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Box 18, Folder 11, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_011.pdf
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  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Complete Folder
  • Text: TO: FROM: Ivan Allen, Jr. ~ your information D Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the n e cessary reply. D Advise me the status of the attached. j' FORM 25-4 / �Recommende d Pric e Reducti ons on 221 lots in Thomasville U. R. Prcj e ct No reci.uctions on singl e l ots Group of 10 lots Reduce $100 per lot Group of 20 lots Reduce $150 per l ot Group of 30 lots Reduce $200 per l ot 50 lots Reduce $250 per lot Group of Gr oup of 100 lots Reduce ~p JOO per l ot All lot s at one time Reduce ~;350 pe:r 1qt · �ROUTE FROM: ~ D SLIP R. EARL LANDERS or your information Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the necessary reply. D Advise me the status of the attached. FORM 25-4- L ./ �William W. Gates 3407 Roswell Rd. N. E. Atlanta1 Georgia 303 05 (40lJ.) 233-6040 Urban limerlea Inc . s saehusat t .s Ave . , Washington, D. C•. 20036 1717 2h, 1967 • ,J. Attent ion: Dear arch • James P. Tt-10 E!Y · • Twomey! A ·c onference was held wit h essi-s. Cecil Alexander. atld \!aleolm Jones in the City Hall today. ·• ilexande~ stated that be diseussed your l et ter to him ~ted ar,eh 10, 1967 wi th -eyor Ivan Allen. The Ira.y'or indie a'ted that be is ·i n agre.ement 'Wit h terms providing that no fees are to be ec>ll~cted: -either by 'TJrban. AJilerica inc . or me for '1113' servic~s in eonneetion wit h projeets· submitted to tb.e Heu~:l:ng Reso~s. e · ttee for guidance or -adV:!..ce. ,OllJ" I !fa,s instructed t o advise you accordingly. The Rousing esources Co ·ttee at. preset confines i:t •s actiVi.ties t o l ov and medium cost housing ti.thin th · t lanta Citq Limits and t heref ore i n ey opinion, i.n which ssrs Al ~der· and Jones concur, proposed projects in the five county metropolitan area outside o.f the Cit y Lurl.ts 1 ould be considered in the s · 1e ·category as. Savannah, ltaeon and other Georgia cities . Very sineerely yours,. .cc :- Mayor Allen Mr • . Alexander k'. Jones . W.W. Gates �,. .., 7 �This i~ n fnsc mc~ s.:i.ge unless its defer red char· acter is indicated by the proper symbol. WE TERN UNIO W . P . MARSHALL CIIAIRMAr"' OF THE BOARD TELEGRAM SYMBOLS ]::Le,, Day Lett er • - Ni~hc Letter R. W . McFA LL (iJ;. lnternn.tional - Letter T elcs;ra PRESIDENT The filing time shown in the date line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME at point of origin. Time of receipt is LOCAL TIM.Ea t point of destination 406A EST FEB -14 6'7 AB070 ·A LLC54 NL PO ATLANTA GA 14 MA YM IVAN ALLEN OARE STATE CAPITOL ATLA DEAR &ENTLEMENs THE An.ANTA BRANCH CF THE NAACP SPONSORED A HSUSING CON='ERENCE FEBRUARY 11TH AN> WITH THE COOPERATION ED MOUSING 4. RE•EMPHASIS ON HUMAN VALUES CF RENEWAL WITH THE REHOOS ING FROORAM 5• NEIGHBMHOOO STABILIZATICN 6. F'AIR HOUSING LEGISLATION ANO OTHERS TH~E RESOLUTIONS ARE READY FOR US TO SUBMIT ANO. WE SUGGEST YOU #'FORD US _THE OPPMTUNITY TC SHARE THESE IMPORTANT ISSUES WITH YOU AT YOUR EARLIEST CONVENIENCE. WE FE&:L OUR COtf'ERENeE JNO· ITS INITIAL RESULTS WILL BENEFIT YOUR COMMITTEE IN DETERMINING VAYS ANJ MEANS BY WHICH YOU 'LL PURSUE A SOLUTION TO THIS VAST MD SERIOUS PROBLEM COM-"RONTING OOR CITY••• HOUSING •• DECENT SF1toWMt~ FOR EVERY CITIZEN D �1,' ' , 1 .• • \/If >r • , • " .. ,. IT ., 1· .. r ., r )1- . - .. ) .. "' I ";' ,., .., ,· .l., • .. ., 1'-1 • IT , t ,.. • ,A • ' - •!'--:\ •I T .. c- ,, I ., ,... •. .-1 I J. . • ? ·~ . ..,1 ( l •• . !l H ' . • •r . ' H ·1 J ... 3... · ., .." , .· -J I ,- '. ' I) "., �CC",SS OF ERVlCE This is a fast message unl ess its dcfcrrcJ char· a.ctcr is indic:lted by the pro pe r 'Symbol. u WESTE W . P . M ARS H A LL CHAlnM/\N OF THE BOARD TELEGRAM R I SYMBOLS DL = D,y Lccrcr NL= Ni~ht Letter R . W . McFALL P RES IDENT LT=lntcrnarion:il Lener Telegram The filing time shown in the d;ite line o n domestic telegrams is LOCAL TfME at point of origin . Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME,, point of dcstin,rion A LLC54 PAGE THRE E DOCTOR A M DAVIS PRESIDENT OF A1t.ANTA NAACP. SF120l(R2-65) �. c- . iT ." ' l ' -. .. \ f .. ' -' ,.,   G.l"J �Jammed City Hall Seeks More Space STREET MARKS TIME siderable space is given over to lawns and to parking space. Mr. Monroe feels a major secondary building could be erected on the Trinity Avenue side of the existing City Hall but he thinks any such structure would have to incorporate parking floors. IRON MOUNTAIN, Mich., March 30 (UPI) - Iron Mountain and Kingsford on Michigan's Upper Peninsula share a street. Going from one side of that street to the other could take ..,.., an hour Saturday, the day Iron Mountain goes on E astern By n.ALEIGH BRYANS Standard time. Kingsford won' t go on Eastern Standard until Atlanta plans to shoe-horn a little ·extra floor space into 24 hours later, at 2 a.m. Sunday. More Doctor,ates City Hall but it still faces overcrowding, which suggests to at - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - least one official that a major city hall annex will be a must been many remodelings which block ar ea, and that's not good WASHIN~TON, March 30 UP). in five years. carved space from hallways and 1 think we ought to start plan- '.111,e proportion of Lutheran semTo meet space demands al- the school department relin- such to augment the office . . mary and college professors ready confronting it, the city quished most of its space in space available. An example is nmg now for a ma1or new an- with earned doctor's ~grees has is preparing a 6,000-square-foot the hall and occupied the build- a ground floor job that expand- nex. increased from 40 per cent in 1960 to 57._1 per cent at present, addition to City Hall-the first ing next door that did house the ed the city cafeteria. such in the 37-year life of the old city health department. "If we continue to grow at CITY HALL SQUARE occu- an educational survey shows. Spanish-Gothic structure. Last year, three other city the rate we are now, we're go- pies the city block bounded by The addition is to occupy a departments moved out of the ing to h;:ive to make some major Mitchell Street on the north, " well" or " court " between 2_ hall and down the street, to a provision for additional office Washington Street on the east, story wings at the second- and building at 260 Central Ave. that space within the next five Trinity Avenue on the south and One More Customer third-floor levels on the south, is dubbed " City Hall Annex. years," Mr. Monroe says. Central Avenue on the west. A pp ly imm ediately or Trinity Avenue, side of the The departments were sanitary, " We're simply outgrowing this In the square is City Hall itPICKRICK b '!din parks and personnel. building - every building we've self and the building that hous,/ ill City_ Hall t _W ' ! ca tt· ered over a , two- es:..:.; FUNITURE The g.sum of $150,000 has ~en __In __ _ itself,. there . . _ have _~~: _er: th;e~s: c::;h~o~ol,,:_d~~e:!p:ar ~t:::m ~e~n.!!t::., . ~A~c:o~n~-~!!'!!!!!!!!!1!!"!~'!!!1!!!!!!!!111!!!~!!'1_.,,. set aside for the addition and for some alterations that will be made in the aldermanic chamber, which occupies the second floor of th,e existing west wing. Building Supt. Howard Monroe, whose department will supervise the contemplated expansions and renovations, says he expects to select an architect for the job soon. WANTED ATLANTA'S City Hall wa s completed and occupied in 1930 and long ago proved inadequate to house all of the city government's gr owing departments and services. Some years ago, for example, / I �:!J~wv/,; nr I Mot t .:11IJUtn al an d CONSTITUTION SUN·DAY, FEBRUARY S, 1967 / ( ~ an a ...14 -------------------------" '\jj.,~t "JI ':2 ra/4~/4~ ~1~tlo,J9'b{ tl/£L-I,__,-"/---, ,/2~~·;, ~~d, 1)/b; ANOTHER WATTS SO·ME SAY ,_j/a2ZZL'rm143.215.248.55 ~a///$.J ~··n=,,..,~--1. · "' - . ~~ I T';143.215.248.55ts Pledg~ RerrtSt;ij;'l By D. J. R. BRUCKNER LOI Aniietes Times New1 Service ST. LOUIS, Feb. 4-Almost 2,000 tenant families of the largest public housing development here are preparing for a rent strike March 1 against the Public Housing Authority in an effort to force major improvements in living conditions. Tenant spokesmen who set the strike deadline said the alternative to over-all upgrading of the huge development is widespread rioting. Tenants r e£erred to " another Watts" and some teen-agers told a reporter, " It's corning, man , it's coming big !" Involved in the dispute are the Pruitt homes and the Igoe apartments whlch form a single housing complex about two miles from downtown St. Louis. They are operated by the housing authority for low-income tenants. Representing the tenants is the Pruitt - Igoe Neighborhood Corp., a community group organized last summer by the Urban League and the War on Poverty to upgrade the comtnunity. Housing authority officials and members of the city's board of aldermen agree that conditions at the development have deteriorated r apidly in recent years. But the housing authority is requir ed to operate entirely from rent receipts, and the officials say they do not have the money to make ne~ded repairs . tion. Today, it is the worst slum in~! : _ ~ ~- '-mITTgoe1s-43 sfmliar-looking buildings, each with 11 floors, set in a tract of 30 square blocks. The land ar is stre oken bottl p cans_ 1 es o etirl.s. Inside _Jjle builgip~ worse tfia~uiside. Each buil f lffame ~ or which stops only at the fi rst, fourth , seventh and 10th floors. A reporter went into four buildings before he found an elevator that worked. The hallway walls are gray cement stone blocks. They never have been painted. Most of the floors also are gray. The RECENTLY, they promised are commonl filled with es ~s a-nd oro"k:en ~ ass. to begin major repa_ir s in the spring, but tenant spokesmen 1"1'11'l'IWl~tni,)"'li ' FP"ovel'run 1i r ats n u s. said work must begin immediately if the strike is to be The stench in some buildings avoided. is overwhelming; many ventiWhen it was built 13 year s lating fa ns do not work. Broken ago, Pruitt - Igoe was widely windows are common, and praised as one of the best pub- many refrigerators and drain lie housing facilities in the na- pipes do not work. A number of kitchen stoves no longer work ] attention given to work orders because tenants over-used them placed by tenants which the corto heat their cold apartments . poration says have been ignored for months. BANDS OF roving youths All these things, the corporaam the elevators, break laun- tion says, must be done on a y machines and windows and crash program. ock out hallway lights. Eugene Porter, corporation About 10,000 people live it:,i president, claims his corporaPruitt-Igoe, and all but one of tion represents 1,900 of the 2,000 the 2,000 fa milies is Negro, tenant famili es and could enMore than 60 per cent of the fo rce its rent strike easily. The families have no male head of housing authority says a rent household and an equal per- strike would , in fact, cut off centage a re on public relief. even the meager operating The tenant corporation's de- funds it now has for the project. mands include adequate heat and hot water immediately, imes' P,a rties Q~ mediate repair of broken stoves , . refrigerators, windows and ele_yators, and regular police protection to replace the two guards assigned by the housing authority to the entire project. It also wants a janitor assigned to each building, contending that the present assign, ment of one for two buildi ngs is insufficient. It wants immediate �cc: The Honorable Ri chard J. Daley, Mayor City of Chicago Chicago, Illinois cc: The Honorable Jerome P . Cavanaugh, Mayor City of Detroit Detroit, Michigan cc : The Honorable John V. Lindsay,May or City of New York New York, New York c c: The Honorable J ohn B. Collins, Mayor City of Boston Bost on, Massachusetts cc : Mr . John Gunther Exe cutive Director U. S. Confe ren c e of Mayors ~c cc : Mr. Patrick Heal ey Exe cutive Direct or Nat ional Lea gue of Cit i e s The Honorable John J . Sparkman Room 320 3 Ne w Sena t e Off i ce Buildi ng Was hington, D. C. The Honorab l e Wrig ht Pa tman Hou se Off i ce Building Wash ington, D. C. The Honorable Will i am A. Barre t t Room 230 4 Raybur n House Offi ce Building Washington, D. C. �Planning Dep ar t me nt November 21 , 1966 Potentia ls for Low-Income Housing in Atlanta INTRODUCTION The purpose of this report is to exp lore the low-income housing ma rke t in Atlanta a nd to locate sites for 5000 units so they might be constructed in the s hortest possible time. The report is organized under the following headings: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Projects undet1'Jay. Projects in planning. Proposed sites. Low-rent housing proposals. Financing. Sunnnary and recommendations. Appendix. Information on existing projects and projects in planning was obtained from the Atlanta Housing Authority. Tre Housing Code Section of the Building Department, Atlanta Youth Council and the Planning Department collaborated on site l ocation. 1. PROJECTS UNDERWAY Perry Homes A 140 unit public housing addition to Perry Homes is now in the fi aa l stage of working drawings and specifications which should be going out to bid by the end of 1966. The addition contains large 3, 4 and 5 bedroom units situated across Proctor Creek from the existing project and adjacent to the Gun Club par.k site now under development. A bridge across Proctor Creek linking the existing a nd proposed projects has recently been completed by the city. Units are expected to be available by July or August, 1968. No community facilities are being made available within the addit i on but t wo rooms will be added to . the existing Community building across Proctor Creek in the existing Perry Homes project. Schools in the area arl operating at cap~city enrollment now. The proposed elementary school in the Rockdale project is expected to relieve the situation but is not yet funded. Local shopping facilities are also badly lacking in the area. Thomasville Three hundred and fifty units of Publi c Housing , 16 of which wil l be f or t he elder ly, are now in the "schematic design stage". Plans are _scheduled f or comp l et ion in February , 1967. The project will be executed in stages with the fi rs t uni t s comp leted by May or June, 1968. Si t uated in the Thomasville U.R.A . , north of McDono ugh Road and south of t he proposed right-of-way for the Lakewood Ext ension (Expressway), this pr oje c t will become a part of the Thomasville Community . Dobbs Element a ry School whe.re Thomasville children attend is op~rating at capacity e nrollment, which me a ns t hat a new elementary school will have to be bu ilt. The site has bee n s e t a s id e but t he s chool is not f unded . Rawson-Washington McDaniel St r eet Pub l ic Hous i ng , whi ch is now in t he constr uc t ion .,; :.. .:, •.c , will consist of 650 unit s , i nc l uding 154 high- r ise units fo r t he elder ly. �I, ~ I I Page 2 Potentials · for Low-Income Housing in Atlanta 11-21-66 Completion dates are scheduled as follows: 248 units - October 1967 402 units - March 1968 650 units (including elderly) - October 1968 A community building will have day care facilities and auditorium space divisable into smaller rooms. The high-rise for the elderly has space for social activities, arts, crafts and meeting rooms. An elementary school and park will be built adjacent to the -project. An architect has been hired for the school which is expected to be finished in two years. 2. PROJECTS IN PLANNING Rockdale Recent interest in the development of 22l(d)(3) housing in the Rockdale U.R.A. has prompted the city's Planning Department and Housing Authority to produce a new development plan for the Rockdale Project which has been predicated on the principle of cluster development to make best use of the rough topography. The amendment to the project has been completed. It is expected that the land can be offered in December 1966 and close March 1, 1967. The Rockdale Project will add 1500 units to the low income housing market, but due to F.H.A.'s unwillingness to finance more than 150 units at a time it could take at least ten years to complete the project. Existing Rockdale Elementary School expansion for 500 pupils and a proposed elementary school for 1,000, neither of which have been funded, will serve pupils both inside and outside the project. An existing Health Center in the project will continue to serve the area. Pub 1 ic Rousing Housing Assistance Administration (formerly P.H.A.) has approved a reservation for 1200 Public Housing units and 300 units under the new Low-Rent Leasing Program for Atlanta's relocation needs. Units will be divided between the four Urban Renewal projects now in various planning stages - Bedford-Pine, East Atlanta, Vine City and Cooper-Glenn. Each one of the projects is being planned with a full complement of community facilities to serve the housing, educational, recreational, and social needs of the people. Each one of the proposed Urban Renewal areas except East Atlanta is to get a Community School whi·c h will provide city recreational, social and educational services as well as space for E.O.A. neighborhood programs. 22l(d)(3) A number of 22l(d)(3) projects are in the planning stage: (a) The Atlanta Housing Authority is offering thirteen acres at Hu nt e r Street and Northside Drive in the University Center U.R.A. to p rovide 260 units. (b) The Atlanta Housing Authority i s a lso ready to offer a 7. 5 a c r ,.! s .Lte between Capitol Homes a nd I-20 Ea st which would provide 122 111' i. ts . (c) A third stage of Wheat Stree t Gardens in the Butler Street provide an additional 149 units of low rent housing . u.n A. will �Page 3 (d) Potentials for Low-Income Housing in Atlanta 1.1-21-66 A number of other sites are under private negotiation for 22l(d)(3) housing. 3. PROPOSED SITES (See Map - Low Income Housing Sites) Inf 1 The tower ·scheme hos a nu mb er o f o d van to g c s and o ne serious c!isod vc111!age. It is readily app c i-c nl tho t the compc1cl p la n resu lts in a minimu m o f peri meter construction crnd th e short e st p o ssible uti!ity r uns, with a Henclon t eco no mies. Eve n mo re significa nt is th e reduction in the a mou nt of exp ensive p ub lic corridor spo ce; in the _tower sch e me the area o f public co rridor per construction room is about hol f tha t in the inte riorcorrido r sche me, ond p ublic corrido r space is rela tively ex p e nsive a s w ill be shown in Chop te r Four_ In most cases, the tower p lan provide s cross-ven tilation and tw o exposures for each apar tme nt, o very desirable arrangemen t a s far a s livability is concerned. The tower scheme a lso offers a d vo nk1 9 e s in site-pla nni ng. The s9 uare plan is e asy to d ispose, even on an irregu la r site, a nd when used in la rge pro jects, it res ul ts in a g re ate r feelin g of cp cnne·ss o n the site than occu rs wh e n long narrow building s a re used. A seri o us eco no !nic ha nd ica p to the lo we r sch eme is the high cost o f elevators. Providing only fo ur to six a partments p er floo r, a s co mpared to !en to twelve o portm e nts p e r floo r in th e interior-corridor scheme, the cost o f clevotors p e r dwell ing unit is thu s two to two r.in d one-half tim e s higher in the to·se r sche 111 e. For this high e r cost, g reat ly improved livob ility is provid e d. This sclwme is p resented here in the bc!ief tho t the econo mi c s no ted in the parngrap hs above w ill offse t th e hig he r cost of the se rvice core, thu s affording imp ro ve d liv a bility a t no in crease in cost. .. �. · ·--·· .- -- - . - --- -·-· ... ··-. ··-= . -- ..... - .~- ...• ....... ii -I .Pc r-sr, cctivc of Towe r ~uildings . �:· -... . ... -, -:. ;· - -·-;;--- -- - --- , · rc:ll"y aspect of 11 ninlerrupted asph:ilt surfa ces Ill walks and re.c reat ion areas. e. Erosion . f. Dama ge to pl an t ma ter ial. ,( �Suggestions a. Walks planned \l'here people need and \\·::int to go; e.g., direct access from buildings to public sln ·ets, tr:rnsporla li on stops, school~, shops, as \l'cll ::is conn:11ie11L patlnrnys to playgrounds and to all entrances wi thin the site. Lawns rai~ctl 18 inches or so aLo YC rnrroumling g r::iclc, sometimes higher to form a ,rinclbrcak for benches set ::igainst the r etaining wal l. b. Entr::inces planned to ::tYoid cross-tr::inic concentration. · Walks from entrances designed as a "horn of plenty" to accomrnod::ite the outrush of .children. c. Walks curYed a t intcrsectio.ns. Radii designed for snow-removal machinery in cold climates. NOTE: A heating tunnel under main. walk1rnys is said to pay for itself in. ease of repairing lines and in l01veri11 g snow removal cost.s. cl. Concrete w::ilks as well as asphalt, each defi ning certain uses. Colored concrete patterns in nrnlls and play spaces to provide play material and interest. Walks edged with cobbles or bricks set in cement. Curbs designed to avoid trimming grass by hand. e. Tllrf or gr oun d coyer on steep slopes. Drain basins ·with top masonry courses that can be raised or lowered easily if unexpected settlement or heaving occurs. Raised lawn areas. f. . fassed shrub beds have built-in protection. Thorny bushes are more effective th an "Keep OfI" signs. The budget for trees is better spent on reasonably well-g rown ones than on a larger number of small trees. Ex isti ng trees stand up best of all when site design can incorporate them. Vines on building walls add to the supply of greener y at little expense and keep children fr om marking walls. Flower beds to be used in competitions between old and young tenants or residents of different buildings stimulate r espect for a ll plant material. Garden plots for vegetables are successful in some areas. St.inchions . . . l nvin Glavan, Architect 'i!.I~--. ,, _-. :, .. '<, .. . ·1 _::_ _ .l ' ·:- . ,-·! ·---~ . .... '_ / '. '!. I •• ....rr.:::-·-· -. . 'r . ! ' ' ~: , ·,·. ·;:"··.,. . " '.• .: ~:. --~·\.; .../~· ·:,· . PARKING Open µarki ng lots demand close a ttention during site design if they arc not to clraw too much a ttention in the fini shed development. They should be near public streets to avoid expensive heavy-duty access roads. They should be away from buildings to keep noise and fumes from dwellings. Decision between scattered lots and fewer larger ones r Low P.o.rking Lc,·el . . . Th oma.s f. M c Donough, Architect Existing Tree .. ·::.-4.··,, ... . ...--:· .. �- _ .._... _,.,_ ~ - - ~ - - -~ !:?.'::-,:~~:;::.;!'2!:'".r'!;;;.~ ;;;;;;i:Z!J!)Jle'r.;IZ?FJ= - -- ..... --·-- =:-=ICiEa:o,i;,::=-=====--143.215.248.55 16:32, 29 December 2017 (EST)--=c-- - - - - -- ·- -·· - - ------ ·--·- -·.-· --· ··- depends partly on site characteristics; but small lots are usually considered preferable in that Lhcy arc less conspicuous and can be closer to the owner's ho11<11c. P a rking lots that penetrate deeply into the site interrupt nalural ,circulation and cut off buildings from each other. A sea of p arking Jots along the site's perimeter, on th e other hand, makes an island of the building group. Diffi culties Enco ntered - a. b. c. d. Parking lots overcrowding open space. Danger to playing children. Annoyance from noise and fumes. Space appropriated by nontenants. Sugg e stions a. Study of amount of open space fo r tenant needs unencumbered by cars before parking lots are laid out. . Waivers from citywide r egulations for the ratio of cars to families, if less need is demonstrable. Parking under buildings, or in troughs covered by walks and play spaces, :lo economize on land use and to separate cars from people, both for safety and a ppearancc. Carports with playgrounds on the roofs, for the same r easons. NOTE: Bnilding entrances near public streets diminish the need for visitors' parking space. b . Fencing to k-cep children from pelting through the parking lot. c. Thick shrub planting and bushy trees surrounding parking lots to hide ,cars from view and t o counteract fu mes. H ardy vines o n fences in northern climates to prolong protection. Parking lots s lightly lower tha n surrounding grade level, whether by taking advantage of natural terrain or by short ramps, to diminish noj se. d. Signs warning outsiders that Lheir cars will be towed away. T ags issued to residents. List of tenants' license plates fo r staff use, or that of a tenant committee. Numbered, assigned places plus violation stickers. Kcy-opcrat cha in or gale. Elcclrically opera ted gale. - ·- - - ---c~· These play spaces should he near entrances, but not so near as to interfere with normal traffic. They afford also gay accents througi1 br ig htly colored benches and play equipmen t. Architects should insist on proYiding the color scheme for playground equipment so that it will complement and enhance overall design. A large playground for older children and their parer.ts is planned if a city park or playground is not nearby. Sometimes it is designed according to park department standards, built by the a utho rity, and run by the park department. If not, an open area largP. enough for softball games and equipped with basketball standa rds, parallel ba rs, shuffie board markings, etc., will be needed. A running track of four laps to the mile could border the space for many such acth·ities and will itself be a popular attraction. The large playground can be a useful counter to mischief resulting fr om teenage energy. Chief Justice Clark has r emarked that, "Most boys would 1:ather steal secon d base than steal a bicycle." Paths for bicycle ridi ng and roller skating are needed away from pedestrian ways, to avoid noise and accidents. It has been observed th at a sign, "No Bicycle Riding," is appar ently illegible to a boy who has no other track than the pedestrian way in which to show off his speed and daring. Existing rock outcrops that lend themselves to play add an economical b onus. Spray pools are welcomed in warm weather. Integral or a pplied color, e.g., swimming pool blue, in the concrete dish adds cheerfulness. The pool can be used as a skating rink in winter. Childre n's Piny Arca ••• Kc.hn an d Jacobs , Architects -, -. _.. -. [d' :::J . 1....., , f.., I - ~ --. i' .:-J t . ·. " · • . ... r .,; ! . ~ ~ ... .., - - -~ ~ . I ' '. ,. ~" . I 1· l r, • t .~ I ,: l RECREATION AREAS r Small playspots for liLLlc children and for mothers sunni ng the babycarriage trade arc conlrihutions to city living always o/Tcrccl in pu blic hou sing development s. One may sa y that in this coun tr y, at lens!, · private developers now ,copy public l1ousing d c~ig n in this r espect. _ __ , �I ~--- Difficulties Encountered a. Piny spaces unused by sma ll children and theiir mothers. b. Lawn areas used for play and digging. c. Play equ ipment markee cleaned easil y and that adds gaiety to the scene. b. Benches of p ip e rail with ,voo d slats, or of concrete with heavy plastic slats.. Slats so fa stened that they can b e replaced, if broken, without injury to the frame. e. Separate p!ay spaces designed fo r " 6 to 12s," with equi pment such as exercise units, checker tables, removable shower, chalk games. NOTE: Pavem ent marlcing for Hop S cotch and Tic-Tac-Toe, however, if p rovided also in the small pla yspots, will ke ep the older child .sent out to watch his you ng brother or sister fr om becoming bored and drifting away. -H- f. The large playground as cl ose as possible to the bui ldings, considering the noise invoh·ed, and in a ny case with easy access to it from all parts of the site. High fencin g to keep b alls insid e. Benches for occasion al spectators, dou bli ng as a place to leave coats. Hose bib for "water b oy" if a drink ing foun tain is not feasible. It is also needed for cleaning, an d can be used to tran sform a curbed runnin g track into a winter skating ri nk . Night lighting for info rmal dances or for dra ma tics. Comfort station with stora ge space, open u nder supervision at definite h ours. NOTE: S wings, slides, and other fast-movin g equipment are usually considered dangeroiis in playgrounds lacking supervision. NEIG HBO RHOO D COM MONS "Neigh borh oo d Commons," a progr am invented an d ·put into practice by P rof. Karl Linn, Landscape Arch itect, completed its fir st dem onBuildin g n Nc if:hborh ood Common, . . . Kar l [,inn . Landsccpe Archirccl Park Dcparl r:1 c nl Playc roa::, d . . . Emery R oth & S01u , A rcltit ec lJ }· ....... -- 1.:. ._ f . ( r ---~ . . ...... Ii' .--, I '1 ., fi ' l'l ..u ~ .• .: .:..: _. • '~~,,' -: -, ,- ~: ~? , \. LI! l '. r . _. / ,. ....... L ~~-·/··:>· \ ~- . ' "' ~:~:: .\::.=·~ . ~.('.,1 ..... j '- . ' ' J - V, ' •• '.L , ....... . . ~ .,., .._.¥_~--··- : -...:.:_ it:· ~ ..__ t - --.' ~- ~ :, 11 �strat ion at l\Ielon P a rk, Philadelphia, in 1%2. The movement has spread to a number of other c ities. . In essence it consbts of trans forming a city-o wned, vacant, rubbi shy lot into a park-playgro und th roug h the labo r of Yo lunt cc r worke rs and you th "ro ups under Yoluntcer profc~;;ional and tcd1nical g uid :111ce. D ona ti~ns of new an d secondh and makria l from co11 tractor::-:, g ifts o f trees fr om the city's par · departmen t :1ml fn1m pri \'atc nurse ri es, etc., are incor porated to m ake "a place of mee tin g wh ere youn g am! o ld may g ather toge ther to e ngage in d1~- ::-JH)n t,1nco 11 s cckbrali o n of public life." 1 Builders and users are the sa me people : adolescen ts o fTcr their young m uscles in con struction jobs; their elde rs pro\·idc ski lled kno wledge; little children dig away with bi g shovels or cover retaining walls with mosaic patterns; and moth ers bring refreshments, an important ingred ient of volunteer work. The resulting oas es g ive local pride and sa ti sfaction because of the n eig hborhood's invclve:;ient fr0m the outse t. This involvement, like th a t of tenant-mainta i:: 8d flo werb eds m e ntioned above, could increase pleasure in and r espect for outdoor living sp ace in housing d evelopments. NOTE: The Nation al Capital Housing Autlw rity, cooperating with the 1 Ex erp t from the Neighbo rhood Commo ns Charter. Dcpnrtmcnt of llealth, Edu cation, an d W el/arc, Jws slartcd such a self-help ten ant grounds impro vem ent program in a Washin gton develop111 cnt, com plete 1l'ith indoo r m eeting room, u;orrlr.shop, and storage space. Auth oritiP.s and architects wanting lo kn o w m ore about the techniqu es and results sh ou ld conscdt Karl Li1111, N ciglcb orlcood Comm ons, 8-10 N ccu /Jr11nps hire A venne, JVaslcington, !J .C. LI GHTIN G N ig l1t illu minntion o f t!ic ll" h olc ~itc pays in r cd uc · i on o f cily o r staff patrol th roug h the g ro unds. Th ere arc tenants u nfamili a r wi th urban living in hig h building developments, there arc o ft en undesirable, so metim es j eal ous people li ving near ·the s ite, the.re may be teenage gangs or wandering crim inals who find opportun i ty for di sturbance and violence in dimly lit opr,n spaces away fro m public streets. Lights on building corners a re less ex pensive than s l anda rcls. Usually, h owever, some s ta nd a rds w ill be needed for ,rnlks,, m a lls, and parking lots. T enants can m eet each other a ft er a workin g , _ _:~·> .?~"- )r.~~=.; '·.• -~~;/c..;~~.:'-'·. . , . ,: . . . : . -'. . J. . . "1 D 7 63----860 0-<15--2 NOTE : Em erge ncy call boxes may be insta.lDed on lightin g standards f or convenience of communication 1t'ii th the office. Nigh t U ghts . .. H olabird & Roo c & Burga , Archiucu �?(' If . ~ / / ·I I ~£: M 4 .. .f / 4 1 / ' ·, ~;;. , ~ 1i:1 / ~ ~ f ~~ ,,;l 1 l;1 . l i-1: ' ,., 1 . i:_, •1 ,... A • ,i t,... ~1 j i~ j •< ,I < i:. l 1l ' ~~ ·-· .~ -~ ~ n !- INTRODUCTION A lively, welcoming entrance encourages good manners from tenants as much as it delights a visitor. The simplest design for easy, safe access, fortun a tely, provides esthetic possibilities that architects will take advantage of. E asy approach to a well-defined and well-lighted door way prevents accidents; a canopy protects from weather and fr om fa lling objects ; smooth panels framing the entrance can be cleaned easily, house numbers must be legible from the strert, and so m ust directional signs for buildings that do not face the street. NOTE : Architects should be consulted on the design of all major signs used in the development, including any found necessary after the buildings a.re occup ied, for example, a community building title or a parking lot warning, to preserve unity of color and lettering. Thus rational design provides the ingredients for an impressive and pleasant gateway: a wide, canopi ed entrance that oilers a horizon tal contrast to the vertical structure ; color and texture different from the overall facing material; and attractive accents in house labels and light fix tures. Architects often ad opt some variation in entrance treatment for a group of buildings to add sparkle to the picture. Nonetheless, an entrance is only a passageway. Benches or p arapets at the entrance platform will turn it into a bottlen eck. If steps are necessar y, a baby carriage ramp will speed traffic and save wear and tear on vehicle and the mother's feelings. Sitting areas a bit removed will draw away people who come out to take the air, or tired shoppers who want to relax for a few moments outdoors before attacking their housekeeping. Diffi culties Encounte red 11 a . Entrn11ce planting damaged. b. \Valls near entrance marked up. e. Sash i11 door and sidelights broken. d. Doors marred. .l i Su gestion s I . F.ntrancc Cnnopy . . . EtgtrJ & lliggills, A ,cliitccts , . , a. Raised plan ti ng beds along the walls, ~ta rting at the point where glazed ·tile or other eas ily clr arn:·d fini,-h st ops. Plants will prevent children fro m marking on thr walls brhind. b. Gbzccl tilr, ccr:1111ic tilr, marble, or other imprn·ious material fra111i11g the rntrnnce. c. Acrylic pl ast ic or trmpered glas;; p:rnes in door panels and sidelights, sized for easy replacement. Lower p:mcls of stainless steel or enamclrd metal. y" �NOTE: Acrylic plastic is scratchable, but scratches can be ru bbed out in sh eets of good q uality. On e airlin e, at least, uses acrylic plastic sheds zcith a fr ee-form prescratclz ed deco ration on -th em, th us anticipat in g 1l;o11 ld -b e decorators . r ' Il d. Doors ,ric1c enough to take bulky furnitur e. P atterned stainlc.;:~ -stccl or heavy-gage aluminum protec ti on plates hi gh enough to protect again st baby ca rriages, ll!arkc t carts, kicks, and sc ratches : Pu sh-and -pull ha ndles. Sealants between fram e and sash covered ll" ith metal stripping so that chi ldren cannot pull out the calking. I I rr \·.I I: I I . I •• I; THE LOBBY The lobby is ~ con co urse, a waiting place, a nd several tim es a day it will°harbo r a traffi c jam. I mpatient children, tired parents, carc~free messenger boys all belo ng here. All ,r ill leave their mark, \\"hcther made by mu·- - 1 ·- -· :: -- ..... -.. ~ 4- c~)t\~~i-;143.215.248.55 16:32, 29 December 2017 (EST)'~): , ~I I. ~ -~~ . -~. ~ .= ·'---.. .- ' . - .,_ ... ,,f \ \, ' \. l r-:....