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Box 15, Folder 2, Document 31

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_031.pdf
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  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 31
  • Text: • Management Information Serviee International City Managers' Association/ April 1969, Vol. 1 No. L-4 �lessons From the Model Cities Program To the growing number of local officials disen, chanted with the problems in federal aid for America's cities, the Model Cities program has been promoted as a radically improved product. President Nixon had been in office less than a week when his associates made it known that the Model Cities approach is to be "applied across the board to the entire system of federal services." The program was enacted in 1966, authorized by the Demonstration Cities and Metropolitan Development Act of that year. Since then, more than 150 cities and counties have begun the involved planning process to implement the program. Grants of $512.5 million are available for operation, plus $142 million for urban renewal within designated Model Cities neighborhoods. The goal of Model Cities is to coordinate all other urban programs ; focus them on areas of physical and human blight in selected cities; offer additional funding; and forge a partnership among local government, the neighborhood people to be benefited, and the private resources of the community. The process involves concentrating public and private agency programs on related problems of, say, housing, education, health, and employment. Toward this end, sponsorship was lodged with local government (city or county) and structure was loosely specified to meet three basic objectives: • To focus on a rational demonstration of results so that viable solutions to basic causes might have lasting, nationwide applicability. • To develop citizen participation structures to insure involvement of the people whose lives are affected by planning and implementation of planning. • To serve as a planning and coordinating rather than a service-delivery vehicle. This report was prepared for MIS by Paul R. Jones, Executive Director, Charlotte (N.C.) Model Cities Commission, and Chairman, National Model Cities Directors A ssociation; and by Barbara R. Bradshaw, Ph.D. , Research Director, Charlotte (N. C.) Model Cities Commission. 2 Through this new "total-attack" approach, Model Cities holds great promise to city administrators seeking to identify and overcome the persisting problems of our cities. Yet it must be cautioned that Model Cities is so far largely unproved in practice. The progra m remains, after three years of federal activity , rather vaguely defined, even in theory, and the first "operational grant" (as opposed to the initial planning grants) was awarded to Seattle, Wash. , only late last year. The program, however, has by now generated various strategies for shaping Model Cities, as evidenced by examining the voluminous applications submitted to the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Since the initial application must describe the intended scale and depth of the full program to be undertaken by a Model City, a foundation has now been laid for preliminary discussion of Model Cities strategies that might be borrowed by other cities. This report briefly outlines Model Cities lessons that appear to be emerging from the program . �Patterns of Poverty and Neighborhood Deprivation HOUSING: Maintenance Costs Financing Costs Tax Costs Construction Costs Lan~ Costs Codes Absentee Landlords .ln-Mgration of ,~~ Disadvantaged Groups - Demand fo r lJJw Cost Housing lJJw Market Demand or Housing Improvements Out-Migration of Successfu l Fami lies & Individuals ~ JJ{_ lJJw Mai ntenance & Investment in Housing I lJJw Community ,t Organization & Leadership Substandard, ~ vercrowded & O Deteriorating Housing Ra~i:~j~d~~:nic ~ Lack of Observation of Communi ty Standaros Excessive Internal Mobility Poor Police Relations Cri me & Violence Inadequate Commercial Services Lack of Motivation; Drug Addiction Feelings of Frustration, - . . . . Alcnholism Powerlessness & Isolation ~ Juveni le Deli nquency Inadequate Community Medical, Education, Social, Legal Services & Faci lities _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _,. • ,!_ SOC IAL PROBLEMS lJJw Participation in Community Affai rs Racial & Ethnic Concentrations Lack of Choice in Housing Lack of Avai labi lity of Credit "' Inadequate Public & Private TransjXJrtation Lack of Access to OpjXJrtunities Inadequate Public Information System Lack of Job OpjXJrlunities 1 Changing Production Methods Lack of LDw-Ski lied Jobs Available Job Restrictions from Union Practices, Industry Hiring Practices & Minimum Wages Poor Job Skills Il legitimacy Lack of Fami ly Stabi lity ECONOMIC PROBLEMS lJJw Income High Unemployment Hi gh Dependency High Debt & lJJw Savings Lack of On-The-Job Traini ng OpjXJrtunities lJJwWork Performance i,' Absenteeism HEALTH PROBLEMS High Illness High Infant Mortality LDw Life Expectancy EDUCATION PROBLEMS lJJw Educational Attainment High School Drop-Out Rates Poor Communication & Understandi ng Figure 1 - Reinforcing Relati onships in Cycle~ of Poverty S o urce: Developing a Program Focus As an indication of the new Administration's support of Model Cities, Mayor Floyd H. Hyde of Fresno, Calif., one of the program's strongest boosters, was named HUD Assistant Secretary for Model Cities. Th4s, the Fresno Model City application serves as something of a "model among models" in characterizing the central focus of the program. Here is a statement from the Fresno application that well summarizes the program focus of most Model Cities: "It is necessary for residents to become acquainted with the steps and processes necessary for assimilation into the mainstream of community life. Any Arthu r D. Little, Inc., Strategies for Shapi ng Model Cities (1967) , p. 35. broad and general program that will be set up in this depressed section must take into consideration the lag in our present social, economic, educational, and legal systems and institutions as they apply to noninfluential groups, termed often as indigenous. "A comprehensive program must recognize that in order to bridge the gap between the existing institutions and the poor there must be an attempt to bring the services to the people on a decentralized basis so that they may take full advantage of them, for often the helping services of existing institutions are removed from the deprived community, both physically and psychologically. "Therefore, a major need for this community is to remove the physical and psychological distance of 3 �Model City Objectives To Combat Poverty and Low Income 1. By decreasing the number of families now living in poverty. 2. By reducing the number of unemployed in the area. 3. By reducing the number of underemployed (those working only part-time or in jobs which pay too little). To Provide Better Housing and Better Environments 1. By making more homes available, with emphasis on low cost. 2. By providing families with a choice of decent homes in environments of their choosing. 3. By providing adequate housing to families requiring relocation, and by minimizing economic loss due to relocation. 4. By improving the physical appearance of Portland West, making it compatible with family living. To Provide Better Education and Proper Child Development 1. 2. 3. 4. By providing adequate school facilities. By increasing the quality of public education. By raising the level of educational performance. By providing educational opportunities for all children, including the handicapped and emotionally disturbed. 5. By encouraging more parent involvement in school policies and administration. To Provide General and Personal Social Services to A ll 1. By improving and expanding existi ng services and making them read ily available t o all residents, young and old. 2. By making preventive social services avail able to all. 3. By providing day care for all chi ld re n. To Provide Adequate Recreational Opportunities 1. By providing conveniently located fa cilit ies fo r outdoor recreation. 2. By establishing indoor fa cilities for cult ural and recreational programs. 3. By overcoming barri ers which preven t more extensive use of existing programs and facil ities. To Reduce the Crime Rate and Juvenile Delinquency 1. By directing attention t o t he specific conditions which cause crime o r cont ribute t o it . 2. By emphasizing crime prevention ; by t reating delinquency in its early stages. 3. By aiding in t he rehabilit atio n of potential and chronic offenders. To Improve the Health o f the Community 1. By increasing public understa nding of health needs and atti t udes. 2. By providi ng comprehensive, coord inated health services to children and ad ults. 3. By recruit ing mo re health person nel. 4 . By making health information accessible to all. Figure 2 - Statement of Objectives, Portland, Maine 4 these services by placing them in the deprived area, and in turn, making them easily accessible to all residents of the area . A related factor in the provision of these services on a decentralized basis is actual employment, whenever possible, of people from the area in both professional and subprofessional capacities. Such a provision in a program will tend to show the residents why they should strive to better themselves. Providing the training and work opportunities for as many people as possible will help to change the attitudes of others and motivate them to strive fo r improvement." Statements similar to this can be fo und in the applications of other Model Cities, thus evidencing that the program has helped focus official thinking on ways to break the patterns of poverty and neighborhood deprivation (see Figure 1). The key word here is "focus," fo r Model Cities is designed to zero in on specific objectives for a limited area of the city. In the program formulation stage, the earlier specific statements of objectives can be developed, the more effectively they can guide the program. Specific objectives (1) provide a focus for data collection and evaluation; (2) speed the process of program design ; • • (3) provide a basis for selecting appropriate projects; and (4) prevent the formation of vested interests in specific approaches. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES In developing a program focus, a city is confronted with a bewildering variety of possible approaches to and proposals for attacking patterns of poverty. No accepted criteria exist for choice among them. To produce a coherent, integrated program strategy, however, a city must have some method of selecting and relating program elements. Experience thus far suggests the usefulness of focusing on a critical process (e.g., in-migration of disadvantaged groups), opportunity (e.g., enhancing physical and social mobility opportunities), event (e.g., construction of a new highway through the Model City area), population group (e.g. , elderly couples), or resource (e.g., private industry). Illustrative of a well-prepared objectives statement is the list appearing in the application from Portland, Me., and reproduced in Figure 2. Note that this statement of objectives builds essen- • �• ,,, • tially around the patterns of poverty specified in the Figure 1 chart. THE "TARGET-AREA" APPROACH As stated earlier, Model Citites requires a geographic as well as a program focus. Selecting a limited area of the city as the target for the program has several advantages: (1) It maximizes program impact by avoiding the diffusion of effort and allowing projects that reinforce one ano.ther. (2) It increases the visibility of the program. (3) It promotes efficiency in the identification and evaluation of program results. Cities have chosen their "target areas" for the Model Cities program in different ways. Some have selected the neighborhoods with the most severe and the most intractable problems. Others have chosen areas in which problems are less visible and less difficult. The shape and composition of the areas selected also varies. No one kind of target area is suitable for all cities, but several factors generally influence target selection. The "typical" target area has experienced significant economic and social changes traceable to regional industrial growth and the migration this has set in motion. Important elements of the population, particularly low-income and minority migrants, have been unable to adjust with the shifts in economic activity . They have thus suffered reduced job, educational, and other opportunities; increased social disadvantage ; and, for welfare recipients at least, continuing dependency. Physical environment and social forces have combined to concentrate a high proportion of such groups in the target area. Here poverty, housing, and environmental deficiencies, ill health, and other conditions are the most acute, and inaccessibility has contribut ed to underutilization as well as insufficiency of public services. Despite the advantages of focusing resources on specific geographic areas of need, an important lesson emerging from the Model Cities program is that problems do not stop at target-area boundaries. Robert A. Aleshire, executive director of the Reading (Pa.) Model Cities Agency, notes: "Meanwhile back at t he metropolitan level, a very legitimate questio n arises. How can a program which strives for a high level of achievement for 10 percent of the residents of a city be effectively meshed wit h a metropolitanwide effort to strengthen the impact of regional interests? For example, the streets of a Model Neighborhood may very well form an important link in a regional network and constitute the lifeline of a central business district. Citywide and regional interests demand increasing st reet capacity. This means more land and more t raffic, both of which tend to be adverse to the goal of strengthening the residential nature of the neighborhood." Thus "a balanced effort recognizing the goals of the neighborhood as compared with citywide and metropolitan interests ... is certainly not beyond the responsibilities· of a Model Cities program," Aleshire observes. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SERVICE April 1969 - Vol. 1 No. L-4 Editor: Walter L. Webb Management Information Service reports are published monthly by the International City Managers' Association, 1140 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Copyright © 1969 by the International City Managers' Association. No part of this report may be reproduced without permission of the copyright owner. Subscription rates (including inquiry-answering and additional services) are based on population of subscribing jurisdiction and will be furnished on request. This report is intended primarily for subscribing jurisdictions above 25,000 population. Concurrent monthly reports, prepared primarily for jurisdictions below 25,000 population, are available from Management Information Service. UNIFIED PROGRAM ELEMENTS Just as patterns of poverty, frustration, apathy, and decay are mutually reinforcing, an effort focused on breaking these patterns must attempt to integrate all elements of the program. The effectiveness of any single project or activity can often be increased if it is associated with the effects of other program elements. Different projects can thus reinforce one another. For example: • The value of a health clinic can be increased if information about the services it offers and transportation to the clinic are provided. • Assuring that jobs are available for those with certain skills increases the value of a training program. • Increased home ownership can provide community leadership necessary for improving the neighborhood environment. Yet experience has shown that project items must be consistent or they may nullify each other. For example , public housing or school programs geared to the cultural transition problems of children from ethnic groups now in the area would be inconsistent with a program to attract middle-class and other racial and ethnic groups t o a target area. Attracting such groups is likely to require provision of singlefamily homes and high-quality educational facilities. On the other hand, projects designed to make a neighborhood attractive to outside groups may lead to increased rents and property values and thereby displace current residents. 5 �Thus, the interrelations of program elements must be examined carefully to assure mutually reinforcing objectives. The Model City application of Portland, Me., illustrates this principle through its statement of overall strategy : "Our overall strategy is three-fold: (1) to increase the purchasing power available to residents so that they will be free to make choices in the planning and conduct of their lives; (2) to improve the physical surroundings and cultural opportunities of Portland West so that the residents will have a variety of alternatives among which to make those choices ; (3) to promote the ability of residents to make those choices wisely and enjoy them happily." OUTPUT SCHEDULE A major dilemma of the Model Cities program is that of balancing long-range approaches that do not immediately show results with the necessity of engaging in projects with high visibility and early impact. Priorities must be made , and the support of the community as a whole and the residents of the model neighborhood in particular is often contingent upon visible results. Though early-impact efforts are primarily symptom-oriented, they are necessary if the more effective, cause-oriented components basic to the demonstration aspects of the program are to be implemented. Therefore , some resources must be allocated to early impact, high-visibility projects, but care must be exerted to insure that more lasting, less visible programs are also begun early and carefully evaluated in accordance with the Model Cities concept. Such projects as the development of vacant lots for playgrounds; repair of street potholes; improved street lighting; street numbering; painting of fire hydrants , utility poles, and fe nces; and pest extermination can all be quickly initiated at little cost. Yet such activities can help develop support required to undertake projects with more lasting significance. Initial programs need not have a physical in1pact , but they must be finely tuned to neighborhood grievances and special problems." For example, meeting demands for appointment of Negro policemen and firemen for duty in the ghetto - or the appointment of civilian police review boards or neighborhood councils for police relations - can be effective, some Model Cities have discovered. Other highly symbolic projects are those whose impact is of unmistakable benefit primarily fo r the target-area residents. Among such projects are: • Programs such as changes in administrative procedures in welfare and social service programs to remove restrictions, red tape, and degrading investigations and inquiries. • Programs to make absentee landlords responsible for repairs and maintenance . 6 • Financial aid, training, and m,anagement assist- ance programs to help small businesses in the area. • Provision of government information in the tongues spoken in the area and the use of bilingual personnel at key contact points. Focusing at the outset on such "immediateimpact" projects as these has been found helpful in overcoming initial resistance to "another all talk, no action" program - which is how many slum residents have come to view government efforts in their behalf. • RESEARCH AND EVALUATION In a demonstration effort, the organization structure must include a strong research and evaluation component. The lack of sound documentation has been a weakness in many other programs designed to alleviate urban problems. To be effective, such an organization structure must have fl exibility and engage in continuous planning so that research findings can impact on the direction of demonstrations and the search for effective solutions. By the same token , the research component must experiment with innovative techniques where indicated and be extremely cautious in the use of rigid experimental design. What is beneficial to a community often is not conducive to tightly quantifiable research results on a short-range basis, so that exploratory rather than experimental designs may fre quently be more fe asible. In this sense , research becomes " contemporary history" that provides a guide fo r evaluation of experience and consequences. 