippe, Chairman of the Board of General Electric Company and also Chairman of the Task Force, will keynote the conference. He will discuss programs instituted by private business to provide meaningful and productive jobs for the hard-core unemployed. % Another part of the program will be a slide presentation on Atlanta's unemployment problem and its relationship to private business. The presentation was prepared by several Atlanta organizations as a means of stimulating discussion of approaches to our dual problem of people who need jobs and unfilled jobs which need people. Y The conference will be at the American Motor Hotel, 160 Spring Street, N. W. Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m., followed by a general session, workshops and a luncheon, with adjournment at 3:30 p.m. There is no registration fee; price of the luncheon is $4.75 per person. Y Please make your plans now to attend, and return the enclosed card to assure your reservation. Sincerely, A. H. Sterne, J Allen, Jr. President Mayor
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 33

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_033.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 33
  • Text: ATLANTA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 1300 COMMERCE BUILDING / P. ©. BOX 1740 / ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30301 November 28, 1967 Dear Mr. Employer: Y The National Urban Coalition Task Force on Private Employment will hold a Regional Planning Conference in Atlanta on Wednesday, December 13, to explore the possibilities of expanding employment opportunities for the hard-core unemployed. Y The Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and the City of Atlanta are cooperating with the Urban Coalition in this effort. Atlanta's key business executives are being invited to participate because of the special significance of this conference for Atlanta business. Y Mr. Gerald L. Phillippe, Chairman of the Board of General Electric Company and also Chairman of the Task Force, will keynote the conference. He will discuss programs instituted by private business to provide meaningful and productive jobs for the hard-core unemployed. Y Another part of the program will be a slide presentation on Atlanta's unemployment problem and its relationship to private business. The presentation was prepared by several Atlanta organizations as a means of stimulating discussion of approaches to our dual problem of people who need jobs and unfilled jobs which need people. Y The conference will be at the American Motor Hotel, 160 Spring Street, N. W. Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m., followed by a general session, workshops and a luncheon, with adjournment at 3:30 p.m. There is no registration fee; price of the luncheon is $4.75 per person. Y Please make your plans now to attend, and return the enclosed card to assure your reservation. Sincerely, “Hi: Yo Pfr, Lm Jr, President Mayor
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 27

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_027.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 27
  • Text: CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 November 30, 1967 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R, EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M, MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison MEMORANDUM To: Members of Urban Coalition Steering Committee GS, of From: Dan Sweat. Enclosed is a letter of invitation and program concerning the December 13 meeting of the Task Force on Private Employment of the National Urban Coalition. I hope that all of you can make your plans to attend this important conference. We might need to ask members of the Steering Committee to actively participate in the workshops as part of panel discussions. If this should be the case, I will notify you at the earliest possible moment. I am also attaching a letter from Mr. M. C. Gettinger, Executive Director of the Atlanta Jewish Welfare Federation, Inc., which is a newly formed central agency involving the Atlanta Jewish Community Council, the Jewish Welfare Fund and the Jewish Social Service Federation. As Mr. Gettinger's letter states, the Federation represents virtually all the adult Jewish organizations in Atlanta and would be the most appropriate representative of all the Jewish organizations on the Urban Coalition Steering Committee. Several organizations and many individuals have called my attention to the fact that the Jewish community is not represented on the Steering Committee and I feel that the Steering Committee should give some thought to inviting Mr. Abe Goldstein, President of the Atlanta Jewish Welfare Federation, Inc,, to serve as a member of the Steering Committee, DS ify
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 32

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_032.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 32
  • Text: CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 303038 November 30, 1967 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M, MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison MEMORANDUM To: Members of Urban Coalition Steering Committee From: Dan AQ, Enclosed is a letter of invitation and program concerning the December 13 meeting of the Task Force on Private Employment of the National Urban Coalition. I hope that all of you can make your plans to attend this important conference. We might need to ask members of the Steering Committee to actively participate in the workshops as part of panel discussions. If this should be the case, I will notify you at the earliest possible moment. I am also attaching a letter from Mr. M. C. Gettinger, Executive Director of the Atlanta Jewish Welfare Federation, Inc. , which is a newly formed central agency involving the Atlanta Jewish Community Council, the Jewish Welfare Fund and the Jewish Social Service Federation. As Mr. Gettinger's letter states, the Federation represents virtually all the adult Jewish organizations in Atlanta and would be the most appropriate representative of all the Jewish organizations on the Urban Coalition Steering Committee. Several organizations and many individuals have called my attention to the fact that the Jewish community is not represented on the Steering Committee and I feel that the Steering Committee should give some thought to inviting Mr. Abe Goldstein, President of the Atlanta Jewish Welfare Federation, Inc., to serve as a member of the Steering Committee. DS: fy
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 41