-~ ~ . ·• ,J;'. -: ..l . I ' �l INTRODU CTION The elevator i:s apparently the most fascinating bit of play equipment that an indulgent authority ca n provid e fo r its children. Self-service elevators, moreover, can be a source of trouble and danger on occasion. No doubt the eleva tor is the chief reason for authoriti es' relucta nce to proceed from ro,~house a nd walkup structures to tall apartm ent types. Some managers report that children's curiosity in the workings of an elevator wanes after several mon th s. One cannot count on this relief in a high building bulging with children. Peakloads at school lunchtime or at the en d of a school day, will fill the lobby with hungry, excitable children . Staff or tenant committee control is commonly adopted to prevent overcrowding and misuse. Design to ease the need for control is also helpful. Difficulties Encountered a. Crowded elevators with exasperating waiting time. b. Hatchway doors and bucks defaced; cab walls scratched; do or shoes damaged. c. Call buttons pull ed ofI ; flo or num erals scratched out. d. Children ridin g on top of cab. e. Urin ating on cab fl oor. £. Confrontation with dangerou s strangers. Su ggestions a. Two eleva to rs side by side (for economy in controls and for conveni ence) stopping a t all fl oors in build ings over six stories high. Elevators speed determined by calculating acceptable waiting time in th e local community. Provision of relay for rush hours so that the car's down travel can be stopped onl y by a call button fr om the publi c corridor. Sliding doors, to arnid accidents and to spL:ed service. Attend ant opera tion for emergency use. Car progress signals. On e regular and one service elevator. One elevator manned at rush hours. A third elevator for rush hours and for bulky furniture. b. Stainless-steel hatchwa y doors and bucks. ·steel fini shed with heayy plastic paint. Metal shoes for leading door edges. Patterned stainless-steel cab walls. Vinyl tile fl oors, to resist urine stain. Epoxy-cement flo oring. c. Steel or heavy aluminum call buttons. Floor numerals etched into car control panels. d. Ceiling escape hatch openable from t op only if local codes allow. Alarm bell to ring if hatch is opened. e. See discussion of publi c toilet off the lobLy and of su ggestions to interest ch ildren waiting for the thi rd or fourth appearance of the elevator, on page 12. f. Two p rotected lights in each cab ceiling. Alarm bell designed so th at a hand must be pressed on the button continu ously if it is to be silenced. Automatic alarm that rin gs whenever a car stops between fl oors. Gl ass or pla stic small windows in cab and hatchway door;;. Intercom in ele\·a tor, conn ected to man agement office . T ra nsp arent materi al for cab and ha tchway doors, where local codes permit. �. INTRODUCTION Dift1 culti e s Encount e re d The stretch of walkway fr om elevato r landing to :1 par t111ent d oor is a "side1rnlk in the sk y," whether designecl as an open ga llery or an in teri or corridor. T he open g a ller y is p referred hy some a11thorities. T hey pra ise ease of s uper \'ision. They g iYc credit to th roug h dra ft in dmJ lings and to the ach·a11 tagcs o f 11r igl1bnrly po rch li fe. They poi nt out the lack of cooking od or s. T hey like the appeara nce 0 11 the b uilding facade. T he " porc h"' sp;1ce on galleries is best enj oyed by tenant s if there is a fin or elongated column between each family's space. It p rovides a place fo r chair or crib out of nor mal circulation a nd also defines each fa m ily's a rea of r esponsibility. One adva ntage inherent in gallery access design is that tenants ca n observe sources of no ise and litter fr om their dwellings and can size up a neighbor wit hout contact, much as if the apar tment wer e on a street. Auth or ities, however, who prefer d ouble-loaded interior corridors speak of plan economy, ease of all-weather cleaning, less traffic d isturbance, and better privacy within the dwelling. T hey note that local codes in northern cities may r equire h eat in gallery Jloor slabs. S ep1ratin, Fins . . . Oskar Stonorou, Archi!t!Ct i I ~; ·l I I ' ' 11 I L I' i ,. r ,jt I ,f ! I I t ··I ·l '·' 15 , 1. . Gnllc rics a. Danger of accidents lo d 1ilor to discourage roller skating and the use of wheel toys. b. Screens and' venetian blinds on gallery windows to combine privacy with wentilation. Bedrooms amh need to scr iliblc. d. Forced vcnfiiluti on. Corr idor wiu dows. Comn1011 hakon ics openi ng fro m corrid or. c. f luorescent lights in pl astic covers. Protected in€:anclcscenl b~lb~ in pa irs. SPECIAL FACILlTIES Autho rities sometimes provide balcony play space off corridor or gallery for rainy days, fo r airing babies, and for inform:il gather ings. This arrangement g iyes welcome light aud Yentilation to interior corridors and dirnrts chil dren's play from ga llery walkways. A b it of play material will attract children ; a small bar e sp:icc, whether in the air or at. gra I y - c·f}-\, '. .' K'• ---::::·. . �Suggestions INTRODUCTION The No. 2 enemy to calm living in an elevator apartment building is the fire exit stair~..-a y : a convenient shelter for hoboes; a trystii1g spot for r omantic adol escents; a perfect setting for smokcwriting, wall cartoons, bonfires~ damage to lights and to firehose, etc. Difficulties Enco tn.nfered a. Need for con.slan t supervision. b. Defacement ,of walls and stair soffils. c. Light bulbs smashed or stolen; windows broken: d. Firehose slashed and nozzles stolen; flood ing from valves turned on by mischiefmakers. e. Standpipes in windowed stai r ways fro zen in cold weather. f. H andrails needing frequent repainting. ~ ·.,_1-. . ,~ .-zr--~---::--... \ ' \, /"(.}; ~ ' •· I ". -· . . '.'J I '\.-:- . \,-,)~ .i l a. An open stairway, visible from grou nrls, if local codes and fire regulations allow. Stainrnys planned on either side of t he elevator la ndi ngs with windows so arranged that there is a good view of both stairways from the public area on every fl oor. Locked roof door;:, if code$ permit. Glazed panels in doors. Stairs ending at entrance floor, or a locked door at that leYel if stairway must go to the basement. Door hardware that all ows exit from each floor but no r eentry except on the lowest two fl oors. · b. Walls and stair soffits finished with easily cleaned material ; for example, plastic paint. H ose bib for flushing down stair way. Caution : The bib must be placed where only the staff can get at it, possibly in a nearby slop sink cl oset. Floor drai ns, of course, will be needed. c. Fluorescent lighting in plastic covers. Incandescent bulbs protected by wire g uards. ~crylic piastic sash instead of glass panes. d. Hose cabi net in public hall, for easier supervision. Agreement with the local fire department that since it use.;,. its own hose, the requirement for a b uilding-stored hose is un necessary if not r idicul ous and should be canceled. Arrangement by which fi remen bring their own valves, if local codes permit. e. F ire standpipe placed on the inside of an enclosing stairway partition, if the stai rway has wind o,1·.s. T he valve is exposed on the stairway si de of the partiti on. Sta ndpipe ins ulated in corner of stairway. f. Vinyl handrails, to save r epainti ng. NOTE ON GLASS BLOCK WALLS Open Exit Snairwny . . . Noonan & Thomp:Son & A'rockcr & Mnrm ori & Mok , Arcliitc1cu Gl ass block exterior ,rnlls or panels will light stairways e:fiectiYely without danger of freezing the standpipe. Caution : A pa1iicularly ingen ious for m of cl :111iage, ho,1·cn·r, has occurrerl. A small hole is punched th ro ugh the surface. a 1l'ick di pped in benzine or other \'Olatikflui rl is pu~hccl int0 the ho ll ow spncf' 1l'ithin th e block, th<-' wick is lighted, nn d hang! Stnin,ar:. Fl:.111king El e nitor Londini;-. . . . llnrbr,nr1 /l o:zih 1. irin&ston ,.t· l orJo n, A rch itt·ctJ Hl �INTRODUC TION Difficul ties Encount ered l\fany large de,·clopmcn1s re nt laundry !'p:1cc to co ncess iona ires who run the faci lity with or with out full -ti me superv ision . The need for common bundries r a rics in clifTe rcn t ci ti es . A conces::: iona ire wi ll refu se to renew a contract if other methods o f lau nd eri ng m:1kc hi s bu :;in c$S unprofitable. La undries, ,,hcther large or small , ca n be s unny and gay . Any laundry 1wt close '. o t!::: c.-..:dling nee ds roo m fo r baby carriages an cl fo r you ng children',; p! a y, as ,, ell as comfo rt able benches. Entrance Aoor laund ries may oYe rl ook a play space nea rby to advan tage. L aundries wi ll foster a neighborly at titp de among tenants if they are attractive. It is st ri ctly a matter of safety to ·encourage mothers to bring their small chil dren along rat her than to leave them alone in their apartmen t; bu t bored ch ildren preclude a cheerfu l, sociab le a tmosphere. Commercial " laundryettes" usually install candy vending machines as well as th ose for soap and bleach. A la undry supervised by ren ter or tenant committee might ,,·ell consid er installing a " space rocket" or other am usement. Although mechanical dri ers are commonly found in large laundry rooms, several authori ties ask for clothesline drying spaces, one of them noting tha t "outside drying areas a re the only proper and healthy means of drying." A.• Common Laundry ·1 ,r,,.,,,.., on If,nu:, ,lries a. Laundri es without at lemlance sub ject lo d isonler. b. Money s lok 11 from cashh oxes. c. Clothes darn:igcd or slolcn fro m a ir-drying c:iges. cl. Abu se of laundry toilet. c. Doors d anwged. f. Wct fl oors. e. Co11d e11sation . Suggest ion s i. Laundri es on entrance fl oors rather than :i n b:isements to take advantage of more li ght, venti lat ion, and ii.11formal supervision. Laundry doors keyed to apa rtme nt keys. Gla ze d panels ( clea r wire glass or ac rylic _plastic ) in door and corridor partitions. b. T okens to activate machines sold at th e m,rnagement office. Window guards. NOTE: Window gua.rcls for l.au.ndries on. entrance floors are preferably not of prison like design. c. Dryin g cages of me tal, large enough so t.I'. t drying lines can be well away from the enclosure. Drying machines where clients are willing r use th em. Caution : Place ven ts from dryers where rl ischarge ,..-ill not be blown into apartment windows above. d. T oi let designed, if poss ible, as a package dleal to serve laundry, lobby, and nearby pl ay areas. See "Pub,l ie Toilet," page 12. e. Steel protection plates for laundry door. f. Floor pitched away from front of machine_ g. Glazed tile walls, terrazzo fl oors, or oth er m aterials to resist the effects of condensation. Di ffi culties, Encountere d ll . lilome Lm, ndri es -'1. , . f I ;, . .... IU ,) ~ .J )he· ,, . ,I _,,,; f I --- .. ::;;?:_ a. Condensation fr om we t li ne n h angin g up to dliry all over the apartment. b. Detergent backup from . au toma tic mach io es a ttached to waste lin es. Suggestions a. Sma ll, tenant-controlled lau ndries on eadn :floor with washtubs an d drying cages, plus a couple o f au tonna tic machi nes in a locked room on th e entrance fl oo r. A key trn that room is sold by d, il!, @ ll, (!JUJ[Jllil,(!0ll°T!fj �1 management for a small fee. Laundry tu ri in Lathroom, as in Swedish practice, with enough drying lines- it herc for a normal wash. NOTE: U1w1,t tached m achines can be used in either of the cases above. b. Prohibition ,of machines attached to plumbing lines within apartm ents. Bypass on p lumbing lines at lower floors. ROOF LAUN DR -,f f fI j Some authorities •express interest in the idea of providing roof laundries. Examples found in pri vately m anaged buildings and in some British "estates" bave been much enj oyed. At Carl Mackley Houses, Philadelphi a, for example, where washing machines were later installed on entrance floors , most of the r esidents still prefer to use th e roof. Many women insist that open-air drying is desirable and take advant age of it wher e prnssiblc; witness not only r owhouse dryi ng yards but also tenement hous e backyards gaily hung with clean clothi ng, as well as P aris balconies simil a rly adorned in spite of large "Dcfendu" signs. It is hard to under sta nd the horror some people have of this in nocent manisfcstati on of m ban life. It might be considered as colorful and appropriate as an lllmLrella on a beach. The use of ro ofs for laundering, on the other hand, is looked at unfavorably by othe r authorities. Heavy-duty roof construction and · protective harriers arc costly. Elevator traffic will in cr ease if a laundry is not provided om every rooftop. Plumbing system requirements are expensive sh ould a utomatic m ach ines be installed. Supervision of an unattended la und'r y is more diffic ult on a roof than on an entrance floor. There are some answers to these obj ections. New types of roofin g arc bringing down costs. Most cities r eq uire some roof-edge protection wheth er or not tenants arc allowed on the r oof, and maintenance men need it on high u ilclings even if it is not r equi red by code. Protection would, of course, have to he increased in height from that usuall y supplied. P ro tective ha rr iers arc not so costly as solid construction on the e ntra nce fl oor, ,d 1crc space could be phnned for la rge famili es with their own ent rances instead of for laundries. Use of a roof laundry could he confined to the Luilding tenants hy mPans of apa rtmenl.-ma~[,ercd keys. Tenant des ire for open-air dr yin g and for clea n, brighr. surro undings would facili tate tenant -orga nized control. Roo£ Lnundr)· . . . K a.Jtn er, Stonorov , Dc,iincn; W . Pope B arn ey, Archilcc, , ll ,. I .r ' ??_..; ·;_;:-tr~..?:_ ~ I .,,., ·\ ~,· .; . ~-- . " '~ ....... . 1./""~ --~J . 1 ,. - ~-- I T cnnn t- Controll c d Lnunllq• 20 �. . . . necessary r oofto p structu res such as elevator madhinc rooms, incinerator slacks, clc., obscured instead of stan co nsla11tl y brea ki ng, with the result th at light s a rc left CJ ll d ay an J ni ght. D ini ng S pac e in Ki1 c1u n Wall -mounted m edicine cabin ets. Lead b ends from b a throo m above con ta ined m fl oor slab or boxed in . Windows of adj acent apart ments in an interi or corn er of a Tor H-sha ped buildi ng well separa ted, o r, better , o ne apa rtm ent wra pped aro und th at in teri or angle so tha t wind o\1·s nearest the corner are in the same d\1·elli ng. b. Sm all foy er g ivin g sepa rate access to li ving ro om, b edro oms, and kitch en. Coa t closet ofT foy e r to keep m ud a nd out,;ide dir t from r est of dwelling. Door b uc ks well anr hored against win d action in h igh build ings. c. Bed room wall $p:i ce a rra ngL·d lo all o w for dc_k or ta ble in add iti o n to urn:i l Ji ,,d rlio m f urn iturc. S pace for s,·11 in g 111:1r h in c or oth er taLlc in pa rent s' bed room. d. D i11in g: ! -, . ·r ........ '~"' :·) _; ,i , .. ·-LI,. - J... .. .-1 ,~ ·.·, "1 ~- .,: (\ . .~" ·; _, I/ < Clo!cl Cu rt.iin I .,. ! ,- �! i f l NOTE: L inoleum is now obtainable in square tiles, thns ov ercoming one reason for the preference for asphalt and vinyl tiles. j 1 .,I -. .( · l1 II r .. - ·, \/. i N _/ lJ Di ffi cul ties En co untered a. Condensation within the dwelling. b. Wall space interrupted by scattered columns, doors, windO\vs. c. Storage spaces inadequate, particularly in the kitchen. Large Rcfrit;cralor r ..... ~--~-t ! A kitchen planned for more than one worker lightens the moth er's load and encourages fa mil y participation in housework . Opin ion varies as to the need for closet doo rs. Authorities who agree with voca l tenants and shocked critics have provided them on all closets. Others are content to put them on fo yer and p assageway closets only, and on living room closets if, by an unhappy chance, precious wall surface is used fo r a closet there. Authorities who look fo r good housekeeping standards may well consider providing doors on all closets, since tenant-provided curtains are apt to be flimsy and neglected. Even when clean and well hung, they give a s1ipshod appearance to the d welling and do not protect clothing from dust. Open shelves over convector runout pipes take the place of toy storage boxes at slight expense. They also protect the pipes from children and the children from pipes. Su gge stion s ~ ""/ a . Dwelling d rsign to provide some posit ive air leakage even at the risk of slight heat loss on the coldest days. No laundering within the apart ment. See "the Laundry," page i 19. - ,. <. ' - r 1 Tile or other impervious fi nish arou nd tub. P ositive ,·cntilation for kitchen range. b. Some uninterrupted wall spnce for la rge pieces of furniture in each r oom. Furni ture lnyouts carefully studi ed, preferably showing more tha n one possible arrangement. c. Flush door;;, cabinets, and bnsebonrds. Convector lou,·crs on Ycrtical surfnccs, not on the top. Tile behi nd rnn gt:. Ch nir r nil t0 protect wnll if dinin g table is in kitchen . llsc of pla~tie pnin t to lengthrn repainting cycle. T enant rcpai11! i11g. l\'01'f: l'nint rollers 1Citl1 pallcrncd surfaces l:a1·c been used on corridor 1rnlls. They migl,t be lcnr to people ca/:',er fo·r individuality in th eir d !l'ellings. 1 r ami ly Tnwd Htt 1.: k~ 1 Psychiatries or Paperhangers? E dit ori:il in " Housing :ind P l:inning New::." Citizens' H ousin g and Plann ing Counc il of New York. October 1%3. · 20 �d. Kitchen shelving planned for both large and small articles. Kitchen cupboards with backs, for vermin control. Utensil drawers. Range and refrigerato r sized for t11e family's needs. H igh and low ha uging poles in ch ildren's clo~ds. DaJo stri ps in ba throoms at 3 and 5 fee t fr om ri uor, fo r fa mily to,rnl racks. Space in bathroom fo r clot11es hamper. · ( ~ ", ... NOTE : Orr;anization of general tenant storage space 1s d iscussed on page 22. "\ !. REDESIGN / --· ., ' ·- \ \_. Some a uthorities show interest in a proposal to redesign the standard ap artmen t layout by planniug a small living room off the foyer and a large kitchen-dining-play ( or study) room. This arrangement justifies the prevalent housewifely habit of "keeping the kids ou t of the living room." It alluws a busy mother to keep an eye on infants 11 , ...-~ ..J .~ ~ ... . ·; ·- - ~f odcl .'\ p:irtmcn t r. Pri \'ntc 8 :?lcon ics . . . /Jarbc.son llouglt Livingston & l arrnn, A rch it eccr:s r ,) ,:.- packed apartment, and it gives the house-prou>d ( a nd latent houseproud) homemaker a chance to show friends amd the priest or rabbi, or the Fuller Brushman, a neat reception roorm. A bedroom so planned that it later can be dividecil into two small rooms will provide flexibility for a family with growiing gi rl and boy. A sliding partition would allow daytime use of the entire space. I_ MOD EL APARTMENT •_ _. .,. .__=n~,--..J while doing kitchen chores ; it is a place for TV, plastic-covered furniture, games and homework, children's and adults' gatherings. It d ivides living space into noisy and quiet a reas within a tightly A model apa rtment has been fo und usefu l to suggest inexpensive, space-saving furnitu re ra ther than old-fashioned{Jrnge piaces. Chairs, sofas and dressers based on Scandinavia n desitgns, and knockdown packaged furniture can be fo und in city shops or obtained through mail-order houses. Reconditioned pieces, suclln as arc sold by the Goodwill Ind ustries, for instance, are at bargaim prices. Bunk beds 27 -- - -- -- ----~~==--=-=-~ - ~-nc=o=·-=-..c==--=====-::.=:::-:··- -· ____ _ ! �---,=""! l I I ' j I ·· --=d A NOTE O N W INDOW SHA DES Window shad es are standa rd equ ipment for publi c hou sin g developments, so much so that th ey often serve to distingui sh p ublic fr om private apartmen t buildings. They arc chec1p, th ey do their work well. But that th ey are far fr om attractiYe is iiot disputed. So far no equally trustworth y a nd economical m ethod has been found to d a rken bedrooms, to set the stage for TV entertainments, to shu t away the outside world . · Possibly a window casing detail for cu1-tain rod s at the outside and sh ades in side would be acceptable to au thorities who enj oy the "happening" made by different famili es' differently colored curtains. 1 Possibly new side-h ung fabrics will be pri ced one d ay to compete with shades. In th at case ten an t curtains will not be needed and the color pattern can be built in . 1 1 T wo-S to ry Flat . . . 1/ o:l!':rd R. Mey er , Archittcc. ' arrangement offers each la rge family privacy and easy access to outdoors, even to an outdoor family playspot, and also relieves pressure on elevators. Certainly th e architect who devises a sturdy, in expensive, attractive substitute for the wind ow shade will find a mon umen t to his ingen uity lifted high aga in st the sky. are not unknown ! o or scorned by former tenement house dwell ers. If the mod el apartment is to Le left in a fully occupied build ing to be used for homem -ing classes, its locati on and exits should refl ect that use. BA LCONIES Pri vate balconi es ib ave been n oted earlier in this ch apter as proYiding a porch for tenants who li ve fa r fr om th e ground . Babi es a nd yo un g children can pla y out of doors with out leavin g tl1eir qu arters, all(] adults ca n cool off in slippered case duri ng hot evenin gs. Costs and local cus toms weight the decision about incl11ding them, as well as the d esire a nd <1bili ty of tenants to p ay for th e advantages of a bakony of th eir own. Architects will be ha ppy with th e cfTcc l of balcon ies on an oth er wi se shee r fn cadr. if th e need for them is clemon slrn bl P. A solid para pet fo r tli c fi rst few fcr.t o f ba rri er g ives a frdin g o f protcclio11 and l1id cs l he arra y of chi ldren's toys or household m ops an d pa il s pu t oul to sun . TWO-STORY FL A TS Ap a rt ment s for lar-gc fa mi li es have hcc n desig ned ra ther li ke two- story row lwu ses on the e ntrance an d second fl oo r of tall buildi ngs . This "\Vhat we need is a brnnd new idrn thnt has bc-c-n thoroughly tested." Al ~"JS:D rl in~arnr o courtesy , S11t urdn, _R evi;w U S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OHICE ; 1965 0-76J - !150 2U �HOUSING, PUBLIC GEORGs~ l.t t\: S T il l u·-I:" IL. OF TEC: iN OLOGY ARCHITECTU RE LIBRARY 17 11 , THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS jll OF ,,.. I' - I I t PUBLIC HOUSING IN METROPOLITAN TORONTO !I 1· I· The Metropolitan Toronto Housing Authority I· August 1963 ~ 4 I 4 • t If i , [j i i i �CPJ.\. PTER VIII - SUHMf,RY AND CONCLUSIONS , 'I 1. Basic Premise The conclusions of this study which d eal with tha ?.ttitudes towfl.rds · ublic housin? of families who h;:ive moved out fire a ff 8cted by t}-,e move-out ·rate which exists in the pro,iects under the administrA.tion of the l"ietropolit;m Toronto Housinf Authority. If i t 1s considered that these move-out rates are greater than might ordinarily exist in the priv;:\tc rentel TTlA.rket, then the c~ta t akes on more sipnificance. Conversely, if t!rn move-out r?.tes are consid - ,·ed to be less than the normal priv~te experience, then the data tak0s o~ sirnific2.nce. sscr It should be clc<'-rly ur10P.rstood that the fir1dings o f ·,his study are based essentially on interviews held with tliose families t :'.10 he ve left -public housin3 communities in Hetropolitan Toronto. 2. Physi cal AccommodAtion and Environment It would appe?.r, b;,sed on the evidence supplied by former kn;,nt s, t hat th e public housing co mmuniti es are es s entially satisfc=;ctory plcices to L .ve , .cit l east as for a s the majority of tenMt families Are concerned. It ,.,,ould also appe..ir that the housing pro,jects provide a r eason~bly satisfactory environrnent '•I for the majority of the families. The major satisfaction which t ends to k e ep the fAmily in the public housing project centres around the ph~rsic;:,l ac corrn:ioc1r1tion. ! ' I I .- As fPrnilies Are g iven housing to meet their renuirements physical overcrowding s eldom occurs. The .l larger units provide accommodation which literally c an not b e found "'nywhere I. I else in the 1-I etropolitan Toronto area. The housing u.I1it, particulcir l y t he hous e type , provides t!1e families with their greatest singl e satis .:.:.--.:::tion . I I �89 - 3. Faciliti e s for Ch;idr cn at Proi e cts · This s-t udy indicates little dissatisfaction with the faciliti es pro'J: children in the housing pro,iects. 2d for What was indic;,ted, however, WP.S t :a pro- jects which are densely child populcited produce an irritcition with th e children in the project. the children. The tenant app:irently feels th8t he is unP.ble to f<:: t -:r,ray from This probably accounts for the action tPken on th e p,r t of the Temints' Associ;:ition in coth pro,"jects to get community centres with c i'1ild oriented programme::;. This l!.'1CO:'.'.ti c-:_ous r.,,;c+-.ion t0 thA J.E.r ge number of children s eems R cl(;?.r ir.- .i .l ! nu:n1·x~rs if larrc w1i ts in one site as in South Regent P.:1rk. A J...-i.rrcr pro- iJOr:.ion of houses to ap2.rtmcnts seems nccess;:,ry. 4~ !1.ttitud e Tow&rds I-ianagemen t Pe rhaps it will te surprising, at least to thos e who administer publ·: · h c,u.;ir.: , that there is a very positive f eeling to 1~rards the public housi !1f: exp,- ri e:--c e of thos e f amilies who h? ve moved out. Only a ve ry sm::i ll percentage of ttis group felt trJt gr r0?.t er sup- -Ii ' '·I • t'I i' . fL I ti I ' I port A.nd assist;:,.nce c ."':1 be provided. 7 .. R.s,ta.\ 3·>-, __ -... -·· - ··-··- ... - ·- 8 s 01-1rc,2; 01' sat~_s.fc1.cti..m. come ·"' S The fact thf't the monthly r ent fits the fr:mi.-!..y I s in- thJ. t ii,co:ne fluctu?tes h2.s bE:: en thought by rnany ex:ps:rts to r:- ovid8 thG .fnrnilies with an excellent for m of soci2l ;:,..nd economic s e curity •,1:1ich :)·vho :· far;ri.lies do not have. satisf;iction. In the o~J, therefore, this should b e r1. In pr;i.ctic e this expe ct-".tion is not realiz ed . r.tP..,ior sct:r ~c r,.i. Ger.er.;.11~.- ::: ;,,2 , }d:.-. f I ' there wn.s dissat isfac ti on expressed on the pc>rt of t he move-out f;:i :nili c s _. ·ii;;, the rental scale. This might hAve been expect ed in th e upper incon --: r An--: -=-.:=: where t he nenalty r ent char ved in public housing ;:ippli eso nc¼"ever, li es with very low i nco mes felt that the r ents wer e too hiFh~ ., ... . 1;i.;r,_ y f3 .1li- This fePll!cS ::.s brought a bout largely from the est r1bl.ishment of mi nimum rm1ts, whic ·. c f.a ~,~ thAt many famili es are paying too high a proportion of the ir inco me: in r 8n"t. , The rec1.l dissr1tisf.<>cti on with th e r e nt.:i l s cr1le shows up in thos e f;i mili e s refus ed public housinr. not low rentn.l. 1,vt10 They felt th;:it .the rents P.sked by the Authorit y 1,.er e In fact, when th e other :nove-in c!l.;"trges were A.ddec:: to t he first month's :rent rn£.ny families could not afford to move into r;t.i Le housine,~ ' l �! '-l ,i 1, !: { 111• 1·1 Ii This stated dissr1tisfnction on the rnrt of move-out f-?.milics and rofus ?.l f : :>. rd lie s indic;:i tcs thc'..t tho rental scf'lc do e s not wholly pcrfor:n its function certni.r.ly "S it ,,ffocts the fc:mili es on WT? low incomes. lndicP..tions are t h:i.t the cst;iblishmcnt of a new sc;-i.le, upd~tcd to f.<1.mily cxpendi turcs of th e pre s ent time, is an absolute necessity. Such a scale if devised should be h~s ed uJX)n a dynamic situ?. tion c1nd chanred on review periodic;:illy r ather than h?.p:--,"vrdly. 8_ High-Ris e Build~_p.g s This study does net :i::~ (,dL,·~-& rl.n,n:=tgi ng 1;vld e nce a ra inst high--risc :9.p.c> r t r::e:1t s 1 .s., ~()1 .nt cc; f or by t ho f ::i ct thr1 t 1 and 2- b edroom f ;:i_mili e s :i.n La·.,rre!1c: e Hc-::. .= :r-t s -!:ind it ea si er tu mov'3 out thc1 n the 3-bedroom fr mlie s in So"Jth Re,e-:er.t ..\J.thot1g11 h i g!1-ris c buildings s e em to provide g r e~ t e r ri12..I1rtger!1ent and 0 .?.:::·!: . L ·~-· . . .,~.e1.~2 "1~._ costs ,:,o t:·: e r, dministr.,., tion, t h e exc ell ent phy s ic;'l.l l ;iym1t of t h e 2.ctu, -.:·.r, :._ . J. r:. ........ .. l ing ur1it appea rs to outweigh .s.ll proble:ns in th e '.'lines of t he t em.n t s , should b e not ed th.-i t t h is e vide nce is b " s cd on f a ~lic s ,·rho h-"'vo ::iovoc 0·:,.t a.nd not .families who c~nt inu 8 to l i ve in tht'.: pr'ojccts o 9- SociP.l 3ti gm.:. In gen eral, whil e t h e r e w is some dis s:milies . IH fAct, it is prob"'ble thrit the sociel re~ctions expres sf':d by these fnmilie.s ;,re no grePter than those thc9t mipht aoply in nn:v n ~ighbourhood. 10. Rect~ons for Reftisal In descending of importance famlies in eppPrent need of housing r ef\ . ed for the following reasons:- ~ -i! 'f.1 (4) '!:tong type of dw0lling i.e. n.p..~rtm-3nt instec>.d oi house (5) ~ulcs nnd regulntions (6) Personal and far.ri.ly rea sons (?) Condition of unit offEre d It is interesting to note that the first two reasons were f?.r and most important a ccounting for nearly 60% of all reasons givenu 2i~-;f-,.;/ tnc �CITY OF .A'I LANT.A HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE CITY HALL Room 1204, City Hall June 23, 1967 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522 -44 63 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR ., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Admini strative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR. , Director of Governmental Liaison Dear Committee Member: The next monthly meeting of the Executive Group of the Housing Resources Committee will be held at 10:00, Thursday, July 6, in Committee Room #2, Second Floor, City Hall. We hope you can attend this meeting. The low and medium income housing program is still confronted with major obstacles, which have recently been emphasized by the local news media. The "White Paper 11 prepared by this Committee and used at the last meeting, highlighted the problems and has been very well received. However, Mr. Alexander desires to discuss several of the items further with you and will look to you for suggestions as to action this Committee should take. Also we would like to have a brief report on the activities of each Panel. The Housing Inventory Report is being brought up to date, and should be available for our July 6 meeting. It should provide a clear picture of the current status of the program. We still do not have information on the following: Ee gal Panel--Chairman & Vice-Chairman Public Housing~-Vice-Chairman Land Acquisition Panel--Chairman & Vice-Chairman Social Problems Panel--Vice-Chairman Please be prepared to provide us at the next meeting with names of those elected to the above positions. Also please let us know on the enclosed return address postal card if you plan to attend the meeting or, in the event you cannot attend the meeting, the name of some other member of your panel who will represent you at the meeting . - Sincerely, ~ ~ e c&~ 2 - < . < 2 - - Malcolm D. Jones Supervisor of In · MDJ/pjm Encl: Return Address Postal Card tion Services �June 7, 1967 The Honorable J obn J . Sparkman The Honorable Wright Patman The Honorable William A . Barrett Gentlem n : Thi lett· r is to call to your attention my seriou cone rn with problem facin the enforc ment of ho in codes in Atlanta and I m certain in all th nation' cities . In ccordance with the ought by Secretary W vigoro ly with th bou tho e re s where an c ntration rea ists, low intere t loan . mpha is pl ced on housing cod enforcement r nd our own de ir , w ve moved ahead ing code provision in Atlanta. As you know. in b n ren wal project or code nforcement con .. hom owners inn d m y q Ufy for gr nts nd with- r they ca to me t t th •• r one ar entitl d to r 1 • In effect they i, a co rod by U. S. Gov rnm nt acti s · c · th r qub d p:rosram cover• thee ir city. They ehoul ot be unduly • To contln lo do ao ere t a n unfair st tlon which will th ntir ff :rt of citl to nforc it. 1. th r fore, 8U eat two ug st that action b 8ibl COUl'See. taken to 11 vi.at tbl Uuatio . W th lr ns •r thb rived peraon who are • I tea • rcea �June 7, 1967 Pag 2 - The Honor ble John J . Spa.rlanan The Honorable Wtight Patman The Honorabl William A . Barrett are faced with r habilitation requirements under cod nforc ment. As tated bove the Workable Progr m is. in effect, F d r l requireme11t for the -ntir city. It ems possible that the law allowing grants and loan could b stend d to cov r all citizens und r wor ble program. 1 would appr ciat your giving this problem your mo t ation. Sincerely, I n All n, Jr . Mayor cc: The Honor bl Richard J . D ley, M yor Chic go, 11,. uuu-,.a The Honor ble .r l'O!Xl P . C vanaugh, M yor D troit, Michl The Hcm.orabl J hn V . Linds y. M yor N York, N w Yo~k Th Honor bl John B . Collins, M yor Bo1ton, M achu tt Mr. John Gun er, E_zecutive Director U. s. Conf rpe of M yor Mr. Patrick a aley, Ex cutive Dir ctor N donal . of Cltl s rnest c on ider- �Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal June 6, 1967 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Ivan: Enclosed is treletter that Bill Slayton suggested you write to Senator Sparkman, etc. He has reviewed the letter and finds it in order and is enthusiastic about your undertaking this. Sincerely, /) I // ~ Cecil A. Alexander J3 vb encl: JamesH. Rnch, F.A.I.A. Cecil A. Alexander, f.A,I.A, Miller D.Barnes, A.I.A. Bernard B. Rothschild, f.A.1.A. f.C.S.!. Caraker D. Paschal, A.I.A. ASSOCIATES Robert D. Ah/strand, R.A. Sidney S. Daniell, R.A. Ira 6rayboff Thomas 6. Joyce, A.I.A. H. King McCain. N.S.P.E. John J. McDinough, P.E. Architects Engineers Interior Designers WIiiiam l. Pulgram, A.I.A. 44 Broad Street N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Phone 688-3313 John Steinichen. A.I.A. Terry-Hutchens Bldg., Huntsville, Ala. 35801 Phone 539-9648 �DRAFT June 6 , 1967 The Honorable J ohn J. Sparkman The Honorable Wrigh t Patman The Honorable William A. Barrett Ge ntlemen : This letter is to call to your attention my serious concern with a problem facing the enforcement of housing codes in Atlanta and I am certain in all the nation's cities. In accordance wit h the emphasis placed on housing code enforcement sought by Secretary Weaver and our own desires, we have moved ahead vigorously with the housing code provisions in At l a nta. As you know, in those areas where an urban renewal project or a code enforcement concentration area exists, home owners in need may qualify for grants and low int erest l oans . However, t here are many areas of Atlanta wh ere we seek to prevent further deter i oration by code e nfo rcement that are as yet not covered by e i ther of the above programs . Home owners i n these areas are with out recourse and are in the unhappy situation of having their homes condemned unless they can produce the necessary funds . It seems to me that these persons are entitled to relief. In effect they are in an area covered by U. S. Government action since the re quired workab l e program covers the entire city. They should not be unduly penalized . To continue to do so creates an unfair situation which will undermine the entire e ffort of c ities to e nforce their codes. I therefore s uggest that action be taken to all eviate this situati on . We s uggest two possible courses . 1. As a minimum approach the F.H.A. shoul d ease up on their requirements unde r 203K and make loans under this program easily avail abl e for financially deprived persons who are sub jec ted to code enforcement expenditures . 2. Much more coul d be accomp l ished if the benefits of th e $1500 grants and the 3% l oan were extended t o all persons wi thout resources who are faced with rehabilitation requirements under code enforcement. As stated above the Workable Program is, in effect, a Federal require - �June 6, 1967 Page 2 - The Honorable John J. Sparkman The Honorable Wright Patman The Honorable William A. Barrett ment, for the entire city. It seems possible that the law allowing grants and loans could be extended to cover all citizens under a workable / ~ this problem your most earnest consideratio~ Sincerely , Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor cc: The Honorable Richard J. Daley, Mayor Chicago, Illinois The Honorable Jerome P. Cavanaugh, Mayor Detroit, Michigan The Honorable John Lindsay, Mayzjr New :Jork,New York The Honorable John B. Collins, Mayor Boston, Mass . Mr. John Gunther, Executive Director U. S. Conference of Mayors Mr. Patrick Healey, Executive Director National League of Cities v: �C T T OF .ATLANT~ CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 June 7, 1967 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Execu tive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison The Honorable John J. Spark.man The Honorable Wright Patman The Honorable William A. Barrett Gentlemen: This letter is to call to your attention my serious concern with a problem facing the enforcement of housing codes in Atlanta and I am certain to all the nation's cities. In accordance with the emphasis placed on housing code enforcement sought by Secretary Weaver and our own desires, we have moved ahead vigorously with the housing code provisions in Atlanta. As you know, in those areas where an urban renewal project or a code enforcement concentration area exists, home owners in need may qualify for grants and low interest loans. However, there are many areas of Atlanta _where we seek to prevent further deterioration by code enforcement that are as yet not covered by either of the above programs. Home owners in these areas are without recourse and are in the unhappy situation of having their homes condemned unless they can produce the necessary funds. It seems to me that these persons are entitled to relief. In effect they are in an area covered by U. S. Government action since the required workable program covers the entire city. They should not be unduly penalized. To continue to do so creates an unfair situation which will undermine the entire effort of cities to enforce their codes. I, therefore, suggest that ~ .c tion be take n 'to alleviate this situation. suggest two possible courses . We 1. As a minimum approach the F. H. A. should ease up on their requirements under 203K and make loans under this program easily available for_financially deprived p ers ons who are s ubj ected to code enforcem e nt exp e nditures. 