1 Quantifiable measures of various types should be used whenever possible to supplement and complement other approaches. The goal is evaluation on all levels to give the fullest possible picture of results of the demonstration. Dissemination of findi ngs should be an important component throughout to serve both educational and resource development functions. • Citizen Participation The Demonstration Cities and Metropolitan Development Act of 1966 states that there should be "widespread citizen participation in the program" including " ... maximum opportunities for employing residents of the area in all phases of the program and enlarged opportunitie s for work and training." Thus the law delineates "widespread" rather than "maximum feasible" participation (as was called for in the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964) and also designates city government as the responsible administering agency. If structure and auspice determine function ( or as Freud stated more colorfully, "Anatomy is destiny"), this consideration has important implications for citizen participation. 1 The discussion of researc h by Marris and Rein is most helpful in gaining a perspective on the role of research in poverty programs. See Peter Marris and Martin Rein, Dilem mas of Social R eform (New York: Atherton Press, 1967). • �• • • Citizen participation has been interpreted if! a wide variety of ways depending on the orientations of the sponsoring agencies. In some instances, such as under the direction of many community action agencies, citizen participation has been used as a base of power to force local institutions to assume greater responsiveness to poverty areas. In other instances, such as under the direction of many relocation programs, citizen participation has meant largely the task of selling residents on acceptance of projects and programs that have already been planned for them. The Demonstration Cities Act approaches the problem differently . The Act sets forth a challenge to cities to incorporate citizen participation into local government in such a way that a new institutional form can be evolved that relates people to their local government in a cooperative fashion. Many critics, looking at this dual challenge to Model Cities to be a part of the local establishment and the emissary of the less privileged people for change, might feel that the inherent contradictions are too many and complex for success. Indeed, success is improbable unless the dilemmas are clearly faced and strategies for meeting the problems are carefully implemented to develop meaningful citizen participation. Perhaps the most important single issue of our time is that of the distribution of power. This issue has bred its discontents not only in the ghettoized inner city but also in sprawling suburbia, where the middle class exhibits growing disenchantment and feelings of disenfranchisement. This sense of powerlessness is, in large part, a fu nction of the complexities and growing size of mass society, but it is aggravated by the inability of our institutions as they now function to cope with these complexities and to improve the quality of individual life. As noted by the National Commission on Urban Problems: " In 1967, our metropolitan areas were served by 20 ,745 local governments, or about onefo urth of all local governments in the nation. This means 91 governments per metropolitan area - an average of about 48 per metropolitan county. If these units of government were laid out on a map, every metropolitan area in the count ry would look as if it had been 'nonplanned' by a mad man ." There are at least three fu ndamental problem areas where awareness must be constantly focused if meaningful citizen participation structures are to be developed. These are: the place of Model Cities in the local governmental structure; the role of Model Cities in the mo del neighborhood community; and the relationship of Model Cities to the state and federal levels. THE PLACE OF MODEL CITIES IN LOCAL GOVERNMENTAL STRUCTURE As a new arm within local government and having broad, often unrealistic and poorly specified responsibilities, the city demonstration agency is easily perceived as threatening to the older, more entrenched departments. It is well-documented that bureaucratic structures are resistant to change, and Model Cities is rightly seen as an instrument of change. It is often seen as another poverty program, associated in the minds of many with disruptions, confrontation politics, and demands that local governments presently are not capable of meeting. This association, along with vestiges of the Protestant ethic often reinforced by years of experience with the most disorganized element of the poor, leaves many administrators cynical about the capability of the citizenry to make meaningful contributions to the solution of complex problems. Further, elected officials see citizen participation as a potential threat to their own political structures and interests. A pessimistic view might well see that an approach such as Model Cities would harden resistance and complicate the development of new alliances between citizens and local government, particularly in cities where conflicts among decision-makers and between government departments are many and unresolved. The strategies to be used to insure that residents from model neighborhoods have a voice in the decision-making process will depend on the special circumstances of each city. The role of the citizen must be adapted sensitively and with an eye toward the future so that such involvement may become accepted during the life time of the program, enmeshed with the ongoing fabric of government. In a speech to the U.S. Conference of Mayors, the former Assistant Secretary for Model Cities and Governmental Relations, Department of Housing and Urban Development, called for: " . .. a policy under which projects or programs that significantly affect the model neigl1borhood area will not be approved unless they have first been routed through the CDA (city demonstration agency) and its citizen participation process, and have been approved by the chief executive of the City ( or county)." What was being recommended is dual responsibility between local government officials and the residents, but no concrete suggestions for accomplishing this end were offered. This is the characteristic of all the HUD guidelines dealing with citizen participation. Thus, because of the great diversity of local governments, implementation is left up to the particular urban governments with only vague, generalized federal guidelines. However, based on the broad HUD guidelines and t he above discussion, a few directions emerge that should prove helpful in thinking through the problems involved. • First, model neighborhood residents should be included from the inception on the decision-making commission or board that ca"ies recommendations for action to city councils or other local governing bodies. They should be elected in some democratic fashion by the residents and should be numerically strong enough on the policy-making body to insure that the aspirations of the residents for their own community are given careful consideration. 7 �• Second, residents should be continually involved on planning task forces working to develop and implement a comprehensive program for the model neighborhood area. Full and significant participation is a developmental challenge that in most instances will take time and considerable patience in searching out representative leadership and establishing working relationships between residents and others involved in the planning process. • Third, because of sponsorship by city government, it appears that advocacy planning should generally be avoided. This is a highly controversial matter, but if the goal is to institutionalize a structure within the framework of local government in which citizen participation will evoke greater flexibility and responsiveness, then the planning responsibility should remain directly within that structure rather than be relegated to planners exclusively accountable to residents' organizations. • Finally, the oft-used term "widespread citizen participation" should be taken to mean not only involvement of residents of the model neighborhood area but also of citizens from throughout the total metropolitan community. This should also be oriented toward encouragement of private initiative and enterprise of all types builders, business and financial leaders, voluntary organizations, and concerned citizens from all walks of life. There are tremendous untapped resources of concern and enlightened self-interest in our cities that must be activated if the Model Cities demonstration is to be effective. -In addition, it is only through this wide involvement that many local governments can begin to develop mechanisms for responsiveness, not only to the needs of people in the most blighted areas but also to the total populace. All of this is a gradual process that involves maintaining a delicate balance and continually instigating mechanisms for change. It is clear, however, that the Model Cities concept will fail if it simply assumes a militant stance as have many community action agencies under OEO. Model Cities must utilize the growing demand for greater responsiveness from local government to reform the structure from within , rather than just react to demands from outside. Thus, a primary goal is to develop greater sensitivity in government and local institutions. THE ROLE OF MODEL CITIES IN THE MODEL NEIGHBORHOOD 8 Facing toward the model neighborhood community, the Model Cities concept is beset by an equally difficult set of problems. Residents of blighted areas are generally discouraged and disenchanted, frustrated and even hostile. Years of experience with local government have taught them bitter lessons about lack of concern, false promises, bewildering bureaucratic mazes, and their own inabilities to control the events affecting their lives. To convince residents that Model Cities is a serious effort to develop participatory mechanisms when the political realities of local government dictate a gradual process is a difficult task. It is further complicated by existing community groups who are demanding rapid change and by the general community attitude that combines alienation and militancy into a dangerous combustible atmosphere. As within city government, a delicate balance must be maintained if the city demonstration agency is to be effective in the neighborhood. There are obvious actions that must be taken and some less obvious ones that must be given careful consideration. Perhaps the most obvious is the necessity of earlyimpact, high-visibility projects. As noted earlier, these are usually symptom-oriented, and an easy fallacy is to place too much emphasis on such projects to the detriment of longer-range more basic programs. Yet as a technique to gain support, show good faith, and begin the process of true citizen participation, early-impact projects are of great importance. They begin the process of breaking through the barriers of apathy and distrust and move th~ disaffiliated away from destructive-like militancy toward a more constructive willingness to consider other alternatives. Also fairly obvious is the in1portance of expediting tjl.at aspect of the act that calls for "maximum op-. portunities for employing residents of the area in all phases of the program and enlarged opportunity for work and training." Focusing on employment opportunities, on a broad scale has two major advantages: (I) It gets at one of the basic causes of poverty and opens avenues for mobility that remained closed in many past efforts at citizen involvement. (2) It alleviates some of the preoccupation with confrontation politics by moving somewhat away from an emphasis on mass social movements. To the extent that Model Cities programs can draw staff from among the residents of the model neighborhood, there is an increase in program support. Most important, however, is the necessity of experimenting with innovative approaches to employment opportunities and job-upgrading methods that will receive the support of both public and private spheres and move significantly in the direction of an adequate standard of living for all people. For instance, in the Charlotte , N.C., Model Cities proposal, concern is directed toward an adequate minimum standard of living as defined by the U.S. Department of Labor, rather than focusing only on poverty levels. Therefore, programs have been developed that provide for "income assurance" incentives t o allow residents to take advantage of developmental opportunities on a " family career contract" basis that will eventuate in incomes adequate for entering the mainstream of American life. Also, economic and housing development corporations are being fo rmed that will allow for increased entrepreneurship among residents. • • • �CONDITIONS FOR COORDINATION The effectiveness of Model Cities as a coordinating vehicle is· dependent on a multiplicity of factors that will vary from one urban area to another. It is perhaps a truism to say that if some kind of workable coordination is not achieved, the Model Cities concept will have failed and the city demonstration agency will be only another of the many already fragmented projects being carried out in urban areas. The need for coordination is clear. Daniel P. Moynihan, chairman of the Council on Urban Affairs, has pointed out that as of December 1966 there were 238 different federal programs impacting on urban areas. In addition, both employment and expenditures have been increasing rapidly at the state and local levels. If the vast quantities of money and energy being expended can be brought together into a system - not systems - of developmental opportunities, past failures and the lessons we have learned from them can be translated into social innovations to meet the growing needs of urban complexes. The Model Cit!es concept is a logical alternative to further destructive fragmentation of local government. Implementation of coordinating mechanisms rests on a number of conditions within local government. There must be a recognition of the need for coordination on the part of key officials and administrators. Given the inevitability of resistance from some departments that view this as a threat to their interests, the recognition of the need must be accompanied by commitment from top officials to act to insure necessary linkage. Even with recognition and commitm~~t, successful coordination will depend on the capacities and capabilities of local leadership and the size and complexity of local governments. For instanc~, the idea of coordinating the 1,400 governments m the New York metropolitan area is a staggering notion. Obviously, selection criteria are needed to de~elop even minimal coordination of the most pertment agencies and departments. . Conditions necessary for coordination with orgaruzations not under the auspices of the local governmental body sponsoring Model Cities are similar to those above, but they involve some different problems and certain facets require more emphasis. Open communication channels are vital in securing cooperation and willingness to participate in building a coordinated system. This is also true of departments within the local sponsoring government, of course, but it is less difficult to establish such channels within an administrative structure than it is with organizations having no formal interrelationship. A further condition for success in coordinating with other agencies is a willingness to sustain continued efforts, often in the face of initial discouragement and even 10 influence with no formal structure and never tried to institutionalize coordinative mechanisms. CPI clearly aligned itself with governmental structure and, although much criticized for its lack of advocacy of the rights of the poor, was able to accomplish much because it had the backing of existing structures that became committed to policies of change from within. hostility from some groups who feel theatened by the new agency and its directives to bring about changes . The hard truth is that many programs have been oriented toward providing symptom-oriented services rather than working in a direct, cause-oriented framework. Many past and present service-orientation efforts have been, in effect, direct and indirect income maintenance programs,4 which are fraught with disadvantages associated with continuing d_ependency while lacking the advantages of offering developmental opportunities to break the cycle of poverty. Although it is obvious that many present programs are necessary while change oriented to basic causes is taking place, some programs that are now aimed solely at providing finger-in-the-dike indirect income maintenance and other services for the poor need to recognize that planning must begin early so as to redirect energies and restructure goals within a developmental framework. In one sense, many service-oriented efforts are institutionalized tokenism which, with·the availability of greater funds, has become an overabundant tokenism with little lasting impact on the cycles of poverty, blight, and decay. Problems o~ c~ordinati?n, then become more than merely establishing working relationships with existing structures but also involve developing mechanisms for establishment of new goals and redirection of emphasis. In many servicedelivery agencies there is a growing recognition of the need for restructuring of goals. Such recognition can prove invaluable when incorporated into planning for change. Looking introspectively for redirection and new mechanisms that fit present-day needs, however painful, can result in far higher cost-benefit ratios than are presently obtained. MECHANISMS FOR COORDINATION From the above, it can be seen that coordinative mechanisms are needed on two levels: ( 1) planning, which should be of sufficient magnitude to contribute to the creative development of the entire urban area; and (2) service delivery. In addition, both levels of coordination need to take place in at least five overlapping arenas: local governmental structures, state government, federal government, private agencies and services, and (perhaps most importantly because of previous neglect and great future potential) the private sector. Coordination Within the Sponsoring Governmental Structure. A look at the organization of almost any city government clearly reveals the vast fragmentation that exists. One of the most important goals of the Model Cities demonstration should be to implement the development of a municipal department concerned primarily with coordination of efforts. Fo~ effectiveness this department should not be JUSt 4Welfare is the obvious direct income maintenance service. Indirect income maintenance is provided in th~ form of such services as public health clinics, charity hospitals, free school-lunch programs, public housing, etc. • • �• • • another line department but should be directly in the office of the mayor or chief executive officer ( or whatever other governmental structure is pertinent) and should act as a coordinating vehicle through which all planning endeavors - local, state, and federal - pass. It should be governed by a policy-making commission or board composed of broad membership from various departments involved, as well as citizens representing the communities most directly involved, and should be responsible to local elected officials. This central coordinating department should be staffed by professionals involved in the various planning endeavors as well as specialists who can act as consultants to develop coordinated urban responsiveness to federal and state programs. The success of such an approach will be highly dependent on local factors such as the multiplicity of governing structures and their willingness to cooperate, but at least the approach would insure coordination within the local governing body that has responsibility for Model Cities and would serve as a demonstration in moving more urban municipalities toward consolidated government. Model Cities has a special role to play in working for the development of a coordinating framework within local government. In effect, such a department must represent a new type of administrative structure in which change is institutionalized through a system of social accounting based on ongoing problem analysis, long-range planning, and evaluation of existing efforts. As a demonstration project, the Model Cities program provides incentives to move toward incorporating the demonstration technique into much larger social experiments that emphasize flexibility and responsiveness to the needs of the people. While it is undoubtedly true that most issues today are national rather than local, the capacity of local governments to adapt national program approaches to meet specific local circumstances is essential if an attack on basic causes of complex urban problems is to be implemented successfully. In this sense, the Model Cities concept is much more than a short-term demonstration effort to alleviate the causes of poverty and urban decay, but rather a vehicle that can validate the need for local coordination and implement the development of an administrative structure to help insure sound development of the entire metropolitan area. Coordination With Other Organizational