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_041.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 41
  • Text: ees Atlanta Chapter THE AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE Hartford Building, Suite 526— 100 Edgewood Avenue, N. E..* Atlanta, Georgia 30303 » 523-8451 November 7, 1967 Mr. Dan Sweat, Governmental Liaison Director City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr, Sweat: The Atlanta Chapter of the American Jewish Committee would welcome the opportunity to participate in Atlanta's Yrban Coalition. The American Jewish Committee is participating in this effort on a national level, and our people here can and should make a constructive contribution to the solution of local problems. Our Chapter Chairman, William B. Schwartz, Jr., is President of Zep Mamfacturing Company and a Vice-President of National Service Industries. He would be willing to serve, as would Edward Elson, Vice-Chairman and President of the Atlanta News Agency and Elson's Book Stores. Mr. Elson participated in the Washington meeting at which the National Coalition was formed. Please advise us whether it would be possible for us to cooperate in this venture. Cordially, 2 CHARLES F. Vv; STEIN Southeast Area Director CFWsru cc: Mayor Ivan Allen WILLIAM B. SCHWARTZ, JR., Chairman LOUIS O. HERTZ, JR., Vice Chairman EDWARD M. ABRAMS, Vice Chairman MRS. RALPH K, UHRY, Secretary EDWARD E. ELSON, Vice Chairman CHARLES S. ACKERMAN, Treasurer Southeast Area Director CHARLES F. WITTENSTEIN
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 29

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_029.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 29
  • Text: c~ < p aif i ' Atlanta eusish Welfare Gedera: fon, Dre. The newly formed central agency merging the Atlanta Jewish Coramunity Council, Jewish Welfare Fund and ihe Jewish Social Service Federation 41 Exchange Place, S. E. ° Ailanta, Georgia 30303 \@ Phone 525-4825 ABE GOLDSTEIN PRESIDENT November 29, 1967 M, CC, GETTINGER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Mr. Dan Sweat City Hall 68 ‘Matchell St... SW. Atlanta, Ga. 30303 Dear Mr. Sweat: In accordance with our telephone conversation of last Friday I wish to, advise you that the Atlanta Jewish Welfare Federation is interested in participating in the work of the Atlanta Urban Coalition. The Atlanta Jewish Welfare Federation represents virtually all the adult Jewish organizations in greater Atlanta. As the letterhead indicates this central Jewish communal agency is the result of the recent merger of the Atlanta Jewish Community Council, the Welfare Fund and the Social Service Federation. I am enclosing a chart describing the structure and program of the Federation. Please do not hesitate to call upon us if we can be of any assistance to the work of the City of Atlanta. Sincerely yours, sf Me ¢, Gettinger Executive Director Enclosure MCG :rgf
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 34

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_034.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 34
  • Text: Ae Tewish Welfare Gederation, One, The newly formed central agency merging the Atlanta Jewish Community Council, Jewish Welfare Fund and the Jewish Social Service Federation 41 Exchange Place, S. E. ° Atlanta, Georgia 30303 e \ Phone 525-4825 ABE GOLDSTEIN PRESIDENT M, C. GETTINGER November 29, 1967 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Mr. Dan Sweat City Hala 68 Mitchell St., S.W. Atlanta, Ga. 30303 Dear Mr. Sweat: In accordance with our telephone conversation of last Friday I wish to advise you that the Atlanta Jewish Welfare Federation is interested in participating in the work of the Atlanta Urban Coalition. The Atlanta Jewish Welfare Federation represents virtually all the adult Jewish organizations in greater Atlanta. As the letterhead indicates this central Jewish communal agency is the result of the recent merger of the Atlanta Jewish Community Council, the Welfare Fund and the Social Service Federation. I am enclosing a chart describing the structure and program of the Federation. Please do not hesitate to call upon us if we can be of any assistance to the work of the City of Atlanta. Sincerely yours, M. C. Gettinger Executive Director Enclosure MCG: rgf
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 59