2. Much more could b e accomplished if the b e nefits of the $1500 grants and the 3% loan were ex tended to all persons without resources who �June 7, 1967 Page 2 - The Honorable John J. Sparkman The Honorable Wright Patman The Honorable William A. Barrett are faced with rehabilitation requirements under code enforcement. As stated above the Workable Program is, in effect, a Federal requirement for the entire city. It seems possible that the law allowing grants and loans could be e x tended to cover all citizens under a workable program. I would appreciate your giving this problem your most earnest consideration. Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor cc: The Honorable Richard J. Daley, Mayor Chicago, Illinois The Honorable Jerome P. Cavanaugh, Mayor Detroit, Michigan The Honorable John V. Lindsay, Mayor N e w York, N e w York The Honorable John B. Collins, Mayor Boston, Massachusetts Mr. John Gunther, Exe cutive Director U. S. Conference of Mayors Mr. Patrick H e aley, Executive Director National Leag u e of Cit i e s _;;,._ �{~ r ~ 1 ~hJ4 ~ · ' HOUSING RESOlrn.CES cor-r-iIIT'l'EE C ITY HALL ATLA:r-;TA, G A. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 Room 1204, City Hall IVAN ALLEN, J R., MAYOR May 23, 1967 R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DANE. SWEAT, JR. , Director of Gove rnmental Liaison Dear Committee Member: The next mont hl y meetine; of the Executive Group of the Housine Resources Committee · (which would normally be held on June 1) will be held at 10 : 00 A. M., Wednesday, May 31, in Commi tte e Room t/1 , Second Floor, City Hall. We especially hope that )rou can attend this meeting . The l ow cost housing program i s currently runni ng into some major difficulties which I need to discuss serious ly with you, with vi ew to adopting a policy posit i on of the Committee as a whole and pl anning a cour se of act i on t o pursue . We wi ll have at the meeting basic f actual data on which to base our conclusions and I hope al s o a list of land tracts in the City by size and location which are appropri ately zoned f or construct ion of mul ti- ffu~ily housing . We still have not been informe d as to the foll owing : Legal Panel - Chairman and Vice - Chairman Public Housing Panel - Chairman and Vice - Chairman Land Acquisition Panel - Chairman and Vi ce - Chai r man Social Problems Panel - Vice -Chairman Please be prepar ed to provide us at the mee ting with appropri ate information on the above. Also_pl ease l et us know on the enclose d r et urn address postal card if you pl an to attend the meeting or, i n the event you cannot att end, t he name of some other member of your panel who will represent you at t he meeting. Si nc erely, ---~~-~ 16:32, 29 December 2017 (EST)~ Cecil A. Alexander Chairman • Encl : Return address postal c ard. �r:iil\;l.JTES HOUSING RESOURCES EXECUTIVS COMMI TTEE 1iEETING i\iA Y 31 , 1967 Members of the Housing Reso ~rc es Commi ttee Executive Group met on Wednesday , May 31, 1967., a t 10:00 a . m., i n Com~i ~tee Room # 1, City Hall. The -foll owing me~j-rs were pre sent; lf.tr . Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman Dr . Sanford S. At~ood, Co-Chairman Mr . Lee Burge, Chairman, f'ir.anc e & Non-Profit Fund s Panel Mr . John C. Wilson , Finance & Non - Profit Funds Panel lf.tr . Dale Clark , Pub l i c Informa tion Panel Dr . Vivia::1 Hend ers o:ri ., Land Acqu isition Panel Mr . RolanG Maxwell, Represent ing -~ - Virgil Milton, Business Partic ipat ion Pane l !V7ir . rorman Underwood, Representing Mr. Charles L. We ltner, Lega l Panel rvir. Robert Winn., Representing Dr. Harrison , Constru ction and Design Panel ~ . Ma lcolm D. J ones, Director Mr. W.W. Gate s, Consultant The Pub lic Housing Panel and the Soc ia l Problems Pane l were not represented at the meeting . Mr . Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman., presided . Mr. Alexander read the Ho using Resources Cammi ttee I s "White Paper 11 ( copy attached ) and exp l ained the di fferent divisions of this r eport . Ee then e xplained the other do c unents which 1-J'ere attached. He also st~ted that there were severa l difficulties in locating rental housing sites., partially because of the racial problems i~ Atlanta, and gave his interpretation of the May 5, 1967 letter from HUD, pertaining to HUD ' s reluctence to approve Public Housing sites in racially concentrated areas . Dr. Vivian Henderson, Land Acquis i tion Pane l, stated that this did not necessarily hold true in all case s ; that he did not thin~ the announced HUD policy was intended to apply to racially ir.tegrated projects in previo usly all white neighborhoodso Dp. Henderson alsc asked about his Panel's previous request for a list of possible sites for locating low-cost housing . Mr . Jones explained that this has been requested from t~e Planning Department, but not yet prepared; however, that he has been provided ttith a group of Land Lot sheets showing va cant property (with current zoning) in the eastern half of the city; and these locations were being looked into. �Page Two Dr . Henderson suggested t ~a t the need for such a list of avail able sites be reported to t, e Board of 1 ldermen . M~. Al exander reported tha t the Planning Committee initially prepared a l ist of sites comprisi -~ 800 ac r es of land that were considered avai l able for use o_ that cculd be re -zo~~d. He also stated that t he developers !:ad already looked i nto t hese prop erties but that only four tra ct s· had been approve d s o far. Mr . Jones stat e d that he knew of only t wo, or possibly three, of thes e t hat had been actually approved by BUD . Mr. Alexander stated that one of the mai n prob l em s was t hat the land devel opers c ould not always use the sites be c ause ·of locations, costs, and building codes. jV[r. John C. Wilso:-. ...,::. :.a nce and Non -Pro fit Funds Panel, suggested that t ... e cornmitt e ~ ~---- ~P t all the l and possible, because to provide al l the housing required, all available la nd would be needed. ~w . Al exa nder s tat ed that this Commit te e should take action one way or another to get these prob l ems corrected before any further subst an tial deve lopments ca n be made . Mr. Jones stat ed that it was this Commit t ee's policy to cons ider any suitab l e l ocati on that was submitted or prop o sed a nd to tr y to ge t a ct i on based on merits of individua l tra cts. Lee Burge, Finance and Non -Profit Funds ~anel, asked ~f this Committee was over-playing the housing pr oble ms, or if this was just the normal type of thing which resulted fr om trying to get through zoning changes , Housing h.u t hor i ty and/or .- FHA approval of a housing deve lopment. ~~. ~r . Alexander explained that there is a greater low-re ntal need in the city than apparently some members of the FHA underwriting staff feel justified . Mr. Jones said that the problems were not being over-pla yed because there were many prob le ms in trying to locate low-cost housing sites. He explained that this was the p0 r p ose of this meeting; to try to work out some of these problems. Dr. Henderson stated that many of the present problems appeared to be with the Planning Department , and they were not very good reasons. Mr. Alexander stated that the City is striving to get a workable Land Use plan which people feel that they can rely on. Mr. Dale Clark, Public Information Panel, asked if the Pla-nni"ng Department is represented on t his Committee. �Page Three Mro Jones st at ed t hot it is not; but t ha t we are wor king i n clo se contact with each other. i\lr Alexander stated t hat t he genera l fee l i:ie; is that i n some re sidential area s the zoning from single fa~i l y houses to a partments wi ll be a ne cessity o He asked the press not to mention any specif:i..c areas wne r e th i s ma y be poss ible, be cause there are no definite plans to this effect as yet . Mr. Burge asked if it would not be~ - ~pful to create a link between the Housing Resources CornLl ittee and the Planning Department? Mr. Ale1:ander stat e d that it wou ld also be a good i de a . to create such a relationsh ip with t he Board of Aldermen. rvr..r. Burge said., i n r ela tion t o item (d) under ttDist.:cu s s io n in the 11 Wh ite P&per 11 ., that he would l:..ke to k now how t he zor.ing people felt about th i s o Dr o Henders on s aid that i t was e asy to disc uss this problem but tha t it would not a l ways work out in pra c t ice, and that the real iss ue is the diffi c ulty of l ocating in an area that does not 1·rnnt housing deve lopments . Mr o Burge a sked the r eason given by FHA for it s action in connecti on with the s ites near Mag~olia Cemetar y , Ether:d ge Drive , and Gun Cl ub Roado Mr. Alexander referred the q uestion to Mr . Ga t e s for ans wer . Gates stated tha t proximity _,t:) Rockda 2.e Urban Re newa l Project., in which ab out 1)500 units are to be constructed during t he r.ext four years, ~ould be take~ int o consideration in determining the probable market abs orpti on in the general area. Both the Ci ty of Atlanta and the Federal Government have considerable investment in Rockdale. ffir. Mr . Alexander asked Mro Jones to [\ ive a report on possib le loca t~ons :or pre-fabricated 143.215.248.55 ~ ~sin Atlanta. T-'lr. Jones stated that there is some effort to build this type of house in Atlanta., But that there is difficulty because of tht At2.anta Building Code . This code states that the plumbing, electrical, and heating fixtures be installed on site in Atlanta, and that the pre-fabricated houses come with thes e fixtures and electrical circutes already instal led. towever., there are plans being matlc now for so~e sites on which prefabricated houses could be located by des~gina ting special areas �Page Four where t his type of housing could b e installed o He al s o st ated that t_he a mount of land r eqLlired to bu i ld a house on was too gre·at economically in Atlanta for t his t ype of hous e ., nnd that there are also plans under wa y t o corre c t this by permi t ting them to be built on a 50 1 x 100 1 lot, or 60 x 83.33 1 (5,000 sqo feet i nstead of 7,500 sq. feet, ·which is now requ::.redo) Mro Alexander stated that· he thought tha t organizatio~s su ch as Tech sould organize stud ies of t he housing s it uation in Atlanta, which wo uld be mad e availab le to this Committee . He asked Mr. Winn if the Construction and Design Panel were looking into this now? Mro Robert Winn , Construction a nd Design Panel, stated that there will be a!·meeting of his panel a week from next Tuesday to discuss this. Mr. J one s inquired if the pre seut meet ing time 2nd date for this Committee was satisfactory, and the reply was affirmative . He a l so stated th2t he h ad appea red before t he Zoning '.:::,-:-,:..mi ttee on sever2 l occasions a nd felt t hat it would carry more influenc e with them if th~s Committee co uld t2ke definite a ction on some areas before he re-appeared. He stated that there were three sites in partic ular coming up for r e -zoning hear i ngs soon on which he. would l ike for t he Committee as a group to i ndorse and support, i~ 1. 2o 3o Fairburn Ro ad Jonesboro Roa d North of Baker 's Ferry Ro a d Ml~o Alexander sta ted tha t he felt t ha t i t was too soon to t2 ke any defini te action on these sites as ye t. Mr . Burge moved t ha t t h i s Committee a ccept t he pr e sent Paper" as a g uide f or furthe r· a c tion. 11 w:r'li te Th e mot i on was seconded and car r i ed unanimouslyo There being no f urth er b usine s s , the meet ing was ad jo ur ned at ll i35 a .mo Respectfully submitted , ~a:-l~~6,._~;fe\,,~/Q_... Ma lcol m D. J o~i Super visor of---!nspe ct ion Servic es Encl: "White Paper" (without a tta chments ) �HOUSING RESOURCES COMM ITTEE May 31 , 1 96 7 White Paper }1ission : The Hous ing Resources Committee is charged wi th : (a) Promoting low cos t housing and facilitating i ts construction i n l~lanta a~ 2~ accelerated basis . (b) Br ing ing together the vari ous interests needed to produce low cos~ housi ng . (c) Insuring that t e human factors i n housi~g are given ~ull play . (d) Informing the publ ic of the· housing problem in Atlanta . G,'.)21S : The City!s goals in the low cost housing new construction program, base~ on f ~ndinzs of tje recently completed CIP study and as announced by the Mayor i n Housing Confe~e~ca on November 15, 1 966 are : 9,800 units during calendar years 1 96 7 and 1 968 . 2,333 units each year during the nexT succeecing 3 year period . nits tot al by end of 1971 . 16,800 Accomplishments to Date : 72 separat e proje cts have been proposed, totaling 15,391 units in t he follo~ing cat egori es : Firm 4,286 units Probabl e 2,57 8 units Total."- 7 , 264 Under Cons iderat i on 4 , 464 Doubtful 3,663 Total Propos ed unit s In Sight 15 , 391 of which 6 , 149 units, pPe viou::;Jy .;. --· . • are currently in jeopardy due to objections f rom vari ous sources as to .1.o,:,'.Ti. :):,:, . Inc l udes 1 ,140 units of Publ ic Housing + 144 units l eased for ? ublic ~o~si~; . ~la j or ?roblems : (a ) See (b) Also see attached : 11 Problem Ar eas 11 attac hed dated April 20 , 1 967, revi sed . l. Memorandums dated April 25, 1967 and Nay 24, 1S67 p21°tc=-~·. n:~r: ;:; ·'·· ... . . , .. :·,. of land i n the City appropriat ely zo ned for construction of l<:>\•I c,:,;~: h-.:-.::,..:.:·:~: :, and , 2. " Statement of Necess i t y 11 undated, extract ed froi'.1 a -cypi.c...,l proposed zoning application . l ' L1:(' t .tJ·, ,. I I �3. Letter to the Mayor fro1 EUD, dat ed May 5, 1967, attached . 4. Two news clippings dated My 8 and 9 , re spectively . Discuss ion : The above factual data and attached papers cle rly illustrat e wh re th ~ d~fficlie and suggest so e obvious indicat ed solutions . T .e program cannot be s uccessfully carried out , unless these prob lems are resolv~d . ~~ In t he initial Hous ing Conference last November the City called on pri vat e enter~ris2 assist i n a large measure in this program . While initial efforts r,ave : :uc.c2e:.u1 i 1. r.,::··.:, -· ducing the 7, 264 uni ts i n s i ght listed above , t·.. ',, is little re a son -co assu:·~e d n c, ... timistic attitude toward futur e effo rts . At this time combina t i ons of Federal pcl~cias, zo ing pro.o:ems , land costs, code requirements and general uncerta inty per-: · .:.nirJ,'i; to t t.2 ?rogram have severe l y curtailed future prospects . Many developers and bui leers Kho tave attempted to part icipate in the program are confronted with i nsurmounta~le obstacle s 2Ld are withdrawi ng . Several aevelopers are holding up on subQitting zoning pet~tions beca~~ ~f t~e discouragement as to ~avorab_e action . In order for the Housing Resources Cammi ttee to perform its ass.:.g:i.ed :·:!i ~~si.cn , ;::::::~ ~e probl ems should be placed before the elected city officials and the ou~l ~c. (a) ?8r a 143.215.248.55n: e : Zoning throughout the City is now being analyzed to insure that the cu~rant needs of the entire city are be ing met . (b) Citizens should be encouraged to realize and accept the fact that i . a larg e a:1d rap i dly growing city, such as Atlanta , single fami ly houses cannot be :-r,2d,, 2.v2.i.la!:ile for all citize ns and that many must of necessity reside in multi-fami ly housing un ~~s ( e ither rental or co- op . ) (c) In zoning matters , pertaining to an overall community proDlet:, ..'., l.de::.·,;:,er1 ~, h ,::,u~.cl a ct on . eeds of t he City as a whole , as opposed to loca l ne i ghborhood uress·.a 1;,E; . 0 (d ) Provis i ons f or decent and adequate hous ing is the nuo.ber one priority :fo::' th-s City and is a ne c essary prerequi sit e fo r solving many other oroblems . (e ) Compliance wi th HUD I s anr.ounced policy of discourag i ng pu:Olic nou~;i::s; j_n areas of rac i a l concentration has severely limited the availa bility of s~~2s . (:::') Land in adequate quantitit es , and at prices wh ich make lm,, cc: !,t :~ot.,si:::;:; econom ically feas i ble , are apparently not avai l a· le in all seg·7errts o,-- ·:::::,! C::·::,.- . (g ) More local churches a nd civic groups should be encouraged t o ~ss~sc -- program as non- profit sponsors . (h ) An ovcr - 2.ll non-p,'.'ofit hou sing f und si1ould be cPectteci to ::,;:,.:):!:-::it,:i .-1.L ... .. , . of the program . �Recommended Action : (a) Submission by the !:-iRC to t e Mayor a nd Board of P.l dc;_~rr:en a ):c·.J.ci .:,:··:.t,: ,:.,·1 . port on current status of the low cost housin: progr am . (b) The Hous ing Resou~ces Com ittce to act ively support re - zon i~g 0~tit~0n~ wh ich are reasonable and in intere st of f urther ing t he nous i ng program . ( C) Conduct promptly a hard- hitt i ng Publ i c Information c ar:ipa i gn l. r ·"n·r,··1_. per t~:1 (:: pu::.L c .Li._ .L . I ~ ~ le:., of the current di fficult i es encounter~d and offerin~ concrete pos i t i ve suggestic1s fer the i r sol ution . As listeci. �Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal ay So,, 1967 COPY Dv. Alb X't M.Davis, Pl"e id nt National A soei tion or Th .Adv nc 859·1/ 2 Hunter Stti et .w. AtUnt,, Gori&, 30814 ent Of Colored People Ori. D vi: D In~ r th t th bX' kdown of c uu!cation yQU f el exist can be r otif!ed, y I ask if you ould rv on the Land. Acquisition Pan l of th · Housin R oUI'C . C itt ? COPY f cin tb progra: in thi oat v lua.ble rvice to th city Since you ar re ,, I bal in helping I 1001< forw to h arin fro you. Sincer _ly, Cec1l A. Al xand r COPY vb yor Iv n All n / bee: Mr. Malcolm Jones COPY �May 31, _967 nOUSING RESOURCES CO:VIMITTEE Cecil A" 'Alexander, Architect., Chairii1an Dr Sanford So Atwood, President, Emory U~iversity, Co-Chairman Dr Benjamin Eo Mays, Pres ident, Morehouse College, Co - Chairman 0 0 PA1 ELS Leg al c: arles Weltner, Atto~ney Ac ting Chairman Donald Hollowell., Reeional Di~ector, Equal Empl oyment Opportuni ty Commission Honorable Lut~e~ Alver son, J udge, Fulton County Superior Court Mr o Archer Do Smith III., Attorney, Harmon and Thackston Mr o Norman Lo Underwood., Attorney., Sander.s, Hester and Ho ll~y Construc tion a · ~ De sign Dro Edwin Harri son., Presidest, Georgia Institute of Technology, Chairman Herman Russe ll., Contra ctor Moreland Smith, Director of Urban Planning Projec t ., Southern Reeional Council, Vic e-Chairman Rev o John Ao Middleton., President., Morris Brown College Henry Fo Alexander, Bui l der Ja mes Moore, President , Atlanta Labor Council Finance & NJn-Prof it Funds Dean Harding Bo Young, Atla nta University L ee Bur ge ., President, Retai l Credit ChaL·:TJan Butler To Henderson, Assistant to Dro Mays, Morehouse co __ege Mills B Lane , Jro, President, Citizens and Southern ational Bank A~ Ho Sterne, President, The Trust Company of Geor ia Gordon Jones , President, The Fulton National Bank Vice-Cha irman Joseph Earle Birnie, President, The Na tional Bank of Georgia Ao B o Padgett, Execu tive Dir ector, Metropolitan Foundation of Atlanta Eernilton Douglas Attorney Rev . William Holmes Borders, Pastor, Wheat Street Baptist Church Dro Rufus Clement, President, Atlanta University John Wilson, President, Horne Wilson Company Albert Love, Executive Vice President, The McCall Corporation Scott Houston, Jr., Executive Director, Wes l ey Woods Apartments 0 �Public :-Ious ing Edwin L · Sterne, Chairian, Housing Au t horit y of the City of Atlanta D~ . Albert Manle y., Presiden t, Spelman Col l~ge L~v~ard Reinch , President , Cox Broadcast ing Compa ny Clarence Oolem2n., Regi onal Dire c tor ., .C at ional Urban League Acting Chairman ~a rles Ra . Pa l mer ., President, Pal. er, Inco 0 La :-·.,~ Ac~uis i ti on Wo Lo Lee , Pres i dent, Atl a nta Gas Ligh t Comp~ny Co Ro Yates ., President., Yates-Mi l ton S t ores Acting Chair ... an Dr Vivian Henderson 0 President, Clark College Jim E., Land, Cliie f Engineer for Georgia, Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Coo 0 Social Prob lems Charles Oo Emmerich, Administrat or., Ec onomic Opport uni ty At _anta, I nca Du a ne Beck, Direct or, Community Council of t he Atlanta A~ea., Inc . Mrso Su jet te Crank, Social Dir ector, Neighborhood Services, EoOoAo _ Dro T o Johns on , Professor of Pol~tical Sc ience, Morehou se College Dean Wil liam J acks on, At _anta Univers ity Chairman Mr ~ Erwin Stevens, Chairman, Citizens Central Advisory Comm ittee, EaO.A ., Mr o Lewis Cenker, Attar ey Business Particination Virg il Milton, Re tired Atlanta Grou p Manager, Sears, Roebuck & Company Chairma n Eo Lo Simon, Auditor., Atlanta Life Insurance Company Vic e-Chairma n Harlee Br anch, President, The Southern Company Co Ao 11 .Art 11 Jenkins, Director of Indu s trial Relations, Lockhe ed Roland Maxwe ll, President , Davis on's Department Stores Publi c I nformation J.ames L. Townsend, Townsend and Assoc iate s �Public I ~forrnat i on ( c ont i nued) Dale Cla rk , Direc t or of Pu bli c Affair s , WAGA - TV Ray Moore, News Di r ec tor, WSB - 'I-V Jim Wood., News Direc t or., 1,·oAK Vice - Chairman STAFF ROOM 1204, CITY HAL~ Tel. 522-4463., Ext. 430 Malcolm D. Jone s , Di r e ctor W, W. Gates, Con su ltant Miss Joyce McKnight, Secretary Cha irman �HOUSI\iG RESOURCES cmG I1.i'TEE 1 Mr Cecil JJ. o P.lex2nder J Ch2 i· · .,an Ho using Resources Comrnitt e Finch., Al exander, Ba!"nes J Rot:1schild and Pascn.a l , 10th Floor Sta~ ard Federa l Bui-d i n~ 44 Br oad Street , No Wo At l a. ta., Georgia O ."'c .itccts Dr . Sanford So Atwo6d, Co-Chairman Housing Resources Co~.~r:1i ttee President ., Emory U iversity At lan t a , Ge orgia 30322 Dro Benjamin Eo Mays, Co-Chair ma n Ho us i ng Res o urc es Committee Pres i dent , ~oreho us e Col _ege Atlanta , Georg i a PANELS LEGAL Mr., Charles 1~ Welt ner , Attorney The ?irs t National Bank !) Suite 2943 2 Peachtr ee Street Atlanta ., Georg i a l.Vlr. Dona l d Holl owell ., Regier.al Direc tor Equa l Emp _oyment Opportunity Commission 1776 Peach tree St reet, N. w. Atlanta, Georgia Honorable Luther Alver son, Judge Fult on County Superior Co urt 136 Pryor Street , So 'WG Atlanta, Georgia ~~. Archer D. Smith III, Attor~ey -.a rmon and Thackston 1944 Nntion3l Bank of Georgia D~ g~ Atlanta, Georgia M.ro Norman Lo Underwood, Attorney S 2nders , Heste:.. · -: :Iolley 1001 Comnerce Bui aing Atla nta., Georgia Ac t ing Cha irma n �i p3ge Two CONSTRUCTION ANlJ DcSIGN Dro Edwin Harri s on, Pres i de t Georgia Inst itute of Technology 225 North Avenue , No Wo Atlanta, Georgia Chairman Mro Her man Jo Russell, Contractor 504 Fair Street., So 1.17 0 At lanta, Georgia 30313 Mro Moreland Smith, Director Urban Planning Project Southern Regional Counc il 5 Forsyth Street ,~ - 1 o Atlanta, Georgia Vic e - Chairman Revo John Ao Midd leton, Presideht ~orr is Brown College 673 Hu~ter Street, No Wo Atlant3 , G,~- . · ~ Mre Her..ry F' o Alexander::, Builder 2439 Fernlea~ Cour t , No Wo Atlanta , Georgia Mro Ja rnes Moore, Preside~t At l anta La bor Council 15 Peach tree Street, No Eo Room 2oe Atlanta, Georgia FINA.JC~ Dean Harding Bo Young Atlanta Univer sity 223 Chestnut Street., S. WG Atlanta, Georgia Mro Lee :Surge., President Retai l Credit Company P o Oo Box 4081 Atlanta , Georgia 30302 rlir o Butler T Henders on Aosistant to Dr. Mays Morehouse Colle3e 223 Chestnut Street, So Wa Atlanta, Georgia g Ch a irman �Page Three FI NANCE (continued) Mr. Mills B o Lane, J ro, President The Citizens and Southern Na tional Bank Po O o Box 4899 Atlanta, Georgia J'vlr. Jo seph Earle Birnie , President The _·ational Bank of'. Georgia Peachtree at Five Points AtlantaJ Georgia 30303 Itra Augu stus H. Sterne, President The Trust Corrpany of Georgia 36 Sdgewocd Avenue , N o Eo Atlanta, Geor 6 ia 30303 !VIro Gordon J one s, President The Fulto:.--. -· ·- -t i onal Banl{ Po O o Box l.;. 387 Atlanta, Georgia 30302 NON-PROFIT FUNDS ( Combined with Fi:_2nce Panel) Mr. A. B. Padgett, Executiv e Direc tor Metropolitan Foundation of At lanta 1423 Candler Building Atla nt a , Georgia 30303 M~ . Hamil ton Doug l as, Jr , Attorney Nationa l Bank of Georgia Building Atlanta, Georgia Rev William Ho l me s Borders, Pas tor Whe2t Street Bapt ist Church ,1c,;:,, · -• ••, Q::::; •l ey D. , _v rive , S ..I. o Vice - Chairm2n l.r VVo Atlanta, Georgia Dr$ Rufus Clement, President Atlanta University 223 Chestnut Street, S W Atlanta, Georgia 0 M.r o John Wi lson, Pre sident Horne Wilson Company 163 Peters Stree t, S o Wo At anta, Georgia 30313 �NON-PROFIT FUNDS (continued ) Mro Albert Love Executive Vice Presidebt The McCa ll Corpora t:on P ,. Oo Box 1000 Doraville, Georgia 300 ~0 vrro Sco tt Houston , Jr o, Executive Direc tor We sley Woods Apa rtments Po Oo Box 15468 . Atlanta, Georgia 30333 PlJ-:SLIC BODS ING Mr ~ Edwin L., Sterne.;, Chairman Housing Author i ty of t he City of Atla nta 639 Trust Company of Georgia Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dro Albert ~anley, President Spe l man College 350 Leonard Street, S o Wo Atlanta , Georgia Mro Leonard Reinch, President Cox Broadcasting Compa ny 1601 Wes t Peachtree Street, N io Atlanta, Georgia Mr o Clarence Da Coler,1an Regiona l Director · Na tional Urban Leag ue 78 Marietta Street , No Wo Atla~ta , Ge orgia · Mr., Charles F o Pal::ner, Pre sident Pa lmer, Inc a, Palmer Building 41 Marietta Street Atlanta , Georgia 30303 Act :L-:g Chairman �P2e;e Five LAND ACQUISITION Mr o ·wallace Lo Lee President At l anta Gas Light Company P., 0 ., Box 4569 · ..,. neo-r> _ g·ia 30302 _,r-,:-....1 an -c-a ~ 3 Mr o Clayton Ro Yates, resident Yat es-Mil ton Store s 228 Auburn Aven ue, N. E o Atlanta, Geo!'.'gia Jim E c Land Chief Engineer for Georgia So ut hern Bell Te l ephone & Te legraph Compa ny 805 Pea chtree Stre e t 3 N. E a At l ant a 3 Georg i a l\1r o Dro Vi vian Henders on , President Clar k Col lef;e 240 Che stnu t Street, S o Wo Atlanta ., Ge org ia Ac t i ng Chairman SOCIAL PROBLE'vIS J\'Ir .. Charles Oo Emmerich Ad .1inistrator Economic Opportunity Atlant a, Inco 101 Mar ietta Street, 11 • W. Atlanta, Georgia 3 Duane Beck, Exec utive Direct or Community Council of the At lanta Area, I nc .. 1000 Glenn Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 rvri r o Mrs. Sujette era· 1-: , Socia l Director Neighborhood Services , E Oo A., Inc 101 11arietta Street Atlanta, Georgia D~ o Tobe Johnson 3 Professor of Pol itica l Science OCorehouse Coll ege 223 Chestnut Street, s. W Atlanta, Georgia 0 Dean Wi lliams . J a ckson Atlanta Uni versity 223 Chestnut Street, S Atlanta, Georgia Cha irma n w. �Page Six SOCIAL PROBLEi'!iS (continued) Erwin S~even s_; Chairrr:an Ci tizens Cent_ a l Advisory Co~m ittee., E.O. A. 799 Parson s Street, S. W. Atla nta, Ge orgia Mr. Mr. Lewis Cen1{er, Attorr~ey 20 45 Manchester, N. E . Atlanta, Ge org ia BUSINESS PARTI CIPAT I ON ivT, r. Virg il Mi lton 3626 TLxedo Road, N. W. Chairman At la nta., Georgia lf~. Ed wa rd L. Simon:_ udit or V~ce - Chairman Atlanta Life Insuranc e Company 148 Aub urn Avenue., N. E. Atlanta., Ge orgia Mr . Harlee Br anch., President The Sou thern Company 3390 Peachtree Road ~ N. E. Atla nta., Georgia Mr. C. Ar t hur J e nkins Director , Ind us t rial Relations Lockheed Company Marietta , Georgia 30060 Mr . Rol2nd Maxwel l, Pr eside nt Davis on's Department Stor es 180 Pea ch tree Street, N. w. At lant a , Georgia PUBLIC I NFOR~~T ION James L. Townsend ' Townsend and Jwso c iates 10 14 Hea ley Bldg. Atlanta ., Georg ia iVir. �Page Seven PUBLTC Il'~P.0RI,'i_l'/I' I 0N ( cc~'cinued; r.~r D2 l e. c _a r~< Di~e c to~ cf Public Af_a ir s WP.GA - TV , 1551 Bri 9 rcl iff Ro2 d, N. E. Atlanta, Geor 6 i a c· _a i~rnan O i\';r. Ra y Mo ore Nel'l s D:Lrector v!SB - TV ' 1601 West Pea chtr e e Stree t, At l an ta , Georgia 30309 Mr. Jim Wood v -:,__ ce - Ch2,irman r!ews Dire c to~, HA0K 110 Ed gewood Avenu e, ~ . E. Atla nta , Georg ia STAFF ROOM 1204, CIT:i HALL Tel. 522-4463 , Ext, 430 Malcolm D. Jo nes, Dire ctor W. w. Gates , Consult a~t Miss Joyce McKnight, Secretary �r ~ ~ - MINUTES HOUSING RESOURCES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING MAY 4 , ·1967 Members of the Housing Resources Committee Executive Group met on Thursd a y, May 4, 1967, at 10:00 a. m. i_n City Hall. The following members were present: Mr. Dale Clark, Public Info rmat ion Panel Dean William S. Jackson, Social Problems Panel Mr. J. E. Land, Lan d Acquisition Panel Mr. Archer D. Smith, III, Le g al Panel Mr. Edwin L. Sterne , Public Housing Panel Mr. Hall Ware, Finance and Non-Profit Funds Panel Mr. John C. Wilson, Finance and Non-Profit Fund s Panel Mr. Robert Winn, Construction and Design Panel The Business Participation Panel was not represented at the meeting. Col. Malcolm Jones presided in the Chairman's absence. Col. Jones explai ned that this was the second in a series of monthly meetings designed to bring the Committee members up to date on the progress of the program. H e then asked each of the panel representatives to make a rep ort on the a ction taken by their r espe ctiv e panels. Finance and Non-Profit Funds Panel - Mr . Wilson and Mr. Ware explained that the Committee is actively engage d i n developing a local funding group to provide II seed" money t o promote low co st h ousing. Preliminary dis cuss ions have been held and material from other such organi zation s is being reviewed. Social Problems Panel - Dean Jackson reported that this panel has met to organize their group and has discussed some of the broad areas to be encompassed by the panel. Two main decisions came out of this meeting: 1. The panel should have representatio n from the community it self and, therefore, two new members have been added. They are: D r. Charles F. Schwab, President, Protestant Welfare and Social Services, Inc., and Mr. Erwin Stevens, Chairman, Citiz en s Central Advisory Committee, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. 2. The panel felt it would be helpful to develop some guidelines as to what is anticipated as goals for adequate living. �Page Two Dean Jackson added that one of his cl as ses is presently conducting a surve y of the attitudes of families living in the vicinity of the B e dford-Pine ar ea to be completed by the end of this month. If anything helpful comes out of the study it will be shared with the Conunittee. Land Acquisition Panel - Mr. Land reported that this panel is still in the process of thoroughly organizing. However, as a result of the first meeting it was decided that two or three real estate men would be added to the group and this is in process at present. Meetings are planned with the Atlanta Housing Authority and the Federal Housing Administration. Construction and Design Panel - Mr. Winn reported t:q.at three archi tec ts have been obtained to work with the panel in carrying out its functions. The panel members have organized and have scheduled regular monthly meetings and are beginning to plan their program. Legal Panel - Mr. Smith, representing Mr. Weltner, stated that two attorne y s have been added to assis t in the work of the panel. They are: Mr. Archer D. Smith, III , Attorney, Harmon & Thackston, and Mr. Norman L. Underwood , Attorney, San ders, H ester & Holley. The panel members are working in thre e areas at the present time: 1. 2. 3. Research and examination of the laws dealing with FHA housin g, particul arly the requisites for obtaining FHA grants and loans; Study of complaints and problems concerning the enforcement of the Housing Code; and Res earch into the pa rt of t h e law particularly co n cerne d with the Grant and Loan Program (fo r re habilitation o f sub-standard housi ng) being restricted to U r ban Renewal and Code Enforcement areas. Public Hrusing Panel - Mr. Sterne reported that this panel has met once and at that meeting the members were generally acquainte d with what is going on in public housing. Mr. Stern e told the group of many of the program.s the Housing Authority is presently engaged in. Public Information Panel - Mr. Clark reported that th e pane l members have met and that he also met with Col. Jones and Mr. Alexander for a bri efing on the overall program. He stated that his concept of this panel's ftmction is: one of informing the general public and to report fully through the news 1nedia what the Committee is doing, and that until some definite action is taken hy the Committee and the function of the Committee is a little better focused, this panel will n ot be able to really move forward on their program. �Page Three Col. Jones then distributed up-to-date copies of the Inventory of the various housing projects which have been proposed and provided members of the pr e ss with a summary of this report. He reviewed the summary with the comm itte e and discussed in detail some of the problems the committee is encountering in getting these projects underway. The major problems include: 1. Attitude of home owners toward apartment units; 2. Zoning; and 3. Determination of the location of housing {HUD prefers that such housin g not be located in areas of racial concentration). The group discussed possible solutions to these problems but no positive decisions were reached. Col. Jones also told the group of a meeting Mr. Alexander has reques t ed for a special meeting of the Board of Aldermen for the purpose of inviting builders and developers to appear before them to discuss their problems from their points of view. He added that it would be helpful to have some members of the Executive Group at this meeting also. Mr. Land of the Land Acquisition Panel said that his panel would definitely be represente d at the meeting. Col. Jones requeste d each of the panels to elect permanent Chairme n an d Vi ce Chairmen as soon as possible, if they have not al~eady done so, and to a d v ise him who has be e n ele cted. Mr . Cl a rk told the E xe cut ive Group members that his panel (Public Infor mati on) is alw ays ope n to committee member s for any sugge stions or r e comme n dati on s a s to h ow th e public infor mati on p r o g ram can help f urth er the goals of the Committee. H e also re commended to Col. Jones t h at the informatio n containe d i n :: t he s u mmary o f t h e proble m areas be made available to the press . Col. Jone s agree d w i t h Mr . Cl ark a n d a dvis e d that h e would t a k e up this matte r w i t h M r . A l e xand er. There being no further bus i ne s s t h e me eting w as adjourn ed at 11 : 30 a. m. R es p e ctf ully s u bmitte d , ,_,__-~:f)t.J!·O.