Structures. No coordinating administrative mechanism can assume or assure involvement of other governmental structures. As with private agencies and services, open communication channels and continuing efforts toward coordination must be maintained, but given the multiplicity of governing bodies there is no assurance of direct coordination. In one sense, this may be used to advantage, since social change can be facilitated by competition among organized structures to prove their capacities to respond to the needs of the citizenry. Developing coordinative mechanisms with other governmental structures and private agencies involves continuing efforts and a delicate balance between planning and service delivery. On the planning level, the task force approach has proved an excellent mechanism for bringing together professionals, residents, and citizens at large in a mutual endeavor to plan in a comprehensive, coordinated fashion. Such an approach opens up communication channels and ·· institutionalizes cooperative relationships. This task force approach should be reciprocal, making for Model Cities involvement in planning efforts initiated by other agencies. Such a philosophy should be incorporated in all metropolitan planning efforts. Political pragmatism undoubtedly will be a keynote in such task force approaches. Utilizing the lessons gained from experiences of such organizations as the Kansas City Association, cities should not attempt to structure formal coordinative mechanisms quickly, but should be geared to developing alliances and working relationships through which trust, confidence, and support can be achieved. On the service delivery level, formal and informal cooperative agreements specifying functions to be performed can do much to insure desired coordination. Service-delivery programs that are in no way dependent on the existence of Model Cities may well tend to resist efforts for coordination, and it is not realistic to expect immediate full constructive alignment of all such programs. However, continual evaluation aimed at the goal of increasing social accountability can serve as a coordinative mechanism of sorts and can prove of some value. If the basic causes of poverty and urban blight are to be successfully alleviated, an essential coordinative focus must be placed on the development of economic and human resources within the private sector. With major efforts made toward developing new opportunity structures for the underprivileged, particularly in income and employment (with obvious but complex relationships to education), there is a need to recognize that the emphasis of the private sector on outcomes rather than processes has an invaluable contribution to make. Model Cities program goals should aim at developing economic resources in the metropolitan area that can meaningfully offer employment opportunities with upward mobility potentials to the economically deprived. Considerable coordination in planning can be accomplished by a developing partnership of enlightened self-interest among business and financial interests, social planners, and residents of the model neighborhood area. Constructive alignment can be further enhanced by economic incentives to the private sector fo r participation both in planning and program execution. One matter that needs more adequate exploration is economic development, exclusive of employment, in blighted inner-city areas. Attention can be stimulated by incentives to invest in the economic development of model neighborhoods. This whole arena of private sector involvement is only beginning to be explored, and local governments need 11 �to place high priority on utilizing the very talented and result-oriented capabilities of private business, manufacturing, and financial resources. In summary, then, coordination is an ongoing process that will face many difficult problems. Complete success cannot be expected and is, in fact, probably not even desirable. However, significant coordination at both the planning and service-delivery levels must be achieved to insure the success of the Model Cities demonstration and the development of long-lasting mechanisms to increase local problemsolving capability. The twin strategies of utilizing formalized mechanisms of coordination where possible and building informal networks of mutual cooperation should be applied with a realistic understanding of what can be done now and what can be developed in the future. Perhaps the most important contribution the Model Cities approach has to make is to demonstrate that coordination is an essential component for coherent, creative growth of metropolitan areas . Implications for All Cities City Manager Graham W. Watt of Dayton, Ohio, has succinctly summarized the implications of the Model Cities program for all cities: "Immediately, it would seem that the Model Cities program forecasts several basic implications of importance to all communities. Inevitably, we shall see increased decentralization of public services. Cities will, with increasing frequency, establish branch city 12 halls, neighborhood service centers, store-front police offices, etc. "Second, we will see growing application of a philosophy of compensatory services - we must prepare to design our public service programs specifically to meet the unique and particular needs of each of the neighborhoods within a city. "Third, we shall witness a much greater degree of participation by citizens in the identification of neighborhood needs and in the design of public responses. This will require of each of us a reorientation of our traditional criteria of success, for in the future we must accept to a greater extent than ever before the concept that participation by citizens is a desirable end product of our efforts." Over and above significant movement toward alleviation of defined problems, the Model Cities concept can be utilized to establish a framework on the local level that can increase the responsiveness of the vast institutions of government. Potentially, the Model Cities concept can be translated into concern about the quality of individual life - not only for the poor, but for all inhabitants of and participants in urban complexes. As a demonstration project, Model Cities is searching for ways to improve the quality of American life through local decision-making processes in a coherent, rational fashion. This concept and the mechanisms that can be developed during the limited lifetime of the program will be, perhaps, Model Cities' greatest contribution, by establishing within municipal governments movement toward clearly defined goals and ongoing response based on sound resear~h and social accountability. • • • �• Appendix Employment and Education Strategies for Model Cities • • Most Model Cities officials agree that deficiencies in employmen t (i.e., jobs) and education (i.e., training to get jobs) are major causes of other troubles that beset the residents of deprived urban neighborhoods. A man with a job, which in tum depends on being educated for the job, achieves through his earnings the purchasing power to make free choices about the conduct of his life. As a supplement to the general discussion of Model Cities strategies covered in this report, this appendix presents specific examples of Model City approaches to providing employment and education opportunities for the underprivileged. The appendix in large part is based on a discussion of these topics that appears in Survey of Model Cities Applications in Northern California, prepared by the consulting firm of Sedway/Cooke and published by the University of California Extension, Berkeley (1968). Thus, many of the examples are from cities noted in the study. Other example°s are taken mainly from Model City applications submitted to the Department of Housing and Urban Developmen t. It should be cautioned that the examples cited are illustrative only. The cities mentioned do not necessarily represent the best examples of projects cited, but rather reflect information available to MIS. Indeed, since the Model City application is simply a proposal, some projects may never actually be attempted by the specific city mentioned or may already have been abandoned. Employment Strategies Many employment proposals of Model Cities seem to be based on ground already broken by recent and on-going programs. Thus, job and income projects may be largely premised on existing skills centers, Neigh- borhood Youth Corps, Job Corps, and similar antipoverty programs. A few involve continuation of experimental projects. Employment proposals include the following: • Creation of jobs as a direct or indirect result of the Model Cities program. Residents would be hired as part of the agency or local citizen staff as community workers, research assistants, home improvemen t consultants, and similar subprofessional employees. Oakland, Calif. , would include payment to local leaders for their effort in attending to community affairs. Residents would be trained and employed in clearance, rehabilitation, construction, and housing project management and maintenance. New Haven, ·c onn., would focus attention on part-time jobs, a relatively undeveloped phase of employment, designed principally at three groups - family heads with underpaying full-time jobs, mothers with only half-days to spare, and in-school youths. • Increased job resources and upgrading. Applicant cities would search for new jobs in existing public and private establishments. Aside from a continuing inventory of vacancies, this would include a reexamination of public and private programs for possibl e new jobs and careers; of civil service requirements to see how present jobs could be upgraded, or where new positions designed for low-income and minority groups might be added; and of policies and procedures of employment services to make any necessary revisions (e.g., to put more emphasis on the trainability of low-income workers vis-a-vis other conventional standards). This also includes proposals for hiring residents as police cadets; interns; and aides to teachers, social workers, and health workers. In Seattle, Wash., some $75,000 of its Model City funds will go for a community renewal corporation, operated by residents, with city contracts to beautify the neighborhood. Dayton, Ohio, has been particularly active in efforts to attract Negro recruits for the police department. Other fun ctions for which deprived residents are being recruited include health, welfare, community relations, and automotive equipment maintenance. Detroit, Mich., also has been conducting extensive and successful efforts to attract the disadvantaged into city employment in these same categories. Richmond and Pittsburg, Calif., would appoint job development specialists. • Small business development. Aside from encouraging commercial and industrial establishments to locate in or near the model neighborhoods, a variety of means would be explored to help residents establish businesses as their main occupation or to supplement their incomes. Oakland, Calif. , would tap federal aid resources to establish small business development (or investment) companies to help residents create individual or cooperative businesses, encourage demolition and rehabilitation workers to form their own contracting firms, and provide for the development of "mom and pop" stores. New Haven, Conn., proposes creating with the Chamber of Commerce a small business assistance office in the model area, staffed by retired businessmen, to provide technical and financial assistance to small businessmen. �In Rochester, N. Y., the Eastman Kodak Company has proposed a plan aimed at promoting formation of independent, locally owned businesses in Rochester's inner city. Suggested businesses include such industries as wood product manufacture, production of vacuum-formed plastic items, ,camera repair service, and microfilming of public documents. The company itself would also serve as a potential customer for some of the products and services of the new businesses. K,odak also has agreed to provide training as well as production and marketing advice and consultation to the enterprises suggested in the plan. • Comprehensive training and employment services. Cities· would expand or continue expanded programs and facilities for "outreach and intake," testing and evaluation, counseling, training, and placement and job-upgrading services. In an effort to raise the education level and increase employment opportunities for model neighborhood residents, Waco, Tex., proposes to use the facilities and resources of the James Connally Technical Institute of Texas A & M. Located on a former Air Force base, the Institute will provide temporary housing and total family training for some families and vocational training and retraining in 60 separate fields. Training periods from three months to two years will coincide with construction and rehabilitation of housing in the model neighborhood, so that families who live on the base during training will return to upgraded housing. The city also envisions using a massive public works program as a major in-service training device. Cincinnati, Ohio, officials recognize that it does little good to provide employment to an individual if nonjob--related problems interfere with his work performance. As a consequence, an "employee diagnostic center" is to be set up as part of the Cincinnati pilot city program to assist people in solving such nonjob-related problems as drinking, poor health, family sickness, and marital difficulties. Similarly, disadvantaged youths in the Oiicago, .J/1., Jobs Now program receive instruction in how to understand oneself, others, the community, and the world of work and money management. Richmond, Calif. , mentions a "Youth Tracking Program" that would trace the patterns of employment, education, marriage, military service, etc., of youth aged 16-21 years to determine their problems and aid in their education and employment. • Subsidies. Pittsburg, Calif. , would provide a maintenance allowance for breadwinner trainees and a "training stipend" for underemployed trainees, in addition to payments for day care, transportation, and clothing under its current vocational rehabilitation project. Oakland, Calif., would examine the possibility of subsidizing transportation for area residents employed or wishing to · be employed in the suburbs if transportation costs are found to be an inhibiting factor. • Education Strategies As with employment programs, proposals in education appear to be based on conventional and innovative approaches that are already current. Proposals usually include the following: • Broadened and intensified curriculum including adequate programs and facilities for both preschool and adult education. . Among these would be compensatory education programs, "motivational" education and day care of nursery-aged children, and job- or home care-related courses as well as basic courses for adults and prospective employees. New Haven, Conn., proposes creation of • • �a "center of innovation" in which preschool through second-grade students could be grouped in small units of 15 children, and selected teachers could be given the opportunity to develop and implement new forms of organization, new teaching methods, and new curriculum. Outside resources could be used, and the center could become a base for the training of teaching staff aides and community workers who could carry new approaches into the classrooms of regular schools. Richmond, Calif. , contemplates an adult education program that would help mothers train their children from infancy. • Team teaching, ungraded classes, reduced teacher-pupil ratios, tutoring, and new technology. As the typical inner-city teacher ordinarily comes from a middle-class background, it is important that he be ex posed to life in the model neighborhood. Hartford, Conn., therefore proposes to renovate suitable structures or to construct new dormitories in the model neighborhood so that teachers and educational personnel employed in the neighborhood can reside there. Hartford also proposes establishing a "tutoring corps" drawn from college and high school students, including paid indigenous tu tors and regular teachers. Oakland and Richmond, Calif., contemplate a departure from the singleclassroom, all-subject-teacher format and would also utilize new technological teaching devices (closed circuit T.V. , computers, video tape, teaching machines, etc.). • Racial integration. Hartford, Conn., proposes these steps in pursuing · its strategy for integration: (1) Substantial expansion of intercommunity compacts for schooling model neighborhood children in suburban schools. (2) The construction of "middle schools" for which sites have been selected. They would be situated so as to draw together pupils from widely diverse social, economic, racial, and ethnic backgrounds. (3) Establishment of a series of child development facilities physi~ cally related to existing schools and so located as to bring together preschoolers from widely diverging social, economic, racial, and ethnic backgrounds. • Facilities and physical plant. Aside from proposals to repair, expand, or modernize the physical plant, some cities are examining the development of educational parks as a major alternative to decentralized facilities. Pittsburgh, Pa. , "plans to establish five large, comprehensive, strategically located high schools that will serve all the children of the model neighborhood along with children from the entire city. The new high schools, to be called "The Great High Schools," would be the fust truly comprehensive and fully integrated high schools in the country. Their very size, each enrolling 5,000 to 6,000 pupils, would enable enriched curriculum offerings including over 100 separate vocational-technical programs. Berkeley, Calif., is contemplating the establishment of "middle and satellite" schools to implement the educational park concept. Experimental facilities are also proposed to be built into model schools. The basic thru st of proposed programs, both in employment and education, seems to be - fust, determine all possible or conceivable resources, then "deliver the inventory." Present services would be made more comprehensive in terms of the types of assistance provided and the opportunities offered; They would then be focu sed and extended to the clients, through the decentralization or "local centralization" of service facilities. Many cities thus come close to proposing junior civic centers as the main symbolic vehicle for their programs. �What you get by subscribing to Management Information Service • 1. Inquiry Service. Ask a question of us and get an answer within 48 hours, if you write, or within 24 hours, if you tele phone . If an inquiry requires extended' resea rch, you will receive periodic progress repo rts . Answers include facts and figures, stati stica l data, and up-to-date reports on successful methods bei ng used by other cities in solving their problems. 2. Monthly reports. Dealing with subjects of practical interest i\lnru14Crncnt hoomu,ilon Senk't· lnttm,llioNI City Mm.gm' Assocl1 tiot'I / April 1969, Vol . 1 No. L-4 to local officials. Issued in two edi tion s each month-one geared to the need s of large cities, th e othe r focusing on problems of smaller juri sd ictio ns. Dozens of earlier reports also are available and may be ordered . Reports are designed for handy filin g in 3-hol e'bi nd ers, which we supp . 3. Special Publications. Periodically yo u receive reports puo li shed by govern ment agencies, uni versi ti es, and other as sociations. Copies made available as obtai ned . No extra charge. 4. Public Man agement. Thi s timely urban affairs magazine is sent as part of your subscripti on. Articles cover such sub jects as new approaches to improved government financing , methods for dealing wi th crime , and topical comment on the ways and means of assuring future growth for rural towns. 5. Municipal Year Book. A "must" referenc e. Its 600 pages annually summa ri ze activities of more th an 3,300 ci ti es. Many usefu l stati stics, too. 6. MIS Newsletter. Reports trends in local government management and serves as a forum for the exchange of ideas. Filling th e information needs of municipal offic ials in cities of all sizes Management Information Service Conducted by the International City Managers' Association 11 40 Conn ecticut Avenue, N. W., Washing ton, D. C. 20036 Tel : (202) 293-2200 • 1 �
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_004.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 4
  • Text: MODEL CITIES PROGRAM MEMO FROM: bYen. Storr DATE: 7! } (/e9 To: Pan SU éa7T— TIME: (4+ For your information [_] Please make necessary reply (_] Advise status of the attached Eneloven /-S Corey oF Tie UT AT T Gwrp €ui ves LIOER< Deétree binnoeo ALL SiK Q cc S S Réexercnrreo. JF You tthkve Any Fvayece OQ vyecraus PKepSE Ca FORM 25-15M
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 5