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_059.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 59
  • Text: October 27, 1967 NATIONAL COORDINATORS WEEKLY REPORT LOCAL COALITIONS Six cities have now announced the formation of urban coalitions and intend to affiliate with The Urban Coalition--Detroit, New York City, Minneapolis, Gary, Indianapolis, and Atlanta. Sparked by the Chicago "Mobilizing Urban Coalitions" planning session dozens of other cities now have organizing committees. The California League of Cities, meeting in San Francisco, formally endorsed the formation of coalitions in all its constituent cities on a motion by Mayor Floyd Hyde of Fresno supported by officials of San Diego. Both cities announced they are organizing coalitions. Regional meetings like the one in Chicago have been scheduled for San Francisco on November 30 and New York in early December. PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT On October 25, some 40 major Pittsburgh employers and labor léaders attended a meeting hosted by Mayor Joseph M. Barr on private industry plans for hiring hard-core unemployed. On October 27, at the invitation of Mayor Herman Katz of Gary and Mr. George Jedenoff, Superintendent of the U.S. Steel Gary Works, The Urban Coalition Task Force on Private Employment joined with several hundred leading Gary employers and unions in developing a program of expanded employment opportunities. Mr. David Stahl, of Mayor Daley's office representing the Task Force, spoke briefly at the luncheon. Other local meetings on private employment have been scheduled for Baltimore (November 14) and Detmit (November 21). Task Force co- chairman Gerald L. Phillippe will speak at both meetings. In Baltimore, Mayor Theodore McKeldin and Council President Thomas D'Alasandra and fifteen major industrial leaders are convening a meeting of top management representatives of Baltimore firms to launch a program of expanding Negro entrepreneurship in the ghetto stimulated by sub-contract arrangements with leading industries. (2) A This is being viewed as a "breakthrough" type of program and is being carried out through the Baltimore Council on Equal Business Opportunity (CEBO). CEBO is a project of The Potomac Institute. In Detroit, the New Detroit Committee's employment and education committee is convening a meeting of industrial and labor leaders to discuss expansion of private employment in the ghetto. The Ford Motor Company has announced that it will recruit 6500 new workers from the central city and the Michigan Bell Telephone Company has announced plans to concentrate its training efforts in an all- Negro high school in the center of Detroit. LEGISLATION Coalition co-chairmen Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph urged members of the House/Senate Conference Committee on Independent Offices Appropriations to adopt the Senateé‘s recommendations for funding model cities and rent supplements--$637 for model cities and $40 million for rent supplements. Rent supplements received $10 million (the House had earlier approved no funds) and model cities received $312 (the House had approved $237 million). The fact sheet and position paper on the Social Security amendments will be mailed to the Steering Committee the first part of next week. EDUCATIONAL DISPARITIES The Task Force will meet on November 7 to map its program and round out its membership. HOUSING, RECONSTRUCTION AND INVESTMENT The Task Force had to reschedule its October 19th meeting for early November. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES Task Force working committee meets November 3 in Washington to consider a pilot three city praject involving development of new lower-income housing on an open occupancy basis in suburban areas. Also scheduled for the meeting are plans to draw together some 300 Fair Housing Committees now operating in suburban communities for a national action session on open housing to be held in Chicago early in January.
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 67

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_067.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 67
  • Text: CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 October 19, 1967 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison Mr. A. H. Sterne, Jr., President Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Post Office Box 4418 Atlanta, Georgia 30302 Dear Billy: Iam sure that you are aware of the movement at the national level to develop a strong coalition of urban interests in an effort to exert more influence in national programs and priorities for ~ the benefit of our cities. Representatives of business, labor, civil rights, religion, education and Mayors of urban cities have joined together in an Urban Coalition to provide coordinated machinery for getting the story of our big city problems across to the nation. I am attaching some information materials on the Urban Coalition. These will explain the background and goals of the national steering committee. It has been recognized from the beginning that in order to be effective, local counter-part coalitions must be developed in all parts of the country to support these goals. It is my belief that for years Atlanta has been able to grow and prosper through an effective and informal coalition relationship of business and govern- ment and with the support of the other areas of interest which are a part of the national coalition effort. I believe, however, that we need to recognize a little more formally the coalitions which keep our city moving and also to develop a local coalition relation- ship with the national Urban Coalition. Mr. Sterne Page Two October 19, 1967 It is my thinking that an initial step would be for us to get together the top representatives of these key interest groups to form a local coalition steering committee and invite the participation by other organized groups. The initial steering committee could be composed of the Mayor, as chief elected official of the city, the President’ of the Chamber of Commerce, the President of the Atlanta Labor Council, the President of the Atlanta Christian Council, the Co- Chairman of the Summit Leadership Conference, the Superintendent of public education, and the Chairman of the Citizens Central Advisory Council, who is the elected representative of participants in the Economic Opportunity program, I have drafted a statement which might be considered by this group which recognizes the need for a local coalition and endorses the declaration of principles of the national coalition. A copy of the principles of the national coalition is also attached for your consideration, By recognizing the existence of a coalition we will be able to better communicate urban problems and focus maximum resources upon their solutions, -In order that we might consider this proposal I have invited the following people to meet with me at my office at City Hall on Wednesday, October 25, at 10:00 a.m.: Mr. A. H. Sterne, President Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Rev. Samuel Williams ’ Co-Chairman Summit Leadership Conference Mr. Robert J. Butler, President Atlanta Labor Council Mr. Sterne Page Three October 19, 1967 Rev. Bevel Jones, President Christian Council of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc. Dr. John W. Letson Superintendent Atlanta Public Schools Mr. Erwin Stevens, President Citizens Central Advisory Council Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. Sincerely yours, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor IAJr:fy
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 66