-, /?.?,-Jee _.d Malc olm D . Jo n,~ Supervisor of In s pection Servi c es �HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE Room 1204 City Hall Tel, 522-4463, Ext, 430 May 4, 1967 V' ,ii ,,,,,,I,'I ,1; The Executive Group of the Housing Resources Committee, recently established ,j 'I by Mayor Allen to promote and facilitate construction of low and medium cost housing in Atlanta, held its regular monthly meeting today in the City Hall, Cecil A, Alexander, Chairman, Dr. Sanford Atwood, President of Emory Univer>sity . and Dr, Benjamin E. Mays, President of Morehouse College, Co-Chairmen of the Committee, were unable to attend, The Executive Group (consisting of the Chairmen of the nine working panels into which the overall Committee is organized) studied a recently prepared Committee report on the status of the current housing progr>am, submitted by various developers, It is summarized as follows: No. Units 1967 Firm 3556 (1312) Probable 3553 Category ',7109 In Sight Total Being Considered 4569 Doubtful 3088 Total Proposed The report contained 71 proposals (1312) Estimate When Available 1968 1969 1970 1971 (1928) (316) (1681) (672) (500) (700) (3609) (988) (500) (700) 14,766 of which 6504 units (1243 listed in the· Firm category, 3409 in the Being Considered category and 1852 now included in the Doubtful category) previously considered likely, are currently in serious difficulty of materializing due primarily to objections from various sources as to proposed locations, ', Includes 1140 uni ts of Public Housing, plus 144 existing uni ts leased for Public Housing. In addition, 1782 units have been rehabilitated since October under the Housing Code. The goals established by the City for the program are 16,800 units by the end of 1971 , consisting of 9800 units during 1967 and 1968 and 2333 units during each of the succeeding three years. The principal difficulties currently confronting the Committee in developing the program are the following: (a) General objection by single family home owners to multi-family units being built anywhere near them, even though the multi-family construction may be a v~ry high type of cooperative sales housing for purchase and occupancy by family units and presold before construction begins, l - - - -- - ---------------:----- - - - - - - - -------. �.. - . ' -2- (b) Difficulty in getting sufficient suitable tracts appropriately zoned, because of objections from residents of the areasinvolved. (c) Persistent efforts by certain groups to effect the spreading of low and medium income housing throughout all sectors of the City, even though suitable tracts of land may not be available in some areas to developers at prices which make construction of such housing economically feasible. (d) Recently announced policy by HUD discouraging the location of public housing in areas of racial concentration. (e) Conservatism by FHA on approving projects in certain areas, to insure against the possibility of over-building the market in any portions of the City. (f) Discouragement on the part of promoters and developers faced with the above indicated problems. The combination of these problems is slowing down the program substantially and, if continued, will make the goals very difficult to attain. ·,I .'i. ,, .,1· . ,, I I' ( .' �May .Z3, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO: Colonel M~lcolm Jone FROM: Mayor lvan Allen, Jr . . The attached reply from the Housing Authority h the information requeated by the Housing Rea011rce Committee.' Sincerely yours, Iv n Allen, Jr. Mayor 1AJ'r/br Encloaur �EDWIN L. STERNE M. B. SATTERFIELD CH AIRMA N EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR ANO SECRETARY GEORGE S. CR A FT CARLTON GARRETT VICE CH AI RM AN DIRECTOR OF FINANCE J. B . SLA YTON GILBERT H. BOGGS DIRECTOR OF HOUSING JOHN 0. CHILES GEORGE R . SANDER FRANK G. ETHERIDGE TECHNICAL DIRECTOR 82" HURT BUILDING ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 JACKSON 3-6074 May 17, 1967 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: This replies to your letter of May 10 transmitting copy of a memorandum submitted by the Housing Resources Committee and requesting our specific comments on items 5, 6 and 9. These comments are as follows: (5) We are unaware of any offers for sale by owners of 103 units on Boulevard resulting from housing code inspections. As a general rule it is not financially feasible to acquire old housing by purchase since necessary financing of the resulting project must extend over a 40 year life. It is preferable to lease units in such buildings since the economics usually do not justify purchase. (6) At the present time negotiations are proceeding concerning the leasing of units in four additional separate sites. We hope t o be able to add to the total number of units now under lease. The great difficulty is the l ow vacancy rate in housing of acceptab l e standard in the Atlanta area, which has resulted in an attitude by most landlords that there is no financial advantage t o them to enter into a lease agreement with the Housing Authority since they already have extensive waiting lists and are n o t having to make improvements that possibly would be required under the Housing Authority leasing program. �Mayor Allen ~age 2 May 17, 1967 The Housing Authority representative is devoting ample time to the investigation of all available leads. All real estate firms listed in the Yellow Pages have been circularized as well as members of the two real estate boards. Constant visual investigations are made in trips to various sections of the city to find out where vacancies might be in existence. The processing of individual tenant leases for occupancy of units in private housing is not greatly time consuming since it only averages about thirty minutes per tenant. It i s considere d very important for the leasing represent a tive to make very frequent checks of existing leased housing to make sure that the public housing tenants are living up to their obligations affecting the care of the premises, etc. If this program can b e controlled so that private landlords see that public housing tenants are better than average tenants this should h a ve a n importa nt impact on t he availabil i ty of addi tiona l units f or l e as e . Althou gh the numb e r of le a s e d sites h a s not increased in the past few weeks, the number of public housing tenants has had a steady growth as dwelling units have become available in pres e nt locati ons. (9 ) Redu c ti on i n minimum p ri ce of sing l e family l o t s fo r sal e in the Thoma sville Urban Redev e lopme nt P ro j ec t b e l ow the ir cu r r ent minimum has been c ons i dered i n t he pas t. The staff is of t h e opinion tha t such reduction would not encourage the deve l opment of t he se lots b e c a use: (a ) The p r ice a s n ow s e t is l e ss t han the value of the lots shoul d t he de v e l oper ac qu i re l and at reasonable price and prov ide the stree t s , utilities , and other ameni ties as provided by this p r o j e ct. (b) The Federal Housi n g Admi nis tra t ion will a ll ow as land valu e onl y the amou nt actual ly paid to us by the deve l oper. Therefore, any redu ction in the price of the land wouldmly res ul t in a redu ct i on in the amount of the loan unde rwritt e n by FHA . At the moment it appears to us the greatest opportunity for provision of additional units for low income famili e s l i e s in �Mayor Allen Page 3 _May 17, 1 967 the 221D-3 Program, and hopefully in increasing the number of units leased for public housing use, although the latter does not increase total housing supply. Sincerely yours, .Lzz- M. B. Satterfield Executive Director MBS/fm �Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal May 16 , 1 967 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr ., Mayor City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Ivan: Many thanks for the help with Lord & Taylor . Joel Cowan feels that your interest has been most helpful in his negotiations. Sincerel y, ~ Cecil A. Alexander vb James H,Finch, F,A.I.A. Cecil A, Alexander, F.A.l,A, Miller 0. Barnes, A.I.A, Bernard B, Rothschild, f.A.1.A. F.C.S.I. Caraker0. Paschal, A,1,A. ASSOCIATES Robert 0. Ahlslrand, R,A. Sidney S. Daniell, A.A, Ira Graybofl Thomas 6. Joyce, A.I.A. H. KingMcCain, N.S.P.f. J.J. McDonough Architects Engineers Interior Designers William L. Pulgram, A.I.A. 44 Broad Street N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Phone 688-3313 John Steinichen, A.I.A. Terry-Hutchens Bldg., Huntsville, Ala. 35801 Phone 539-9648 �Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal y 161 1967 ·It' . Rodney M. Cook COPY 34 10th trot . ,E. Atlant . , Geo~gia, 030 COPY Siner l y , COPY ~~L~C il A. Al COPY X&C ~ �BESSEMER PROPERTIES, INCORPORATED Two PE A CH TR EE STR E ET, S U IT E 3400 ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303 TELEPHONE 404•523 -25 18 ~ May 17, 1967 The Honorable Ivan Alle n, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta Atlanta, Geor g ia Dear Mayor Allen: Just a note to thank you for your h e lp with the Lord & Taylor matter. I b e li e v e you h ave h e a r d di rect fr om t h e m that city cooper ation was most h e lpf ul. T h e tax a ss e ssors we r e mos t c oope r a tive a s well, and ope n e d suffici e nt files to complete ly assur e th e m of the ir position. A gain, my thanks and w e hope thi s p r oj e ct w i ll b e broug h t t o a s u ccessful conc lusion, w h ich will be a credit to the City. Sincer e l y , JHC:rp CC: Mr. C e cil Alexand er �MINUTES HOUSING RESOURCES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING MAY 4, 1967 Members of the Housing Resources Committee Executive Group met on Thur sday, May 4, 1967, at 10:00 a . m. i_n City Hall. The following members were present: Mr. Dale Clark, Publi c Information Panel Dean William S. J ackson, Social Problems Panel Mr. J. E. Land, Land Acquisition Panel Mr . Archer D. Smith, III, Legal Panel Mr. Edwin L. Sterne, Public Housing Panel Mr. Hall Ware, Finance and Non-Profit Funds Panel Mr. John C. Wilson, Financ e and Non-Profit Funds Panel Mr. Robert Winn, Cons tructi on and Design Panel The Business Participation Panel was not represented at the rn.eeting. Col. Malcolm Jones presided in the Chairman's absen c e . Col. Jones explained that this was the second in a series of monthly meetings designed to bring the Committee members up to date on the progress of the progra1n. He then asked each of the panel representatives to make a report on the action taken by their respective panels. Finance and Non-Profit Funds Panel - Mr. Wilson and Mr. Ware explained that the Committee is actively engaged in developing a local funding group to provide "seed" money to promote low cost housing. Preliminary discussions have been held and material from other such organizations is being reviewed. Social Problems Panel - Dean Jackson reported that this panel has met to organize their group and has discussed some of the broad areas to be encompassed by the panel. Two main decisions came out of this meeting: 1. The panel should have representation from the community itself and, therefore, two new members have been added. They are: Dr. Charles F. Schwab , President, Protestant Welfare and Social Services, Inc., and Mr. Erwin Stevens, Chairman, Citizens Central Advisory Committee, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. 2. The panel felt it would be helpful to develop some guidelines as to what is anticipated as goals for adequate living. �Page Two Dean Jackson added that one of his cl a sses is p r es e ntly conducting a surve y of the attitudes of families living in the vicinity of the B e dford-Pine a r e a to be completed by t h e e nd of this month. If anyt hing h e lpf ul comes out of the study it will b e sha red wit h the Committee . Land Acquisition P a nel - Mr. L a nd reported that this pane l is still in t he process of thoroughly organizing. H ow e ver, as a r e sult of the first m e e t ing it was decided that two or three real estate men would be added to the g roup and this is in process a t present. Meetings are planned with the Atlanta Housing Authority and the Federal Housing Administration. Construction and D es i gn Panel - Mr. Winn reported that three archite c t s have been obtained to work with the panel in carrying out its functions. The pan el members have organized and have scheduled regular monthly meetings and are be ginning to plan t heir program. L e g al P a n e l - Mr. Smith, re p re senting M r. W e ltner , state d that two a ttorn e ys have b ee n adde d t o as s i st i n t h e w ork of the panel. They are: Mr. Arche r D. Smith, III, Attorney, H a rmon & Thackston, and Mr. Norm.an L. Underwood, Attorne y, Sanders, H es t er & Holley. The panel members ar e working in t h re e ar e as a t the pres ent t ime: 1. 2. 3. R esearch and examina tion of the l a ws d ealing wit h F H A hous ing , p articularly the re quis ite s fo r obtaining F HA grants and loans; S t u d y of comp l a ints and problems conc ernin g the enfor ceme nt of the Housin g Code ; and Re s earch into t h e part of the l aw par tic ul a r ly conc e rne d with t h e Gr ant a nd L o an Pr o gra m (for reh a bilita tion of sub -standard housing ) b e i n g r e stri c ted to Urb a n R e newal and Cod e E nfo r c ement areas . Public Hrus i ng Panel - M r . S tern e re porte d tha t this p anel h a s met on c e and at that meeting the members w ere gen e rally ac quain t ed with w h a t i s going on in public h o using. Mr . S terne tol d t h e group o f m a n y o f the pr o gram.s the Housing Aut ho rity i s p re sen t ly engaged i n . Publi c Informati on Panel - Mr . Clark r ep orted that the panel members have met and that he also me t with C ol. Jon e s and Mr. Alexander for a brie fing on the overall program. He stated that h i s concept of this panel's function is one of informing the general public and to report full y through the news 1nedia what the Committee is doi ng , and that unt il s ome definite action i s taken by the Committee and the functi on o f the C ommi ttee i s a l ittl e better focused, this panel will not be a ble to really move for w ard on their program. �Page Three ~Col. Jones then distributed up-to-date copies of the Inventory of the various housing projects which have been proposed and provided members of the press with a sum.mary of this report. He reviewed the summary with the co1nmittee and discussed in detail some of the problems the committee is encountering in getting these projects underway. The major problems include: 1. Attitude of home owners toward apartment units; 2. Zoning; and 3. Determination of the location of housing {HUD prefers that such housing not be located in areas of racial concentration). The group discussed possible solutions to these problems but no positive decisions were reached. Col. Jones also told the group of a meeting Mr. Alexander has requested for a special meeting of the Board of Aldermen for the purpose of inviting builders and developers to appear before them to discuss their problems from their points of view. He added that it would be helpful to have some members of the Executive Group at this meeting also. Mr. Land of the Land Acquisition Panel said that his panel would definitely be represented at the meeting. Col. Jones requested each of the panels to elect permanent Chairmen and Vice Chairmen as soon as possible, if they have not already done so, and to advise him who has been elected. Mr. Clark told the Executive Group members that his panel (Public Information) is always open to committee members for any suggestions or recommendations as to how the public information program -can help further the goals of the Committee. He also recommended to Col. Jones that the information contained in :: the summary of the problem areas be made available to the press. Col. Jones agreed with Mr. Clark and advised that he would take up this matter with Mr. Alexander. There being no further business the meeting was adjourned at 11:30 a. m. Respectfully submitted, ~<-.42c-~-.!!!:..--t)-o. u -Q ____, Malcolm D. Jones ,_ Supervisor of Inspection Service :3 �HOUSING RESOURCES COMMI TTEE Room 1204 City Hall Tel. 522-4463, Ext. 430 May 4, 1967 The Executive Group of the Housing Resources Committee, recently establ ished by Mayor Allen to promote and facilitate construction of low and medium cost housing in Atlanta, held its regular monthly meeting today in the City Hall. Cecil A. Alexander, I '·! Chair man, Dr. Sanford Atwood, President of Emory University . and Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, President of Morehouse College, Co-Chairmen of the Committee, were unable to att end . The Executive Group (consisting of the Chairmen of the nine working panels into whi ch the overall Committee is organized) studied a recently prepared Committee report on the status of the current housing program. submitted by various developers. It is summarized as follows: No. Units 1967 Firm 3556 (1312) Probable 3553 Category ',7109 In Sight Total Being Considered 4569 Doubtful 3088 Total Proposed The report contained 71 proposals (1312) Estimate When Available 1968 1969 1970 (1928) (316) (1681) (672) (500) (700) (3609) (988) (500) (700) 14, 766 of which 6504 uni ts ( 1243 listed in the· Firm c ategory , 3409 in the Being Considered category and 1852 now included in the Doubtful category) previously considered likely, are cur~ently in serious difficulty of materializing due primarily to objections from various sources as to proposed locations. Includes 1140 units of Public Housing , plus 144 existing units leased for Public Housing. In addition, 1782 units have been rehabilitated since October under the Housing Code. The goals established by the City for the program are 16,800 units by the end of 1971, consisting of 9800 units during 1967 and 1968 and 2333 units during each of the succeeding three years. The principal difficulties currently confronting the Committee in developing the program are the following : (a) General objection by single family home owners to multi-family units ' ' ' being built anywhere near them, even though the multi-family construction may be a very high type of cooperative sales housing for purchase and occupancy by family unit s and presold before construction begins. l ' ·I I I �. . ~ . -2(b) Difficulty in getting sufficient suitable tracts appropriately zoned, because of objections from residents of the areasinvolved. (c) Persistent efforts by certain groups to effect the spreading of low and medium income housing tnroughout all sectors of the City, even though suitable tracts of land may not be available in some areas to developers at prices which make .! construction of such housing economically feasible. (d) .:1 ,I Recently announced policy by HUD discouraging the location of ,I public housing in areas of racial concentration. ,, (e) Conservatism by FHA on approving projects in certain areas, to I insure against the possibility of over-building the market in any portions of the City. (f) Discouragement on the part of promoters and developers faced with the above indicated problems. The combination of these problems is slowing down the program substantially and, if continued, will make the goals very difficult to attain. ,· .·.·1 ( ' .. -· .·· ···.' , ....... I . ~ • ~ .' ·:· ·. :··: . '.,• \ .. .. 1•. . :,. ' , ,. . . ' ' ... -~-:.. ..... ,, .. .. . ,, (. . l I ·, ..: . .. \ ·,, I , ,.. - . ... . ' .,i' I ~ \ • ,, . �HOUSING RESOURCES COMMI TTEE C ITY HAL L ATLANTA, G A. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 Room 1204, City Hall IVAN ALLE N, J R., MAYOR .May 23, 1967 R. EARL LANDERS, Adm inistrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secret ary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Direct or of Governmental Liaison Dear Commi ttee Member: The next mont hl y mee tine of the Exec utive Gro up of the Housing Resources Committee (whi ch woul d normally be held on June 1 ) will be held at 10: 00 A. H. , Wednesday, Hay 31, i n Corn."Tlitt e e Room Ill, Se cond Fl oor, City Hall. We e specially hope t hat you can at tend this meet ing . The low cost housine; progr am i s currentl y runni ng int o some ma j or difficul ties which I need t o discuss seriously with you, wi t h view t o adopting a policy position of the Commi t tee as a whole and pl anning ·a cour se of action to pursue . We will have at t he meeting ba sic f actual dat a on whi ch t o base our conclus ions and I hope also a list of l an d tracts i n t he City by s i ze and l oc ation whi ch are appropriately zoned f or constructi on of mul t i-family housing . We still have not been i nforme d as t o the f ollowi ng : Le gal Panel - Chairman and Vi ce - Chairman Public Hous ing Panel - Chai rman and Vice - Chairman Land Acquis ition Pane l - Chai rman and Vi ce -Chairman Social Problems Panel - Vice -Chairman Pl ease be pr ep ar ed to provide us at the mee t ing with appropriate information on the above . Also pl eas e l et us know on the enclose d r et urn address postal card i f you plan to attend t he meeting or, in t he event you c annot attend, t he name of s ome ot her membe r of your panel who will repre sent you at t he meeting. Sincerely, .,,.,,..... ' ~ /7 . . . - -~ ~ ?~ - t? c{~ ~ ~ Ce ci l A. Al exander Chairman Encl: Re t urn address postal c ard. �i Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal . w. dv n.c nt Of Clot> d Peopl COPY t yaUJY eonv n.1 nc will nvit f !cd . . t ·o t . witb yo~ ¢ · .itt _. and itte wh you think ould b to ttend. COPY Out> C 0\U'CO COPY vb ¢0 1 COPY 1tt C . tnit t �~w Lege~d , F - Relatively Firr:i (Fl- 21) P - Probable ( Pl - 11) C Be in g Co~ ~idered (Cl - 27) D CouLtful ( Dl - 12 ) HOUS ING RESOURCES COMMITTEE An Inven t ory of Tot u l d·,;e1 lin; un i ts cons·,_1"'uctc8. LOW AND MEDIUM COST HOUS ING IN ATLANTA 1%3 ~ce~tly Comp ~ted_L __in ~ v ~ ~ ~sed Hegot i at i e,n s st2.rted ·:1i th FHA 1%Lf 1%5 I I tem No I No o Un i ts New Exi s t 0 Fl l Progra m Location l'..;bb 1% 7 Pe rmit or ciev~lo;_)ed ii1na::;e1~ 1 s A;, t . ) 142 F- 2 - 5 1+9 - 84 i ·:108 Tota l l 1 1 I i-:Lea.t St . Gan.lens tJ 2. But l e r St , U. P.. , Pro j e ct 108 u. - I 221 d ( 3 ) Int eres t I Park ·. lest 1\pts . I ! t·!:·i Cor . int crsecR•. D/ 22·{ cl ( 3 ) ! GorU/yr . i t ent atively per un it - Lewis Cenkt~ , Le~al . l ikduccd frc ,, 2110 l:nits . i:c.:cl L:ir:.=iculj:y Jon tax s lructure . Si1oulci co1,11,letc i 1: lann ing anC 6 3 u n i·t· s rcspe c t ive l y .. I' ros;,ec t s ,1c hang_e ci fro m Pr·obab le to i:' i nil . 6 d i ff; 1~en t month l y p1,1ts . 1, 2 , 3 & 4 le :CCl:".;~.~1.ul. l f.c., ,.__ ~-- ,·l"'U\.·:d ,:i.;. ..... ·_;_, ·.jJ L :i...,V~ ~l c. c..:..~ w ti1".:. <.. L Le i.. : ,l ~- :t: Lo c ~40.:;~· . Cc r.~-l~-··1ct.i cr1 LC ,LL..r l .i..1 1~ ;·.o • .1.1·c ..1 1.... c.Lo.; i.1:.., ; · for 1f ,C!k tl l!C J·c ·.,r...; . ,_"'I t .i.01. 1,,1ctu,, .• i.~1tdC'1 �HOUSIN G RESOURCES COMMITTEE DATE An Invent ory of LOW AN D ME DIUM CO ST HO USIN G I N ATLANT A Recen~~ ~ t e d_i 143.215.248.55!1~~velopme2:_t and P:c op os e d Noo Units New Exi st Item No , F- 8 Designatio1;.., Locat ion = , . -c.- -~-......,___"L._~= ~=143.215.248.55-~=l--~"~~=L ~:-~-f===~ . Thc mo. sv i l J. e ?ro j ect Publ ic Hous i ng 35 0 Perm i t or ItiI~;dr~ooi~s -~~-~ · 1 Ren~al~3~ ; AvaJ.~:~~e_J Ot her Val ue =~-~ 1 Progra m u. 1 R. "== . jB i c. s~,r i ng ! - _ 1% 7 ! - -=---.t~~ . -,.-=~==143.215.248.55 cost $Ff , 500/U , Comment ·- Se e surr,J:la ry of PuLli c 1-: o us~n~ , c:tt c:i c:, cci , ... . ....., l:rea k Cto1·1n . /1v , I ~ . v ; . F- 9 Fublic Housing 1 40 i' Pe rry i l iI I i l , .... rees< . I I ' h1Llic 1:ous i ng !t I l C..' ;.7 w .. I i I I I I ' ! i i I I I i I 65 r - 11 , i: c Da n i e l St , lf8 ! I /,vJ l i, oi /Q1~or ic:.1 l Lcasi.n; Pro 6 ram for Publ i c liou :; - ' oppos i te At l a ntic 1 inJ I~u-::iph) Ai-Jt[; , · SupC!rrnar kc: t Tcnncse:an ' Co~,1;r.ons Apts . II I I I ' i ii I l I ' 2 II ': I I I 2 LJ 8 !:~v . Oct, 19G 7 ·' Lf Q2 '.·'.C:U' Ch l SG 8 c 0s t Cllf , 500 / U. rI L oo; Same Vic i n i t y c1ttc.c li e d . ! u n<.:,C l." l1,,· .. I I 1.11,s Corn,· tilul:ic,n Pel. , ;; . t. nc otia t ec . 23 unitd no~ Coni.Lol ,) 0 r:c in,., ric~o tia ·L(:6. . _'c".._uirc rL.1<·~ ili.t L~ti1.l__: ; 0 t.: :.z i t;tin,_; uuil:~; L, ..i :.1_i c,__.i:vcrl:.::c! t o i+ uni.t:~ i-:iti.1 :) ~~Cl~roo1~....:; c.i8 , uuo . arch l 9li '/ G, li OO I I .J . I II I l Luj l G.<.!l' - I'1+52 Conv . L,:'..nicr St . C'o nv , l :652 f:ll»cr i'l. Conv , 17 , G'/0 7 ,: 1inor Pl . Co11v , Fi , 1)(JtJ ~ i A. J • S1,li. i1 0\; r,Cl' b:.:.il(icr - i·,i tc·;.eJ.l Lonst . Co . O•.-:r.<2r - ;:z , L. J;:_,cic~on li . L , 0~111.._r - I; . it , Dc..:.c:~:..;t.:'0.:1 L' . L , O·.-i1,,:l"' - f.L f'l";1..-d.,C1. 1;=:.:Jlcin U . I ,. o 30 'l'o.;2..l I I itc;""l.l COi .st . Cc . 000 359 Lo.n i e r St . i-i'./ 2 2 1r0 l 1 Co nv . 120 Da . I, , �- ------ ------ ------------ ~---~---· HOUSIN G RESOURCES COMMITTEE DATEi-~r i l 20 ~ 1S6 7 !m I nvent or y of LOW AN D MEDIUM COST HOUSIN G ·1N ATLANT A ~ I tem No o Unit s No o --- New F- 20 220 E~ :-=::=...,_ ..:.. b 6 I I, 1U y Co~ le i:_:~-2_ .in De ~ ~= !!opos e ~ Noa Be drooms Rentals Permi t o r Hhen · ot her Value Lo -:at i on Desig_!'l~tion I . Turnkey !Gilber t Rd . & !Flynn B.d , SE i'I 1 n Th is is on ly ~ ~ ich i i I I i Comment =========~===~=·--===-- 20 Ii , site zo11 ed for ai--ts . • coEs i. deced favoro.bl_i by liA . Pro:not er - Bil l Woodwar d of Adams Cates , Duilder l ha s ~l v en te nt l tive approvi l , lI II Wh itinJ-Tu rne r . To Le ~e veloped a t dens ity of 11 Li p2 r i-L U , l-.as t ent at i ve l y allocateJ 220 units . i' F- 21 Un iv e r s ity Cecter 22 .i d ( 3 ) ~? 1+, 0G0 . 00 U. R. Proj e ct i!on - Pl.~of i t Offerini ' price fo r J ' l an(: . ' r-1 2soj 1 I ! Former iia;;no lia 1 Cemetery Sit e I;:est of llol ly-,;ood '. Rei ., 1-ii·i ( Hort h of 1 Proctor c 1~eek ) I 20 ,5 A +? ITrn'.'nkey posed in lv ic_inity un<.kr 22 1 .. J.. i .1s ' 4SU I j • • r 1 This projec t i i s cons i de:cecl excct l ent by Hf. Jand HtlS i ~i tip.Uy_ favoro.bly considerec.· by rL'\A ; now opposed by· tiic Ir,t c r-groun l~e l cit.ions Section of IiUD . ,T enta ti vely •.:rovcJ f'eb . 6 . U11.i.ts tentc.1 ti vely p l ed 0 e,d b~1 LA. J\lso c1d d units pro - d '('3 ) 1 3 A. offered Ly E.f.. J,"n . 1 5 . Hi;\ has r.:; i vcn re:~r:::1\vc1tion . DiUs o~e:r e u /ipri l 1 2 . 8 s uLs t antia l b i tls re c e iv e d . 1 off !!;n,\•:8 11 Rd. I • I l!\·/1 l ~---·-------- Turnke y This pro j,~c~ is , ppusc<.l l,y t_i1e ; ·11!,CP in lette r to tlic t,.3 ~·01' ;;,11°ch 21 , l~b 7. f\ls c, oL jcct ed to ' by Inter~r9up l·'. , lations Section ct l ,~c2, .i.011n l O.i.-ficc o.f lilJD in l et tee to JI. A. I · ---3Lf ,\ , Zc,r,ca ; und,~r 0 1,t:.on ; I ,;., cil lci r',-:_, li b:: ; OK '.·!i.th PoLi.c::i· Ccr,>~ . i,i, ·.:i.JJ.~n__; to cccc,ivc lJX'o,os a. ls, S"onso1' ,'c .LG.'.:lcr6 ·· :'.i ,,l u' i~,:ei lt.,·. u.. its t<..iiti,tiv,q.1--l'"~(~L~Lc.~ LJ' H.1 • �HOUSING RESOURCES COMM I TTEE DATE h~ril 20 ,1 96 7 An T.nventory of LOW AND ME DIUM COST HOUSING IN ATLA NTA _R-e=c-e=~=t ~ l e ~ e<:1_~_~i-~=~~ lopmen t an~~ose=d~ Noa Units Item No a Bedrooms _N ~ o..;.'- ~ ~l= fo=·-w..:1,t.=x..2~s=t- -=1P.=~D _e=s=-i g~;..~t io~= ~ ~ ~~ ·_!:9~a t i?2;,.__=~~ P- 3 Program J Ce,.,etery site , .) ., I i' iI I ' _l '.)6 Butl e r Stree t U. R. Pro j e ct Cas t l II I ' I i ! I 75 I I I of I,olly1-:ood ' i! ! In prc - cor !n1i tr.ient st Ge - fliA !F in anc i nu ; Fishe r E, Pt1illi p s ( Le~a l ) >:t . to 3- '.25 -li7 1c Let teP outst c.mJ i ,1s. F ! ! i I i 7S 85 I I i -·'ru.cr ty l Dr. , _; , ',/ , 11t 0 4 S:c,e:c . ! 3B ·----~-------- 22 'f 7 'J I ·-------C-i.-·C_O_l_il_'_a143.215.248.55c~::o_.-i_t:~·__o_r_i_t_;i_i_l~~-:-~'i·ry i'-'/) !, i' t.:o 11. . \ JtL . Lb l j . G /. ; :..·c:;1. ...">itJ l;J l,//··. . ~;_.. o:.::.. ... ~·c 1. ~;L _ vctc. • .,.:.ro j c ct rhor~asv ille ,ProJ e ct = U , R. U. R . _ U. R . U. T{ . INo~ ~ Bed r~oms = R!._n_i.:_a_~s __ ~}.:~ m~ ~~-=-_J:_ .-2.~~=~=_i=+}=-- l --~~ ~ j Si n l e 1 I 1 i I l ! on 6 - B.- 22 I I 1Tho.;ia::.; ville Pro j e ct U. R. _21 d ( 2 ) or -:'.onvcn Li on al! i I i ! I I ' ..-' I . . I i l • i ssued ) Pa~cc J. s C-1 , .1 _t_d '-----------3-ar ! i Ei rls auc Le e . 1 3 , l.9GG . :; o '..! id s rl.: '.c eivec. L8lleau , Inc . ii. tcrcstcu . · l3uildc.;rs \:a.n t F' .1. to is:.:u e 0-B cornrn t, 101: i.: 3 . !:-, ,oL ,er i ncen ti 'le i·:oul rl Le to r2C..uce 1Jri:::e cf lots . 1 ! I . J ; ; I !}c:rnson-\·\1shington il lld ercctinl :sin~ l e $50 , 00u .OO Offori r,g r:r ic G for l and . 1 _____ H01r.es u_. _i,_ .._ P_r_O . ncl _J_·e-~-cI-20 t - - - ~ ll_!(_J_n _- _r_r_o_f_i_·t_ ·-------------' I r.ot ac::;r~c to rcauce eacn . sl ca t . .;_ i2 21 d ( 3 ) I b ids . __ I ________________________________________ _ '~~ e"l\·,ecn Ca ; itol L[ Di et s d ue ! ~(';C . llt, l '::166 . i:o receive d . Buillcrs ·:~nt ' 0-U co1; ,::-,itr;;en ts . (Fi [;.. ·.-,ill Ar.e t he r i ncent iv e ',!oulc. l.c ~rice o f lots $2u0 to s~uo See ~r o~osa l on seJcirate 1 _, I Eid:.; clue :-:arc\, 24 , l ~b 7 Di ds due Fc,Lruc:r:,-,- 8 , lS07 . ( I l/2,·tio~al Lo;11c! i:; . c on0js e Pror.1ot E:r •.-:an t s t o .i.r,crt::i.:.se c e r:::; i ty t o 12 U/ A ~e c n use o f l o::;s o f 9 , 6A. t o Sc hoo l Ge j_, t . FL,\ o'.) -Jo a ccc;;: t a nc ·~. 95 ; 260 ~dd ition J l pot e nti7 l P - 11 L Si O!l Sor--Dui l 22)_ ,l ( 3 ) l 100 -~=-----~ P l. and liol(i.e:1°nes:s St . ( , j,-f-l'.O>( . 3 , tr,:,.) This i-•~o pe rtJ holds 8xce llent bot2,,tia 1 : for · I clevc l c~mcnt under;' 221 , d ( 3 '. ---'------'_____. ;. ._________. ;.,. ____________L__ I Value ._ II - I·G'l ' , .l] nroc 1( i)r f.,uck LcCrc.H l ' Zon . n~ fr·orn , -::i to ,\-1 Pl0.nnin 6 DEr t . eco l to c:1,:·t11Lin0 '"---------·---..;...---1.. . C- G 1 • -'--···---------- --------·--------- ------~-----· i • • Lo ful'-= I,. C . .. drci1 23. 1:..__;_,, <.. v c r a;;,!iLii,,., .,u1 ,ii. ri(, n o ·~" . - l<;i;.:, , ' ,:,. ,· 1,~c f a J.rL;n°n t1-ll 1nec...ii H,1],, ·r~; ['f~r'P\' 20 1 C- 7 ---··-------;P.ri.' _s .:~ - - --- ----------~ rC:rlr . ' . l c1ncl 32 i u,l.e Ct . ,, ,J.~,n. '.l'urukcy I f, ;:or"'.th. l'/we , l.L P.c~1t1l; . /.~.,;ts . I '.::, r: I , 11 :': l I --..------·--- -·- ------ ·------ --~--~---·-------·- ----~· :·,·--·-·-- ----·- -- i ,;: [ ic ir~. 1c J Ii , L,i1• ,:o,,lil:'.on , ];. j 1 ·<. t , 1,. ,. , : ..' ·~1 1·1 1 .~ .. :c.::.il- 1, L _ur . J·:"j c~o. �HOUSJ:N G RE S OU RCE:S COMMIT TEE f, DATE • "I l .1. =--l' l..L /in Invent ory of LOW AND ME DI UM COS T HOUSING I N ATLANTA Recent l y Complete ds i n Deve l opment and Proposed ~ - -- ~ ~ -. ......... v. - .--=-- ·_,,,.., ~-= ~~ --- -- ~-- ~ - =-·,r. Noo Unit s 1~ w Exist Item No, 0 = C- 8 I I·=---~ sign_~~n=·143.215.248.55== ~cca~on__ :~:g~~m --t-_J NO o ~ De ~ l l~- i Rentc1.ls dro oms .Be .:.-;···-- .- =1 -·- 2-,_ 100 ~/hen ' ~:z-==: =3~~ t Ava :i l a b le . ! ~~"~ ~~--~ _ _.;. ,---- Permit or I ·- ~~1~:vid ~:1:;~:~s~~=~stdeSalcs Ot her Val ue Comment (,. . , ,. __16:32, 29 December 2017 (EST)I=~=- .r .- 4 •• i ICor) . i s sc eld.11:,; l c:;nd on ·., 11ich to lo-,, c o s t ai:-··. a rt n,e uts ( •11a nt;:, I !J. 0 0 un it s ) for l ea.; ,:: ·t.. o t he L,\ ui,C.:.e r I , . its lo~-zent l eas in g ~ro3~2~ . ! Bi .::;; Be t he l c: ,urcn 1., r o,; oscs to s~o;1._,c.,r ,10 - l lf ::.; t c-1·y hi.;,·, - 1·i s•.: or. c .. urc i1 0 1..1 .eu vco;,e '. . rt'y' 1 00 ' x '2 7 G' . tc v. :Ju.:; s ,.;· , , ifu. ::;t o r . :-::c,·,,,,.J:, ,] ou,.:;; Lor. , Lc;__~Gl . ~ryi n~ t o nu; 0li~ta f0r d ~d . ~G j fic c ~t ~d i:'c c l :i O' :< 2 '7 6 '. ,~,.; r:cd ii .1. . ; .J. i 1 ~-ovc.J. I eve l o ~ 1 i C-S St . !Butler Bi . 0 1 G·· · l .:;.._:LI • ,:.\..., L ,.l ..· .-· • t: .( . t • r~i.: Lo ( u l c :.:· lr,· :1 ,:, ·.. . ,,,~, '--' .. t'-'.1.' . oc 1I ,. · • J· . · ·Li "1 l .'., , ,·t,-_-L' .. , L<..·, 1··l 0 , JJ , , , ,._ 1r, I . , , , • _ ,_ 1 • • l "', 1 ' J ' 7 .; • 1 .. - \.., rJfvr 1 , \ i"• c .. , .. , c.. 11,(· ,1 c: 1 1 c•c'".· r; ·••,-,; :-, . . , ) l · J·· ~L- < 1 ,_,· ,1, ,_.·, , J • •· > • ·J '· ,. l ·, - ------ -·---- -·---- -·- --··- _.. j/)l ,'. ( ,J .. , .. ~- ' 1 1 ( 'J . ., ( c) ) ?. , • -~ t. �HOUSI NG RESOURC ES COMMITTE E An Invent ory of LOW AN D ME DIUM COST HO USIN G IN ATLA NTA Rece n tly Completed, i n.. D0ve.J..opment c:md~__!'.:r143.215.248.55 16:32, 29 December 2017 (EST) - ~ " ' ' " " -~ = - ~- = - ~ -..,.·=-----c:... -:z--=.,r., - Item j cmment Noc C- .t.4 Joncst.cro ~-!.d . Sf~ S , oi' I!utc r1 i ll S l:JO F\~ "l.uire::; r"8 - Z.(Y.. iii1u , ii,i.i.c.!er - ,Jillie:: i.crn !! Turnke_;,- - -~1--......J.--....:--------·------------L----------j !,:i" a. c:.-J"> F··..._ ni·,cl .,rviv·,,---. ·L J U· c1 -i -1 l c • \ ) ,( iiifJtri~llLG:r·~ 1.·or 1~i1..<.;,:.;l.-Ll[J !.c ..·.cs) , ,.·o ·~ L\...!. ·,• .:-· • l•cd .. uC cwl;. "~ C.1.:C "1 • OI"' 1\1.-. .. J. '-....'. .... •u.:.. -C ~?. 1:-C...-~-=>• .!.. Prefers City owned ',· C- J...J .L. L ind . ._ • , • t,;!,. • • • _. ._ , 1 1 ~, I ~_[ ____ ____ , _ _ for ti C-lG !1011 co~l i.Gus.in 0 ur1:i.t ;-::ic.". 0--h. . .::r.~c..1..~ tLun to c.iLy i'or cc..,. ,.:..L.1..;l'c-.t.:.c •. l/l0 . !i; . u . ' :_; liLj ..:;ctic1.~ _;u:.'Jl:..~ld·:;U l.i.,i '2/ '1. I l I Cr~·,1st<..!i1. r_.,f Tc r-1·..1 .:\_c;.j_tJ Le . . 1L~ ·tiY.cl av;ii.loi.l,: c., ccr..::.i:....t:.1.·,_c. 3u.:.ti;. .. :i.~ ·i' f/L,...1'\j -.- es t ·fur le):,; cor; ·c i.·,ou~_i_1:c.: . I~ .i . . ~t...}'."'~ ...; ::(!1..l ir. ~ , 11 J.. ' 1 .. > L! l :,_, , H,1r·1-:121. J. i • ... -·---- L ,. 1....,1 .... ~ , l.,<.,11 ...~-~-~t..."-!-L _____________ _____ .. _ -·-------~--j_ '/ J 'l' t,r-d:c~ y ?'.,, J. <1 (3 ) n1 d ( 2 ) lc1p·;c L1!.~o j cct hclf) ;c.c_: tu P(. - .:un ifi . .: . i, • ,.i...t. 1_. ... .,._. '1':1.i~:; 1 _.jj_J _l il.1r1:.:~r.1l1 (7.~.3 ·-!•\i• ________ I________ ---------· ( ,.- 0 Kj1i~lc'.J..=.1. - 1.-r1 c..:r~ - .!.. 1,_.\.._lo.;. 1..:.L':..i s i.t,:, 1~ . J L:/d, : . 01, .L ; - J ; L 1 L v · o,.... ..J~) '(\ ~ 1~:\.L.:P cu_ > i . .,•' 1""':,_ •• •-< .. ... _,. • l.,cC.:L1-'~~,· ,-;·,·· :.\·,.<. �---------- ---- --------- -- - ---~--16:32, 29 December 2017 (EST)-143.215.248.55--~- - -~-- ~----- - HOUSIN G RE SOURCES COMMITTEE An In vent ory of LO\-/ AND ME DIUM COS T HOUSING IN ATL i\ NTA Re cent ly Cornple te d--=--~ s in Deve lopment and Pr oposedco .._ -~ -.. ,. . . , , . ,. - · ---C-,..-. • - -..-......-- - - ·~- - - .---....,-~ · - ..-c · -..-- ~ ~==·· Item No o Unit s No, N w C-19 ...-::--e. ~ Comme nt 1tx.ist 200 FJ"i f.. I 221 C- 20 d ( 3) rs..! &l tu:cs , is ;:- rvr;, o t i L,.., s.__ v (.. rc.l siL1.;;t for lo·,: c o~; t ;-: u us :i. nz (o n e .ir. S . L ) I ~----~---- --- ·- - --- - - ------·- ---~- ; I C-2l iI 600 I,,t a J.. r uu rn l. Rd , site I I i ? . s i cle o f r,,irLurr ~; . of Lo l y Fam ily 'r osr i ::a l I I II i 'l'u :cni~~y OJ, 2 21 rl ( :J ) , Co-o~.· . ! I t .· Ol'.S O i. 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( ~·r..i..,; l "r'.'v j ~cl: t:·""c:.·' ~; .... :. o.i'r.;;s:..;_~_o:~ J.. _lc(~1.·.... ·2W ~cu LC.·:- .::u 1 _.:.. ;_: C1.it F 1211 ( c,:r'r i~:..; :.,~:r::·--- ci...::;.::; it.., l::s .:,..:,_-cu. zvnir1.:.:, ) 'i :. i~ ~;."'o~ . . . c t r. ~-.:c.~ ::--1 o - con~, i c~er~s t i1 .i.S I site ro:q i;., roj cc t prc:r. ,~.t: u:cc , /,t'cL. housin~ for ~lcierly . o .L"e:s~~ioni:J.l • ,-:;L..CC(:c.G , I .::.,_g lcO ! ________ ._,________________ -;-----~-------7----~ . ___-~---,,- I I /e.lley Vie·.-; To·.-:11hou,;es 1 t~ r · vl~lc c.1.--- .J • ..... Oil.L~-<:., to . ... 01'"'<. ~1.., ., • . cr;;·'--c:~··:11.;. -'-· _.c 'i:C, .., ______ ... . of : '. creL1nd i', •;c ,; 221 d ( 3 ) C of Ccnstitut:ion Co-op . Rd . SE 79 ':If .,)];i ,1 /or, .:L"i f.-1, c) • CL:i:~ l1;t,: c_.1 ; '. ~J ! . . I Tl1is pro1,osc1 l ·::c•.s 1·..; .i t::llrm:11 f.·t,L . (J rro ..: t1~e '.i.'.d u ( 3 ) 1 :r. L ..,l"L"L~ ~,cc,cu::;c '·1 J' l--'e l: c:,.;·L1J.,1 l l: · \ 1··.11'. · 1 ·• C:...1:\... l.<.JV;J,; ' L. :~.../,,liC.r" ~;c.;·... 1'1l.!,,_.,OLl~L • • ~1.L · · ::-_., -.:.-_1· 'L.·,. 1 O,·-cr - 1Jl. u ... l .... e o U J'.U• 1J0. ~, : , 1 v,~l'Y suLt;tanti.a l 5.n:;ur'...:.ince ccht-c-1 11y fo1."I· (:Gr1;-1 .... 1.~ic1.r1_j_ 17.F': ! [-,-·t=~-~2 3 l d Pr opos e d R~ n_t a l s _ Wh en j Pe r mit or 1 2 ; 3 l Ava i labl e - ; Ot h e r Value Ccmme n t -·---~== , ~~¢o1,_=====~~!~~====,....,j~.,i3=u= i =l=cl=e=r= -=R=.C .=C=u=;1-r~.i=n~=]=;a;,.;,-r;,;,n=,-~,;.k~l=a~10=m=a = 6 l j 36 0>'::": lI I I I I · Rumor is t h a t a pp .ica ti o n wa ~ wi t cJra,. n L •c aus,2 of jn e i g}1Lorho od res i stanc e . Nm-i cce k i n13 s i t c s in S . E .I · i ! I I! j I ! . II I Brock Ave . ll , W. 13et·,1e e n Ilollywoou. Rd . f, Lo tus Ave . i 22 ,;_ d ( 3 ) Re nt Sup l I i ! 1 2 A. s i ·t:e fro1Jti n~ cm Eoll :-,.-woo d ! Jorm C1·:e rr_;7 - /, r c h.i teci: . C01,s t . Dep t . e stirnnt e::; 1 5 00 ' GO " stcmn S (J ',-; ·2 ~· n eet:.E:ti c. t c o st of ~,7:) , GGG . 0 0 . 1 Pr omo t e rs hav e e ntered i nto a g r - eme nt with But l b r S~r e e~ YVi Cl/1 t o i a c t i Cit If . opera tor ; not, s ee k i r:g ar..ot h e r s te i1 1 I Lastr r tidn 01 'I ' as non - o ro f i 1: i . ! • ' j ' i J. I I I I ! I i I I i I i ! ! ! ' !' l l ! i II 1 [ ·j I j D- 1 2 i 2 4 0 l ! Ci ty . App l . to f ~A f i l ed Feb . 2 3 . Subse qu ent l y Ki t hd r awn Ly a p licant . ·, s am e .Gu i l d e r s t a t e s t ha t c omi,e titor fi led a r:;p l i cat i o n wi t h FhA c1;,ea1,J.]_6-, r-,alcolm D. Jone"' Su; erviso r of Ins~ e ction s~rvices Enclosure : Sur:1~nary of PuLli c rous i n3 i n /,t l anta �Aj?ril 20, 1 96 7 SU Hl·iARY OF PU BLIC !:OUSING IN AT LAliTA Units in operation - fi lle d . 