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  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 5
  • Text: Office of the’ Mayor ATLANTA, GEORGIA ‘Pp ROUTE SLIP K >” . mr one, Cort - Node Coline FROM: Dan E. Sweat, Jr. [_] For your information [_] Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the necessary reply. [_] Advise me the status of the attached. FORM 25-4-S
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 24

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  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 24
  • Text: i MECHANICSVILLE MESSENGER © JULY 1969 ISSUE NO 1 Newsletter Supplies Area Information The Mechanicsville Messen- ger will be the official means of getting information about the neighborhood to the resi- dents of Mechanicsville. It will be published by the Mechanicsville Neighborhood Coordinating Planning Commit- tee working with Harland Bartholomew and Associates, planning consultants for the neighborhood. The success of neighbor- hood improvement will depend on the interest and support of the residents. This News- letter will be. the best source of information concerning the Mechanicsville parts of the Model Cities Program. It will inform the people as to what is being done and will help them in their efforts to take part. Every issue should be read carefully by every resi- dent with an interest in his neighborhood. In this way, the citizens of Mechanicsville May take a useful part in the improvement of the neighbor- hood. The Committee plans to mail the Messenger to residents of Mechanicsville once each month. M.C. Program Involves Citizens Mechanicsville is one of six neighborhoods which make up the Atlanta Model Cities Area. Although it is small in size, it includes the most people of any of the six neighborhoods. The Model Cities Program has one major objective: to face the many different kinds of problems of urban living in order to increase human oppor- tunity and enjoyment. , The program is intended to.rebuild the worn-out faci- lities. It is intended to in- crease the supply of housing _for low and moderate income families. It is intended to increase the earning power of the, people through training and expanded job opportunities. It is intended to provide the need- ed public facilities such as parks, schools, streets and utilities. In short, the pro- gram is intended to provide an environment for good living re- lated to the needs and desires of the residents. To accom- plish these goals requires cooperative effort - of the citizens, of the city of the Model Cities staff, of the Atlanta Housing Authority and of professional planners assisting in the work. t CENTRAL AVENUE PRYOR STREET rT | Bye GEORGIA AVENUE SOUTH EXPRESSWAY I-75) Agencies At Work The urban renewal program in Mechanicsville involves the work of several groups and in- dividuals. The first is the Model Cities Administration which operates as a separate part of the city. Making use of a planning consultant and work- ing with the residents, the Model Cities Program (MCP) pre- pares plans and submits them to the Atlanta Housing Author- ity. The MCP also provides a means of hearing individual problems and recommendations. The Atlanta Housing Authority's role is that of action and assistance. It is the AHA's responsibility to carry out the plans. It also gives assistance in relocation and other problems. The City of Atlanta is, of course, the final authority The City pays one-third of the cost and provides other types of services. The Planning De- partment will insure that the 1970 activities agree with the 1983 Model Cities Plan. Consultant Action Mr. Joe Ross represents the planning consultant, Har- land Bartholomew and Associ- ates. His work with the Committee will include: A survey of possible 1970 acquisition areas A relation of areas chosen to the overall improvement plan and preparation of necessary maps and reports. Other consultants, such as economists, appraisers and architects will also be used. Pianning Committee The Neighborhood Coordi- nating Planning Committee is made up of the heads of oper- ating committees under the Model Cities Program and the Advisory Council. These are residents and businessmen of Mechanicsville. This commit- tee is the direct contact with the consultants and the Model Cities staff. Any questions of residents should be dis- cussed with them. The commit- tees responsibilities are: 1. To keep all residents in- formed of existing and planned activities. 2. To encourage active parti- cipation in meetings and by questions and comments to make this participation meaningful. 3. To encourage every resident to help in planning. 4. To furnish the means for the residents to be heard in all phases of the urban renewal process. The committee will provide ideas or proposals to- ward the solution of existing problems. PROJECT OFFICE The Atlanta Housing Authority's Office in Model Cities is known as the Model Cities Neighborhood Development Program Area Office. This office is responsible for carrying out the physical implementation of the plan that the Model City Planning Office has developed, in cooperation with the many citizen participation groups. The Model Cities Neighborhood Development Program Area Office has two separate sections. The first is charged with the responsibility of satisfactorily relocating the residents and businesses from those areas that are scheduled to be: cleared and redeveloped into a truly model residential com- munity. The other section is concerned with the remodeling of those structures that are within the designated rehabili- tation areas. This includes an actual inspection of each dwelling and the preparation of a list of needed repairs. In many cases financial assistance is available through either the Loan or Grant Program. The Rehabilitation Advisor follows the construction from beginning to end, inspecting each step to assure the home owner of receiving complete value for his dollar invested. The Model Cities Neighborhood Development Project Office is presently located in room 141 of the Martin Luther King Memorial High Rise for the elderly at 530 McDaniel Street, S.W., one block off Georgia Avenue. The telephone number is 523-0245. On July 15th the office will be moving to its new and permanent address, 683 Capitol Avenue, S.W. at the corner of Georgia and Capitol Avenue. Our new telephone number will be 523-5851. For future reference, listed below are the departmental Supervisors. W.R. Wilkes, Jr. - Project Director Thomas Walker - Asst. Project Director Walter W. Reid - Family Services Consultant Supervisor R.C. Littlefield - Rehabilitation Supervisor Miss Dorothy Moon- Secretary C.V. Dickens - Financial Advisor Mrs, GLOVER TALKS WITH ONE OF HER NEIGHBORS MRS. EVA GLOVER Mrs. Glover's primary interest is making Mechanicsville a better place for family life. Although she was born in Sparta, Georgia, she has lived in the Mechanicsville area since 1925. She was a strong force in organizing local support for the Community Center and is active in its operation. Besides her work on the Advisory Council, Mrs. Glover is chairman of the Relocation Committee, serves on the Pro- gram Committee and sings in the choir at St. Paul's AME Church. Mrs. Glover campaigned hard for her election to the Council because she knew she could do a good job for the committee, ABOUT THE NEIGHBORHOOD, Which she has been doing. Participation. The Model Cities Program depends on citizen participa- This action is three tion. Fold. The resident is responsi- ble for taking an interest in He can read this Newsletter and others following, and he can talk with the members of the Ad- his neighborhood. ing with citizens and the Neighborhood Coordinating chanicsville. included three and a half R O F L E Renewal Activities In the summer of 1968 the Model Cities staff began meet- Planning Committee from Me- When the Model Cities application-was funded by the Federal Government it blocks in Mechanicsville for visory Council from his block. These are listed on page four. The Neighborhood Coordi- nating Planning Committee will keep the resident informed. It will distribute information to the resident; for example, acquisition during 1969. Two blocks bounded by Wind- sor, Fulton, Formwalt and Richardson. One block bounded by Richard- son, Cooper, Crumley and Windsor. this Newsletter. the technical services needed in working out a plan with the residents. will work with the Committee and the Advisory Council as well as other groups. : Pp R O F | L E The consultants provide The consultant REVEREND M.M. THOMAS Reverend Thomas grew up in Jackson, Georgia and later moved to Atlanta. He has lived in Mechanicsville for the past 15 years. Reverend Thomas is employed by the Lockheed- Georgia Company in Marietta. His spare time is divided among his family and his two churches, the Sardis Baptist Church and the Shoal Creek Baptist Church in Pike County. In spite of this busy schedule, he finds time to serve on the Advisory Council. Reverend Thomas has shown himself to be willing and anxious to work for the improve- ment of living conditions in Mechanicsville. One half block on the east side of Formwalt between Georgia and Glenn. Planning for 1970 activi- ties was begun in May 1969. On June 23, the first meeting of the committee was held with the planning consultant. r REVEREND THOMAS RELAXES IN HIS SPARE TIME i. ir Mechanicsville Neighborhood Coordinating Planning Committee Atlanta, Georgia 30318 Mrs. Alyce Nixon, 703 Cooper Street, SW 524-4920 Vice Chairman ADVISORY COUNCIL Rev. Simon Shuman 428 Hightower Road, NW Miss Doris Thomas 401 Rawson Street, SW 524-2368 Rev. B.J. Johnson 388 Glenn Street, SW 521-1271 Mrs. Ann Childs 620 Ira Street, SW 523-4056 Mrs. Janie Lowe 623 Ira Street, SW 522-2762 Mrs. Bessie Aaron 74 Whiteford Avenue, NE Mr. William Gaston 465 Pryor Street, SW 523-4930 Rev. W.L. Finch 465 Pryor Street, SW 523-4930 Mrs. Emma Rose 563 Cooper Street, SW 521-0244 Mrs. Mattie Compton 567 Cooper Street, SW 322-3695 Rev. J.H. Gromes 740 Amber Place, NW Rev. J.H. Lockett 606 Pryor Street, SW 755-4862 Mrs. Beatrice Gooden 637 Pulliam Street, SW Rev. L.C. Clack 591 Pulliam Street, SW 524-5160 Mr. Arthur L. Hodges 698 Crew Street, SW 523-7054 Mrs. L.M. Thompson 223 Bass Street, SW Mrs. Ernestine Hurley 294 Bass Street, SW Mrs. Bessie Kelley 709 Pryor Street, SW Mrs. Dorothy Jenkins 252 Hendrix Street, SW Mrs. Dorothy Lawrence 194 Hendrix Street, SW Mrs. Lucy Hall 740 Central Street, SW 524-1870 Rev. M.M. Thomas 931 Fortress Street, SW 525-9755 Rev. T.R. Jones 1437 Murry Street, SE Mrs. Eva Glover 675 Ira Street, SW 688-8821 Mrs. Hattie Mosley 374 Bass Street, SW 524-0062 Rev. LL.M. Terrill 606 McDaniel Street, SW CHAIRMEN OF OPERATING COMMITTEES Mrs. Bertha Barton 260 Bass Street, SW 525-8919 Mrs. Carrie Berry 721 Cooper Street, SW 525-3903 Mrs. Rosa Burney 712 Garibaldi Street, SW 521-2118 Mrs. Dorothy Finney 803 Cooper Street, SW 524-7537 Mrs. Eva Glover 675 Ira Street, SW 688-8821 Mrs. Annie Ruth Newton 528 Wells. Street, SW #1590 577-5044 Mechanicsville Messenger BULK RATE 1700 Commerce Drive, N.W. U. S, POSTAGE Suite lll 3. 8c PAID Atlanta, Georgia Permit No. 1089
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 30

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  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 30
  • Text: CITY OF ATLANTA'S EVALUATION REPORT OF THE PROPOSED MODEL CITIES PROGRA! CITY OF ATLANTA'S EVALUATION REPORT OF THE PROPOSED MODEL CITIES PROGRAM FEBRUARY 1969 DATA PROCESSING OPERATIONS DIVISION Li EVALUATION REPORT I. INDEX l. Indéx II. Historical Background This section of the report gives a very general description of the projects' hiStory......ccccccccccscvees III. City's Participation in the Proposed Program This section of the report discusses the City's participation and the preliminary negotiations GE PAE SYSHCW... asesinse giceneteieneace eek Vie WRENN Ree mee MERON oe Page IV. Analysis of the Program and the Formula Used to Arrive at Cost This section of the report sets forth the personnel requirements which the City will be expected to furnish and gives the formula used in arriving at the cost to CHE CLE ccwwieses i RRS exete rei Se PRUE Sie~TE BRE ara wie V. The Two Major Types of Cost and Final Conclusions This section of the report gives a detailed cost figure on both one time and continuing basis and gives a brief conclusion. 2% «0% ees 63 OSS. E4 POR ee Ves 66 SRG POET CSS CESSES II. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND The Model Cities Program employed Arthur Anderson & Company to design a Management Information and Control System which could keep track of the accounting functions of the various projects involved in this program. This information system would also be used to produce other management information reports showing how well the goals of each project are being achieved. The consultants have divided their proposed system into three major groupings. They are as follows: 1. Responsibility Reporting 2. Project cost reporting 3. Benefit reporting and cost - benefit analysis In November, 1968, Arthur Andersen & Company presented to Model Cities a general proposal titled "Atlanta Model Cities Program Management Information and Control System" in which is set forth the proposed automated system. IIL. CITY'S PARTICIPATION IN THE PROPOSED PROGRAM We have met with the consultants from Arthur Andersen & Company briefly on three occasions to find out. what role the City will be expected to play in this application. It seems that this will be a package. application with the consultants furnishing all systems, programming, and design concepts. They will be responsible for all clerical procedures, correction routines, and testing of the system until it is operational. At this point they will turn the programming and all documentation over to the City. The consultants will require space for their personnel for a period of two months. The City is asked to furnish one Programmer for approximately two days. The purpose of the City furnishing a Programmer ig to familiarize our staff with the programs which we must maintain after they become operational. We have reached tentative agreements in the following areas: 1) The City will furnish one Programmer the required indoctrination period. 2) The necessary space will be allotted on the 13th Floor by utilizing the Conference Room. 3. The City will furnish the normal computer time necessary for completing the system during the regular two-shift operation. If the consultants desire more time, they will use the machine on the 3rd shift. 4) All City personnel who will be involved in the operation will be given a brief introduction to the procedures they will be expected to follow. IV. ANALYSIS OF THE PROGRAM AND THE FORMULA USED TO ARRIVE AT COST In the last meeting we held with the consulting firm we were given some of the detail proposals which they had completed. This included report formats, card layouts, master record layouts, transaction file descriptions, transaction code arrangement, and a system flow chart. No concrete volumes could be given at this point but a not-greater- than figure was arrvied at based on the information which is available. The preliminary findings indicate that the City will be committed in the following areas: 1) Data Control and Scheduling 2) Key Punching 3) Computer Processing and Reporting 4) Program Maintenance The major types of cost were forecast based on the following assumptions. It must be noted that if any of the rules are changed or adjusted that it will make a difference in cost. This difference could be considerable in many cases. 1) The Master File will contain 2,000 records and each record will have 200 characters. 2) The Master File will have 1,500 transactions to be processed against it each month. Model Cities - System Parameters: Estimated monthly volume: a. Voucher transaction 1400 b. File Maintenance 1000 Keypunch: i 1400 x 60 (characters per card) 84000 100 x 40 (average character per card) 4000 @ 88000 characters Printout: ‘Number Average . Report of Copies # of Lines Total OL 8 20 160 02 1 20 20 03 200 15 3000 04 200 15 3000 05 12 30 360 06 12 30 360 07 1 40 40 08 2000 09 1 - 1350 5350 10 2000 ll l 40 40 eed 1 50 50 13 1 100 100 14 2 40 80 15 10 40 400 16 1 30 30 17 l 1500 1500 18 1 10 10 One Time Elements: 14,460 - @ 15,000 2000 M. F. records x 125 (Avg. char/required card) = 250,000 char. 2000 program x 3 prog. x 40 (Avg. char/req. card) = 250,000 V. THE TWO MAJOR TYPES OF COST AND FINAL CONCLUSIONS Using the above stated formula we have further divided the cost into two major breakdowns: (1) one time conversion cost, and (2) continuing operating cost. One time or conversion cost will be as follows: l. ‘Programming 2. Key Punching 3. Computer 4. Invalid Data Rerun Monthly Operating Cost 1. Control Section 2. Key Punch Section 3. Computer Section 4. Misc. & Supplies 5. Program & Systems Maint. $65.60 860.00 4,000.00 201.60 $5,127.20 15.00 74.00 75.00 25.00 4:50 $192.50 The Model Cities Program will fluctuate from a minimum of 70 to a maximum of 200 projects, therefore, no accurate or comprehensive cost figure can be established until we have gained some experience. suggested that this Information System be reviewed at least on a lt is quarterly basis and revised cost figures be submitted as they occur. The operating cost should steadily increase as the project ages.
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 45