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_066.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 66
  • Text: October 19, 1967 Mr. A. H. Sterne, Jr., President Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Post Office Box 4418 Atlanta, Georgia 30302 Dear Billy: I am sure that you are aware of the movement at the national level to develop a strong coalition of urban interests in an effort to exert more influence in national programs and priorities for the benefit of our cities. Representatives of business, labor, civil rights, religion, education and Mayors of urban cities have joined together in an Urban Coalition to provide coordinated machinery for getting the story of our big city problems acrose to the nation. I am attaching some information materials on the Urban Coalition, These will explain the background and goals of the national steering committee, It has been recognized from the beginning that in order to be effective, local counter-part coalitions must be developed in all parts of the country to support these goals. It is my belief that for years Atlanta has been able to grow and prosper through an effective and informal coalition relationship of business and govern- ment and with the support of the other areas of interest which are a part of the national coalition effort. I believe, however, that we need to recognize a little more formally the coalitions which keep our city moving and also to develop a local coalition relation- ship with the national Urban Coalition, Mr. Sterne Page Two October 19, 1967 It is my thinking that an initial step would be for us to get together the top representatives of these key interest groups to form a local coalition steering committee and invite the participation by other organized groups. The initial steering committee could be composed of the Mayor, as chief elected official of the city, the President of the Chamber of Commerce, the President of the Atlanta Labor Council, the President of the Atlanta Christian Council, the Co« Chairman of the Summit Leadership Conference, the Superintendent of public education, and the Chairman of the Citizens Central Advisory Council, who is the elected representative of participants in the Economic Opportunity program, I have drafted a statement which might be considered by this group which recognizes the need for a local coalition and endorses the declaration of principles of the national coalition. A copy of the principles of the national coalition is also attached for your consideration, By recognizing the existence of a coalition we will be able to better communicate urban problems and focus maximum resources upon their solutions, In order that we might consider this proposal I have invited the following people to meet with me at my office at City Hall on Wednesday, October 25, at 10:00 a.m,; Mr. A. H. Sterne, President Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Rev. Samuel Williams _ Co«Chairman Summit Leadership Conference Mr. Robert J. Butler, President Atlanta Labor Council
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 1, Document 52

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_001_052.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 1, Document 52
  • Text: THE ATLANTA URBAN LEAGUE, INC. An Educational Community Service Agency Covering Over 47 Years of Preventive Social Service Pe es Le 521°2355 * 239 AUBURN AVENUE, N.E. ® ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 NATIONAL URBAN LEAGUE AFFILIATE October 23, 1967 Mr. Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: We wish to congratulate you for forming an Urban Coalition Steering Com- mittee along the lines of the National Urban Coalition, This is to request that The Atlanta Urban League, Inc., be invited to be a member of Atlanta's Urban Coalition Steering Committee. We make this request because since 1920, our Agency has been concerned with urban problems, particularly, in areas of Housing, Health and Welfare, Job De- velopment and Employment and Youth Incentives and Education. We employ the techniques of Community Organization in our attempt to do preventive social work, We are an United Appeal Agency and should we have a success- ful United Appeal Campaign, January, 1968, we expect to substantially add to our community resources development efforts; which would greatly add to the ability to communicate with the grass-root people in Metropolitan Atlanta; both in the areas served by Poverty Programs and otherwise. On the Urban Coalition Steering Committee, we would want to be identified as an Educational Community Services Agency supported by all of the citizens of the Atlanta Community. We respectfully ask that this request be granted. Very truly vours, yb ted H. Qauset& f <= Harold N. Arnold, mg . 7 / : : Executive Director HNA:vbm "
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 1, Folder topic: Local Urban Coalition | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021