88 74 1140 Uni ts i n Deve l opment s tage, as follo1-1s : ( 650 ) Un i ts off Nc Dan i el St , , in Rawson - Wa s h ingt on U. R. Proj e ct ( scheduled for crnnpl et i on by June 30 , (248) by Oct , 1 67 (402 ) by M~rch 1 68 _ ( 350 ) Un i ts in Thoma svi l l e U, R , Pro j e ct ( 40 ) l Bedroom (16 for e l derl y ) ( 120 ) 2 Bedroom ( 80 ) 3 Bedroom ( 80 ) 4 Be droom ( 30 ) 5 Be droom ( HO ) 1200 300 1 60 ) Now in hahd s of arc hi t e ct . Cannot a dvertise unt il a out May 15 . 2- 1/ 2 - 3 DO~t hs a dd itional Le fore construct i on cian start , 12 mont hs , a t least , a dd itional for construction , Will try to ha ve part deliver ed befor e f i nal. Units, Per1°y Homes F.:xt e ns ion - Sout~ cf rroct er Creek , · ( 78) 3 Bedroom ( li 6 ) 4 Bedroom Bi ds ope ned t a r ch 7, 1 96 7 . ( 16 ) 5 Bedrooin Estimat e 18 months to construct . Units pr eviously allocated - Pr oposed Turn Key ( a ll t e nta ti ve l y pl edged ), Un it s alloca ted for propos e~ purc has e or l eas e ( On l y possiLility fo r a dditi onal Pu blic Eou sing un its i r1 occupancy by mi ci -1.967; can only be t ur ned over f or Pub li c Hou s i n 6 occ u~ancy a s bec or:ie va c ant ). ": :r, Units under l e a se i44 ..... ( GS u1 it s , I:u r J?hY Apt s .. ; 48 un i ts , TEr.r. e s s ean Cc:w;ions ; 31 un i t s , Si ms ::ado.ox ' s Apt s , a t Cap i to l a nd Vi nar a , re qu i re r eha b ilitatio n ,) 2640~·, Tot a l add itiona l pl anne d ( as i n di c ated a bcve ) 300(;:': !iC!w Allocat ion - Propos e d Turn Key , an nounced FcLruary 24 . f,f,j,;ro ved. Ly BC: , of Al c:ermer. Dc c crr.b er 20 , l S66 , ( 300 t erd:a t i v eiy i,- l ed.:_:;ea ) ~Tota l a ddi tiona l un it s ~reje c t ed ( 5640 ) 14 , 514 l:.r.cl : Tot a l Potent i a l Re: se: rva. t ion uy l i\Ji) �HOUSING RF.'.SOURC:S S COYJ!'~ITTEE Topics f or discussion with the 1ayor May 8, 1967 Surmnary of April 20, Housing Resource s Committee report shows: 1. Estimate when avai l able No. Units 1967 1968 1969 Firm 3556 (1312) (1928) (316) Probable 3553 (1681) (672 ) Category 1970 1971 (500) (70'J ) (500) ( 700 ) - -7109 I n Sight (1312) Total Being Considered 4569 Doubtful 3088 (3609 ) (988) 14, 766 units Total Proposed Of the 71 proposals cont ained i n this report, 19 of the best ones and those which unti l recently were considere d among the most promising (comprising 6,504 units) have ei ther been turned down or are i n jeopardy . The princ i pal reasons fo r this, toge tr..er wi tb some suggestions to iJ prove the situation 1 Kere inc l uded in l etter of April 12 , t o the Chai rman of t he Housing Resources Committee. The proble~ areas of greatest concern are indicated i n the accompani ng l ist. 2. 2ffects of the problem encountered with the NAACP and the I nter- gr oup Relations Sect ion of HUD i s beginr.ing to be fe l t loc ally i n FctA also. It is apparent that the position t aken by the I nter-group Relations Section of ?.U D has been brewing for some time and now has the support ·of HUD LTJ. ivas hingt o • Thus far we have depended primarily on private developers to c ome in with proposed sites. Unless the current situation can be materially i mproved s oon, it may behoove the City t o go into t he business of sys temicall y cicte r mining sites for low cost housing and acquiring the land needed for such use, by condemnation if necessary, in much the sar1e manner as is dor.e by the Scnool Board f or needed school .sites. Of t he 9800 unit goal f or t he first t wo yenrs of the low co st housing progrc.. , alloc ation breakclmm specif i ed by the ifayor in the Housine Conf'er e ice .re as f oll01-rs  - - ~- - �- 2 - Public Housing 57% C: 5586 uni t s ( 5640 alloc ated) Private Develo)ers (conventio al 30~~ = 2940 units 22ld(3) Non- prof it 13% = 1274 unit s Total 9800 It seems that t he 22 l d(3), co- op i s the most popular approach t o the nonpr ofit development and is best for bot h t he City and the purchaser- occ upant . The prospect i ve home owner gets more for his money in t hi s t ype of home ownershi p t han in any other manner thus far propose d. The failur e and f oreclos i ng r ate nat i onal ly on the s e developments i s negligi bl e . Thi s t ype development s· _o uld be abl e t o ac count for a gr eater proporti onate share of the over al l r e~ui r ement t han t he 13% previ ousl y i ndic ated; i t should be widel y encouraged . 4. .An article by Alex Coffin in the Atlanta Constitut i on, April 17, s tat ed t hat 25% of Atlant a is in vac ant lot s . I f thi s be t r ue, our most available resource f or l ow- cost housing, both publ i c and pr ivate , i s on s catter e d sites. I nci dentall y such pro cedure woul d create a mi nimu."';;. of nei ghbor:0.ood ob j ecti on and polit ical di f f i culty. Bot h privat e devel opers and the Housing Aut hority s hould be calle d upon to pursue this principl e t o t he maximum. 5. The Housing Code i nspections on Boul evard have produced offers f or sale by ovrriers of at l e ast 103 units . 6. No adciiti onal sites under t he Public Housi ng le asing progr am have been &cc_t.:.ir ed since previous ousi ng Resources Cornin.i t t ee report of Fcbru.s.ry 20 . It appears that most of the time of the fousing Authority repr esentative assigned to leasing is t aken up in processing indivi dual t enm~t l eases for occupancy of the l eased units rather t har1 devot ing t he mai n effort t o sec~ring leases fo r adoitional units. The leasing of additional project s for Public Housing should be pushed. --- ------ -- - --- - - - - �- 3 - 7. Al though rehabilitation of sub - s tandard dwe l l ing units does not pro - vide additional hous i nb (and such is not i nclude d in Housing Resources Conmittee tabulation t otal s o_ prospe ctive housing uni ts ) , still t his feature adas materially t o the availabl e reso urce s of st an dard housing and tends to reduce t he r equirement for new hous i ng . Consequent l y it i s des i rabl e for the Housing Res ources Cammi t t ee to ha•ve cur rent inf or mation on t he extent of rehabi litation and princ i pal areas involve d . Thi s i nform&tion is cont ai ned i n r outi ne monthl y report s of ac t iviti es of the Housing Co de Di vision and has been r eques ted several times , but has not been r ece i ve d since J anuar y and only par tial i nformation was provided for Decembe r and Janu.s.ry . There appears t o be no l ogical r e as on why c cp i e s of the Housing Code Di vision ' s mont hl y rep orts s hould not be r;}t e,, ':'!;' (11) f tti made avai l able t o t he Hous ing Resources Commi ttee. 8. Although s ome of the di ff ic ul ties confront ing t he low- cost hous i ng progr am may be beyond t he abili t y of the Ci ty, however t he odcome of zoni ng petit i on numbe r Z-67-33G (deni al of r ezoni ng f rom M-1 t o A-1) i s t ypic al of situati ons over which the City doe s have control and 1-1her e r ez oning may have to be accomplished i n order to provide ample locations f or deve l opment of low- cost housi ng . 9. There are s t ill 157 singl e family l ots in t he Thomasville Urb2n Renewal Pro j ect which have not been sol d f or 221 de ve l opment. t--1ir1imum . h ave b een es t abl_is . h.e d on a 11 of t hes e 7_ov~ s, ranging . " &900 ~vO prices 1rom ~ !;:.2 100 eacn . In order to enc ourage development of t hese lots, r eco,1i:- end t:i.at pr ice reductions be made for multipl e pur chases, as shown on the attached card and that publicity be gi ven to that effe ct. our FHA consultant, conc urs wi th this principl e . ~ ivJ:r. Gate s, The s ugge s ted r educt i on ~as been shown to a r eputabl e and experienced developer who agree s t hat it is practical and should result i n de vel opment of these lots. • 1-,J to~r/ �- 4 - 10. In order to keep the interest and confidence of prospecti ve developers in the low- cost housing field, suge;est t hat a confe r ence be c a lled by the I·' ayor with the Board of Alder:nen and t hat some of the most interested lowcost housing prrn oters and developers be invited to present their views and comments on the prograin . such an opportunity. Several have indicated that they ,·1 ould welc ome Suc h meeting might produce s ome he l pful ideas . In any event it would provide an opportunity fo r them to stat e their side of the problem and should s e rve to cle a r tie currently conf used at~nosphere . Also suggest that the Pr ess be i nvited to such a meeting . Encls: Sug e;ested p rice r educ tions on Thorr.e.sville lots I1emo d ated April 21, 1967 �- - - -- - - - -- - - - - - -~ - --.- - - ----- -- -· ~ - · - .. - - _ .. .. ._ _ _ ..~_ _ _ _ __ __ , _ , _ _ _ I • ' L 1 I • .. ~ - · I April 21. 1967 MEMORANDUM · To: Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Director of Governmental Liaison F -rom: Malcolm D. Jones Supervisor of Inspection Services Pursuant to our brief discussion this morning, the following is a concise list of major problems currently being encountered in the low-cost housing program (for more detail see copy of my letter of April 12 to Cecil Alexander). 1. Difficulty for developers to find land suitably zoned and at prices which make low-cost housing development economically feasible. 2. NAACP objection to sites proposed in areas which they . consider occupied predominately by Negroes. 3. Support of the NAACP position by the Intergroup Relations Section of the Regional Office of HUD. with apparently the backing of HUD at the Washingtonllevel. 4. FHA reluctance to approve locations which they consider might offer competition to development of Rockdale; also constant and extreme conservatism against ov er building in any area until each development is actually tested as to marketability; plus the ov erflow effect of the difficulty e x pla ined in 2 and 3 above , although no directive to that effect appears to have yet actually reached the local FHA office. l �l .... Mr. Sweat Page Two April 21, 1967 5. Neighborhood resistance by home owners, generally to apartments going anywhere near them. 6. Reluctance of the Board of Aldermen to rezone suitable areas because of neighborhood objections. 7. Reluctance of the Planning Department to recommend . rezoning of necessary areas because of inconsistency with previously adopted plans in most areas. 8. Difficulty in keeping developers interested in view of the combination of the above listed problems. 9. Slowness of non-profit groups to sponsor projects (a mandatory provision of the 221 d (3) low-interest rate program). Malcolm D. Jones Supervisor of Inspection Service s MDJ:'fy ��------- -- EOUSING RE SOURCE S r ·nH:,;T T',Tl-: - -- 1% 7 ---· --. - Probler.: Ay:,eas ~ - - - -··;  ; - ; ~ · l: -- 2 S8 i ·• Program Location i . --~---=.-- ::::._ ---· - -··--· -,. 1:cc~t cf Ho llyv;ocd Ro ad llorth of Froctcr Creek Turnkey Opro s e . , · ··--:-; Dr. Cleveland Denard, Principal,Carver Vocational· School .. . . ' .... · . . . .. ·.-.·.·,~i ,:, S ee B e l ow · • · . ,, ' :, • : •• • • • • ·~: •• f •• • ~ · 1' \. _ • , . , . 4 ~.-. • I , • • I •; ~ . )i:'.[ ~.. .i .· Finance Jack Tarver, Federal Reserve Bank Richard Courts, Courts & Co • ·Jesse Hill, · Atlanta Life Dean Harding B. Young, At~anta University Lee Burge , Pres., Retail Credit. Harold Patterson, Pres., Federal Reserve Bank · .. . ·_ . •:\ . ,·, : . . , 143.215.248.55 d ·{ ul'· . ~ -- . ' ·. · - ·. .. .· . ' '. _· ' ·-. \ . ,,. ./;! -.. -: \ / ! .: -~ ·1-, :1t - .... .. . . .. . .... ' . • . ... ~ .-.. : • ,. . ' -' ;-·; - Butl er T. He n ders on , Ass i stant to Dr. M ay s, M o rehou s ~ C o lle_ge_ Nonpr ofit Funds . A. B. Padgett, Director Atlanta Metropolitan Fund · Boisfeuillet Jone s, Director, Woodruff Foundation Hamilt on Do_u gl as , Attorney_. Rev . Holmes Borders . Dr. Ruf us Clement, Pres ., Atlanta Univers i t y _,. John Wilson, Director, At lanta Chambe r of Commerce . . : .: . Albert Love; Ex-Vice Pres., The McCall Corp. • l ! . _. t -'.' . • • ,I \ I, . ~ ··· ·.·· Public Hous ing E. H. Sterne, Chairman ; Atlanta Housing Author ity· . •, Dr. Albert Hanley Lucien Oliver , Vice Pres ., Sears Roebuck Co, Leonard Reinch , Pr~s ., Cox · Broadcasting Co. · · Clar'ence Colema n, Nationa l Ur ban Le_a gue ,., .: ~ . \ .' . Land Acquisition Robert Biven , President, Central Atla nta Robert L, Sommerville, President, Atlanta Transit W. L. Lee , Preiident, Atlanta Gai Light C. R. Yates, President ,. Yates-Mil t6n St ores Vivian Henderson, President, Clark Coll_e ge Socia l Prob l ems , Charles Emmerich~ Director E. 0.A. Duane Beck, Director, Community Council Suyette Crank Prof. T. Johnson, Political ·Science, Morehouse Coll_e ge William Jackson, Atlanta Unive~sity C. A. Bacote 1, T. D. Archer, President,. Buildin$ Trade s Council Henry F . .Alexander James Moqre, President, Atlanta .Labor Council • 0', ~ , ~ ~ ~ ~ ·,r• . ~ \f J ' n !I, ~,. . 11J•.'-~ ~,:~~\I 1.t\~ • j io ~,a ,.: •• . .•i I • ,·_: r . '~- .' -. •I •fl,, .• _ al , • . L-l . '· t.'~ '-. ' •' "" ' j l �II . ·, ' -2- i ., . Busine s s.Participation .· J ohn J. McDonough, Finch,Alexander,Barnes,Rothschild &·Paschal, · Architect Virgil Milton, 3626 Tuxedo Road N.W. L. D. Miltsm, President, Citizens Trust E. L. Simon, Atlanta Life Harlee Branch, Southern Company W. A. Pulver, President, Lockheed Rolland Maxwell, President, Davison's Dept. Stores ,- ! .1 • , > • • . . :·1 . ,·, . .. ,·. -• • ' ' I . .- ·1. · , . • ~! I Public Infor ma tion ' . John Crown, City. Editor, Atlanta Journal William I. Ray, Executive Editor, Atlanta Newspapers c. A. Scott, Atlanta Daily World Ernest M. Pharr, Editor, Atlanta Inquirer James Townsend, Atlanta Magazine Dale Clark, WAGA . Ray Moore, WSB -.• .. i, . .... ·. .i ,: 1, · ·; . ,.. , .,.::,1l L -:: ; t i . .. The . subcommittees are, in addition to supplying "know-how", also to be influential at all levels in gain acceptance for the program. Each Committee will s elect at least two y·ounger men to work with_the·m. · These men should come from f irms that can afford to donate part of their time for intensive work. Su_g gestions of a f ew follow: ·, ,· ··• •· ~ I .; _. _::·,;! I I ". •.i ' ,. _ . ' 't ., ( ... .. ! ·  ' ,-. ' ,• <·. ,... ' ,: · • . ~ I I . · .• \ "Bo" Whitman, First National· •Bank H. Alan Elsas, The Robinson Humphrey Co. Geo_r ge Kennedy, Trust Company of G~o.rgia Tom Porte:r, The Coca -Cola Co. ,, . ' • . f j ... -. ; . ·_.. ;I •./j ' . ! . . :· _·. . :- : ·. -·,,·i . ..  :.:~-f f 'i .·. : . I l •.: I In addi tion ~ each Committee will s elect ar;i advisory panel of .men :active i n the ·, . .·.: ~· ·. _.:.:·: r·' f i e ld o f hous ing. It is understood that this panel · will be avciilable to ad· ··· · ..:- ' · vise when needed but will be free of any ·conflict in pursui_n g ~ctive housi_ng · : : _.: .. interests. ··. ·· _· ·· · ·· · · . ·-1 ' 1 >\H . . •. ". .. ' . ·/ ·. ·:-.L/,.;:i I .:· . ·.. . ' .· ;·/ i! , .. . . .::.' :.:-.. 1 . -~· .. I \ '· ' 11 ' I . ' : .,, · ,' . ~I •' ·, ' f, 1•• . .·, ·, ' I ,I~ .. ~ . .... , • . /- . '. ' ', . ... . • • .:-: •. . .· / ,, I .. . . . . _., •' i .·,.. ... : .. I ' I ' j , I ,. • I 1•"t\•:,r It t .; .··.:>~/: ·.· .·_/./ ·! 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  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 18, Folder 20, Document 14

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_020_014.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 20, Document 14
  • Text: . f4 - APRIL, MAY, AND JUNE "~ PerCTa.'1ent po sitions filled (Second Quarter) I ID ~~ CIT'£ OF ATLANTA - POSITIONS FILLED AS OF SEOJND QUARTER 1967 FOR IW'nite ~r143.215.248.55 f Temporary Employment - Summer Only (as of June 30, 1967) vThite olored I Colored -· \{ale Lo1 670 .1071 Female 56 13 69 457 683 Male Female 149 161 310 26 25 51 175 186 "":n 0 1140••• Total 361 • • Tota!l ""* Appointments for Second Quarter, April, May, June, 1967 40% white and 6Cf/, colored. Ratio-of approximately 2:3 white, to colored males. Ratio of approximately 5:1 white to colored females. Temporary summer- appointments, as of Jur.e 30, 1967. 48% white - 52% colored. Ratio of approximately 1:1 white Grand Total(Including Summer Help) and Perman en~ Appointments - April, May, June - 1967 ., .-:~ ·  :n white Paul E.'; Leslie , George Hill, Jinrrnie Shanks , J immie Le e Cotton , Jerry , Jr, West , Larry &rntest ',lilkes, Charles &rl Jackson, Charlie Fiolrr.es , 11ilton Elder, Eugene Daniel Powell , Arthur Keith Fot-ler , Walter Treatment Plant Opr. l ab orer II Treatment Plant Opro Laborer II Carpenter Treatment Plant Opr. Labor er II Laboratory Technician Laborer II Semi - Skilled Worker Eng, Aide I Engineering Aide I I E-ngineering Aide I Laborer II Engineering Aide I F4uipo Operator I Laborer II II Senior Typist Clerk Tr eatraent Plant Opr. Laborer II II II II " Sewer Serv, I Laborer II II II II II " " II II NUMBER DEPARTiilllT 2020 310 39.5 2090 2114 297 989 21.51 2086 20.5/+ 83 87 93 461 56 268 2058 310 Construction C -< '"J ' '.) II II II II II II II " II II II II II II II II 2o44 II 130 914 361 421 863 3?9 II " " " II II 7(:}+ II 875 2J.1+2 825 .534 859 913 570 76.5 8.58 2128 II 764 (3) . II II II II II II II II II II II DATE EFFECTIVE 5/24/67 5/24/67 5/29/67 5/31/67 5/11/67 5/8/67 4/6/67 5/18/67 5/25/67 2/17/67 3/23/67 6/12/67 6/12/67 5/19/67 6/5/67 5/6/67 6/ 2/67 6/21 67 6/16/67 6/29/ 67 6/19/67 6/20/67 6/15/67 6/ 22/67 6/15/67 6/ 23/67 6/15/67 4/ 20/67 l~ / 21/67 4/ 20/67 4/ 21/67 4/ 21/67 4/ 20/67 4/27/67 4/ 25/67 4/ 24/ 67 4/ 27/67 RACE 1,nn 1·7!11 wm '\•7!11 •7!11 cm 1·7!11 wm wm wm wm 1-nn w111 wm wm Hnt wf cm cm cm cm cm wl':l cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm wm cm cm �- :::. -< - ~-3 POSIT . CLllSS ~;_:.3 - - ----- - -~----.. . .•=,..... , ---~ ..:,er..,:2-~:.::..!"~, ,-::,~·., ,.-, - - - - J P.:.. thur ·l !ic~a s J ?.2.lF-<1 · ·oooward Kai -t.r:, :i.fo~zc. ~", ~;J 1er T-.c , Huff, 1/ -:: x, "· -:-~ • X 1 ~5 - < a " .3 I NDMBER wcrr ex/ bd II "II " " " "II WCII-Day II wcrr " WCII-Day WCII WCII-Day Sanitary " " " "II . II II a "II II II " II 'I " Laborer wcrr DEPARTMENT " WCII-Day WCII II fl WCII-Day Wa ste Collector D-.civer II WCII-Day " "II II II II II II II II II " II II II II II II II II II II " II II " II " "II "II II II II wen II " II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II (18) II EFFECTD!E 5/26/67 5/ 26/67 5/29/67 5/29/67 6/5/67 6/ 6/ 67 5/Jo/67 6/5/67 5/29/67 6/5/67 6/5/67 6/7/67 6/ 8/67 6/'?/67 5/31/67 5/25/67 5/30/67 6/5/67 5/30/67 6/ 2/67 5/30/67 6/5/67 5/17/67 5/11/67 5/22/ 67 5/ 23/67 5/19/67 5/ 23/67 5/ 22/ 67 5/ 23/67 5/ 23/67 5/ 23/67 5/24/ 67 5/23/67 5/ 24/ 67 5/ 25 /67 5/ 23/ 67 5/ 24/67 RACE cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm wm cm cm cm cm cm wm wm cm cm cm cm wm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm - om �_ , _r_ CLASS -~ Rus sell , John De-,rny Jr. WCII Srrd. th , Eerbert ":X )7  ;J .!:;_/ -: x ' ,  ;, - Sanitary II II II II II II II II WCII(Ni ght) WCII(day ) II II II II II II WCII(I-:ie;ht) WCII (Day ) II -_ - DATE EFFECTWE 3/29/67 3/31/67 3/30/67 3/30/67 4/4·/67 3/30/67 5/5/67 3/30/67 3/30/67 4/14/67 4/12/67 L~/13/67 4/13/67 ll L~/lJ/67 II II II II II II II II II II If ll II II 4/12/67 iJ.-/12/67 iJ.- /12/67 4/12/67 4/6/67 4/7/67 3/30/67 L~ /11/67 4/14/67 4/14/67 4/11/67 4/10/67 4/13/67 4/13/67 Laborer II ii Ii WCII(Day ) L,tb or er 1lCD (Day ) II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II 1625 ll42 II II WCI (Day ) II WCII (Day ) WCII (Ni ght ) WCII (Day ) WCII (Ni ght ) WCII (Day ) II II wx / bd II II II II ll II II II II II ii II II 1492 II RACE _,__. II (20) ~::, DEPARTMENT L~ / 27/67 L~/ 27 / 67 4/28/ 67 4/ 29/67 4/27/67 4/19/67 5/ 2/67 4/24/ 67 cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm wm wm cm wm wm ,,'!Tl cm wm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm �CLASS n"x\ 01'1 "Jl) ' 31 -. Oil .~8J j Williams, Walter Rudolph , Fletcher Charles Bryant, F.ddie L. V.u rry, Willie Lee St illwell, Loyd Oberhausen, John Frank Favors, Gordon Chafin, Elmer Lee Cash, Arthur Kelley Philli ps, Josei:h Hugh Starks , Charlie Jr. Sanders , Forest E. Wooten, Knivelton B. Jr. Weath ers , J ohn Thomas Townsend, Bill Har mon s:v·. Rutl edge , Alber t Jr. Roscoe , Albert Sonny Robinson , John Long, Gl ynnis Alt on Kane , Thoma s Lee Harri s , Edward James Hamby , J i mn1y Lane Bowen , Thoma s Lee Dover, Clarence El.mer Bostick , Charl es Wesl ey Hill, Tommie Fr ed Benjamin, Clarence Carter , Isaac Davison , Rufus Evans, Charles Eo Flemi ng , Thomas Gocx:hd.n, Char l es D. Howard , John W. Inman , William Douglas Dowdell , Joseph Kini ght , Edward Ray WCI(Day) WCII(Day) II II II WCD(Day) WCII(Day) WCD(Ni ght) WCD(Day) Laborer WCII(Night) WCD II WCD(Day) II WCD( Ni ght) II WCD (Day) POSIT. NUMBER DEPARTMENT 1690 3171 3244 3249 3411 1101 J425 4231 1174 6029 4186 3156 3119 Sanitary -;J Oi II ex/ bd II II II " II II It II II II II II II WCD (Night) II WCD(Day) WCD(Ni ght) WCD(Day ) II II II II II II II II WCII (Day) II II II II II II II II WCII (Ni ght) WCII (Day ) WCII(Ni ght ) WCII (Day ) Laborer WCII(Day ) Incin. Operator I II II II II II II II II II II 1489 666 (21) ..,X \ II II II DATE EFFECTIVE 4/24/67 4/27/67 4/27/67 4/27/67 4/ 27/67 4/27/67 4/27/67 4/27/ 67 4/27/67 4/24/67 4/27/67 5/11/67 5/11/67 5/1/67 4/ 27/67 4/25/67 5/ 2/67 4/26/67 4/27/67 4/28/67 4/24/67 5/ 2/67 4/28/67 5/4/67 5/3/67 5/3/67 5/2/67 5/4/67 5/3/67 5/ 2/67 5/3/67 5/2/67 5/2/67 5/3/67 5/11/67 4/ 27/67 RACE cmcm cm cm cm wm cm wm wm wm cm wm wm wm wm cm wm cm wm wm cm wm cm wm wm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm wm �POSIT. CLASS ~ nx \ 01'1 I 0 Jl; , 1 ~ o, 1-~ Flant , - Calvi n SteJ:hens, Charlie Henry Tompkins, Abner J ames Webb, John Carl Cannon, Richard Columbus Parker, Larry Donnell Lay, Stanley Favors, Gordon Maddox, Coy Howard, Donald Dean Cheel ey, Willie Sam Wells, James Clifford Adams , Will i e Henry Jr. _ Henders on, Herber t Hill, Tonnny Lee Jenkins, Curtis Robins on , Bruce Mathis Boone , William Campbell , Curtis Watson Eberhart, Norris Lee Hunter, Elbert Perrimon, Leroy Leach, Charles F.cl.ward Johnson, Johnny Gordon Sea ts, William N. Wright , Ben Bilbo Beasley, Rufus Brackins , F.ddie c. huey, Waddell Jro Goggins , Joseph Watkins, Rufus Arrlrew Stephens, Hubert Elliott, Sam Davidson, Clarence Kennedy, Ben Plant, Van Jro Simmons, Fred Jr. WCII WCII (Day) WCD(Day) II . . -- II WCII(Day) II WCII(Day) WCI (Night) Laborer WCII WCII NUMBER 2458 1468 1184 2454 1175 1310 1383 3467 4306 ex/bd --:: x \ .: , ~-;J ~o ' J Sanitary II " II II II . II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II WCD(Day) La.borer WCII II II II II II II II II II II II II II II " II II II II II II II II La.borer II II WCI(Day) WCI(Day) WCII(Day) II 7o45 7o46 7030 1611 1615 1470 ex/bd WCII E WCII II II II II II II Labor er II II (22) 1 DEPARTMENT II DATE EFFECTIVE 5/11/67 5/11/67 5/11/67 5/11/67 5/11/67 5/11/ 67 5/11/67 5/12/67 5/11/67 5/8/67 5/11/67 5/10/67 5/11/67 5/15/67 5/15/67 5/12/67 11/18/66 5/16/67 5/16/67 5/16/67 5/15/67 5/15/67 5/16/67 5/16/ 67 5/17/67 5/16/67 5/15/67 5/16/67 5/12/ 67 5/18/67 5/18/67 5/18/67 5/15/67 5/17/67 5/15/67 5/17/67 5/19/67 RACE cm cm cm cm wm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm �l--~J )( 1 c ., ' ..,"" ,.. , ._,;;.· CLASS ~ ~, 0 1'1 "Jll ' l ~ Oi=l ·;-ti -~_gj I ", J -:, / Jackson:;- Charles Jr, WCII (Night) II Kennebrew, Harold Lu..1<:e , Harry WCI(Night) WCII(Day)Pitts, Clavin II Almond, Samuel II Roberts, Eugene II Ward, Lester Jr. WCII(Night) Willis, Albert Bob WCD(Day) Spence, Sanford Eugene WCII(Day) Bigsby, Johnny P. Griffin, Lawrence WCII(Night) Johnson, Willie Joe WCII(Day) II Phillips, Robert Eugene Baker, Har old Wesl ey WCII (Day) Barnwell , Robert James WCII(Ni ght) Benford, James WCII(Day) II Dunson , Wayne Robert Garner , Warner Laborer II Gates, Robert Cecil WCII(Day) Hemphill , Ralph Jackson, Walter Lawr ence WCII(Night) WCII(Day) Martin, Willie T. Jr. II Phillips, Ja..~es Lewis Jr. II Richardson, Lorenzo Alphonzo II Trimble, Ri chard Bowen, Thomas Lee WCD II Dover, Clarence Elmer II Hamby , J immy Lane II Hill, ToJErie Fred II Roscoe , Alberts . II Sheppard , Geor ge E. II &ni t h , Norris E. WCII Barron, .Arthur Jo II Lucas, James Cecil WC Mor el and , Ceas er Jr. II Parks, Bobby Lee WCII(Day) Carroll, Williard Lee II Sh effi eld, Sylvester POSIT. NUMBER ex/bd Sanitary II II II II II II II II II II 1185 ex/bd II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II 4183 1185 2182 1101 4184 3241 1460 4289 4132 4285 3425 II ex/ bd II (23 ) I, DEPARTMENT " II II II • II DATE EFFECTIVE 5/1/67 5/2/67 5/1/67 4/28/67 5/3/67 5/4/67 4/27/67 5/2/67 5/4/67 5/3/67 5/9/67 5/11/67 5/11/67 5/9/67 5/5/67 5/10/67 5/10/67 5/9/67 4/25/67 5/8/67 5/8/67 5/9/67 5/8/67 5/9/67 4/27/67 5/25/67 5/25/67 5/25/67 5/25/67 5/25/67 5/24/67 5/25/67 5/25 /67 5/25 /67 5/25/67 5/25/67 4/12/67 4/6/67 RACE cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm wm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm wm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm wm wm cm wm cm cm cm cm cm cm wm cm �~-;- c -: . -: :;:r .i .~ : - POSIT. .!. CLASS - ,. r,;;t -...=. _!.:.: NUMBER DEPARTMENT DATE EFFECTIVE RACE I Da. 11, Joseph , Willie James Hamilton, Jesse Gore, George Norris, David Lee Whicker, Simon Jr. Barlow, John W. Adams, Willie James Maddox, Roger Lee Marshall, Clifford Tucker, Robert James Culpepper, Howard Jac!-::son, Leroy Jackson, George Lee Dowdell, Freddie Ezell Crawford , George Franklin , Woodie Potts, Jerry Lee Gordon, Murray W. Cberhausen, John Frank McCor d, Andrew Jr. Ester , Jerry Jerome Conwell , Howard Hills , Freddie We ston, Claude Sonny Scott , Grady 1-'i lls, J a.mes Fddie Y.insey, F. K. Dillard, William Franklin Cannon , Richard Columbus Rawls, Emmitt Hinton Webb , John Carl Spence , Sanford Eugene Delong, Frank McDowell , James Jordon, Albert Fre eman , John B. D t.1 1: ~ ~r g~\ ""'llJ J ~ ~ Cti -:::i ~ 1 ~x =7 -::i 'Jo/ WCII(Day) ex/bd Sanitary II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II WCII(Ni,ht) WCI(Day WCI WCII(Day) II WCII(Night) WCII(Day) II II II WCII(Night) II WCI(Day) WCD(Day) II WCII(Day ) II 1211 1464 429'-I1178 1210 1336 1408 4134 4187 3661 1]_75 1174 ex/bd II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II II WCII WCD(Day ) WCD (Day ) 1659 2274 II II 1184 II II 2697 II II ex/bd II WCD( N:i.ght ) WCII (Day ) WCII (Night ) II II II II II II II II II II II II (24 ) 4/4/67 4/17/67 4/18/67 4/18/67 4/4/67 4/14/67 4/10/67 4/6/67 4/13/67 4/13/67 4/13/67 4/13/67 4/14/67 4/13/67 4/13/67 4/13/67 4/13/67 4/13/67 4/13/67 4/13/67 3/9/67 2/9/67 4/18/67 4/19/67 4/18/67 4/18/67 4/19/67 4/17/67 4/13/67 4/17/67 4/13/67 4/ 21/67 4/19/67 4/ 21/67 4/ 20/67 4/20/67 4/19/67 cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm wm wm wm cm . cm cm cm cm cm cm cm wm wm wm cm ·wm wm cm cm cm �POSIT. CLASS 0~ 01'1 \ w Davis, 1·: alt er Leon Barber, Bobby Farris Pl ant , Cal v-4~---i Webb , Ilon Buren Chappell, \-layman Hutchins, Henry Parrish, Horace Stone, Freddie Lucas, James Cecil Ward, Joseph WCII(Day) WCD(Day) WCII(Day) WCD(Day) Laborer NUMBER DEPARTMENT ex/bd Sanitary 3241 II ex/bd II II II II II II II II WCII(Day) II II II II II II II II II WCII(Night) WCII(Day) DATE EFFECTIVE RACE 4/20/67 4/13/67 4/21/67 4/18/67 4/24/67 4/18/67 4/25/67 4/24/67 4/25/67 4/25/67 cm wm cm wm 6/13/67 4/17/67 4/4/67 6/13/67 5/2/67 4/29/67 6/1/67 wm cm wm wm cm cm cm cm cm cm 0 8i1 ~ :.J Traffic Checker Laborer II · Electrician Traffic Checker Typist Clerk Labor er II Stenographer 41 182 225 40 80 178 70 Crews , J. T. Crutcher, J ean M. Earls, H. G. Hend on, Sandra Lee Hi t chell, J.E. Arnall , J ames E. Buyer I Vari-Typer Operator Duplicating Assistant Typist Clerk Duplicatine Assistant Buyer I 6 19 21 10 Bennett, K. L. Eberhardt, Robert W, Hogsed , R. V. Jo:ies , W. L. Lowry, Genevieve Robinson, L. J . Wood , Japhus W. Correction Officer I Corr ection Officer I 34 Callaway , Marie Lynn Davis, Marion L. IG..uttz , J. H. J enkins, Snndra E. Payha..m , Leila c. Stenographer Stenographer Planner II Stenographer Typist Clerk (In Sr.Typist ) 18 29 6 19 16 21 11 f _-<'!_1 . ,<' . 12, J Stephens, James W.,Jr. Johnson, Claude Dovms, Ira, Jr. Lett, Anth ony F. Crosby, Janell F. Crowder, Freddie E. Conner, G. Y. 14 II 44 II 27 55 37 48 II Nurse-Matron II (25 ) Traffio Engineering II II II II II II Purchasing II II II II II Prison II II II II It II Planning II It II II wf cm wf 6/6/67 6/12/67 5/23 /67 6/5/67 1/10/67 5/2/67 wm wm cm 6/1/67 6/12/67 5/4/67 4/4/67 4/18/67 6/14/67 5/16/67 wm wm wm wm 6/12/67 4/4/ 67 4/18/67 6/12/67 5/4/ 67 wf wf wf wm wm wf wf cm wm wf wf �]~ ~ -:;i "'" ' J..._;;..· ~ 01" I jJJ 0 ~ on 1 _j~J POSIT. ~- a- ....-. CLASS _..:_·_:, NUMBER DEPA."R.T.MENT Fester, ~-~argaret L. Wccx:i, J c.ns K. Typist Clerk Personnel Assistant I 18 20 Personnel Giles, Gary Paul Draftsman I 37 Tax Assessors Fergerson, Charles D. McElharmon, H. R. Jackson, Allen D. Jackson, Glen E. Churchill, George E. Cooper, Dan E. Callaway , David Mo Green, Jerry D. Westbrooks, C. Stephens, Loren B. Stiles, O. L. Stowe , Dwain Lamar Thurman , John A. Todd, A. L. Stegall , Ral ph E. Self, H. A. Rakestraw, Elizabeth McCrickard, B. D. Millsaps, P. H. Eoore, H. Lane Morris, J . A. Nei-nnan , James I. Fatula, Fdward F. Landers, Billy Joe Lux , Frances J. Kalb , Hank Thecx:iore Holbrook , W. R. Howard , John Ro Cooper, Virginia L. Crider, J. L. Pumping Plant Operator .524 261 87 .526 7.5 88 313 398 511 462 .541 14 .566 618 497 632 583 II II II II II II Meter Mechanic Security Guard Automotive Servic eman I Auto-Body Repair.Painter Customer Service Clerk Semi-Skilled Worker Automotive Mechanic Treatment Plant Opr.II Typist Clerk Water Meter Reader Wat er Meter Reader Treatment Plant Opr . Water Meter Reader JS 380 619 476 465 381 462 54 442 112 380 477 96 II Customer Service Clerk Automotive Serviceman I Customer Service Clerk Water Meter Reader Treatment Plant Opr. Water Meter Reader Customer Service Clerk Security Guard (26 ) II Water II II II ti II II II II II II II II II II II II II II 11II II II II II II II II II II · DATE EFFECTIVE RACE --6/12/67 4/3/67 wf 6/19/67 wm .5/31/67 .5/17/67 .5/24/67 6/12/67 .5/24/67 .5/29/67 .5/30/67 5/15/67 5/23/67 3/24/67 6/12/67 4/18/67 3/16/67 .5/12/67 6/21/67 4/4/67 4/24/67 4/28/67 4/26/67 5/9/67 6/15/67 4/10/67 4/10/67 5/3/67 5/1/67 6/5/67 5/15/67 6/23/67 4/17/67 4/5/67 wf wm wm wm wm wm wm wm wm cm wm wm wm wm wm wm wm wf i-nn wm wm wm cm wm wm wf wm wm wm wf wm �i POSIT. NUMBER )( • c --: '::;J ..::,.: -,- Der=non, R.R . Eea.-r~, R. _f. Breed, F. E. Bruce, Susan S. Bryant , M. C. '1><\ jy 0 ~ 'rl 3.~ CLASS ·~ r--: - -~ Calhoun , L. W. Sentell, David Ray Cotton, ~lichael P. Cox, Donald Wood.all, Lewis E. Sutton, Larry Dennis Ferrell, Charlie Mack Tucker, James Henry Grant, Ronald Bigsby, J. P. Brooks, John E. Davis, William Sharp, Ivory Coleman , Nathaniel Holton, Eddie Ben Jones, Tommy Frank Bladenburg, James H. Fowler, Adolphus Thomas , Willie Freddy Pierce, Howell Faust, Walter Lee Cox, Charles George, Carlton Foster, .A..rrnon S. Brown, Dwight Lee Cornelius, Gregory Wood.a.rd, Ji..'TII!ly Larry Whatley , John Albert Patte~son , Arthur L. Swinger , Freddie E. Williams, Jerome Arnold, Harold Lee Security Guard Treatment Plant Opr. Security Guard Typist Clerk . Water Meter Reader Treatment Plant Opr. Laborer 511 559 DEPARTMENT Water II 512 II 695 II 40 II 597 II 189 679 636 521 449 359 720 521 555 6o4 640 221 449 236 425 554 303 II " II II II " " ,, II II II II II II 555 195 425 236 554 687 303 6o4 681 166 411 614 297 248 II II " II II " " " " II II II II (27 ) II II II II II DATE EFFECTIVE 6/2/67 5/30/67 4/24/67 4/19/67 5/2/67 6/1/67 4/18/67 4/10/67 4/19/67 4/4/67 5/3/67 5/3/67 4/27/67 4/27/67 5/1/67 5/2/67 4/10/67 4/6/67 4/4/67 4/4/67 4/3/67 5/9/67 5/15/67 5/8/67 5/17/67 5/16/67 5/9/67 5/Jl/67 5/31/67 5/29/67 5/29/67 5/24/67 5/23/67 5/26/67 5/30/67 5/30/67 5/30/67 RACE wm wm wm wf wm cm wm wm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm wm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm wm cm cm cm cm cm �POSIT. CLASS Ea:-ris , Willie Ste:!± a::ts , ': i l l i e , Rollie Lorenzo Porter, Raymond Kelley, Lonnie ~e Brow-:n, Benny Lee Reigner, Charles T, Pace, James Arnold Cooper, Loran c. Wright, Michael Mosley, Gary Hughey, Maggie T. F~1 1 Calloway, Herman L, Spence, James M. Trimble, Donald Owens, Leroy Wynn , Bobby Ingram, Marcellous HcCullers, James W, Jordon, Oscar R. Oliver, John Tnomas Henson, Charles Dewitt Gre en, Perry L., Jr, . Usher , Hulen , Jr. Carey, Alonza G. Ferrell, lfolan Ha.son , Robert M. Sims, Albert Leon Daniel, Nathaniel Glover , Erick v. Plant, Dan Releford, Curtis Rome , Ralph s. Rowland, James C, Rozier, Dennis L, Rushin, Marcus A, Nill'113ER Laborer II 362 Water 721 II 614 338 358 376 252 688 517 293 192 477 II II II II II II II II II Customer Service Clerk Laborer 90'-fll. 9o46 417 815 9o45 793 9o49 9o43 9o47 9050 9o48 II School Custodial Worker II Laborer School Custodial Worker Laborer II II II II DEPARTMENT II II II II II II II II II II School _ II " II II 90'-fll. II 348 433 631, 825 588 483 483 692 433 755 813 825 School Custodial Worker II II II II II II II II II II II (28) II II II II II II II II DATE EFFECTIVE 5/30/67 5/4/67 6/9/67 6/5/67 6/13/67 6/6/67 6/5/67 6/5/67 6/15/67 6/6/67 6/1/67 6/17/67 5/1/67 5/1/67 5/4/67 5/4/67 5/2/67 4/3/67 5/1/67 5/3/67 5/1/67 5/3/67 5/1/67 5/23/67 6/6/67 6/7/67 5/25/67 5/29/67 5/29/67 6/1/67 5/22/67 4/10/67 5/25/67 4/25/67 3/20/67 4/5/67 RACE cm cm cm cm cm cm wm wrn cm cm cm wf cm wm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm wm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm �J':,,;-, C ;i -::;:, POSIT, NUMBER ""'0 .Z ~ E.Al --3 CLASS DEPARTMENT DATE EFFECTIVE RACE - --- - ix \ 01'1 ' 0 3 ,?I vl'l _::_8) l S-im.s, Albert L, Sims, John W. Stefford , steve Swinger, Leonard S-wi.."1.~ey, Jerrell Thomas, Fred L. Thompson, Charles A. Bell, John Baker Burks, Glen H.,Sr. Butts, Thomas Jenkins, Howard B. Jewell, John T. Johns, Eddie Lee Johnson, Melvin Rice, Betty L. Royal, D. C. St. John, Pa..mela J, Saylor, Raymond Scott, Bobby Scott, Virginia Sewell, P. V. Se;ynour, A. E. Shippy, Mary Ellen Steverson, Ruby L. Talton, Susan M. Tourand, Helen Crit tenton, Charles Dallis , Ernest Haslett , Martha S. Holcombe, George W, Hunt , Judith A. Jackson , Jen.~ifer L, Jones, Theodore E, Kindell , Willie Ll. g,l it , James L, Mahone , Willie W, Mangram , Esker Yiartin , Johnny B.,Jr, Mason, Robert M, School Custodial Worker II II II II II II II II " " II II II Typist Clerk Ass't,Broadcast-Pro.Dir. Typist Clerk School Custodial Worker II Typist Clerk Key Punch Operator Electrician Stenograpier Senior Typist Typist Cle:irk Stenograpier School Custodian II Stenograpier Clerk Personnel Assistant I Stenograpier School Custodial Worker School Custodian II II II " " (29) 825 633 439 695 826 567 483 432 635 592 623 826 825 790 808 658 1086 629 357 1150 848 913 739 37 359 837 455 447 862 662 871 862 824 795 610 562 1163 484 631 School II II II " II II II II II II II II II II II "" II II II " " II II II "II "II II 5/29/67 3/6/67 3/16/67 3/1/67 4/5/67 4/3/67 3/1/67 6/22/67 6/21/67 6/22/67 3/13/67 6/23/67 4/17/67 6/20/67 5/18/67 5/15/67 4/24/67 3/30/67 4/5/67 3/20/67 4/21/67 5/8/67 3/13/67 4/27/67 6/7/67 5/31/67 6/26/67 6/26/67 5/8/67 6/16/67 4/17/67 6/19/67 4/4/67 6/26/67 3/15/67 5/29/67 3/28/67 3/20/67 5/25/67 cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm wf wm wf cm cm wf wm wm wf cf wf wf cm cm wf wm wf wf cm -cm cm cm cm cm wm �"":x , ~~ · -·-"'" ' -, 11.A.!.IB POSIT. NUMBER CLASS DEPARTMENT DATE EFFECTIVE RACE .-i x \ ~g ·, ~ ~ en ~lJ I -<2.J r ! 1v:a yes, Curtis, Jr. -1ays, Johnny G. Eaxwell, Fddie L. HcGinty , Erroll Wnitlow, Josepi Walker, Barron Waller, Gerald Williams, Jarnes Cit Williams, Ronald Willis, Richard J. Wilson, John Wilson, Samuel Worthy, Bobby L. Wri ght, John M. Trimble, Donald Turner , J esse H. Meroney, Pat Wo Miller, Roberts. Nixon, J. C. Yarbr ough , Michael G. Waters, Kathie F. West, Cynthia J. Widemon , Ben F. Williamson , L. T. .A21thony, David M. Bailey, Charles L. Bailey, Jame s A. Ponder, C.H. Baulson, .1U.fred E. Bibbs, ~.2.rion L. Blessitt, Claude L. Carey, Alonza G. Collins, Okey, Jr. Daniel, Nathaniel Epps , James H. School Custodian 531 465 417 503 lOOJ J78 815 691 789 616 391 779 357 819 417 499 9002 II II II - School Custodial Worker II II II II Carpenter Programmer Trainee Draftsman I Draftsman I Typist Clerk Typist Clerk Plumber Draftsman I School Custodial Worker 8'+5 575 575 1149 II II II II II II II II II II II II 562 II II 911 720 606 692 1162 801 789 ?OJ J48 417 II II II II II II 605 II II School II II- 4/10/67 J/15/67 J/22/67 J/29/67 6/23/67 J/Jo/67 4/J/67 J/16/67 J/28/67 4/17/67 J/2/67 J/7/67 3/20/67 4/3/67 5/4/67 J/Jl/67 5/15/67 5/1/67 J/20/67 3/20/67 5/11/67 6/1/67 4/12/67 5/23/67 3/30/67 J/22/67 J/16/67 5/8/67 3/20/67 4/28/67 J/16/67 6/6/67 5/22/67 II 588 II 510 5/29/67 II II 3/30/67 (JO) cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm wm wm wm wm wf wf cm wm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm �CLASS ~-, Ji; 0 ~ -n ., :i, _:- '!.I BtlJ.ew , Sandra Barron, T. J. Britt, D. C. Brow-n, Delores s. Brown, Flynn N. F.dwards, Audrey Ruch Evans, E. H. Fanning, Larry B. Ferrell, Nolan Fitzpatrick, Melvin Flower, Frank Leon Gamble, Margaret A. Green, R. S. Gregory, Samuel Griffin, James R. Griner, Katherine M. Harley, C. E. Harrison, O. C. Bl anton, Harcia Ann Posea , Faye Evans Cd.oms, J olm Davis Ovme s, Ler ay Pap , John Light, J ames .Leonard Bawlosn, Alfred Eugene Bl essitt, Claude Leroy Williams, Ronald Bailey , J a..rnes Arthur Bailey, Charles Lewis Harrison , O. c. Eaxwell , F.d.di e Lewis Mays, J ohn,~y Cartr ell Ro zier , Dermis Leon Stafford , Steve Willia.'lls, James Clyde Mangram , Esker Saylor , Raymond McGinty, Err oyl Epps , James Hildret Stenographer Carpenter Broadcast Engineer Typist Clerk Building Custodian Typist Clerk Duplicating Machine Opr. School Custodial Worker 11 II II Typist Clerk Statistician School Custodial Worker II Typist Clerk Audicvisual Tech I. School Custodial Worker Typist Clerk Senior Typist School Custodial Worker II Clerk School Custodial Worker II II II II POSIT. NUMBER DEPARTMENT 22 School 9005 158 39 1113 832 1093 787 433 600 818 ll51 ll57 703 826 830 73 678 1151 869 3$4 815 ll5 610 801 703 789 692 II 562 II 678 417 465 813 439 691 1163 629 503 510 II ii It II II II II II II (Jl ) ?'.) 1'1 3g_l It It II II It It II II II II It It It It II II II II II DATE EFFECTIVE 4j4j67 5/22/67 1/3/67 5/1/67 1/4/67 4/16/67 3/29/6'7 3/21/67 6/7/67 5/1/67 4/3/67 5/1/67 5/29/67 4/5/67 4/24/67 5/2/67 5/24/67 3/15/67 6/12/67 6/16/67 3/29/67 5/4/67 4/11/67 3/15/67 3/20/67 3/16/67 3/28/67 3/16/67 3/22/67 3/15/67 3/22/67 3/15/67 3/20/67 3/16/67 3/16/67 3/28/67 3/30/67 3/29/67 3/30/67 RACE wf cm wm cf cm wf cm cm cm cm cm cf wm cm cm cf cm cm cf wf cm cm wm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm cm �i )( , Ji_; POSIT. NJ.ME . ,;-\ JjJ lJ 0 . "';";;\ ~Q' CLASS School Custodial Worker fu.--ner , Jesse Boward WaL1-cer, Barron Anthony, David Pd.lton ~.a.yes, Curtis Jr. Releford, Curtis Scott, Bobby Dennie Gregory, Samuel Martin, Johnny Benjamin Jr. Thomas, Fred Lee Brown, Glynn Norris Sims, John William Lowe, Jerry Laborer Collins, Bobby Lee School Custodial Worker II Jenkins, Howard Bernard Page, George Cleveland Jro Laborer Johns, F.ddie Lee School Custodial Worker II Flower, Frank: Leon II Griffin, James Robert II Rowl and , James Clinton II Willis, Richard Jerome II Fitzpatrick, Melvin II Biles, :M.a.rion Lewis Thomas, Roy William Laborer II Sewell, Fred Ernest II Radford, Charles William II Pryor, Linds ey Jro II Henderson, Freddy NUMBER 499 378 606 531 692 J57 70J 484 567 lllJ 6JJ 244 444 623 2J7 825 818 826 DEPARTMENT School II II II II " II II II II II II II II II 755 616 600 789 259 261 238 9049 9046 r--<