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_045.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 45
  • Text: a.) cl) oe ee a ee ee ee MINUTES GRANT REVIEW BOARD DECEMBER 31,1968 The City of Atlanta Grant Review Board met in the office of the Director of Governmental Liaison at 9:30 a.m. on December 31, 1968, to review the Atlanta Model Cities Program application to the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for Supplemental Funds. In attendance were: Dan Sweat, Director of Governmental Liaison, Chairman, Grant Review Board Collier Gladin, Planning Director, Member, Grant Review Board F George Berry, Deputy Comptroller, Member, Grant Review Board Johnny Johnson, Director of Model Cities George Aldridge, City Planner Carl Paul, Deputy Director of Personnel Jay Fountain, Senior Accountant The Grant Review Board discussed with Mr. Johnson several major points of concern, primarily procedures for approval by responsible City departments and agencies; administrative organization; and personnel requirements, In view of the complexities of the Model Cities Program and the need for full understanding by all responsible City officials, the following concensus of the Grant Review Board membership is hereby presented: The Model Cities Program as established by the President and Congress of the United States is perhaps the most comprehensive and optimistic grant-in-aid program ever offered to America's cities, The concept and intent of the Model Cities Program is good. It provides for the legally responsible local governing authority to exercise its authority and influence in demonstrating bold new techniques of urban planning and development. It provides maximum opportunity for real involvement and participation by citizens of neighborhoods in the planning and execution of programs which effect their daily lives. i Sl el il OE erg etter) rere cesar eres) meron = agai Page Two And it promotes coordination among local, state and national agencies and departments of the limited resources which are available. The successful planning and execution of a Model Cities Program can be a valuable experience for any city in its search for orderly and timely solutions to its multitude of urban problems. Atlanta's City Demonstration Agency has attempted to meet the challenge and intent of the Model Cities legislation. Citizens of all six neighborhood areas encompassed by Atlanta's Model Cities Program were actively involved in organizing and planning for Model Cities more than a year in advance of the beginning of the City's formal planning stage. Local, state and federal public agencies and numerous private groups participated in the preparation of the required planning grant application. The Mayor and Board of Aldermen endorsed and supported the planning effort. The Model Cities planning staff worked long and hard to prepare the documents necessary for successful funding of the first year program. The final documents detail a bold and innovative plan of attack on the major problem areas in the Model Cities neighborhood. The Model Cities staff has made an admirable attempt to live up to the concept of the Model Cities program. Toa great extent they have met both the needs and wishes of the citizens of the area and the requirements of planning and administration of the City and federal governments. The Model Cities Program also places on all City departments and agencies the requirement for cooperation, coordination and approval of program components. There are indications that this requirement has not been met. Where it has not done so, each department and agency is obligated to review and pass on the specific components of the program which assigns execution responsibility to that department. Each committee of the Board of Aldermen should review and approve/disapprove each program component which falls within the responsibility and authority of the committee. The Planning and Development Committee should exercise its responsibility for overall planning of the city by reviewing the Model Cities plan and making Page Three the determination as to the compatibility of the Model Cities Program with overall city plans, The Finance Committee should determine the financial feasibility of the program and the capability of the City to meet the requirements placed upon it by the program. The full Board of Aldermen should carefully consider the priorities involved in the Model Cities execution, its impact cn the area served and the entire. city as well. The Grant Review Board believes these approvals should be given Betore Aldermanic sanction is granted. We feel that if the provisions of the Model Cities application are understood and accepted before final approval is granted a much stronger program will result, It should be understood that this is not intended as criticism of the planning grant document or the work of the Model Cities staff, but is an effort to gain full understanding and support of the strongest program in the best interest of all citizens of Atlanta. It is therefore recommended that the Mayor and Board of Aldermen require written acceptance or denial of each component of the Model Cities plan by the departments and agencies responsible for the execution of each component before final approval of the grant application is given, Respectfully, lu’ Dan Sweat Chairman DS :fy _ oh On ~ George’ Boda, Member 0S HLL a Collier Gladin, Member = KJ. x drtasael E. H. Underwood, Member
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 7
  • Text: Allen Reassured On Medel Program By ALEX COFFIN Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. and key aides were reassured late feet week about what the Nixon administration intends to do about the Model Cities program. A telegram from the office of George Romney, secretary of Housing and Urban Develop- ygment, and a call to Allen from a top White House _aide calmed *Y fears that the city might have : start from Shorhoods south and onal “of ilanta Stadium. ‘The effect,” said Dan Sweat, uly chief administrator to et “3s fat Atlania’s plan- ning and organizing has not been in vain. We have not wasted any time or eff The telegram from Romney’s office does indicate, however, that some slight changes will be coming. Perhaps the most im- portant is that the mayor’s of- fice will keep a more watchful eye on the program and will need to exercise closer super- vision, with the Model Cities Executive Board becoming sowewhat more advisery in na- ture, City officials also had clear Young GOPs Pick Atlantan Constitution State News Service CALLAWAY GARDENS, Ga., Knott Rice of Atlanta, a 22-year- old Emory graduate student, was elected chairman of the Georgia Federation of Young Republican Clubs at their an- nual convention at Callaway Gardens Saturday. He defeated H. Royce Hobbs of Macon, 374 to 323. Rice was the incumbent young Republican national committee- man and a former president of the Emory YR club. Hobbs, 34, was a candidate for mayor of Macon in 1967 and the Georgia General Assembly in 1968. The convention opened Satur- day morning with the defeat of then-chairman Terry Moshier for temporary chairman by Hor- ace Taylor of the Fulton Coun- ty delegation, 395-316. Moshier had backed Hobbs while Taylor supported Rice. Fulton County and College clubs throughout the state pro- vided Rice with his heavy sup- port. Hobbs got most of his votes from metropolitan areas outside Atlanta. The same pat- terns held for the lower offices. Dick Jones, 32, of the Fulton County club was chosen national committeeman over Fred Neal of Augusta. Betty Baker of the Fulton County club won the post of national committeewoman over Sandra Ford of the metro- politan Atlanta club. Jenny Bailey, Georgia College in Milledgeville, defeated Nancy Grider of Atlanta for vice chair- woman. Incumbant secretary Caroline Meadows of the Cobb County club was re-elected by acelama- tion. indication last week that the $7.2 million in supplemental im- plementation funds, approved last January, finally are close at hand. Probably the best news to city officials in Romney’s telegram was clarification of the role of state government. Allen and his Staff had been concerned that Nixon might seek to interpose the state between the federal government and the city in run- ning the Model Cities program. Not so, said the telegram, al- though greater involvement by the state is sought. Another important change, and this pleased city officials, is the erasing of the boundaries of the area to be covered. The city earlier itself had estab- lished the 3,000 acres and gen- erally is expected to stick to that area—however, in certain eases, the boundary need not be a barrier. The Romney telegram also called for the establishment of priorities, rather than trying to “attack every conceivable prob- lem within these neighborhoods. This obviously would be un- workable” and result in cities “dissipating their resources in a vain effort to solve all’’ prob- lems. Allen already is engaged in close scrutiny of the proposals. Model Cities Director J. C. John- son, sources say, is working hard, with some success, in making a good case for the proj- ects, most of which are inter- related. Minor adjustments will have to be made in the program, city officials are saying, but they will be minor ones — such as getting more private involve- ment. But, generally it can be re- ported that city officials aren’t glum at all about the Nixon ad- ministration’s attitude toward Model Cities. The tory thril suck the telar ing Stre pla’ gre Ric’
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 46

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_046.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 46
  • Text: CITY OF ATLANTA TRAFFIC ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT Atlanta, Georgia 30303 January 27, 1969 KARL A. BEVINS Traffic Engineer Mr. Johnny C. Johnson, Director Model Cities Program 673 Capitol Avenue, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30315 Dear Mr. Johnson: In answer to your memorandum of January 16, 1969, and confirming our conver- sation with you regarding the projects listed in the Atlanta Model Cities Program Application to HUD for the year 1969, we have the following report. Due primarily to a 2,172 per cent rate increase on street lighting services which was effective as of December 1968 and which was not anticipated in September of 1968 when our budget request was prepared, there are no funds in our 1969 appropriation accounts to cover your proposed upgrading of street lighting in the Model Cities Area. A sum of $21,000 will be required to cover the cost of the leased street lighting that is proposed in your program. We whole heartedly agree that the street light upgrading program which you propose is necessary as well as desirable and we agree that it is particularly desirable that this work be completed during the year 1969. Our assistant traffic engineer who handles street lighting will be able to do the necessary planning and engineering work required to prepare the resolutions for consideration by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen during the time period that you set forth. We would anticipate completing our portion of this work within three to five months. Each unit of the work would be passed on to the Georgia Power Company as soon as it was completed by us and approved by the Board of Aldermen. This would permit the Georgia Power Company to complete their engineering and installation work at the earliest possible date. The Georgia Power Company will complete their work on projects of this type ten to fifteen weeks after receiving authorization by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen, With the positive knowledge that the money will be available to finance this project, we could have the first groups of street lights ready for consideration by the Board of Aldermen at the February 3, 1969, meeting and have a similar group ready at each subsequent meeting, thereby completing our part of this work by May or June of 1969. The Georgia Power Company will then have the months of July, August and September and possibly October in which to complete the projects that were still in their hands when we complete our part of the work in May or June. Mr. Johnny C. Johnson January 27, 1969 If the sum of $21,000 is made available to us during the month of February, we see no reason why the street light upgrading projects should not be completed as requested during the calendar year 1969. If you desire additional information, we will be glad to try to supply it promptly. Sincerely, Karl A. Bevins KAB/fd ec: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Mr. R. Earl Landers Mr. Charlie Davis
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 42

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_042.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 42
  • Text: PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT (Street Division) Project Description Total Cost Pittsburgh Street Resurfacing Grant Park Street Resurfacing Adair Park Street Resurfacing Mechanicsville-Peoplestown/ Summerhill Street Resurfacing Complete resurfacing of Mayland Ave. - Stewart to Hobson; Mayland Cir. - Uni- versity to Mayland Ave.; Hope St. - Stewart to Hobson; Hobson St. - Fletcher to Mayland Complete resurfacing of Park Ave. - Berne St. to Glenwood Ave.; Sydney St., - Hill St. to Park Ave.; Augusta Ave. - Hill St. to Cherokee Ave.; Pavilion St. - Cherokee Ave. to Oakland Ave.; Berne St. - Boulevard to Park Ave.; Waldo St. - E. Confederate to Glenwood; Rosalia St. - Boulevard to Park Ave.; Gress Ave. — Home Ave. to Mead St.; Marion Ave. - Home Ave. to Ormwood. Complete resurfacing of Tift Ave. Pearce St. to Shelton Ave.; Bonnie Brae Ave. - Allene to Tift St.; Elbert St. - Brook- line to Allene Ave. Complete resurfacing of streets to be determined after land use plan is finalized. Greenfield-Ormond to Vanira, Martin-Ormond to Atlanta. $ 8,000 60,000 10,000 22,000 / Continued Public Works Department (Street Division) Page 2 Sidewalk Construction In Peoplestown, add sidewalks to one side $40,000, of Capitol-Milton to University; in Pitts- burgh, add sidewalks to: one side of Hobson Arthur to Rockwell-N. side of University- Mayland to McDaniel; in Grant Park, add sidewalks to Grant St. - Grant Cir. to Atlanta Ave.; additional sidewalk construction as needed according to final land use plan. a vf Extend Fulton St. West from Completion of extension of Fulton St. west from 450, 000* ) Windsor to Glenn Windsor to Glenn pe 1. The above amounts have been appropriated in our 1969 Budget. 2. The necessary staff and equipment within the department to complete this work during the 1969 fiscal year are available. *Note: Of this amount, $300,000 is coming from the state and $150,000 is coming from the City.
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 20
  • Text: Office of the’ Mayor ATLANTA, GEORGIA ROUTE SLIP FROM; Dan E. Sweat, Jr. {_] For your information [| Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the necessary reply. [_] Advise me the status of the attached. we Ms Wir JSeney CuvemBuracsr. -— Ceroiy Disccrn§ f Chi Aue O fe Bequest ren WAcr L777 ae Kir Suburi ri-~ & Oy Miers = PL - GUT _7 ee Co Let = ISAS Cc A CT vs Mh Ere a. tr K Ar7 10 i A Fo. Ke Cons tides ent a FORM 25-4-S
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 39

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_039.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 39
  • Text: TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT Project Description Total Cost Street Light Improvement $71,000 1. The above amounts have been appropriated in our 1969 Budget. 2. The necessary staff and equipment are available within the department to complete this work during the 1969 fiscal year.
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 17

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_017.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 17
  • Text: Office of the Mayor! ROUTE SLIP To: KL wu. Stutet— FROM: Ivan Allen, Jr. LJ For your information (| Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the necessary reply. (_] Advise me the status of the attached. leans eet ong FORM 25-4
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 64

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_064.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 64
  • Text: CITY OF ATLANTA PLANNING DEPARTMENT OFFICIAL POSITION PAPER RELATION OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE AND PLANNING DEPARTMENT TO MODEL CITIES EXECUTIVE BOARD AND STAFF —— PROBLEM STATEMENT AND RECOMMENDATIONS-——— Respectfully submitted, Cs $00... Collier B. Gladin Planning Director February 13, 1969 The purpose of this paper is to identify certain problems which have arisen in the comprehensive planning process in Atlanta over the past year. The problem centers around a misunderstanding of the responsibilities of the Model Cities Program staff and Executive Board in relation to the responsibilities of Planning and Development Committee and its professional staff arm, the Planning Department. In November 1967, the Planning and Development Committee of the Board of Aldermen sponsored and recommended approval of a resolution establishing the Model Cities Executive Board. This resolution was subsequently adopted by the Board and approved by the Mayor on November 20, 1967. The resolution specifically stated that "the Model Neighborhood Executive Board is hereby created for the purpose of administering the planning phase of (the Model Neighborhood) program." The Planning Department invested a great deal of time and effort both in preparing the Model Neighborhood Application and subsequently in assisting “in developing the Model Neighborhood Plan. In fact, much of the material contained in all the Model Cities reports and applications originated and was refined in the Planning Department by its staff personnel. It was and still is our intention to work closely with the Model Cities staff in assuring the success aa of this program. There appears now to be a lack of understanding on the part of the Model Cities staff as to the role and responsibility of the Planning and Development Committee and the Planning Department. The committee, using the department as its staff arm, is charged with the responsibility of reviewing all plans and programs concerned with urban growth, development, and redevelopment throughout the city. The Model Cities Program, on the other hand, is a special purpose six neighborhood demonstration program primarily concerned with one tenth of the city's residents and less than five per cent of the city's area. For consistency sake, obviously the Planning and Development Committee should review the physical programs, plans and proposals developed by this agency for the Model Neighborhood area as it would review plans and programs of any other area of the city for conformance with overall city policy and goals. The Planning Department's concern is not control over the Model Cities Program. Instead, the department is simply exercising those functions for which it is responsible as staff arm to the Planning and Development Committee and as set forth in the Code of the City of Atlanta. The department, as a general planning agency, must have the opportunity to review plans. When in the department's professional judgment inadvisable proposals have been advocated that lack any justification in view of existing city policy, then the department must have the opportunity of reporting such situations with positive recommendations for improvement to the Planning and Development Committee wien and eventually the Board of Aldermen. We had assumed at the beginning that conflicts could be resolved through a close inter-staff relationship between the city planning agency and the Model Cities agency. Unfortunately and iewenily, a, of conflict communications have broken down and this has not been achieved. The source of conflict has been a disagreement over the necessary degree of conformity between Model City plans and programs and City overall goals and objectives. The Planning Department has attempted to explore and resolve this problem with the Model Cities staff. However, the Model Cities staff seems to interpret this action as a Planning Department attempt to run their program. An analysis of their lack of understanding indicates no apparent realization of the fact that the planning effort for a portion of the city should be coordinated with the city's overall planning effort. It is important to point out here that we are not attempting to stiffle the Model Cities Program or to prevent innovative approaches to problem solving. To take such a view ignores the fact that through the leadership and effort of the Planning Department, with much assistance from other agencies, Atlanta was awarded one of the first Model Cities Grants in the nation. Perhaps this whole misunderstanding is based on the Model Cities staff's perception of the Planning Department as a line department. Planning transcends traditional departmental lines, is a staff function, and established responsibilities as defined in the Code of the City of Atlanta must be met. One of HUD's underlying goals for the Model Cities Program was to bring into clear focus -4- problems in governmental organization. The department has been well aware of such problems in the Atlanta governmental system as witnessed in the PAS report, a product of the CIP and planning. Though that report found fault with the governmental system, it indicated that the present system has worked very well, primarily on the basis of mutual trust and cooperation. In order to avoid further conflicts it is imperative that such a cooperative atmosphere be established. It is inadvisable that the aldermanic committee system be used at times and ignored at others, depending on which happens to serve one's purpose best at a particular time. It is difficult enough to make the system work now. The proposed approach being offered by the Model Cities Program (which is to ignore the aldermanic committee system) would invite chaos, unless a suitable and acceptable overall reform is accomplished. The Planning and Development Committee expressed its concern over this problem in its meeting of January 17, 1969. Chairman Cook asked the Model Cities director several questions concerning the role of the Planning and Development Committee, other aldermanic committees, and city departments in the Model Cities Program. Mr. Johnson took the position that the Model Cities Executive Board would report to the full Board of Aldermen through the two aldermanic members of the Executive Board. This procedure, in effect, bypasses the Planning and Development Committee and to a large extent ignores the aldermanic standing committee concept under which the Atlanta City Government presently operates. In effect, the Model Cities area is thus treated as a separate entity, apart from the total city. It offers no opportunity for the Planning and Development Committee to review Model Cities plans and to make recommendations to the Board of Aldermen concerning plan conformity with city general plans. Chairman Cook further indicated that the Planning Department had certain reservations about physical plans for the Model Cities area and asked what role would be played by the Planning Department in further testing plans for the area. Mr. Johnson stated that he felt the physical plans for 1969 required no change. Here lies the crux of the problem. Mr. Cook stated that the Planning Department was responsible for all planning activities throughout the city, therefore, the Planning and Development Committee has the responsibility to review and evaluate physical plans developed for the Model Cities area. This paper deals with a confrontation in responsibilities between the Model Cities staff and Executive Board, the Planning Department and Planning and Development Committee of the Board of Aldermen. We strongly suspect that the fundamental problems and issues involved here could spread. Thus, other confrontations could develop between other departments and their aldermanic committees and the Model Cities staff and Executive Board. In this light, we offer the following recommendations; The adoption of a formal review procedure by the Board of Aldermen that is consistent with the existing aldermanic committee system is warranted. In other words, every resolution, ordinance, etc., when introduced into the Board % of Aldermen meeting, must be referred to a standing committee of the Board of Aldermen unless such a rule of procedure is waived by majority vote of the full Board of Aldermen. A time limit on the period of review by the standing committee of the Board of Aldermen could be specified. As with all issues concerning the city, the matter will eventually be resolved on its | merits by the full Board of Aldermen. The value of such formal review procedure by the Board of Aldermen should be fairly apparent. It keeps the appropriate aldermanic committees and department staffs informed of proposals and offers an opportunity for reviewing, making recommendations and achieving coordination. As mentioned earlier, to ignore the aldermanic committee system is to invite chaos, unless a suitable and acceptable overall reform is accomplished. A second alternative approach to the current situation would be to immediately move toward establishing a Department of Administration in the Mayor's Office as recommended by the PAS Report. Such a department would include the following functions; Planning, Budgeting and Management, Personnel, Public frifernedten, and Data Processing. The Model Cities Program, with its innovative approaches and demonstrations, would serve as a testing vehicle for administrative and technical purposes and would be responsible to the Mayor and Board of Aldermen through the Department of Administration. EXHIBITS Chapter 32 N URBAN RENEWAL* Sec. 82-1. Duties of planning department. Sec. 82-2. Duties of planning engineer. Sec. 32-3. Determination of phasing and of allocations to be devoted to project areas. Sec. 82-4. Determination of locations of projects. Sec. 82-5. Rezoning recommendations. Sec. 32-6. Processing applications embracing subdivisions, requests for building permits. Sec. 32-7. Commitments by builders. Sec. 32-8. Minimum structural requirements. ; Sec. 32-9. Varying specifications in description of materials. Sec. 32-10. Designation of changes in “description of materials”. Sec. 32-11. Restriction on issuance of building permits. Sec, 32-12. Technical committee. Sec. 32-13. Eeserved. Ne .sec. 32-1. Duties of planning department. Urban renewal activities of the city shall be conducted in the department of planning under the general supervision of the mayor and board of aldermen through the planning and development committee. The department of planning shall study the urban renewal requirements of the city, to determine ways and means for their accomplishment, and to promote and facilitate timely coordination and orderly development of urban renewal plans, projects and other related activities throughout the city. (Cum. Supp., § 564.3; Ord. of 6-1-64, § 2; Ord. of 12-21-64) Editor’s note—The planning and development committee has heen substituted for the urban renewal committee in §§ 32-1, 32-2 and 32-13, pursuant to Ord. of Dec. 21, 1964 abolishing the urban renewal com- mittee and transferring its functions to the planning and development committee. Sec. 32-2. Duties of planning engineer. The planning engineer shall devote particular attention to the requirements and commitments of the ‘workable pro- gram”, as defined in the National Housing Act of 1954, as amended, and shall call upon the various departments, agen- *Cross references—Minimum housing standards, § 15-21 et seq; responsibility of department of -building inspector relative to demoli- tion of buildings, § 8-12; director of urban renewal emeritus, § 21-75(y). State law reference—Powers of municipalities as to urban renewal, Ga. Code, Ch, 69-11. Supp. No. 5 i : 1617 : § 32-2 ATLANTA CODE . § 32-5 cies and agents of the city, as required, to carry out their re- sponsibilities thereunder to include annual revisions for re- certifications of the “workable program”. The planning en- gineer shall insure coordination of capital improvement proj- ects with urban renewal project plans in order to obtain the besi possible advantage for the city. He shall frequently con- sult with the mayor and chairman of the planning and de- velopment commitiee of the board of aldermen and keep them informed as to urban renewal requirements and the state of development of the city’s urban renewal plans, and shall make recommendations thereon for facilitating progress of urban -renewal in the city. (Cum. Supp., § 56A.3; Ord. of 6-1-64, § 2; Ord. of 12-21-64) Note—See editor's note following § 32-1. Sec. 32-3. Determination of phasing and all allocatiors. to be devoted to project areas. The planning department, in coordination with the housing authority of the city, will determine the phasing considered desirable for construction of F.H.A. 221 housing allocations and what portions thereof, if any, should be devoted to urban renewal project areas, and shall make recommendations ac- cordingly to local F.H.A. officials. (Cum. Supp., § 56A.4; Ord. of 6-1-64, $ 2) Sec. 32-4. Determination of locations of projects. The planning department will study proposed locations for such projects and determine those considered most suitable from the city’s standpoint for 221 housing projects and shall coordinate thereon with local F.H.A. officials. (Cum. Supp., § 564.5; Ord. of 6-1-64, § 2) Sec. 32-5. Rezoning recommendations. The Atlanta-Fulton County joint planning board will make timely recommendations to the zoning committee for rezoning such areas as it considers appropriate in order to facilitate the 221 housing program. (Cum. Supp., § 56A.6; Ord. of 12-21-64) Editor’s note—Ord. of Dec. 21, 1964 redesignated the planning and zonin, committee as the zoning committee. Supp. 1618 kat aerial LS § 2-39 ATLANTA CODE § 2-40.1 recommendations with references to civil defense; to super- vise the expenditure of appropriations made to civil defense by the city for civil defense purposes, and to handle all matters in connection therewith. (Code 1953, § 28.11; Ord. No. 1966- 46, § 2, 6-20-66) Amendment note—Ord. No. 1966-46, § 2, enacted June 20, 1966, and effective December 31, 1966, amended § 2-39 to add the provisions codi- fied herein as subsection (b) . a Cross references—Duty to grant permits to places selling sandwiches, soft drinks, §$ 17-159, 17-160; duty to formulate rules and regulations for police department, § 25-1(a); duty to pass on permits and licenses, § 25-1(b). i Sec. 2-40. Special duty of finance committee relative to annual tax ordinance. In addition to the powers, duties and authority set forth in sections 2-29 and 2-31, the finance committee shall prepare and report to the mayor and board of aldermen the annual tax ordinance. (Code 1953, § 28.12) Cross references—Duty of building and electric lights commi:tee to supervise department of building inspector, § 8-3; power of tex com- mittee to cancel business license penalties and fi. fa. costs, § 17-24; petitions for license to peddle articles not enumerated in annual tax ordinance to be referred to finance committee, § 17-323. _ Sec. 2-40.1. Planning and development committee. (a) Creation. A committee of the board of aldermen is hereby created to be entitled the planning and development committee. (b) Membershsip. The planning and development commit- tee shall be composed of six members and a chairman (total of seven) to be appointed by the mayor. The mayor shal! appoint the planning and development committee go that a representa- tion is obtained of aldermanic committees concerned with community development, redevelopment and improvements. N (c) Functions, responsibilities. This planning and develop- ment committee shall have the primary responsibility to re- view and coordinate the long range plans and programs of all city efforts in the fields of community development, redevelop- ment, facilities and improvements, and to make suggestions to other appropriate aldermanic committees or recommend actions and policies for adoption by the board of aldermen to Supp. No. 4 ; " =— 52 CS: 2 § 2-40.1 ADMINISTRATION § 2-41 insure maximum coordination and the highest quality of urban community development. This responsibility shall in- clude the review and evaluation of the elements of the com- prehensive (general) plan development by the planning de- partment with guidance from the Atlanta-Fulton County Joint Planning Board; this comprehensive plan to be composed of at least a land-use plan, a major thoroughfare plan and a community facilities plan with public improvements program. The committee shall further be responsible for developing policy recommendations on all other matters concerning the '- planning and coordination of future city developments in- cluding, specifically, the community improvements program (CIP), the 1962 Federal Highway Act, the workable program for community improvement, urban renewal preliminary and project plans, and other related urban renewal matters. (Ord. of 12-21-64) ‘ Editor’s note—Ord. of Dec. 21, 1964, from which § 2-40.1 is derived, did not expressly amend this Code, hence the manner of codification was at the discretion of the editors. That part of said ordinance abolish- ing the urban renewal committee and providing for transfer of its functions and activities to the planning and development committee, has not been codified as part of this section. Sec. 2-40.2. Urban renewal policy committee; membership. There is hereby established a standing committee of the board of aldermen to be known-as the urban renewal policy committee, to consist of five (5) members of the board of aldermen, to be appointed by the mayor, including the chair- man, the vice-chairman and one other regular member of the planning and development committee, and two members to be appointed by the chairman of the Housing Authority of the city. (Ord. of 1-18-65) Editor’s note—Ord. of Jan. 18, 1965 did not expressly amend this Code, hence the manner of codification was at the discretion of the editors. The preamble to said ordinance recited the fact that said com- mittee, pursuant to resolution, is ccordinating urban renewal activities pe between the city and its urban renewal agent, the housing authority. . Sec. 2-41. Duties of zoning committee. The duties of the zoning committee shall be to hold any public hearing required to be held by the provisions of the . Zoning and Planning Act of the General Assembly of Georgia approved January 31, 1946, and contained in Georgia Laws Supp. No. 6 = 53 eg
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 57