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 20, Folder topic: City Jobs Opportunities Committee | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 18, Folder 24, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_024.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 24, Complete Folder
  • Text: - - - - - -------, Official monthly publication of the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce · Seventy-five cents �Reprinted from Atlanta Magazine, March, 1967 �ATLANTA• VOLUME 6, NUMBER 11 ANATOMY OF A SUPERSCHOOL The master plan for the stunning, split-level Georgia State CoJl ege of the future is still largely o n the draw ing board, but n eed , logic, and vision are solidl y in its corne r , a nd th e first steps have already b een taken. Bv BRUCE GALPHIN . \N ATLANTA ALDERMAN looked with a mixture of admiration and doubt at the plans for the Georgia State Coll ege of the futu re, sprawling over ten blocks in the heart of the city, handso me buildings connected by tree-lined p edestrian plazas straddling the busy streets below. "Mr. Steiner," he asked, " do yo u believe a ll this will ever be?" His skepticism was appropriate. A few yea rs ago the school's home was a converted six-story garage, and before that it had occupied at least eight other sites in Atlanta under eight different nam es. But to And rew Steiner, the Robert & Company architect who has spent two years developing the handsome and ambitious plan, th e answe r about its fulfi llment is an emphati c "yes." I n fac t, to a degree few Atlantans realize, the transformat ion is well under way. Georgia State already occupies four buildings; another is nearing completion ; three more already have been fund ed and let to design contract. The Board of Rege nts has endorsed the entire master pl an, and the city has approved th e first two p edestrian bridges across D ecatur S treet th at tangibly mark it as a sp li t-level ca mpus. Th e multi-level, or "platform city," feature of State 's 1112.ster is o! g r e at si g nifican ce iunc ti.o n a lly, a esth e t i c ally , a nd svmholically. Fu nctionall y, it's the devi ce that makes the whole scheme "·o rk : how to transform a few city blocks criss-crossed by hea\·il y trave lled streets into a campus for 25 ,000 students by 'lJ7'i · By confining through traffic, deliveries, service, uti li ties, ~nd parking to lower levels, the plan will permit a vehicl e-fr ee upper level connecting fort y-four acres of campus. T he aesthetics of the future campus depends heavily on the platfo rm concept. Principall y, rising above city traffic will , rrate a fee ling of unity. This will be emphasized by land" aping, notably a tree-lined prom enade above D eca tur Street fro m the expressway to C ourtland. But the platform, combined with landscaping and judicious placement of th e bui ldings, will also allow di viding the campus into more intimate areas : smaller plazas, places for sitting to read on a wa rm day 0r informa l gatherings, sites to display sculpture and other wo rks of a rt. As a sym bol, a platform campus is peculiarly appropr iate IIJ Atl a nta , for downtown Atlanta itself is largely sp lit-level. Ma ny newcomers ( and quite a few older hands) don 't realp\an ize how much of wha t appears to be "street level" in the central city is really viaduct level. Few have explored the dusty old Atlanta beneath today's busy streets, though recently there have been suggestions of making it a tourist attraction. Even before the turn of the century, Atlantans had been forc ed to grapple with the fact of the city's sharp gradi ents and had come to a solution similar to the one now proposed for Georgia State. There are two main distinctions : Old Atlanta sealed off its earl ier level from the light, whereas the Geo rgia State platform will be pierced to provide light and beauty of sight below; and ..even more important, older Atlanta made the mistake of letting cars come upstairs. Though in a sense Atlanta already is one, the platform city is a hot item of innovation among civic designers around the country. If implemented on schedule, the Georgi a State complex would be a trai l-blazer. It's doubtful whether the exam ple could be widely imitated on such a scale. For a fl at city, th e cost could be staggering. But Atlanta's topography is especiall y suitable. In the ·six or so blocks from Five Points eastward to th e expressway, the altitude drops more than fifty feet . Th e original ga rage building of Georgia State sits on ground at l eas t t hi rty feet higher than the lowe r e nd of t h e proposed camp us. · Thus an artificially raised main cam pus level wou ld be consistent with what Atlanta already has don e to conquer its rolling terrain. It also wou ld complement the recently announced com mercial p latform city planned to span th e rail road complex north and east of the State Capitol. The Steiner p lan explai ns how the new pedestrian plaza could be woven into the fabric of the surrounding city without any rough seams or sharp edges. The reason that so few Atlantans rea lize how much of thei r downtown is artifi cially raised is that there are comparatively few visible seams. They can be seen from Central Avenue or Courtland Street, for these streets cross the rai lroad gulch. And an even more dramati c view of how Atlanta raised itself up off its tracks can be seen from the T echwood and Hunter Street viaducts, which span the vast rail yards that probably wi ll be platformed ove r in fu ture development of the city. But for the most part, since buildings have been constructed right up against the downtown viaducts with few openings to th e old city below, the viaducting is not so obvious. Under �• Georgia State College had occupied eight different homes before it moved to an old garage on I vy Street. No w it's permanently rooted in one of the m ost advantageous lo cations of any urban university in America. The site photograph belo w suggests State's future role: at the center of Atlanta's transportation (expressway at the left and bottom, rapid transit main station to be nearby) , close to its financial he·art ( Five Points at upper right ) , adjacent to a major medical center (Grady Hospital at left center), and near Atlanta's government centers ( Capitol, County Courthouse, and City Hall at top center) . Th e remarkable location adds validity to Andre w Steiner's proposal for an " urb an extension" to hel/1 solve problems of cities of the futur e. �, th e Steiner plan, one wou ld not lose all sense of the natural g rou nd level at Georgia State. The present streets would continu e to p rovide vehicular access to the campus, and th e spans above would be pierced to admit light and views of the ca mpus. T o avoid abrupt drops around the periphery of the ca mpus, Mr. Steiner p roposes grad ual d ropping of the pedestria n level and extensive use of landscap ing. Further, he suggests that the fut ure cam pus' high-rise buildi ngs - except for the adm inistrative center which is the foca l point of the entire plan - be placed on the outer edges, thus blending in wi th the city's other tall structures, priva te a nd public. High-rise buildings a re not ideal fo r heavily used classes. Either an unreasonable a mount of space must be devoted to elevators, or there is an intolerable delay fo r students rushing to class. Since the entire 1975 campus is designed so th at th ere will be no more th an a ten-minute wa lk from a ny one class to a ny other, the qu estion of bui lding heights raises a problem . F or accommodating as many as 3 2 , 0 0 0 people (including fa culty and staff ) on a campus of less than fi fty acres necessarily mea ns ve rti ca l expansion . Mr. Steiner solves th e prob le m by keeping heavil y used classroom bui ldings relatively low; th e tall er stru ctu res wo uld be used for such ac tivities as adrninistration, research , a nd housing. Georgia State President Noah L angd ale, Jr., with customary enthusiasm an d verbal color declares tha t " the pla tform complex resembles th e raised plazas of th e classic city of Veni ce." There is indeed , in addi tion to the modern elements, a fl avo r of old E uropean capitals when monarchs had the power a nd the money to raze the old and ugly and build whole new cities in a centuri es-long riva lry to create th e j ewel of th e continent. The p latfo rm ed Geo rgia State would have a uni ty and a sweep tha t evokes well, maybe V eni ce or maybe Mr. Steiner's na tive Vienn a . Th e p la t form wo uld begin to the west of Courtla nd ; drop slirrht ly below Courtland, wh ich itself is a viaduct ; rise bac k up ; a nd then begin an uninterrupted sweep almost all the way to the expressway. Thi s would be th e ma in axis of th e new ca mpus. The minor axis, crossing at th e ad ministration buildi ng, wo uld be a small er spine extending northeastwa rd a long Piedmont to a point beyond the rear of the old Municipal Auditorium . D ecatu r, Piedm ont, and Butler all would be bridged . Beca use the nat ural g round level d ro ps ra pid ly towa rd the east, there would be room fo r as ma ny as fou r laye rs of pa rking below the plaza, an importa nt consideratio n, since estim a tes fo r the 1975 demand run from a bout 4 ,400 to 8,750 spaces, dependin g on th e ava ilabil ity of ra pid tra nsit and other public transporta tion . On tb."' ~, lutt.ercd platform above, accord ing to the Steiner phm,--'-'--\,a-ndscaped plazas are one of the most important uni fying elements of the campus and shou ld be designed to create a ri ch and va ried environm ent, including intimate sea ting an d rea ding a reas. Other imp orta nt pa rts of the la ndscape trea tment a re such elements as street furniture and the many small details which can ma ke life on the ca mpus p leasant and exciting. By street furniture we mean a ll th e obj ects tha t furn ish our sidewalks, such as lighting sta nda rds, signs, baskets, benches, fl ower boxes and containers, vend ing m achines, kiosks, a nd shelters fr om wind and rain. In som e of the open spaces, book stalls, fl ower stalls, and even outdoor cafes a nd small structures for sa le of so ft d rinks a nd sandwiches could be an importa nt p art of the overall d esign." Hurt Park, the only ma jor greenery that relieves the sta rkn ess of the present complex, would be drawn even more intim a tely to the future ca mpus when the bl ock of Gilmer Street between the park an d the college is closed. In its expans ion, Geo rgia State is perfo rm ing the not-a t-allincidenta l job of urb a n renewa l. Most of th e existing ca mpus space was acqu ired with federa l urban renewal assistance, a nd college officia ls hop e to obtain even more of the futur e re- The 1975 campus is designed so that no classes are more than a ten-minute walk apart. 1. Campus Plazas 2. A dministrative Center 3. Communications Center an d Th eatre Arts 4. Central L ibrary Comp lex 5. Sparks H all- Classrooms 6. Fine A rts Building- Classrooms 7. A rts and S ciences - Classrooms 8. Schoo l of Business A dministration 9. Physical Education Building 10. S cience Center - Physical Sciences 11 . M edical and Nu rsing Center 12. Future E xpansion Area 13. Grady Hospital E xpansion 14. Stud ent A ctivities Com , plex 15. S pecial S tudies 16. Pri vate Development ( possible cooperative use) 17. High R ise S tudent Ho using 18. Grady Hospital �The proposed expansion plan will enable community and college to make immense reciprocal contributions. quirements through the same method. The college already has swept aside some of the city's worst slums: rows of pawnshops, cheap hotels, rundown warehouses - areas which contributed heavily to the city's crim e rate. But a valid question remains whether this is the wisest use the city could make of the property. Since their conversion from slums to office buildings, apa rtments, and motels, other urba n renewal distri cts are now adding millions of dollars to Atlanta's tax base. \ ,Vhy p lace Georgia State in such a potentially productive location? Few if a ny other major urban colleges occupy so mu.c h space so close to the city's commercial heart. And Geo rgia Sta te h as moved befo re frequently. Since it was found ed in 19 13, it has occupied space a t Geo rgia T ech, the Walton Building at Walton and Cone, the Peachtree Arcade, an attic at Auburn and Pryor, 106¼ Forsyth Street, scattered offices donated by Atlanta businessmen, 223 v\Talton Street, 162 Luckie Street, and fin ally th e garage on Ivy Street which is the taproot of th e present cam pus. It has been designated the Georgia T ec h Evening Schoo l of Commerce, University System of Georgia Evening School. University Extension Center, University System Center, Atlanta Extens ion Center, Georgia Evening College, Atlanta Division of the University of Georgia, a nd Georgia State College of Business Administration . In 1962, Atlanta city fathers m ade their basic commitm ent to th e proposition tha t Georgia State has found a permanent hom e. They designa ted · a n area of a little more than two blocks as the " Geo rgia State Urban R edevelopment" area, thus qua li fyin g it for federal assistance. The \i\1hite H ouse a nnoun ced approva l fiv e months la ter, in reco rd time. There is more than ample justification .for the ald erm en's judgm ent. After all, express1rnys also remove huge tracts of land from the tax d igest. ( The Memorial Interchange, for exam ple, occupies more ac reage than the Steiner pl an proposes for the 1975 Georgia State campus. ) Yet expressways are vital; the expenditures of land a re made. And it can be convincingly a rgued that a vital camp us in the midst of the city ret urns fa r grea ter intangible va lues to Atlanta. It is more th an just a question of meeting the growing demand fo r higher edu cation in Atlanta . It is more than a llo\\·ing students to work downtown while also attending college a n unqu es tioned asse t for the city. It is more th an convenience for the Atlanta businessmen ( with a surprising number of advanced degrees ) who teach part-time. Given the nea r- comp lete expressway system a nd rapid transit within a few yea rs, a downtown Georgia State is within an hour's j ourn ey of about half Georgia's population. It is I immedi ate ly adj acent to centers o f g ove rnm e nt, m edi cin e, comm e r ce, a nd fin a n ce. C o m- munity a nd college can have im mense recipro cal contributions to make. Jvlr. Steiner summarizes the potential as " urban exten ion" - a highl y sophisti cated cousin of th e agricul tura l extension • Platf arming is the key to solving space and traffic problems at the Georgia State of 1975 and later. I t's a solution long used in Atlanta, w hich has been rising on viaducts abo ve its railroad tracks for almost a century. But at State there would be a diff erence : Th e platforms would be for people, and the cars would stay below, where they w ould still receive daylight through perforations in the cover. Th e illustration at left ( abo ve) shows how the perforations might look at the pedestrian level. The rendering below it shows how plat/ arming would affect t he vista of a motorist. The overall view (right abo ve) shows such treatment of Decatur Street. The lo cation's sharp dro poff from I vy S treet to the expressway would allow increasing layers of parking and service access, shown in the cross sections at right . ��cooperation of colleges and agribusiness that has achieved such dramatic results in the past decades. The urban extension concept was suggested in the 1962 annual report of the Ford Foundation. Says the Steiner master plan: " There are many fragments of theory, observation, empirical research, and practical tools cf application, sca ttered through the rel ated fi elds and disciplines, which could make major contributions to such a program .... Hum an ecology, physical planning, and urban design are concerned with different aspects of the geographic-physical environment and its organization into cities and regions. Economics has well developed macro and micro concepts which are every day proving their practical value in regulating the American economy and which are being extended to deal with international problems of finance and economic development. " Political science, through techniques of interpersonal and group dynamics, is aiding the constructive understanding and control of the forces of social change. To all of these, the cultural interpretations of the creative arts and the mass media of communications are making a vast contribution. The value of mathematics, science, philosophic logic, and the computer are too well recognized to bear elaboration, but their critical and generalizing fun ctions must be built into any total conceptual frame." Thus Georgia State, which already has established excellent and reciprocal relationships with Atlanta's business community, in the future can be expected to expand its role to include th e interests and needs of the entire com munity, viewing them with the integrated eye of all the academic disciplines rather than the narrower vistas of the math ematician, sociologist, artist, etc., working alone. What would be the dollar cost of the ambitious Steiner plan? Obviously, it won 't come at bargain basement rates. But considering the location of the complex and its scope, th e estim ate is relatively modest: about $96 million for land and buildings not already fund ed. And of co urse this does not mean a cash outlay of that much by the Board of Regents • The view from Edgewood Avenue, belo w, indicates how existing fa cilities might be utilized and how the j1latf arming could be tap ered off and landscaped to avoid any shar/1 edges. Hurt Park, at present the only gree nery around Georgia State, would remain an important focal point. S f1arks Hall, right center, wo uld tie in with future classroom buildings, and the old Municipal Auditorium, left center, also is included in th e master plan. immediately or even over the next eight years. Some or all of the buildings could be constructed under bond issues, and many phases of th e expansion would qualify for various federal assistance grants. Some eyebrows were raised when Mr. Steiner included the present Atlanta Police Department headquarters in the overall campus. The plan also includes Georgia State's ownership of the old Municipal Auditorium. With the cooperation of the city government, these should prove no major barricades to the plan. A new auditorium and convention complex.. is being completed now on Piedmont between Forrest and Pine. When the second phase - extension of the convention facilities across Pine - is accom plished a few years hence, the city's need for the old auditorium will be at an end. Implementation of the Steiner plan would indeed require building of new police headquarters elsewhere, but the present building itself would not be razed . With some interior remodeling, it would become an integral part of the new campus, surround ed at its second-floor level by the platform which would be part of the principal pedestrian plaza of the future campus. An expenditure that might cause greater controversy is the setting aside of I per cent of the' total building budget for art. The idea is well established in Europe. In Zurich , the art allocation is Io per cent. But in the United States, few governm ent units have adopted the scheme for public buildings. Priva te developers have been bolder than the government in this respect. The Steiner plan is insistent on the point. And it's not talking merely abo ut paintings hung on interior walls. The unique plaza campus, the report asserts, offers unusual opportunity to create beauty, contribute to the status of art in th e university system, and provide an outstanding example for civic design. The master plan urges imm ediate developm ent for a "systematic, comprehensive, and ambitious" plan for art development and for appointment of an art ists' committee with full power to pass on acquisitions and acceptance of don ations. Experience shows that it's a long trip from the drawing boards of ambitious master plans to realization. But the Steiner plan has overwhelming logic as well as beauty on its side. It accommodates the projected student load . It makes brilliant use of Atlanta's topography and the man-made delineations of rails and street patterns. Above all, it helps establish a clear definition of Georgia State's role in the future of Atlanta and the state. W �~- - Li[H][E R[E IT\l[E\W[R NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL Vol. 5 No. 11 Atlanta, Georgia December 1967 J OPENSHAW CALLS FOR CONCERTED ACTION TO HALT BLIGHT AS HE GIVES REPORT ON YEAR OF URBAN RENEWAL GAINS Delivering an inspiring report of notable progress in urban renewal during 1967 to our Dec. 19 full committee meeting, Howard Openshaw, Atlanta Housing Au .. thority redevelopment director, also sounded a call for private enterprise, churches. labor organizations and civic groups to join with public efforts in a concerted en .. deavor to turn back the spread of blight. Summed up Mr. Openshaw: "Too many people look to a single tool to solve all the problems of the city. For example, urban renewal was not designed to speak to the problems of unemployment, lack of education, crime, and other social diseases. Too long have we looked to public programs alone to solve our problems. Churches, civic organizations, labor unions, industry - private enterprise must become involved if we are to succeed in our endeavors." In addition to citing the gains achieved by Atlanta'~ urban renewal program duz,ing 196 7, Mr. Openshaw also reviewed the exciting outlook for 1968. The text of his report follows: SLUMS AND BLIGHT ARE GROWING - "Atlanta, like every maj<,r city across our land, has awakened to find itself sitting on a potential powder keg. Countless ages of neglect and apathy has resulted in an accumulation of urban blight and decay. People are rebelling against their environment, and we see the resulting strife and turmoil in Milwaukee and Detroit. To make matters worse the slums and blighted areas are growing, not shrinking. In the last 5 years, Atlanta has increased its number of dwelling units by 9, 141. During this period, the number of dilapidated structures were reduced from 12, 000 to 3,000. How. ever, the number of substandard units increased from 22,800 to 49, 300. "The City's population increase is projected at an annual rate of 2%, with the negro population increasing by 62% and the white population by 4%. Those who can afford it are moving to the suburbs. The City's financial resources are limited, there is no help from the State, and the demand for Federal funds is three times the available supply. We simply do not have adequate resources to cope with all of our problems. 11 MUST USE EVERY AVAILABLE RESOURCE - "The time for action is upen us. We must use every available resource, every tool to make our cities more livable, to enrich the quality of men's lives, and to make every citizen a pro. ductive member of Society. We must eliminate our slums, yes. But also, we must halt the spread of blight. Urban renewal is the tool that can allow us to have a slumless city. An effective program of code enforcement is essential to preserve our neighborhoods and to halt the spread of blight. A top priority in the city is to provide housing for low and moderate income families. The mayor has set a goal of 16,800 units to be constructed in the next five years. But even here, we are finding it difficult to find suitable, reasonably priced land for low-cost housing." PAST TWELVE MONTHS SHOW PROGRESS IN ALL PHASES OF RENEW AL PROGRAMS - "In 8-1 /2 years, Atlanta's urban renewal program has made giant strides in redeveloping its blighted areas. �- 2- "From the period D e cember 1, 1966 t o December 1, 1967, the Atlanta Housing Aut hority ha s a c qu.ir ed 538 parcels of land at a cost of $4. 7 million. The Autho r ity r e locat ed 5,6 f a m ilies from urban renewal areas, and provided housing a ssis tanc e t o 6 8 7 a dditional families relocated as a result of other governmental a ction , During the past twelve months, the Authority demolished 477 structures c omp r i sin g 76 6 dw e lling units, and completed rehabilitation of 201 dwelling units. T he A uth o ri ty sold 97 p arcels of land for $886, 72a and put under contract for sale a n a d diti o nal 60 pa.reel s of land having a value of $2 million. Construction was b egun on improvem en ts t otaling $2~ 1 million. These improvements include 106 a part men t unit s in the Butl e r Stre e t Project, and 38 single family units in Thomasville. Improvemen ts t c':.:.·~::~~ $4, 8 million were cortipleted in the past 12 months, i ncludi ng office bu 1 ldin gs ·for the tJ, Rubber Company, Ford Motor Company, A vis Rent - A- Car, and Cousins P ~operties, Construction was, started on 240 dwelling u nits and a n a dditional 41 dwelling units completed during th~ peribd. 11 s. N INE P ROJEC T A ME N DMENTS APPROVED - "Amendments were submitted and F ed e ral a pp r ova l r ec e i ved on the following urban renewal projects: Butler Street, t o p r ·ovid e a s e con d },_i_g !1- rise for the elderly adjacent to Graves Homes on Hilliard S tre e t, and l and expansion for Ebenezer Baptist Church; Rockdale, to p rovide f o r c hange s i n land use a nd street pattern; Thomasville, to provide public h ousing n ort h of M'CDo n ough Road; Georgia State, to add the block north of the p olic e st a tion t o the p r oject area; Georgia Tech, to include an additional $737,810 a s Sectio n 112 c r e d it s toward the City's share of project cost; Buttermilk Bottoms, r eceived Fede ral a pp r o val of Part I of the Application for Loan and Grant; B e dford-Pine , to com bine the Buttermilk Bottoms project with Bedford-Pine; Bedford- Pine Lett er of Consent, to permit acquisition of additional street rightof- w a y fo r th e Auditorium; Bedford-Pine draft Part I Application for Loan and Gr a nt. A m endrne n t,s w ere submitted on the following urban renewal projects for w hic h Fed eral app r ov a l has not yet been received: Rawson- Washington, to extend p r oj ect b o undary t o p r ovide land for school expansion, park, and neighborhood c enter; B edfo rd- Pine E arly Land Acquisition Loan, to provide a site for public h ousi n g, a nd to m a ke a v ailable rehabilitation loa ns and grants for properties a l on g Bou levar d , 11 C OMPETITIO N SP URS SUPERIOR PROPOSALS -"A significant achievement of the r enewal p rogram w as the development competitions for land in Rockdale, Rawson .. Wa s h ingto n and Um.ive r sity C e nte r Projects. A fixed price was e stablished on the l and, a nd rede v elo p ers propos a l s w e re r e stricte d to r e side ntial development under S ection 2 2 1 d 3 . ..,,..he Atlanta Housing Authority staff, the City Planning D e part. ment, the Am eric a n In stitute of Architects, American Society of Landscape Archi. t ee t s, the Citi z en s Advis ory Committee for Urban Renewal, the Housing Resources C ommi ttee, the State Planning Bureau, the U~ban Renewal Policy Com. m itte e a n d the Hou s ·ng Authori ty' s B o a rd of Commissione rs reviewed four re d eveloper s propo s a ls in R oc kda l e , seven proposals in Unive rsity Cente r, a nd six proposals in R a ws on- W a shington. T he fixed land pric e , development compe tition a pproach not o nly .result e d in superior proposals from redevelopers, but assured maximum livabili ty fo r families of low and moderate incomes. The Authority, w ith assi s t a nce fr o m CACUR, conducted l, 271 p e ople on tours of Atla nta's urban. ren e w al a nd p u bli c housing p r o grams ." MOD EL C ITY , BE DF ORD- PINE E XECUTION TOP EXCITING OUTLOOK F OR NEW YEAR - " Ex.,citing t hing s a nd a lot of hard work lie ahead for 1968. The C ity , in c oope r at i o n w ith o the r agencie s and residents of the a r ea, will begin pla nning t he m o deA city a rea, T h e urb a n ren ew a l a nd public hou s ing prog r a m s will be i n volved i m. the tota l attack on t h e s ocia l a nd phy s ic a l blight of t h e 3 , 000 acres of .la n d extending fr om We st End t o the other s ide of Grant Park. T h e Bedfo r d - Pine Ur b an R enewal Area w ill enter execution. The Authority will p rovid e t empor ar y r e l ocation hou s ing for those famili e s living in the initial cle ar . anc e a r ea. Stagin g t he e xecution a c tivities will minimize the number of fam ilie s displac ed. Con str uc tion w ill b e started on improvement s c o sting $ 26. 2 millio n on urban renewal lan d i n 1968. The s e improveme nts include 1, 468 dw e lling u nits , the Ira H ardin Office B uild ing , s t a dium mote l, a n d the I nt e rna tional Hou s e in Universi t y C ent eit". �... 3 _ "The ninety-five areas of land on McDonough Road :b,ic~rttiy made available to the City by the Federal Government will be added to the Thotnasville Project; and plans will proceed immediately to IFl'Ovide land for public housing, townhouses, single-family development, and an elementary and middie-high school. We must continue our commitment to eliminate slums wherever they occur, and to halt the spread of blight. We must provide decent housing for all our people, with special emphasis on low and moderate income families. But we must do more than this. We must become more sensitive to the physical design and development of our City. For, unless Atlanta is to become a haven for the homeless and the poor, we must create an environment t o attract people of every economic level of life as together w e seek to make Atlanta the great city it is destined to become. 11 HUD' S STRAUB CONGRATULATES ATLANTA ON PIONEERING MODEL CITY CONVENTION Thanking Mr. Openshaw for his pertinent and perceptive report, Chairman Sommerville emphasized the importance of the model city program and called on Charles N. Straub, Federal Agency Liaison Specialist, from HUD, to bring our committee abreast of developments in this new city-federal cooperative endeavor, Explaining that Atlanta was one of only nine southeastern cities and 63 in the nation t o receive conditional approval, Mr. Straub pointed out that final disposition of the planning grants reserved, depended upon the cities presenting acceptable work programs to HUD. Such plans are exptected within 45 days. He specified that HUD had requested Atlanta to outline a five year program with a specific work plan for the first year. He pointed out that Atlanta 's plans would have to be revised because the city's request for $500, 000 as a planning grant was cut to $152,000. In discussing this reduction, Mr. Straub mentioned that Atlanta had received an additional $100, 000 from EDA, but only $18, 000 of this would apply directly to studies in the model city area. Then Mr. Straub congratulated Atlanta warmly on innovating the plan of holding a convention open to all residents of the model city area. This convention, held at Hoke Smith Technical High School Sunday.~afternoon, Dec. 10, is regarded as a new departure in citizen participation, Mr. Straub stressed. Said he 11 No city has really thrown the model city program open as Atlanta did with this convention. The city also is to b e congratulated on accepting what the people asked for. 11 (NOTE- This refers to action by the Aldermanic Board Dec. 18 approving the request made at the convention for a representative from each of the six neighborhoods involved on the governing board of the model city program) In a following discussion, Mrs. S . F . Crank pointed out that EOA was a prime mover in organizing the c onvention. Mrs. Grace Hamilton a lso e xpressed congratulations to the Aldermanic Board in accepting the recommendations made by the convention. (NOTE - Among others representing our committee at the conve ntion was Director Howland.) Action is under way to locate houses for s uitable r e habilitation by our nonprofit corporation, CAC URRCI under the 221 H program, the full committee meeting was informed. Executive committeewoman Hamilton reported that with Walter Screws of the Atlanta Housing Authority, and Director Howland , s he inspected a number of dwellings in and n e ar the University Center project on De cember 14. She s tressed the point that if such houses could be found in this area, their rehabilitation would improve the pr oject's public image. Mr. Screws added that all houses seen were single family occupied. In reply to a question from Executive committeeman Percy Hearle, Chairman Sommer ville said 19 houses had b een located east of Gl en Iris and north of Hunter Street. A guess~ s timate would b e tha t th e houses would rang e in value fro m $ 4 , 500 to $8,000 and that rehabilitation would cost from $2,000 to $4,000. E xecutive committeeman Harold Arnold a lso suggested some houses on Morgan Street and Boulevard Place. He pointed out that also considered had been the area Mrs. Hamilton inspected , the area .adj ac ent to the Nash-Banns section, the South Atla nta region beyond the model cities area a nd the a r ea east of Bedford-Pine. In s upport of the B oule v a rd Place - Morgan Street location , Mr. A rnold pointed out th at it h a d exp e rie nced racial unrest and that location of the 221 H project there, would indicate interest in solving its problems. In the following discussion, Mrs. Ha milton urg e d that the Atlanta Housing Authority keep a coordinated list of pro pertie s s cr een ed~ C h a irman Somme rville pointed out that such lists would be a v ailable fr o m the city B uilding Depa rtment and the Housing Authority. ACTION BEGINS TO LOCATE 221 H HOUSES; TWO LISTS OF SUGGESTED DWELLINGS GIVEN �1flH](E R[l!