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_057.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 57
  • Text: MODEL NEIGHBORHOOD EXECUTIVE BOARD Wednesday, May 14, 1969 10:30 a.m. The monthly meeting of the Model Neighborhood Executive Board was held on Wednesday, May 14, 1969 at 10:30 a.m. in Committee Room #2, City Hall. The following members were present: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., Chairman Mrs. Mattie Ansley Mr. Clarence Coleman Alderman E. Gregory Griggs Mr. John Hood Alderman G. Everett Millican Mr. J. D. Newberry Deacon Lewis Peters Dr. C. Miles Smith Mr. Bill C. Wainwright Mrs. Martha Weems Mr. J. C. Whitley Absent: Mc. Sam Caldwell Mc. Walter Mitchell Other City Department Heads; representatives from Arthur Andersen and Company, Eric Hill Associates and the Atlanta Housing Authority; representatives from neighborhood organization; the general public and the press were also present. Vice Chairman Everett Millican called the meeting to order. He then entertained a motion for the adoption of the April 15 Minutes. It was so moved and unanimously approved without correction. The Chair- man, Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., then proceeded with the meeting. REPORT OF THE MASS CONVENTION STEERING COMMITTEE Deacon Peters stated that he had no report of the Mass Convention Steering Committee because of the postponement of the regular meeting of the convention. Page Two NEW BUSINESS The Mayor read the letter received from Floyd H. Hyde, Assistant Secretary for Model Cities, which stated that "the city of Atlanta comprehensive city demonstration program has been approved and that a grant agreement in the amount of $7,175,000 has been autho- rized for carrying out the first year action program." The Mayor congratulated Mr. Johnson and the Model Cities Staff for making Atlanta one of the first three cities in the nation to receive funds for implementation of its Model Cities Program. He then moved that the Aldermatic Board be asked for a resolution accepting the grant agreement. The motion was seconded and unanimously approved. REPORT FROM MAYOR ON REVIEW COMMITTEE PROCEDURE FOR EXECUTION OF DELEGATE AGENCY CONTRACTS The Mayor rdéported that the Review Committee that was authorized at the last meeting has met three times to review the projects contained in the program. The members of the committee are: Dr. C. Miles Smith, Mrs. Martha Weems, Alderman Everett Millican, Mr. Walter Mitchell and the Mayor. The committee has reviewed over fifty percent of the projects and will continue to have review ses- sions in the coming weeks. Mr. Johnson had previously suggested that since the staff must review each project for final action before implementation that the staff be allowed to make recommen- dations to the Review Committee for action. Mr. Wainwright moved that this procedure be approved. The motion was seconded and unanimously approved without discussion. REPORT FROM FINANCE COMMITTEE ON DESIGNATION OF BANK FOR GRANT FUNDS Mayor Allen reported for the Finance Committee on the designation of the bank to receive the letter of credit for the $7,175,000. It was the recommendation of the Committee that the Citizen's Trust Company be the designated bank. Alderman Griggs moved that the Board accept the recommendation of the Committee. The motion was seconded and unanimously approved. PRESENTATION OF RESOLUTION ACCEPTING GRANT AGREEMENT Mr. Johnson explained that it would be necessary to draw up a new resolution authorizing the Mayor to enter into contract with the Federal Government because of some changes by the Nixon Administra- tion in the handling of the funds. The money allocated under the Page Three grant agreement was allotted by components rather than projects and this called for some changes in the wording of the resolution. Mr, Wainwright moved that a new resolution be adopted to be in keeping with the requirements of HUD. Mr. Coleman asked if line items were transferable. Mr. Johnson answered that line items were transferable by 10% or $100,000, whichever is less. Mr. Coleman then asked who was authorized to make adjustments or transfers. It was concluded from the discussion that followed that the Staff and the Executive Board could make recommendations to the Board of Aldermen for any adjustments in a line item. The previous motion by Mr. Wainwright was then seconded and approved unanimously by the Board. DIRECTOR'S REPORT Mr. Johnson presented two groups to give reports to the Board. Mrs. Roslyn Walker, Evaluation Analyst-Model Cities Staff and Mr. Dave Houser of Arthur Andersen & Company presented a report on the Evaluation and Management Information Systems. Mrs. Walker outlined the staff activities to date with its latest work being the preparation of an evaluation framework for the Model Cities Program projects. Mr. Houser explained the management information and control system. He presented a slide presentation of the actual print -out from the computer of the financial and evaluation reports of the projects in the program. Mr. Louis Dismukes and Mr. Paul Muldawer presented the report on the housing study, "Lowering the Cost of Housing", which was com- piled by Eric Hill Associates. The study was a research study to provide background information on the problem of housing in the Model Neighborhood Area. Mr. Dismukes listed the procedure followed in conducting the study and the conclusions drawn from the study. Some of the conclusions were: (1) there are no easy answers (2) the cost of housing can be reduced about 30 or 40 percent by (a) inducing new technologies, (b) removing local constraints (¢) programming housing production to the needs of individualized families and (ad) using maximum housing assistance programs. Mr. Muldawer dis-~ cussed various housing patterns that could be applicable to certain neighborhoods in the Model Neighborhood Area. A discussion followed after the presentation which resulted in Mr. Hood suggesting that the Physical Planning Committee of the Board work with the consultants and review the proposals in the study and bring a report back to the Board. Mr. Coleman then moved that the report be accepted as information and be referred to the Physical Planning Committee for consideration. The motion was seconded and unanimously approved. Page Four Mr. Coleman also moved that the City Attorney be asked to give a ruling on who has the authority to make adjustments in line item contained in the budget, OLD BUSINESS Mr. Griggs said that he had been contacted by Mr. Clarence Ezzard concerning Southside Day Care Center, which is located in the Model Neighborhood Area. He stated that the Board should give some state- ment as to whether Mr. Ezzard's center will be included in the pro- gram. Mr. Johnson stated that it was the recommendation of the Model Cities Staff to proceed with the Day Care Program as it is outlined in the comprehensive plan, which excludes Mr. Ezzard's program. Southside Day Care Center is funded aiready by EOA and it is expected that they will maintain their effort. Mr. Coleman moved that the Executive Board meet with the Board of Trustee of Southside and make some decision at the next meeting. The motion was seconded and unanimously approved. Mr. Millican suggested that in the future consultant reports be given at meetings separate from general business meetings so as to conserve time. Mr. Johnson introduced the latest addition to the Modei Cities Staff who is Mr. Frmk Keller, Physical Planner. The meeting was adjourned at 12:20 p.m. APPROVED: JohnnyC. Johnson, Director Model Cities Program Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., Chairman Model Neighborhood Executive Board
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 65

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_065.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 65
  • Text: SE — EE ————= 2 ae ei: ee ——-= 7 * "are - 2 a z feo OF\TCE OF CITY-CLERK--- =e orth CITY HALL me ae A\LANTA, GEORGIA A RESOLUTION BY PLANNING AND DEVE , OPMENT COMMITTEE WHEREAS, pursuc: t to a resolution adopted by the Board of Aldermen on-March.4, 1967, the City of \-lanta has submitted an.application to.the Federal ? Department of Housing and Urbar evelopment for a Mode! Cities planning grant under Title | of the Demonstration | ities and Metropolitan Development Act of 1966 and, WHEREAS, the announce » at of those cities which have been chosen to receive such grants was made Nove ¢ '6, 1767 and WHEREAS, Atlanta is omc those te beh ond, WHEREAS, if is, importor’ a af the as paahhx phase of this program be started unraediatehy zines this neg 1‘ mited to 4 o04 year period and, | + that the authority * tos program be vested a Bicistigs the St eee the Atlante schoo! Roar, * = Chairman of the Fulton County Carin ssion: one member to be appcinted 6 + — -ernor; and three members to represen? the pr ivate sector E the community; ene trom: "he general public, one from ainong the City's Negro leadership and ore from the Model Neighborhood Area reside 1's. ha NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED &-. % & Mayor and Board of | a | Aldermen her the Medel Neinhibotheod: Executive Bool s 5 nereby created for the -=g5- == See emis esse eeethpneiidigtree me . purpose of administering 4 the planning phase ; of such EA ig ar which is conducted ae under Title | of the’Demonstration Cities‘and Metropal itan Development Act of 1966, commonly known as the Model Cities Program, and for which federal financial ; assistance is received. to tee THAT the Model Neighborhood Executive Board shall be composed of 4 the Mayor of the City of Atlanta, who shall serve as Chairman; two members of the Board of Aldermen, to be selected by the membership of that body, one of which shall be from among those mem\ers representing the first and fourth wards; the President of the Atlanta School (ioard; the Chairman of the Fulton County Commission; | one member to be appointed by tiie Governor; and three members to represent the private sector of the community, cve to be appointed by the Mayor from the _general public, one to be appointec by the Mayor from among the City's Negro leadership, and one to be selected by and from the membership of a committee to be formed representing the citizens of the Model Neighborhood Area (Model Neighborhood Area Council). THAT the Model Neighborhood Executive Board shall have the authority and responsibility for administering the planning phase of the City's Model Neighborhood Program, including the approval of plans and work programs oped by the project staff and the reconcilin f conflicting plans, goals, programs, (pol and time schedules of t th ponsipility f ding to the Board of Ald the gllocation of e responsibility a ecommene 59 © the Board o ermen ecation o funds received for this program from the Federal Government. pene prog deral Goi agencies; and shall have THAT the Mayor is requested to make such sppointments as he is authorized to make under the above provisions and is further requested to contact the Fulton County Commission, the Atlanta Board of Education and the Governor of Georgia, and to request that they make appointments to the Model Neighborhood Executive Board in conformance with the above provisions. ‘ ple (eee eet ee ee ee tae ie a ——— APPROVED NOVEMBER 20, 1967 ADOPTED BY BOARD OF ALDERMEN NOVEM BER | 40, 1967 stead toni t
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 70

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_070.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 70
  • Text: Chapter 32 URBAN RENEWAL* Sec. 82-1. Duties of planning department. Sec. 32-2. Duties of planning engineer. Sec. 32-3. Determination of phasing and of allocations to be devoted to project areas. Sec. 32-4. Determination of locations of projects. Sec. 32-5. Rezoning recommendations. Sec. 82-6. Processing applications embracing subdivisions, requests for building permits. Sec. 32-7. Commitments by builders. Sec. 32-8. Minimum structural requirements. See. 32-9. Varying specifications in description of materials, Sec. 32-10. Designation of changes in “description of materials”. Sec. 32-11. Restriction on issuance of building permits. Sec. 32-12. Technical committee. Sec. 32-13. Reserved. .Sec. 32-1. Duties of planning department. Urban renewal zctivities of the city shall be conducted in the department of planning under the general supervision of the mayor and board of aldermen through the planning and development committee. The department of planning shall study the urban renewal requirements of the city, to determine ways and means for their accomplishment, and to promote and facilitate timely coordination and orderly development of urban renewal plans, projects and other related activities throughout the city. (Cum. Supp., § 564.3; Ord. of 6-1-64, § 2; Ord. of 12-21-64) Editor’s note—-The planning and development committee has been substituted for the urban renewal committee in §§ 32-1, 32-2 and 32-13, pursuant to Ord. of Dec. 21, 1964 abolishing the urban renewal com- mittee and transferring its functions to the planning and development committee. Sec. 32-2. Duties of planning engineer. The planning engineer shall devote particular attention to the requirements and commitments of the “workable pro- gram”, as defined in the National Housing Act of 1954, as amended, and shall call upon the various departments, agen- *Cross references—Minimum housing standards, § 15-21 et seq.; responsibility of department of -building inspector relative to demoli- tion of buildings, § 8-12; director of urban renewal emeritus, § 21-75(y). State law reference—Powers of municipalities as to urban renewal, Ga. Code, Ch. 69-11. Supp. No. 5 * . 1617 ; § 32-2 ATLANTA CODE . § 32-5 cies and agents of the city, as required, to carry out their re- sponsibilities thereunder to include annual revisions for re- certifications of the “workable program”. The planning en- gineer shall insure coordination of capital improvement proj- ects with urban renewal project plans in order to obtain the best possible advantage for the city. He shall frequently con- sult with the mayor and chairman of the planning and de- velopment committee of the board of aldermen and keep them informed as to urban renewal requirements and the state of development of the city’s urban renewal plans, and shall make recommendations thereon for facilitating progress of urban ‘renewal in the city. (Cum. Supp., § 56A.3; Ord. of 6-1-64, § 2; Ord. of 12-21-64) Note—See editor’s note following § 32-1. Sec. 32-3. Determination of phasing and all aliocations to be devoted to project areas, The planning department, in coordination with the housing authovity of the city, will determine the phasing considered desirable for construction of F.H.A. 221 housing allocations and what portions thereof, if any, should be devoted to urban renewal project areas, and shall make recommendations ac- cordingly to local F.H.A. officials. (Cum. Supp., § 56A.4; Ord. of 6-1-64, $ 2) Sec. 32-4. Determination of locations of projects. The planning department will study proposed locations for such projects and determine those considered most suitable from the city’s standpoint for 221 housing projects and shall coordinate thereon with local F.H.A. officials. (Cum. Supp., § 564.5; Ord. of 6-1-64, § 2) Sec. 32-5. Rezoning recommendations. The Atlanta-Fulton County joint planning board will make timely recommendations to the zoning committee for rezoning such areas as it considers appropriate in order to facilitate the 221 housing program. (Cum. Supp., § 56A.6; Ord. of 12-21-64) Editor’s note—Ord. of Dec. 21, 1964 redesignated the planning and zoning committee as the zoning committee. . Supp. No. 5 1618 Vea” . --- ee
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 47

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_047.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 47
  • Text: i ok ‘ies Bie = ‘tot, — ae) CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel, 522-4463 Area Code 404 DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING COLLIER B. GLADIN, Director January 20, 1969 Mr. Johnny Johnson, Director Model Cities Program 673:Capitol Avenue, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia Dear Johnny: As you remember the Planning Staff reviewed the proposed Model Cities Land Use Plan late last November and forwarded their comments to me. | discussed them with you and give you a copy of them. | realize it was next to impossible to make any changes at that time while the weight of preparing your final report and application was on you. Now that the application has been approved and the program funded, this would be a good time to continue the planning process through a closer look in order that these questions may be resolved. The original comments have been reviewed again and divided into three categories. The first are observations which we think would be helpful to you but involve no errors of fact nor conflict with plans or policies of the city. The second category involves errors of fact, that is where no difference of opinion exists, somebody just put the wrong color on the map. The third group contains the most serious of these comments, these refer to apparent conflicts between Model City plans as we know them and officially adopted plans and policies of the city. | want to take every opportunity this year to improve our working relationship and insure that all the plans and policies that result will facilitate the implementation of the Model Neighborhood and are consistent with the overall goals and plans of the city. | am sure you feel the same way. Sincerely, ¢ Collier B. Gladin Planning Director CBG/jp :
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 74