\l[E\W[R NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL Vol. 5 No. 11 Atlanta, Georgia December 1967 OPENSHAW CALLS FOR CONCERTED ACTION TO HALT BLIGHT A S HE GIVES REPORT ON YEAR OF URBAN RENEWAL GAINS Delivering an inspiring report of notable progress in urban renewal during 1967 to our Dec. 19 full committee meeting, Howard Openshaw, Atlanta Housing Authority redevelopment director, also sounded a call for private enterprise, churches, labor organizations and civic groups to join with public efforts in a concerted endeavor to turn back the spread of blight. · Swnmed up Mr. Openshaw: "Too many people look to a single tool to solve all the problems of the city. For example, urban renewal was not designed to speak to the problems of unemployment, lack of education, crime, and other social diseases. Too long have we looked to public programs alone to solve our problems. Churches, civic organizations, labor unions, industry - private enterprise must become involved if we are to succeed in our endeavors. 11 In addition to citing the gains achieved by Atlanta•~ urban renewal program during 196 7, Mr. Openshaw also reviewed the exciting outlook for 1968. The text of his report follows: SLUMS AND BLIGHT ARE GROWING - "Atlanta, like every major city across our land, has awakened to find itself sitting on a potential powder keg. Countless ages of neglect and apathy has resulted in an accumulation of urban blight and decay. People are rebelling against their environment, and we see the resulting strife and turmoil in Milwaukee and Detroit. To make matters worse the slums and blighted areas are growing, not shrinking. In the last 5 years, Atlanta has increased its number of dwelling units by 9, 141. During this period, the number of dilapidated structures were reduced from 12, 000 to 3, 000. However, the number of substandard units increased from 22,800 to 49, 300. "The City's population increase is projected at an annual rate of 2%, with the negro population increasing by 62% and the white population by 4%. Those who can afford it are moving to the suburbs. The City's financial resources are limited, there is no help from the State, and the demand for Federal funds is three times the available supply. We simply do not have adequate resources to cope with all of our problems. 11 MUST USE EVERY AVAILABLE RESOURCE - "The time for action is upon us. We must use every available resource, every tool to make our cities more liv a ble, to enrich the quality of men's lives, and to make every citizen a productive member of Society. We must eliminate our slums, yes. But also, we m u st halt the spread of blight. Urban renewal is the tool that can allow us to have a slumles s city. An effective program of code enforcement is essential to preserve our neighborhoods and to halt the spread of blight. A top priority i n the city is to provide housing for low and moderate income families. The mayo r has set a goal of 16,800 units to be constructed in the next five years. But even here, we are finding it difficult to find suitable, reasonably pric:ed land for low-cost housing." PAST TWE LVE M ONTHS SHOW PROGRESS IN ALL PHASES OF RENEWAL PROG RAMS - " In 8-1/2 years, Atlanta's urban renewal program has made giant stride s in r edeveloping its blighted areas. �-2"From the period December 1, 1966 to December 1, 1967, the Atlanta Housing Authority has acquired 538 parcels of land at a cost of $4~ 7 million. The Authority relocated 576 families from u rban renewal areas! and provided housing assistance to 687 additional families relocated as a result df other governmental action . During the past twelve months, the Authority demolished 477 structures comprising 766 dwelling units, and completed rehabilitation of 201 dwelling units. The Authority sold 97 parcels of land for $886, 722 and put under contract for sale an additional 60 parcels of land having a value of $2 million. Construction was begun on improvements totaling $2. 1 million. These improvements include 106 apartm ent units in the Butler Street Project, and 38 single family units in Thomasville. Improvements tailing $4. 8 million were completed in the past 12 months, including office buildings for the U. s. Rubber Company, Ford Motor Company, Avis Rent-A-Car, and Cousins Properties. Construction was started on 240 dwelling units and an additional 41 dwelling units completed during the period." NINE PROJECT AME NDMENTS APPROVED - "Amendments were submitted and Federal approval received on the following urban renewal projects: Butler Street, to pr·ovide a second high-rise for the elderly adjacent to Graves Homes on Hilliard Street, and land expansion for Ebenezer Baptist Church; Rockdale, to provide for changes in land use and street pattern; Thomasville, to provide public housing north of McDonough Road; Georgia State, to add the block north of the police station to the project area; Georgia Tech, to include an additional $737,810 as Section 112 credits toward the City's share of project cost; Buttermilk Bottoms, received Federal approval of Part I of the Application for Loan and Grant; Bedford- Pine, to combine the Buttermilk Bottoms project with Bedford-Pine; Bedford-Pine Letter of Consent, to permit acquisition of additional street rightof-way for the Auditorium; Bedford-Pine draft Part I Application for Loan and Grant. Amendme nts were submitted on the following urban renewal projects for which Federal approval has not yet been received: Rawson- Washington, to extend project boundary to provide land for school expansion, park, and neighborhood center; Bedford-Pine Early Land Acquisition Loan, to provide a site for public housing, and to make available rehabilitation loans and grants for properties along Boulevard." COMPETITION SPURS SUPERIOR PROPOSALS -'!A significant achievement of the renewal program was the development competitions for land in Rockdale, RawsonWashington and University Center Projects. A fixed price was established on the l and, and redevelopers proposals were restricted to residential development under Section 221 d 3. The Atlanta Housing Authority staff, the City Planning Department, the American Institute of Architects, American Society of Landscape Architects, the Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal, the Housing Resources Committee, the State Planning Bureau, the U~ban Renewal Policy Committee and the Hou sing Authority's Board of Commissioners reviewed four redevelopers proposals in Rockdale, seven proposals in University Center, and six proposals in Raws on- Washington. The fixed land price, development competition approach not only resulted in superior proposals from redevelopers, but assured maximum livability for families of low and moderate incomes. The Authority, with assistance from CACUR, conducted 1,271 people on tours of Atlanta's urban renewal and public housing programs." MODEL CITY, BEDFORD-PINE EXECUTION TOP EXCITING OUTLOOK FOR NEW YEAR - "Exciting things and a lot of hard work lie ahead for 1968. The City, in cooperation with other agencies and residents of the area, will begin planning the model city area. The urban renewal and public housing programs will be involved in the total attack on the social and physical blight of the 3, 000 acres of .land extending from West End to the other side of Grant Park. The Bedford-Pine Urban Renewal Area will enter execution. The Authority will provide temporary relocation housing for those families living in the initial clearance area. Staging the execution activities will minimize the number of families displac ed. Construction will be started on improvements costing $26. 2 million on urban renewal land in 1968. These improvements include 1, 468 dwelling units, the Ira Hardin Office Building, stadium motel, and the International House in University Center. �- 3"The ninety-five ar eas of land on McDonough R o ad rec ently m a de ava ilable to the City by the Federal Governme nt will be added to the Thoma s ville Project, and pla ns will proceed immediat ely t o g.;rovide land for public housing, townhouses, single -family development, and a n elementary a nd middle-high school. We must continue our commitment t o e liminate s lums wherever they occur, and to halt the spr ead of blight. We must p r ovide dec e n t hous ing for all our people, with special emphasis on l ow and mode rate income families. But we must do more than this. W e must becom e more sensitiv e to t he physical design and development of our City. For , unless Atlanta is t o become a haven for the homeless and the poor, we must create an environment t o a ttract people of every economic level of life as together we s e ek to make At l anta the gr eat city it is destined to become. 11 HUD'S STRAUB CONG RA T ULATES AT LANTA ON PIONEERING M ODE L CITY C ONVE N T ION Thanking Mr. Openshaw for his pertinent and perceptive report, Chairman Sommerville emphasized the impo r tance of t he model city program and called on Charles N. Straub, Federal Ag ency Liaison Specialist, from H UD, to b r ing our committee abreast of developments in this n ew city-federal coope r a t ive e ndeavor. Explaining that Atlanta was one of only nine s outh easte rn cities and 63 in t h e nation to receive conditional approval, Mr . Straub p ointed out t hat final disposition of the planning grants reserved, depended upon the citie s p re s enting acceptable work p r ogr ams to HUD. Such plans are exptec t ed within 4 5 days. He specified that HUD had requested Atlanta to outline a fiv e y e ar progr am w ith a specific work plan for the first year. He pointed out that Atlanta's plans w ould hav e to be revised because the city's request for $500, 000 as a planning g rant w as cut to $152, 000, In di scus s ing this reduction, Mr. Straub mentioned that Atl ant a had received a n additional $100, 000 from EDA, but only $18, 0 00 of thi s w oul d appl y dire ctly to studie s in the model city area. Then M r. Str aub cong ratulated Atlanta warmly on innovating the plan of holding a convention open t o all re sidents of the model city area. This convention, held at Hoke Smith Technical High Sc hool Sunday.., afternoon, Dec . 10, is regarded as a new departure i n citizen par t icip a t ion, M r. Straub stressed. Said he 11 No city has really thrown the model city program open a s Atlanta did with this convention. The city a l s o is to be congratul ated on acc epting .what the people asked for. 11 (NOTE- This r efers to acti on b y the Alde r manic Board Dec. 18 approving the request made at the convention for a repre s e n tat i ve from each of the six neighborhoods involved on the g overning board of the m odel city program) In a following d is c u ssion, Mrs. S. F . C rank pointed out that E OA was a prime mover in organizing the c onvention. Mrs. Gra ce Ha milton a lso express e d congratulations to the A l de rmanic Board in accepting the recommendations made by the c o nven tion. (NOTE- A mong othe r s representing our committee at the convention was Diredor Howland. ) A ction is unde r w a y t o loc a te hous es for s uita ble r e h a bilita tion by our nonprofit corporation , CACURRCI unde r the 2 2 1 H program, the full committe e meeting was informed. Executive committ eewoman Hamilt on r e porte d that w ith Walter Screws of the Atlanta Housin g Authority , and Directo r Howla nd, s h e i nspe cte d a numbe r of dwe llings in and near the University Center project on D ecemb er 14 . Sh e s tr ess ed the p o int that if such houses c ould be fou nd i n this ar ea, the ir reh a bilitation would impr ove the project's public image. Mr . Screws a dded that all houses seen were single family occupied. In reply t o a quest i on fr om :Executive committeeman P e rcy Hearle , Chairman Sommerville said 19 h ouses ha d bee n located east of Glen Iris a nd n o r th of Hunter Stre e t. A guess~ stimate w ou ld b e that the houses w oul d range in valu e from $ 4 , 500 to $8, 000 a nd that r e h a bilitation woul d c o s t fr om $2 , 000 t o $4, 000. Exec u tive c ommitteeman Harol d Arno ld also suggested s ome hou ses on Mo rgan Street a nd Boulevard Place. He pointed out that al s o considered had been the a rea Mr s. Hamilton inspecte d, the area ,a d jacent to the Nash- Banns section, the South Atlant a region beyond the model citie s area and t h e area east o f Bedfor d -Pine. In support of t he Boulevard P l a c e - Morga n Street l o cation, Mr. Arnold p ointed out that it had experien ced racial u nres t and tha t l oca tion of the 22 1 H proj e ct there , would indicate interest in solving its pr oblems . In t he following d i scussion, Mrs. Hamilton urged that the Atla nta Hou s ing Au thority keep a coordina t e d li st of properties screened. Chairman Sommer ville p ointed out that s u ch lists would b e available from the city Bu ilding Dep a rtme n t and t h e H ousing Authority. ACTION BEGINS TO L OCA T E 2 2 1 H HOUSES ; T WO LISTS OF SUGGESTED DWE LLINGS GIVEN �CITIZENS FOR URBAN RENEWAL OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303 PHONE 524-2745 ROBERT L . SOMMERVILLE CHAIRMAN WILLIAM S. HOWLAND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MRS. EVELYN DODDS SECRETARY December 11, 1967 Dear Committee Members: Twill be the sixth day before Christmas and all through our program will be items of timely interest for our last full committee meeting of 1967. We will start off with a report on the year's activities in urban renewal and allied undertakings by Howard Openshaw, director of redevelop. ment for the Atlanta Housing Authority. In addition to telling what has been going on during 1967, Howard will give us a concise preview of what is ahead for 1968. Then we will have some updating on the Model Cities Program by Chuck Straub, in charge of this program in Atlanta for the regional office of HUD. Thirdly, we will have some updating on our participation in the 221-H program. Before our meeting, Mrs. Grace Hamilton and I are going out to look at some possible sites for our project. We are asking Mrs. Hamilton to tell us about these sites. We hope to have this program fully underway after the first of the year. Then, if time permits we have asked James A. Smith, chief of the housing code inspection service, to tell us about the streamlining of the housing code that has recently been effected by the Board of Aldermen. I am sure there will be some questions and answers on these various topics. Chairman Sommerville and I will be looking forward to seeing you on Tuesday afternoon, December 19, 2:30, Atlanta Room of the C & S National Bank. Sincerely yours, j(J~~./J William S, Howland NOTE: time changed to 2: 30 p. m, ~ �I I -IJ1rat1w 7r- (Ji lE lR[[NfWER NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL Vol. 5 No . 10 Atlanta, Georgia November 1967 CHAR T ER PUTS OUR CORPORATION IN BUSINESS T O I MPLEMENT $96, 000 221 -H ALLOCATION At our executive committee meeting, Nov. 21, Attorney Hugh Peterson, Jr. pr esented a prestigious document, bearing the gold sealsof the State of Georgia and the Superior Court of Fulton County. Said the first page of the document: "I, Ben Fortson, Jr. , Secretary of State .of the State of Georgia, do hereby certify that "The Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal Rehabilitation Corporation, Inc. was on the sixth day of November, 1967, duly incorporated under the laws of the state of Georgia by the Superior Court of Fulton County for a period of thirty five years from said date." This document went on to list the incorporators as Robert L. Sommerville, William S. Howland, H. W. Whitm an, Harold Arnold, Herbert Waldrip, Mrs. Grace Hamilton, Percy Hearle and Harold Davis. It then set forth the corporation's purposes saying "Said corporation is and shall be organized and operated exclusively for the purpose of assisting in the development of projects, undertakings, studies and other activities by itself or in cooperation with local government and civic bodies and other corporations and associations for the elimination of slums, blight and blighting influences and to aid, assist and foster the planning, development, renewal and improvement of the metropolitan, Atlanta , Geor gia, area, all for the primary purpose of combatting community deterioration and securing adequate housing, community facilities and related facilities f or the general welfar e of the community. 11 The document further stated "no part of the principal fund s or income of the corporation shall ever inure to the benefit of any private shareholder or individual or beneficiary, or revert to any donor or to the estate or heirs of any donor and no part of its activities shall ever be carrying on propaganda or otherwise attempting to influence legislation or participating in or intervening in (including the publishing or distributing of statements) any political campaign on behalf of any candidate for public office. 11 The document included an order by Superior Court Judge Jack B. Etheridge granting the charter. As Attorney Peterson handed the papers t o Chairman Sommerville, he said, with a srr.ile, "Now we'll get a seal for the corporation if I can just get all those letters on one. 11 The essence of all the words and seals and signatures on the papers which made up the blue bound document is that what is known as a legal entity" has been created to put i nto action the $96, 000 221 H grant allocated in response to our committee's application. Summed up Mr. Peterson: "The corporation is now in business. Application for tax exemption has been sent to the Internal Revenue Service. I understand that the committee received the grant even before the corporation was organized, so now everything is ready to roll w hen tax exemption approval is received. 11 On the afternoon prior to our Nov. 21 executive committee meeting, our new non profit corporation, the Citizens Advisory Committ ee for Urban Renewal Rehabilitation Corporation, Inc. me t with Attorney Hugh Peterson, Jr. to complete its organization. All eight incorporators, as listed previously, were named trustees of the new corporation. In turn the quorum present elected two officers to carry on the corporation ' s work. Officers are Robert L. Sommerville, president and chairman, William S. Howland, secretary-treasurer. It was also decided that CACURRCI will h o ld regular monthly meetings on the same date as the monthly meetings of our comrnittee. CACURRCI ORGANIZES SELF , INCORPORA TORS NAMED TRUSTEES, OFFICERS ARE CHOSEN Acceptin 6 the charter documents, Chairman Sommerville explained that the a p p r ova l of a $96, 000 221 H grant for our committee specifies that the new corporati on will r e habili tate eight dwellings . He pointed out that the 6 rant calls for the pur .. chase , rehabilit ation and resale of this number of structures. NEW CORPORATION WILL REHABILITATE EIGHT STRUCTURES, CHAIRMAN POINTS OUT �-2The Atlanta Housin g Authority ha s a g reed t o a.ss~st CACURRCI in locating the structure s , h e a dded. Said M r. Sommerville :'This numoer o:£ structures - ei g ht_ may se em sn:. all, but the idea will spread. " FHA OF FICIAL OUTLINES PROCEDUR ES FOR PU TTING OUR CORPORATION TO VlORK Followin~ deli very of our new corporation's charter, Otis Haire, FHA real e s tate evaluator assi 6 necl to the 2 21 H pro g rarn in Geor gia, outlined to the executive comn.i ttee the procedure by whi ch the $96, 000 g rant allocated to our pro;ect will be put t o work. M r . Haire first pointed out that 21 applications for 221 H grants so far h ad been m ade in the state, four of these in Atlanta . He expressed the hope that our comn, ittee's plan to rehabilitate eiJht houses will spur J rowth to include several hundred units. Said he " Expansion brick by uric1,, house by house, street by street, n ei g hborhood by neighi:>orhood is the only way this can be done. It serves a two fold pu r pose -- ..; etting rid of dilapidated houses and up 6 rading people as well as structures . ' ' First step for CACURRCI will De to review rehabilitation requirements with the city buildin6 inspector's office, he pointed out . This is essential, Decause a work w rite-up itemizing deficiencies from foundation to roof will be required for each structure. Next point is that all rehabilitation in one project must be carried out by one contractor, chosen from competitive bids . The contractor will stipulate the exact price , after which 20 per cent of the fee will De held back until all rehabilitation is completed . This is in lieu of a performance bond . Upon cornpletion of repairs, individual appraisals w ill be made. The arr. aunt of loan ~~ ranted will vary with re 0 ard to the size of families and other factors . After completing the initial paper work and other preliminarie s, the CACURRCI' s next step will be to make financial arran 6 ements with local lending institutions for acquisition of properties After houses are rehabilitated and sold , FHA will pick up the tab. Mr. Haire also pointed out that FHA has certain stipulations about the types of houses to be purchased and repaired. For exa;.n ple, so called " shotgun houses ' ' will not be approved. The speaker also ur g ed that at least lo to 20 houses De considered for choice of the initial ei ght for the project, because frequently approval difficulties are encountered . In a discussion followin 6 i\ r . Haire's talk, i'.frs. Grace Han-.ilton asked if there were any restrictions on location of the eiJht units . John F. Thigpen, Director, (Georgia) Department of Housing and Urban Development, Federal Housin.:;; Administration, replied that any area within the city could iJe used for location . Mr. Haire added that location of any project w ithin a two mile radius was desirable both from the corporation's viewpoint and that of the contractor . In reply to a question from I\ rs . Doris Lockerman, about value of houses, Chairman Somm erville pointed out that the total ~rant of $9 6, 000 would indicate a value of $12, 000 per house . Two groups of houses were brought to the attention of the new corporation by James Henley of the Atlanta Housing Authority. One is located east of Glen Iris Drive and south of the Sears store. These are on Rankin, Wilmer and Dallas Streets. The o t her g roup is in an area bounded by McDonough, Lakewood and Carver Hoines . Mr. Henley pointed out that no individual houses had been designated but that preliminary surveys indicated that the houses were in a purchase price ran g e of $4, 500 to $8, 000, with repair estimates rangin 6 from $2, 000 to $4, 000. Said he: "The houses appear to need considerable repair w ork, but are not beyond rehabilitation. They also appear to be owner occupied, single family dwellin 6 s ' '; Mr . Henley emphasized that the Housing Authority would be delighted to do all within its power to assist CACURRCI. I n an ensuing Q & A session , A. B. Padgett asked Dan E. Sweat, city director of 6 over nm ental liaison, if the new corpo r ation would help the city's model city program (fo r w hich Atlanta had recently received federal approval) by choosing homes in that a r ea . Mr. Sweat replied that this would definitely be of assistance, but that since considerable time would be required before definite model city plans could be made, he s u 66 est ed that CACURRCI go ahead with its pro g ram in other areas. In reply to a qu est ion a bout whether churches were showing interest in 221-H, Mr. Haire said that a Sunday Sc hool class at the Second Ponce de Leon Baptist Church had called a meeting t o di scuss participation. In reply to another question about time limits for a project, Mr. H ai r e s a id a total of 00 days would be allotted- - 30 days for choosing a site, 30 days fo r naming a cont r ac t o r. AHA SUGGESTS TWO GROUPS OF HOUSES FOR NEW CORPORATION TO CONSIDER �- - -- - - - -- - -- - -.- - - - - - - - - - - - -3As the discussion ended, FHA.Housin 6 and Ur bah Developmen.t Director Thigpen remarked that his or 6 anization is so pleased with bur participating in the 221 H prog ram that he is assi 6 ning two of his top assistants to work with CACURRCI. BEDFORD- PINE LEADERS SEEKING TO EXPEDITE PARK THERE, CHAIRMAN WALDRIP REPORTS A nun1ber of leaders of the Bedford- Pine urban renewal project area met Nov . 20. with me.r.. ~bers of the Board of Aldermen and representatives of the Atlanta Housin~ Authority to discuss how a park for that area could be speeded up, Herbert Waldrip, chairman o f our Bedford-Pine associate comni ittee told the executive comn·,itte e Said M r. "\V aldrip - ;'The property for a park (adJoining the new C. W. Hill School) ha s been cleared for a year and the people in the comn-1unity hate to see another sumn ,er come around with no recreational facilities for the children there. 1 1 M~r . Waldrip pointed out that the Nov . 20 meeting was told that the Board of Education was holdin g up development of a park and that another meeting to include representation from the Board of Education will be scheduled shortly, but that he feared that it would be June before any action on a park would ~et under way. NOTE -- The clay followin 6 our executive comm ittee meeting , Director Howland, who attended the Bedford-Pine meeting, arranged for M r . Waldrip to confer with Mayor Allen and also with Dr . Darwin Womack, assistant superintendent for scnool plant plannin 6 and construction, about the need for action on a Bedford- Pine park . At the Nov. 21 meeting, Chairman Somn. erville expressed our comrr ittee's reJr et on the death of Dr. Rufus B. Clernent, a lon 6 ti me ;..:: e rr1i.1er Said M r . Sor"!l. r., erville : 11 Dr Cl ement was seldon1 able to attend m.eetings, uut no rner:: ber w or '.(ed harder to help our comn-,ittee and the subcomn. ittees on which he served achieve their purposes. I never knew a man r: ,ore g entle in speech norm.ore powerful in 6 ettin 6 thin3 b done. If you asked Dr Clement to do something , I know of nobody who would 6 0 to m ore trouble to help you. " CHAIRMAN EXPRESSES APPRECIATION O F DR . CLEMENT'S NOTABLE SERVICES Before y ear I s end, final surveys and reports of the CIP are due to be received for evaluation, Director Geor J e A ldridg e reported to our executive com.n. ittee . He added that since many of these will have to be su bmitted to comn . ittees for review, he probably will not be a ble to present a full report until our January rneeting. FINAL CIP STUDIES BEING EVALUATED, DIRECTOR ALDRIDGE TELLS COlvi.MITTEE Active citizen participation is among maJor requirements of the model city program in which Atlanta i s one of the first 63 cities to receive a federal J r ant, Dan E . Sweat, Jr . , city direc tor of 6 overnmental liaison, emphasized in an updatin 6 talk to our executive comn, ittee Nov . 21. Although Atlanta w ill rec eiv e only $15 2, 000 out of the $500, 09 0 plannin 3 fund requested, the city probably will obtain another $74,000 for model city purposes, iv'.: r . Sweat said. This latte r amount is being reserved in the Comi-..1.unity Ir.. proven-, e nt Prog r am funds. The city m ust show need for it in the mode l city pro 5 rarn . l\ti r . Sweat delineated the m odel city a rea as com prisin 6 3 , 000 acres in the southern section of the city , oounded on the north uy I n t erstate 20, on the west by Lee Street, and on the south and east by the railroad belt line. Althou 6 h c ompri sin~ only 3. 7 per cent of the c ity land area, the model city site includes 5 per cent of the total population , on a 7 5 per cent Ne g ro, 25 per cent white basis . As reasons for its choice for the m ode l city prog ram, I\/. r. Sweat showed that this a re a includes 8 3 per c ent of the total housing units, but 2 0 per cent of these a r e s u bst a ndard A l so it includes 11 . 3 per c e nt of the city ' s illiter a t es a nd 2 0 per cent of the population with incomes under $3, 000 per year . Unen1.ployn, ent rate is 5 1/ 2 per cent as com pared with the city wide r a t e of 3 1/2 per cent . All in a ll, the area r e pr es ents 20 to 25 per cent of the city I s maJor probl ems . Mr Sweat a l so 0riefly outlined the methods by whi c h the .i\·: odel city pro g ram will ue a d m inister e d Top dir ection will be provided by a pr o Ject e x e cutive boa rd, consisting of policy rr..akin 6 officials NOTE-- On Nov . 22, Mayor A lle n a nd othe r city officia l s conferred with Re 6 ional HUD A d m ini strator Ed Baxter and other re 6 ional fede ral officia l s involved in i n, plementin g th e m od e l city program , Our comr.1itte e was represented iJ y Director Howla nd F ULL COMMITTEE MEETING -- TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19-DETAILS LATER. CITIZEN PARTICIPATION rv:AJOR ELEMENT IN M ODEL CITY PROGRAM, SWEAT EXPLAINS 9: �lf{H(E lR[E[NfEW[R NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZENS AbV1SORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL Vol. 5 No. 10 Atlanta, Georgia November 1967 CHARTER PUTS OUR CORPORATION IN BUSINESS TO IMPLEMENT $96, 000 221-H ALLOCATION At our executive committee meeting, Nov. 21, Attorney Hugh Peterson, Jr. presented a prestigious document, bearing the gold sealsof the State of Georgia and the Superior Court of Fulton County. Said the first page of the document: "I, Ben Fortson, Jr., Secret ary of State .of the State of Georgia, do hereby certify that "The Citizens Advisory Committee f or Urban Renewal Rehabilitation Corporation, Inc. was on the sixth day of November, 1967, duly incorporated under the laws of' the state of Georgia by the Superior Court of Fulton County for a period of thirty five years from said date." This document went on to list the incorporators as Robert L. Sommerville, William S. Howland, H. W. Whitman, Harold Arnold, Herbert Waldrip, Mrs. Grace Hamilton, Percy Hearle and Harold Davis. It then set forth the corporation's purposes saying "Said corporation is and shall be organized and operated exclusively for the purpose of assisting in the developm:eilt of projects, undertakings, studies and other activities by itself or in cooperation with local government and civic bodies and other corporations and associations for the elimination of slums, blight and blighting influences and to aid, assist and foster the planning, development, renewal and improvement of the metropolitan, Atla nta, Georgia, area, all for the primary purpose of combatting community deterioration and securing adequate housing, community facilities and related facilities for the general welfare of the community. 11 The document further stated 11 no part of the principal funds or income of the corporation shall ever inure to the benefit of any private shareholder or individual or beneficiary, or revert to any donor or to the estate or heirs of any donor and no part of its activities shall ever be carrying on propaganda or otherwis e attempting to influence legislation or participating in or intervening in (including the publishing or distributing of statements) any political campaign on behalf of any candidate for public office : 11 The document included an order by Superior Court Judge Jack B. Etheridge gr anting the charter. As Attorney Peterson handed the papers to Chairman Sommerville, he said, with a srr.,ile, 11 Now we'll get a seal for the cor. poration if I can just get all those letters on one. 1 1 The essence of all the words a nd seals a nd signatures on the papers which made up the blue bound document is that what is known as a "legal entity has been created to put into action the $96, 000 221 H grant allocated in response to our committee's application. Summed up Mr. Peterson: "The corporation is now in business. Application for tax exemption has been sent to the Internal Revenue Service. I understand that the committee rec eived the g rant even before the corporation was or ganized, so now e verything is ready to r oll when t ax exemption approval is rec eiv ed. 11 On the afternoon prior to our Nov. 21 executive committee meeting, our new non profit corporation, the Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal Rehabilitatio n Corporation, Inc. met with Attorne y Hu gh Peterson, Jr. to com plete its organization. All eight inc orporators, as listed previously, were nam.ed trustees of the new corporation. In turn the quorum present e lected two officers to carry on the corporation's work. Officers are Robert L. Sommerville, pr esident and chairm an, William S. Howland, secret a ry-treasurer. It was also decided that CACURRCI will hold regular monthly meetings on the same date as the monthly me etings o f our c omrnittee. CACURRCIORGANIZESSE LF, INCORPORATORS NAMED TRUSTEES, OFFICERS ARE CHOSEN Acceptin 6 the charter documents, Chairman Somn,e rville explaine d that the approv al of a $9 6 , 000 221 H g rant for our committee specifies t hat the new corporation will rehabilitate e i ght dwellings. He pointed out that the 6 rant calls for the pur .. chase, rehabilitation and resal e of this number of structures. NEW CORPORATION WILL REHABILITATE EIGHT STRUCTURES, CHAIRMAN POINTS OUT �-2The Atlanta Housing Authorit y h as ag:teed to as sist CACURRCI in locating the structures, he added. Said Mr. Sommerville " Thi s numoer of str uc t ures - ei g ht_ may s ee m sn--.all, but the idea will spte ad. 11 FHA OFFICIAL OUTLINES PROCEDURES FOR PUTTING OUR CORPORATION T O WORK Followin 6 delivery of our new corporation's charter, Otis Haire, FHA real estate evaluator assi 6 ned to t h e 2 21 H pro g ram in Geor gia, outlined to the executive comn _ittee the procedure by w hi ch the $9 6, 000 g rant allocated to our proJect will be put to work. Mr. Haire first pointed out that 21 applications for 221 H grants so far had been m ade in the state , fou r of these in Atlanta. He expressed the hope that our com n, ittee's plan to rehabilit ate ei 6 ht houses will spur ,; rowth to include several hundr ed units. Said he "Ex pansion br ick by uric K, house by house, street by street, nei;shborhood by neig h oo r hood is the only w ay this can be done . It serves a two fold purpose - - .;; etting rid of dilapidated houses and up 6 radin g people as well as structures . ' ' First step for CACURRCI w ill De to review rehabilitation. requirements with the city buildin,;; inspe c t o r 's office, he pointed out. This is essential, Decause a work . wr ite-up itemizing d eficiencies from foundation to roof will De required for each structure. Next p oint i s that all rehabilitation in one project must be carried out by one contracto r, chos e n fr om competitive bids . The contractor will stipulate the exact price , after whi c h 2 0 per cent of the fee will De held back until all rehabilitation is completed . This i s i n lieu of a performance bond . Upon co rnpletion of repairs, individual apprai s als will l> e m ade . The a r.:, ount of loan ~~ ranted will vary with re 0 ard to the size of fami lies and other factors . After completing the initial paper work and other prelim inarie s , the CACURRCI's next step will b e to m ake financial arran 6 ements with l o cal l e n di ng ins t ituti ons for acquisition of properties After houses are rehabilitate d a nd sold , F HA will pick up the tab. ivi r . Haire also pointed out that FHA has certain s t i pul ations about the types of houses to be purchased and repaired. For example, s o calle d " shotgun houses ' ' will not be approved . The speaker also urged that at lea s t 16 t o 20 houses De considered for choice of the initial ei ght for the project, oe c ause frequently app roval difficulties are encountered . In a di scuss i on followi n 6 j\ '. r. Haire's talk, 1'. frs . Grace Harr.ilton asked if there were any re s tric ti ons o n location of the ei J ht units. J c,hn F. Thigpen , Director, (Georgia) . Depar t ment of H ousing a nd Urban Development, Federal Housin~ Administration, replied that any area w ithin t he city could ue used for location . Mr. Haire added that location of any pr o j ec t w ithin a two mile radius was desirable both from the corporation's viewpoint and tha t o f the cont ractor. In reply to a question from l\ ,rs. Doris Lockerman, abo ut value of hou ses , Chair m an Somm erville pointed out that the total ~rant of $ 9 6, 000 would i ndicat e a value of $12 , 000 per house . Two groups of houses were brought to the attention of the new corporation by James Henl e y of the Atlanta Housing Authority . One is located east of Glen Iris Drive and south of the Sear s stor e. These are on Rankin, \Vilr.i er and Dallas Streets. The other group is in an are a bounded by McDonough, Lakewood and Carver Hoines. Mr. Henley pointed out t hat no individual houses had been designated but that preliminary surveys indicated tha t th e houses were in a purchase price ran g e of $4, 500 to $8, 000, with repair estimate s ran g in 6 from $2, 000 to $4, 000. Said he: " The houses appear to need considerabl e rep a i r w ork, but are not beyond rehabilitation . They also appear to be owner occupi e d , sing le fam ily dw ellin 5 s " . Mr . Henley emphasized that the Housing Authority woul d be deli 6 hted to do all within its power to assist CACURRCI. In an ensuing Q & A session, A. B . Padgett asked Dan E . Sweat , city director of 6 ov ernmental liaison , if th e n ew corporation would help the city's model city pro g ram (for which Atlanta had rece n t ly r eceived federal approval) by choosing homes in that area . Mr . Sweat replied t hat this would definitely be of assistance, but that since considerabl e time would be re qui r ed before definite model city plans could be made, h e su oo ·., 7e sted that CACURRCI u•YO ahead w ith its pro -z r a m in other areas. In reply to a question about whether churches wer e s how ing interest in 221-H, M r . Haire said that a Sunday School clas s at the Sec ond P once d e Leon Baptist Chu r ch had called a meeting to di s cuss participation . In reply t o a n other question about tim e lim its for a project, Mr. Haire said a t otal of 00 days w ould be allotted- - 30 days for choosin6 a site, 30 days for naming a contractor . AHA SUGGESTS TW O GROUPS OF HOUSES FOR NEW C ORPORA TION TO CONSIDER �- 3As the discussion ended , FHA .Housin 6 and Uroan Development Director Thi g pen remarked that his or g anization is so pleased with our participating in the 221 H pro g ram that he is assi 6 ning two of his top assistants to work with CACURRCI. BEDFORD-PINE LEADERS SEEKING TO EXPEDITE PARK THERE , CHAIRMA N WA LDRIP REPORTS A nun 1ber of leaders of the Bedford- Pine ur oan renewal project area m et Nov.20 . with mer.. bers of the Board of Aldermen and representatives of the Atlanta Hou s ing Author ity to discuss how a park for that area could be speeded up, Herbert W aldrip, chairman of our Bedford-Pine associate comr,. ,ittee told the executive comn--ittee Said 1\-i.r. 1,V aldrip - " The property for a park (adJoinin 6 the new C . W. Hill School) has been cleared for a year and the people in the community hate to see another sumn !er come around with no recreational facilities for the children there . " Mr. Waldr ip pointed out that the Nov . 