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_074.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 74
  • Text: URBAN RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC. FULTON NATIONAL BANK BUILDING e SUITE 710 e ATLANTA, GA. 30303 ¢ 404-523-2877 BETHLEHEM, PENNA. ° DENVER, COLO. ° SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. July 29, 1969 Mr. Dan E. Sweat Director of Government Liaison 206 City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Sweat: It was a pleasure meeting with you to review our work for the Atlanta Housing Authority as it relates to the Model Cities plans and the Stadium Authority's future space needs. Our sincere thanks for providing time from a busy schedule. Your comments were very enlightening and we have since discussed the stadium activities with the Chairman, Mr. Montgomery and Mr. Scarborough, the Manager. Hopefully, we were able to give you a brief insight into the work we are doing and our concern for the stadium's need for additional parking space. A plan must be developed that will recognize the long range needs of both the stadium and the Model Cities Neighborhood. This will not be an easy task, but after reviewing the existing conditions we are confident that a workable plan can be achieved which would be an asset to all peo ple using the area. Again, thank you for your aid and please do not hesitate to call if we can be of assistance. Sincerely yours, Matin <. Gilera Martin C. Gilchrist Executive Vice President cc: Mr. Arthur L. Montgomery Mr. Lester H. Persells Mr. Johnny C. Johnson MCG/nh PLANNING THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT FOR BUSINESS e INDUSTRY ® GOVERNMENT
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 55

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_055.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 55
  • Text: MODEL NEIGHBORHOOD EXECUTIVE BOARD Committee Assignments FINANCE COMMITTESR Alderman Everett Millican Mr, Clarence Coleman Mr. Walter Mitchell PERSONNEL COMMITTER Alderman EB. Gregory Griggs Dr. C. Miles Smith Mr. Clarence Coleman CITIZENS PARTICIPATION COMMITTEE Alderman EH. Gregory Griggs Deacon Lewis Peters Mr. J. D. Newberry Dr. C. Miles Smith SOCIAL PLANNING COMMITTEE Mr. Joe Whitley Mes. Martha Weems Mr. Sam Caldwell PHYSICAL PLANNING COMMITTEE Mr. Bill Wainwright Mrs. Mattie Ansley Representative John Hood REVIEW COMMITTEE Alderman G. Everett Millican Dr. C. Miles Smith Mrs. Martha Weems Mr. Walter Mitchell
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 2, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 2, Document 23
  • Text: The Director Speaks .c<< sels oscw eis "The Model Cities Program, authorized by the Demonstration Cities and Metropolitan Development Act of 1966, provides technical and financial assis- tance to help communities plan and carry out com- prehensive programs to upgrade social, economic, and physical conditions in blighted neighborhoods. A total of 150 communities have received planning funds since the first grants were made in November 1967. Atlanta was one of the first 63 cities to receive its planning grants and is among the first communities in the Model Cities Program to submit its comprehensive program to receive funds to carry eut its first year projects. The Atlanta Model Cities document includes a definitive use of HUD Supplemental Funds, describing allocaticns for programs and projects, representing a total of $7,175,000 in Model Cities supplemental funds. In addition to these funds, the Atlanta Program has been given fund assurances for other programs by the Department of Housing and Urban Develop- ment, the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, the Department of Labor and the Office of Economic Opportunity for activities in the Model Neighborhood. These funds will represent an additional $16 million for our first year programs. — The Model Cities Program is a new concept and we have all learned as we have gone and are going along. We recognize the fact that if our urban problems are to advance toward solution, it is important, if not imperative, that we alter our attitudes and previously caged philosophies. The program is designed to contribute to a well-balanced city containing a mixture of the facili- ties and services needed to serve the diverse groups living and working in the city and includes projects and activities further designed to make services and facilities, jobs and housing outside the Model Neighborhood more accessible to neighborhood residents. We have made conscientous and serious efforts to reap productive involvement from the neighborhood re- sidents. Our document includes and reflects the con- structive participation of the residents in planning and the implementation of this program. We have compiled a summation of the program which we submitted to HUD and includes the allocations for program areas listing their major projects." ----- Johnny Johnson atlanta model cities 673 capitol ave.s.w. atlanta ga.30315 524-8876 Atlanta's model neighborhood covers 3,000 acres, and includes 48,000 people living in six sub neighborhoods, The target area ranks far below the rest of the city in income, employment, education and heelth. a The unemployment rate for the model neighborhood is 15 percent compared to 2.8 percent for the city. Over half of model neighborhood families have poverty level incomes and only 29 percent of neighborhood residents have incomes above $5,000 a year. Almost twice as many model neighborhood students drop out of high school before graduation as compared to the city as a whole, and 78 percent of neighborhood parents did not complete high school. There are no physicians or dentists living or practicing in the model neighborhood. About 70 percent of the model neighborhood population is Negro. Atlanta's five year program was devéloped with the help:of 11 central committees made up of residents from counterpart program subcommittees in each of six sub-neighborhoods. The City Demonstration Agency: (CDA) including staff members on loan from other public and private agencies provided the committees with technical assistance and staff work for the planning. Plans went from the central committee to the 16-member Sseering Committee of the Model Neighborhood Mass Convention, which was oren to all neighborhood residents. The Model Neighborhood Executive Beard, composed of chairmen of elected councils in the six neighborhoods, 4.x public officiels, and two citizens at large appointed by the Mayor, as responsible for policy guidance during the planning and final . e,vroval of plans before submission to the Atlanta Board of Aldermen. Five Year Strategy The Atlanta Model Cities program will focus on widening cree for model neighborhood residents while ane eae a eee a Sige to allow residents ant causes of socio-economic deprivation adva : iti Atlanta will concentrate tual opportunities. To realize this goal | a Sreavans Cie support one another and generate benefits beyond initial impact. According to standards set by residents and the CDA, priority programs are those directed at meeting basic needs cages Sa aaa residents. These are housing, Ureneporus’ sc? eee eee aC . jn social services, an Residents felt that other programs | cre ted to these primary goals 4 lture, and health, are closely rela ae cantor be fully appreciated until more severe conditions are alleviated To improve job information and Perey ‘the Georgia State Employment Service would operate a communications s wit! located in four outreach posts to relay Job information to residents as rapidly as possible. A Job Mobile eae provide ‘services to the outreach offices for recruiting residents and trans- porting them to outreach offices for perenvels: and to job sites for — interviews. Many residents are unable to take advantage of job o: they lack money for transportation, clothes of Painoe Be To overcome these problems, the program would Lees direct maintenance funds for eye-glasses and denta and an assistance fund to help the new employee meet crac tset first pay day. These activities vould support eee, N , National Alliance of Businessmen, which fj create jobs for the hard-core unemplo: } job opportunities and reducing the high, To strengthen existing small Peace and to locate in the model neighborhood, At! Devetonment meee tae aon to ee ae ioe c operat z eee eet Supplenent ing fase Saas a Cha to be established for model neighborhood cee pro give aid to model es ‘businesses and b An existing Outreach Program aie provides tec to small businesses will be cha . ‘ neighborhood. This program, by 2 Tee gives training in bookkeeping, : techniques as they apply to. the actual opera ‘Satisfactory Community Environment _ The Atlanta program seeks to eliminate several major sources of blight and decay in the model neighborhood. A Sewer Program Study will determine the best means of controlling the flooding and overflow of old sewers, and faulty sewers will be reconstructed or replaced under the Neighborhood Development Program. Programs to replace and repair water mains and to increase rubbish collection are also included.~ " Housing The housing program, identified by model neighborhood residents as a top priority, aims to increase the number of families living in adequate housing by 6,432 or 160 percent. Home ownership among model neighborhood families would be increased by 25 percent. - A key element in Atlanta's housing strategy is establishing a Modél Neighborhood Housing Center to include a nonprofit Housing Development and Rehabilitation Corporation and a Home Ownership Agency. The Center would provide extensive housing services to residents and promote self- help programs of housing rehabilitation and construction. The Center will also attempt to promote equal opportunity in housing and assist residents who want to move to other parts of the city. The Housing Corporation would “encourage rehabilitation and construction by sponsoring housing : ‘projects, providing seed money for sponsors, and doing the technical ‘preparation for housing projects that would then be bid on by commercial ‘builders. ; + Other programs for housing construction and renewal planned under the Neighborhood Development progrem would be supplemented by © Code Enforcement program. Job gee and recruitment Direct Medical Maintenance Job readiness-Resident Welfare Fund Manpower Study; Data Gathering mee Day B Pre-School eS . Group Practice oo Facility croup, Health and SS t, ar Pants Benches Group: in Crime Data compilation at Juvenile Delinquency Prevent Group Foster Home| i United Youth Outreach ; Spacianived 5 eee es eNGae en Public Facilities. aeueecs Deere and Rehabilitation Corp. bani: Center To meet a serious shortage of day care facilities of working parents, Atlanta would use a combination ae tended Day Program for school children and fot t olds will be supplemented by training ré x cis and block mothers to care for ch sc essionals to work te the. feasted By a variety such serv learn and communicate good habits in Existing resources would be expanded decal: services in the model neig expanded to serve all residents who need it, “J as presently to recipients of public welfa | would be expanded to include aay care, mee older persons. ~ by residents' inability to age te to medical fa pay for adequate care, and insuffic ent. To remedy these conditions, Atlanta plans a | grams to ors health pee to eae Education The high school dropout rate for the model neighborhood is 8.9 percent compared to 4.9 percent for the city. To combat these problems, Atlanta's comprehensive program for upgrading education includes construction of new schools, expanded vocational education programs, curriculum redevelopment, pre-school activities, and adult education. Existing programs such as Curriculum Aides and Teacher Aides would continue. New programs such as the Extended Day Program to keep schools open 11 hours a day, a Twelve Month School program for all model neighborhood high schools, and a Communications Skills Laboratory are designed to increase the impact .of the schools on the community. To deal with environmental effects on the education process, plans call for School Social Workers, a Parent Education program to help parents with home related problems, and a-program of Curriculum Development and Family Living to improve the self confidence and social acceptance of children. Atlanta also plans a special Middle School for children in grades 6-8. Crime and Delinquency Prevention Although crime and delinquency rates are expected to drop as @ result of other programs to alleviate basic causes of socio-economic 411s, the Atlanta program calls for immediate activities. The Georgia State Department of Criminal Justice would conduct a Crime Data Compilation project to further assess and offer approaches to solving the crime problem in the model neighborhood. An existing program of using model neighborhood residents as Community Service Officers attached to the Crime Prevention Bureau would be expanded. To prevent juvenile delinquency from becoming a problem of crime, the ‘program calls for a United Youth Outreach program in which young people would be employed by the Atlanta Children's Youth Council to reach "hard core" young people in the model neighborhood. A Group Foster Home for Delinquents and Pre-délinquents will also be established to serve adoleseent boys between the ages of 14 - 16. Recreation and Culture The limited recreational and cultural facilities in the neighborhood do not meet the needs of residents. Transportation difficulties prevent the majority of residents from benefiting from existing recreational facilities. : The program calls for buying land suitable for development of open space parks, Block Parks and Playlots. Park facilities will have full-time recreation staffs to provide organized recreation activities for all age groups. As an interim measure while parks are being developed, the program proposes five Mobile Recreation Centers to provide recreational opportunities for residents. The program also calls for activities to develop cultural pride and encourage self-expression among residents through classes in music, drama, dance, visual arts, and creative writing. Professional artists working with classes of 20 are expected to reach 1800 model neighborhood residents a week in this program. The program proposes three store-front libraries within easy access of bus routes and parking facilities. VUiV#v Transportation * Unless transportation faciliti : lit i residents will be unable to tose “eS are improved, model neighborhood health services. advantage of Job opportunities or ntra System to provide trans = Bu: i rtation f i within the model neighborhood and to eran areas Se a wae ee ox provide access to shopping facilities ‘ 9 Bn> PO=nLS Ob cranster to ‘other bus route ard : : es. Al E plaored is a system of specialized péssenger vans for aronemicet dey care chillren, the elderly. + i ; ict y, the handicapped, and those in need of Programs for street repai i rs pair and widening, sidewal erid streel lighting will be continued and as = cafes Resident Involvement The program calls for a series of special activities to increase the quality and quantity of both model neighborhood resident involvement and mutual involvement of neighborhood and city residents in the program. An incorporated nonprofit Model Cities Resident Organization would become the central body for recruiting residents, involving residents in future Model Cities planning and working with other groups in the neighborhood. To organize neighborhood youth and coordinate youth activities, a Model Cities Atlanta Youth Council would be established to serve residents age 14-21. The Atlanta program also proposes a special Resident Training project to give residents skills in leadership, self-help activities and social planning. A-newly created Community Relations Commission would direct a program to increase city-wide participation in Model ‘Cities through activities such as a Talent Bank to increase the use of volunteers and a series of Town Hall meetings throughout the city. MODEL CITIES PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION JOHNNY C. JOHNSON, DIRECTOR . David F. Caldwell, Assistant Director for Administration Donald V. Holland, Senior Budget Analyst Velma L. Carr (Miss), Principal Stenographer Mary Ann Ryder, (Miss), Senior Stenographer Howard Turnipseed, College Intern Edna Lockett, (Mrs.) Resident Trainee PROGRAM MANAGEMENT B. T. Howell, Program Coordinator Alan Wexler, Technical Writer i Joseph A. Stroud, Program Specialist PLANS AND EVALUATION Roslyn Walker (Mrs.), Evaluation Analyst Mitchell A. Mitchell, System Analyst Pat Akin (Mrs.), Stenographer Bayard Irwin, Research Specialist PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT James L. Weight, Jx., Director of Physical Development Louis Orosz, Physical Planning Coordinator Michael Lewallen, Graphics Specialist John Sluss, Draftsman Barbara Hawk (Miss), Stenographer Cont'd. " a ha his a 23 ami any ee ee kd — El ot James R. Shimkus, Director of Social Developm Davey L. Gibson, Social Planning Coordinator Frances Eisenstat, (Mrs.) Social EaapDens ass eran. Warden, Cx eee) Social Pla vo Warden, © and Sel aanenao nner Willie Es ; ho ee On (Mrs) Social pisiher 0: D: Purp, es Ee », State, abe as EX, ¥ en ve Winfred knights a careerist ae Deva eee - Department Representati ne, State tative Jim Culp, Economic Sevbloceene Planner I Rose M. Petting (Miss), Economic Development Program Specialist De epee ee teeey Reisese uoed nies ae Rose- e Stewar ss), Ne Organizer Lyall Scott, Neighborhood Organizer Maria McDonald (Mrs.), Stenographer Ruby M. Coleman (Mrs.), Community Relations Assistant Laverne Maddox (Mrs.), Community Relations Assistant Elizabeth Lee (Mrs.), Community Relations Assistant Mary A. Roberts (Mrs. ae Community Relations Assistant Elizabeth Parks (Mrs.), Community Relations Assistant Eleanor Rakestraw (Mrs.), Community Relations Assistant Betty Tye, (Mrs.) Community Relations Assistant
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 2, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1968-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021