20 meeting was told that the Board of Education was holdin g up development of a park and that another meeting to include representation from the Board of Education will be scheduled shortly, but that he feared that it would be June before any action on a park would ~et under way. NOTE -- The day following our executive com m ittee meeting , Director Howland, who attended the Bedford-Pine meeting, arranged for Mr. Waldrip to confer with Mayor Allen and also with Dr. Darwin Womack, assistant superintendent for scnool plant plannin 6 and construction , about the need for action on a Bedford- Pine park . CHAIRMAN EXPRESSES APPRECIATION OF DR . CLEMENT'S NOTABLE SERVICES At the Nov . 21 meetin 6 , Chairman Somn, er ville expressed our com.rr:ittee's r eJret on the death of Dr. Rufus B . Clement, a long time :.:r,.e ;:n,.ler Said Mr. Sor"11ne rville: " Dr Clement was seldorn able to attend n,eetings, uut no rn.eL : ber w or '.(ed harder to help our comrc ittee and the subco1nn . ittees on which he served achieve their purposes. I never k new a man r: ,ore g entle in speech nor n,ore powerful in 6 etting thin31:, done . If you asked Dr Clement to do something, I know of nobody who w ould 6 0 to m ore trouble to help you. " FINA L GIP STUDIES BEING EVALUATED, DIRECTOR ALDRIDGE TELLS COiv1MITTEE Before year's end, final surveys and report·s of the GIP are due to be received .for evaluation, Direc t or Geor 6 e Aldridge reported to our executive comn:ittee . He added that since many of these will have to be submitted to comn ittees for review, he probably will not be able to present a full report until our January· meeting. CITIZEN PARTICIPATION M AJOR ELEMENT IN MO DEL CITY PROGRAM, SWEAT EXPLAINS Active citizen participation is among maJor requirements of the model city program in which Atlanta is one of the first 6 3 cities to receive a federal grant, Dan E . Sweat, Jr . , city director of 6 overnmental liaison, emphasized in an updatin~ talk to our executive comm ittee Nov. 21. Althou 6 h Atlanta will receive only $152, 000 out of the $500, 0 90 plannin;:s fund requested, the city probably will obtain another $7 4, 000 for m odel city purposes, :r,t r . Sweat said . This latter amount is being reserved in the Corrn.,unity Ir. .provement Program funds . The city m ust show need for it in the model city pro 6 rarn. Mr. Sweat delineated the model city area as comprising 3, 000 acres in the southern section of the city, oounded on the north uy Interstate 20, on the west by Lee Street, and on the south and east by the railroad belt line. Althou 6 h comprisin.:;; only 3. 7 per cent of the city land area, the model city site includes 1 . 5 per cent of the total population , on a 75 per cent Negro, 25 per cent white basis. As reasons for its c h oice for the model city pro 6 ram, l\·~r . Sweat showed that this area includes 8 3 per cent of the t otal housi ng units, but 20 per cent of these are substandard Also it includes 11 . 3 per cent of the city's illiterates and 20 per cent of the population with inc omes under $3, 000 per year. Une m ployment rate is 5 1/2 per cent as compared with the city wide rate of 3 1/2 per cent . All in all, the area represents 20 to 25 per cent of the city's major problems . M r Sweat also i.)riefly outlined the rnethods by which th e l\ : odel city pro g ram will ue adm.inistered . Top direction will oe provided by a project executive board, consisting of policy .::r..a1cin 6 officials NOTE- - On Nov . 22, M ayor Allen and other city officials conferred with Re g ional HUD Administrator Ed Baxter and other re c:,,1ional federal officials involved in i m ple1nenting the model city program, Our comr. 1ittee was represented i.;, y Director Howland . FULL COMMITTEE MEETING -- TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19-DETAILS LATER. �CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY HALL-ATLANTA. GA. 30303 PHONE 524-2745 ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE CHAIRMAN WILLIAM 5. HOWLAND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MRS. EVELYN DODDS SECRETARY November 17, 1967 Dear Executive Committee Member .. I feel sure that all of us agree with The Constitution's editorial today which said "Yesterday's announcement that Atlanta had been approved for a model cities planning grant is an event of major importance. It gives Atlanta what is potentially the most powerful tool it has ever used to reverse urban decay and to serve a changing population. "Atlanta's selection is at once a reward and a challenge. 11 Since our committee has been an ardent supporter of the Model City Program from its inception, I have asked Dan E. Sweat, the city's Director of Governmental Liaison, to brief us on the program I s present status and future potential at our meeting at 2 p.m., Tuesday, November 21, in the Directors Room, Fulton Federal Savings and Loan Building. Sincerely, , ':'s I I . !I J ( ·1-v t t { ~ William S. Howland �CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303 PHONE 524-2745 ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE CHAIRMAN WILLIAMS. HOWLAND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MRS. EVELYN DODDS SECRETARY November 14, 1967 Dear Executive Comn,ittee Member - Just to remind you that because of the Turkey Day holiday, we are meeting next Tuesday, repeat Tuesday, November 21, at 2 p. m. in the directors room of the Fulton Federal Savings and Loan building, on the southwest corner of Pryor and Edgewood. Even though that is two days before Thanksgiving Day, we have a lot to be thankful for and to be interested in. For instance: 1. Our legal eagle, Hugh Peterson, Jr., has completed the incorporation of our non-profit corporation to enable u s to participate in the 221-H rehab program. Mr. Peterson will brief u s about the w o rking s of our non-profit corporation with its almost non-pronounceable name ... The Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal Rehabilitation Corporation, Inc. (CACURRCI) . How's that for a tongue twister and a headline writer's headache? 2. We have received official confirmation from John F. Thi gpen, Georgia FHA director, that we have been granted $96, 000 to cover the rehabilitation of eight dwelling units. 3. To help CACURRCI get started PDQ on putting this grant to work, Mr. Thigpen is delegating Otis M. Haire, Georgia FHA real estate evaluator, to meet with us Tuesday and outline the steps that CACURRCI must take. 4. Also to help us to get started with utmost speed, Lester H. Persells, AHA Associate Executive Director, will give us some specific sites to consider. �-2- So how we can begin active participation in 221-H will be the first order of business Tuesday. Also we will have a brief report from Herbert Waldrip, our Bedford-Pine Associate Committee Chairman, on some recent developments in that area. All in all, a full menu is presented for our pre-Thanksgiving meeting. Chairman Sommerville and I will be very thankful if you can attend and give us the benefit of your thinkin~. Sincerely yours, -. ~11( I IlA ~-~~ William S. Howlarid �. .. . .. 1 lR[NlEWlElR . NEWSLETTER OF THE CI Tl ZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL Vol . 5 No. 9 Atlanta, Georgia October 196 7 COMMITTEE FORMING NONPROFIT CORPORATION The Citizens Advisory ComTO PARTICIPATE IN 221 H REHAB PROGRAM mittee for Urban Renewal will form a nonprofit corporation to participate actively in the new 221 H federal rehabilitation program. T h at was the unatlimous decision of the executive committee at its October 19 meeting. Following the September meeting, at which the details of the new federal program were explained, the city attorney's office was asked for a ruling as to whether the committee by itself could receive loans and grants ·to participate by handling a project fol' the rehabilitation of dwelling units. Edwin L. Sterne, associate city attorney replied, saying, in substance, that the aldermanic resolution creating our committee provided that our function was to advise on urban renewal matters but had nd authority to act as a nohpt4ofit d:rgahizatioh. Mr. Sterne held that our committee is nbt what is known as a "legal entity 11 , but a group of persons. Accordingly, he suggested that we create a rtohprofit corporation which would be a legal entity and be authorized to enter into contracts, etc. In line with Mr. Sterne's suggestion, Chairman Sommerville called for a motion to create a nonprofit corporation. The motion was unanimously approved for a nonprofit corporation to be known as The Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal Rehabilitation Corporation. The following were named as incorporators: Robert L. Sommerville, William S. Howland, H. W. Whitman, Harold Arnold, Mrs. Grace Hamilton, Percy Hearle, Harold Davis, all of our committee and Herbert Waldrip, chairman of the BedfordPine Associate Advisory Committee. Hugh Peterson, Jr. was engaged as attorney to effe c t the incorporation. Mr. Peterson briefly outlined the incorporation procedure saying that the chief expense involved would be _publication of the charter in a legal newspaper. This he estimated, would not exceed $100. Chairman Sommerville explained that these and other initial costs will be taken care of by a loan from the Atlanta Transit System. Summed up Chairman Sommerville: "I think it is important for our committee, by means of this nonprofit corporation, to participate actively in the 221 H program. If it is carried out under the aegis of our committee, it will get good n otices and it will be very encouraging to the kind of people we have been w o rrying about." Commenting on the committee's action, Henry R. Fillmer, present in his new capacity as assistant chief of the real estate disposition depal:'-tment, HUD regional office, said: "This should generate actir,n by other nonprofit groups in Atlanta. " Carrying out General Nathan Bedford Forrest's famed battle ·plan of "gittin' thar fustest with the mostest", immediately following the Sept. 27 luncheon conference with the federal officials, Chairman Sommerville and Director Howland filed an application for a federal allocation of $96, 000 to rehabilitate eight dwelling units under the 221 H program. On October 23 we received the good news from Kenneth Finn, architect in the regional FHA office, that our application had been approved by Washington headquarters. Accordingly, while our nonprofit corporation is being formed to implement this allocation,. preliminary steps to determine a site for the project have been taken with the Atlanta Housing Authority. It is our intent to locate our rehabiliation undertaking adj.a.cent to or in the vicinity of an urban renewal project. OUR APPLICATION FOR $96,000 ALLOCATION FOR 221 H PROJECT WINS FEDERAL APPROVAL DRASTIC CHANGES IN RENEWAL CONCEPT URGED A resolution calling for two BY NAHRO DELEGATES, OPENSHAW REPORTS sweeping changes in urban renewal was adopted by the 1800 delegates to the 31st Conference of the Nn.tional Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials, Howard Openshaw, Atlanta Housing Authority, redevelopment director who attended the Portland, Oregon meeting reported to our executive c ommittee. �.. ' 2 One change was that the urban renewal concept be one of total community development instead of single project approach. The other was that the federal contribution be made .90 percent (instead of 66-2/ 3 %) and that local credits be eliminated. That would mean the 10 percent local contribution would be all cash. The resolution further proposed, Mr. Openshaw explained, that Congress adopt a goal for national housing produc tion-at the rate of 2 million units per year for the next 20 ye~rs, and that 500, 000 of this total production be established for low and moderate income housing, one half of which should be reserved for an expansion of the public housing program. The delegates also stressed the need to decentralize the Department of 11ousing and Urban Development to provide more decision making pow ers at the re~ional level to expedite urban renewal and housing programs. The res olution further rec ommended special attention be directed toward meeting the housing needs of large families and very low income families. ATLANTAN'S DESIGN FOR SAN FRANCISCO Mr. Openshaw also told the EMBARCADERO CENTER IS IMPRESSIVE executive committee that he . . was very much in1pressed by San Franci sco 1s prbposed Embarcadero Center, as designed by Atlanta's John Portm ah. He explained that the plan calls for 2, 800, 000 square feet of office space, a hotel, entertainrr.ent center and landscaping with sculpture and foun t ains , In additioi1, the Golden Gateway Center contains townhouses and high rise office buildings; a 1300 car garage and more sculpture and other works of art. Mr. Openshaw pointed o_u t that the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency requires that at lt:!ast one perteht of construction costs be devoted to exterior works of art. Fr esno, California, also is carrying out a m~jor urban renewal project, transform.fog its main street to a mall, 16 blocks long. Landscaping and extensive use of art are employed. Summing up, said he: "My particular interest was not only to see redevelopment programs of other cities, but also to secure the design standards and contr ols that produce such magnificent redevelopment areas. 11 Corr:,n1enting on the national acclaim Atlanta's urban renewal program receives, he said "We have only begun to scratch the surface. 1 1 FINDING SUITABLE SITES FOR HOUSING DIFFIC ULT IN ALL AREAS, JONES REPORTS Finding suitable sites for new· housing is diffic~lt . iri..a.U.a.r.eas of:... the city, Col. Malcolm Jones, Director, Housing Resources committee, pointed out to the executive committee, He added that sites for 3, 300 units are awaiting zoning action. Col. Jones said that 6,340 unit s now seem firm and 1,479 more appear probable, making a total of 7,819 that can be regarded as definite so far in the five year program. He added that the number available for use by the end of 1967 should be scaled down from the earlier estimate of 2, 534 to a little more than 1, 900. The prospect for 1968 is seen as a total of 3, 159. He said that the Housing Resources committee had recommended the selection of scattered sites. In a discussion following Col. Jones' remarks, Collier Gladin, city planning engineer, reported that the land use study is proceeding slowly with continued revisions. He expressed hope that an acceptable plan would be ready by January 1, 1968. Executive Committeeman Calloway urged support of a project in the Jackson -- Boulevard-Hollywood area. It embraces 60 acres, including 221 D 3 units, apartments, shopping center and condominiums. Mr. Calloway added that it was adjacent to the first turnkey project and was awaiting federal approval. Referring to the difficulty of obt aining sites for housing, Lester H. Per sells, AHA associate executive director, pointed out that4·, 500 public ·.hou.aing units mea~s finding some 40 parcels of land. Consequently, they will have to be located in different areas in the city. He als o pointed out that with the lead time on individual projects ranging from six to 18 months, the need for action is apparent. An honor guest at our October 19 meeting was Maruo Shioda, deputy chief editor of Shukan Yomiuri, weekly magazine with a circulation of 700, 000, published by a leading Japanese newspaper. In Atlanta as a participant in the State Department's international visitor program, :tv.. r. Shioda was making a special study of u r ban problems, with emphasis on the sociological and human factors. JAPANESE EDITOR IS OUR GUEST, TELLS OF HUGE HOUSING COMPLEXES �-3Asked by Chairman Sommerville to address the comrr.ittee, Mr. Shioda spoke briefly through Ichiro Mike Nishimura, State Department escort-interpreter. He stressed the point that the housing shortage iri Japan most serious affects the middle income groups. Government housing is supplied in very lar 5 e complexes, which include parks, shops and super markets. Housing is in high rise structures, extending to 15 stories, with 22 to 25 families on each floor. Mr. Shioda also photographed our comrr:ittee in action . NEW GA . STATE PROGRA!v: TO DEVELOP TRAINED URBAN WORKERS, DA VIS EXPLAINS The airn of Geor Jia Stat e ColleJe' s new urban affairs program is to develop skilled people to work with cities and counties, Executive Committeeman Harold Davis, public relations dire ctor at the colle 6 e, explained October 19. He pointed out that the four year course, for the dec,;ree of Bachelor of Science in Urban Affairs, will train students to help solve uroan problems. After two years ·o f general studies, thos e seekin 6 this degree will devote their final two years to courses in urban J eography, racial minorities , the politics and economics of urban life, demoJraphy and kindred subjects . To support this program, the City of Atlanta is contributin 6 $18,000, he said. Mr. Davis also briefly mentioned the remarkable 6 rowth achieved by Georgia State over the past tntnihee I s pdlicy is to finance tours only for groups or orgahbations that tlo not have r esources for such purposes. Executive Director i-Iowiand expressed our committee's thanks to Mrs. Margret Ross and her associates at the Atlanta Housing Authority for helping to conduct the tours. Illustrating the value of such first hand exposure to urban renewal, Mr. Sommerville read a letter from Dr. Beate B andy of the Georgia State College faculty which thanked us for arrangin 6 a tour July 13 for two of her classes. Wrote Dr. Bandy: "Since you took us on the tour of the Atlanta Urban Renewal Areas we have had two very lively class sessions. Most of my students know social problems of this magnitude only from books; a realistic demonstration like this can make the points better than any combination of classroom instruction and reading. I want you to know how much my students and I appreciate the time and effort you spent on us, and also, that this time and effort is put to very good use. ! I Warm appreciation of a tour conducted June 22 for teachers of disadvantaged youth attending a NDEA institute at Emory University also was expressed by Dr. Dora Helen Skype k, . institute director. Wrote Dr. Skypek, The tour was the highlight of the first week of our program. It was enlightening and enjorable not only for the 18 teachers from New York, Detroit, Denver, Seattle, Spokane, Milwaukee and urban areas in California, Illinois and the Southeast, but also for the 19 teachers and staff members who live in Atlanta. Some preconceptions were shattered and limited information had to be revised. Emphasis on the rehabilitation aspect of urban renewal was a worthy prelude to our required reading of H. Gans• ' The Urban Villagers• and related sociological readings. 11 11 EX -SENATOR DOUGLAS AND HIS COMMISSION ARE SHOWN HIGHLIGHTS OF ATLANTA RENEWAL At the request of the National Commission on Urban Problems, a special tour of Atlanta urban renewal projects and the model city target area was arranged by our committee July 20. Headed by Chairman Paul Douglas, former U.S. Senator from Illinois, the commission members who were in Atlanta for hearings July 21, viewed Buttermilk Bottoms, Bedford-Pine, Butler Street, model city, part of West End and University Center areas. Hig h point of the tour was a stop at the Antoine Graves housing for the elderly: Commission members visited a number of apartments and expressed themselves as much impressed by what they saw. Tour conductors were Director Howland and Mrs. Margret Ross, Atlanta Housing Authority information officer. At the hearing next day, Director Howland made a brief appearance as a witnes s to tell how our committee had helped obtain active citizen participation and thereby obtained a cooperative a ttitude in Bedford-Pine planning . Mr. Howland also expre ssed our committee's endorsement of the Housing Authority's plan to try temporary housing as an experiment to relocate people while new permanent housing is under construction. On behalf of our committee, Chairman Sommerville July 6 expre ssed congratulations to the Celotex Corporation upon being selected as developer of 208 units of housing in the University Center project. Chairman Sommerville . spoke at the contract s igning July 6. Also representing our committe e were T. M. Alexander, Sr . , chairman of our s pecial subcommittee to review redevelopment proposals, and Director Howland. Said Mr. Sommer ville: 11 This i s a spl e ndid indica tion of the blending of private enterprise and public service. The quality of this proposal a ssures us that we will n ot be building a future slum. I heartily congratulate the Celotex Corporation a nd welcome it to this first venture in the field of low a nd moderate income housing. What h as impressed me a bout a ll the developme nt proposals is their excellenc e . Representing Mayor A llen was Dan E. Sweat , Jr. , directo r of governmental liais on for the city. Saying he p ers ona lly w as 11 exc ite d a nd pleased with the selection 11 , Mr. Sweat read a statement from Mayor Allen. 11 1 warmly congratulate t he Celotex Corporation 11 , stated Mayor Allen. "This m arks a n important new step toward meeting Atlanta's housing need s in that one of the largest building mat erials manufacturers is entering this field for the first time. In so doing, Celotex is demonstrating a v ery high sense of public r es ponsibility. I w ould a l so like to express my appreciation of the excelle nc e of a ll seven propos a l s submitted. 11 CHAIRMAN ACCLAIMS SELECTION OF CELOTEX AS 11 SPLENDID PRIVATE P~ND PUBLIC BLENDING' THE NEXT COMMITTEE MEETING WILL BE IN SEPTEMBE R-NONE IN A UGUST �CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY HALL-ATLANTA. GA. 30303 PHONE 524 - 2745 ROBE:RT L . SOMMERVILLE CH A IR MAN WILLIAM S. HOWLAND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR July 11, 1967 MRS . EVELYN DODDS SECRETARY Dear Executive Committee Member: 11 Tis the la s t rose of summer Left blooming all alone All her lovely compa n i ons Are faded and gone . 11 1 Perhaps Thomas Moor e 's famed verse does not e x actly appl y to CACUR 1 s a c tiviti es, but I have borrowed it t o call to your a t tention that our last meeting of the summer will be held at 2 p . m., Wednesday, July 19, in the Fulton F ederal Dir ect o r s' Room , on the southw est corne r of Pryor and Edg ewood. Alt hough w e s hall not have the last r o s e on h and, we s ha ll p resent a p r ogram b lo oming with info rmation as follows : 1. Collier G l adin will give us a r u n down on the city ' s l a n d us e pla n, which is s o importa nt in pla nning future urban r enewal and hou s ing projects . 2. Cecil Alexander, Housing Resources Committe e Chairman, will bring us a b reast of deve lop ments in the city's housing progr a m, exclus i ve of pub lic housing . 3. Gilb ert Boggs, Atlanta Housing Authority Housing Dir ector , will update us on public h ousi n g p r ogress . 4 . Le ster He rman Per s ells, Atlanta Hou sing Author ity Redevel o pment Director , will fill us in on what i s g oing on now and what i s i n the immediate future i n urban renewal and associated act i vities . Because so many commi ttee members will be out of town in August, we shall not m eet again until September. Chairman Sommer ville and I are l ooking forward to meeting with you on J uly 19. Sincerely, w ~:Owl~d Nv ··~ ~ A Exe cutive Dir ector - --- · �CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303 PHONE 524-2745 ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE CHAIRMAN WILLIAM S. HOWLAND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MRS. EVELYN DODDS SECRETARY June 2 7, ~ The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor, City of Atlanta City Hall 68 Mitchell Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Mayor: Your concern to do everything you can to push forward housing construction in Atlanta is well known to us and at all of the meetings of this committee we review the situation. At last week's meeting there was considerable discussion about the reluctance, or refusal, of the HUD people to approve some suggested sites for public and other low cost housing. This leads naturally to an increased search for sites that might be more readily acceptable. It was brought to our attention that one of the most pressing needs is a complete and up to date listing of all vacant land in the city that is, or could easily be, zoned for low or moderate income housing. We are informed that the City Planning Department is in the process of this listing. Is there any way in which their work could be speeded up? Is there any way in which we could help? Sincerely yours, RLS:sgs % {a/;;{)~ ~/4-cl//1/ {7)4/i s ft c/)'//)/ JMe_ (? - �~ £ _Lan ~,es lrlH!E IR EIN[E \!\/lE IR NEWS LETTER OF THE CITI ZENS A DVISOR Y COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RE NEWA L Vol. 5 No . 6 Atlant a , G eorgia June 1967 DE TERMINED TO KEEP FAITH WITH BEDFORD- PINE P EOPLE ON HOUSING, PERSELLS ASSURES COMMITTEE Despite the difficulties of obtaining federal approval for public housing in "racially identifiable " areas, the Atlanta Housing Authority is determined to keep faith with the people of the Bedford-Pine area and install housing there. That was the a s surance given our executive committee by Lester H. P ersells, AHA rede velopment dir e ctor, in a discussion foliowing an updating summary of the far fr om rosy housing picture given by Gilbert Boggs, AHA director of hous ing. Said Mr. Pe rs ells: "The policy of HUD aria. the Public Housing Admi nist r a t ion is that they do not choose to finance housing in I racially identifiable' a reas , but housing will be built in the Bedford-Pine area. The federal agencies are n ot delaying us. Vl e are going full steam ahead. Vl e are going to keep our faith with the Bedford-Pine people. " In answer to a question from Herbert Y.T aldrip, chairman of the Bedford- Pine associate citizens advisory committee, as t o what action would b e taken if the federal agencies refuse to finance housing in t he area, Per sells replied, "They are not going to say No. 11 FECERAL DE CISI ON ON BEDFORD. PINE V.'ILL HA VE BEARING ON OTHER AREAS Mr. Persells further pointed out that there is talk that no more public housing can be built in the western two thirds of Atlanta because it is 11 racially identifiable" s ince it has a large percentage of Negro population. Asked he : 11 How can y ou writ e off 66 and Z/ 3 per cent of the population ? 11 He then pointed out that i n u rban renewal areas the population seemed always to be almost 100 per cent white o r almo st 100 per eent Negro. Said he: "The Bedford-Pine area is also 1 racially i d e ntifiable ' as almost 100 per cent Negro. But these people want to remain there in bette r living conditions." He added that the Bedford-Pine application had been delay e d for some time while federal agencies are considering this problem. He also mentio ned tha t t he conditions in Nash-Bans and Model City areas are sL-nilar to those in Bedford. Pine. Accordingly, the federal answer to the Bedford-Pine application will have b e aring on these projects. Mr. Persells also added that, in the two year program embracing more than 9, 000 housing units, from ten to 25 different sites will be required. He made the final point that our committee could be of servic e in encouraging the federal and city governments to locate low r e nt housing in various s ec tions of Atlanta. In discussing the immediate housing efforts, Mr. Boggs said that emphasis was being placed on the new turnkey plan, but that turn downs on sites by the regional H UD offic e w e re slowing progress. He explained that tentative approval had been give n t o four sites which would provide room for 1,125 units, but six sites which would have provided for 1, 650 units had been rejected. Summed up Mr. Boggs, " We are c ontinuing to submit sites. V!e are hopeful that we can produce the housing that is n ee ded. Y.' e can provide more housing more quickly under the turnkey program, but we fac e another difficulty because such housing is not approved unless the costs are ten per c ent under costs for other housing. 11 A final point made by Mr. Boggs was that applications h ave been filed for 500 more units of l eased public housing. SITES APPROVE D F OR 1, 125 UNITS, BUT SIX FOR 1, 650 A RE TURNED DOWN In a question and answer exc h ang e , Edgar Schukraft urged that 300 addit i onal units for the elderly be construc ted a djoining the John O. Chiles building. He a l so suggested that churches should join i n s ponsoring apartments. Executive Committeeman Calloway sounded a note of opt imism, saying that Atlanta is now reali s tic a lly facing the housing problem which h as b een building up over several ye a rs. Sai d he , " We have the spirit now and it is the ~pi r it that will conquer. 11 �- 2- U.S. POLICY, ZONING A ND AVAILABLE LAND DISRUPT HOUSING EFFORT, JONES DECLARES Asked by Chairman Sommerville to comment on the crash program on housing, Col. Malcolm D. Jones, housing resources coordinator, linked zoning and availability of land with federal policy as having disruptive efforts. He explained that on the previous day the Housing Resources Committee had asked the City Planning Department to furnish a list of tracts of land embracing five or more acres that could be zoned for multiple family housing. Col. Jones also pointed o~t that the present trend was toward cooperative housing. Chairman Sommerville requested Col. Jones to update our committee at the July meeting. COMMITTEE INSTRUCTS CHAIRMAN TO ASK MAYOR TO EXPEDITE AVAILABLE LAND LIST Following Col. Jones' talk, the executive committee adopted a resolution requesting Chairman Sommerville to write Mayor Allen asking that the information on available land tracts be expedited. Mr. Sommerville said he would do so promptly. CITY COUNTING ON FEDERAL AID T6 EXPAND SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM, DIRECTOR SAYS Atlanta again is counting on financial help from the federal government to enable it to step up its recreation program to meet the extra needs of the summer season, Miss Virginia Carmichael, city director of recreation, explained to our executive committee June 21. Said she: "For many years, Atlanta has carried on a very fine all year recreation program for all ages, but our funds are insufficient to meet the e xtra needs for the summer. Last year we received funds from the federal government which made it possible for us to expand our regular progra1n in such ways as leasing and staffing playlots and "operation champ" areas. We were able to conduct an all around program, including picnics, tours to industries, to ball games and many other activities. So last year we had one of the best summer programs we ever had. We received $25, 000 for an intensive swimming instruction program. This reached more than 20, 000 children, 12, 000 of whom were taught to swim. But all these funds were cut off on Labor Day, so since then we have had to carry on the playlots out of regular funds. Now we have gone to the federal government again. While we have not heard from them yet, we are going ahead on faith. Vi e plan to operate and staff 25 playlots and 22 champ areas. Last year, we did not get the word until July 4 , but we had gotten ready and so we went into operation on July 6. We can do that again. " In the questions and answers that followed Miss Carmichael's talk, it was brought out that the Metropolitan Foundation of which Executive Committeeman A. B. Padgett is director had been most helpful in sustaining a residence camp for children at Lake Allatoona. Miss C armichael also stressed the success achieved by four portable swimming pools obtained with $30, 000 given by the Rich Foundation. These are being operated in "hard core" areas and 1nay be loaned to the school department after the summer season. Summed up Chairman Sommerville: "The donation of four portable swimming pools is not a small thing at all, but it was done at the time it was needed. If things like this can be done when there is need, a great deal can be accomplis hed. " In the discussion the re were also several comments regarding the city' s prompt action to improve conditions in the Dixie Hills area following the recent disturbances there. Said Mr. Calloway: "Agitators always pick areas which present them with an opportunity t o 'get the show on the road'. Let us give thought to providing facilities immediately in areas where we know they are nee ded. 11 Commented Chairman Sommerville "I wish the city could avoid putting itself in the light of rushing bulldozers to work aft er these incidents. It's ridiculous. If we know of these places, let ' s put our fingers on the m and b e in there doing something b efo re incidents happen. 11 FEDERAL FUNDS NOW SEEM ASSURED Two da ys after our meeting , city recreation officials received unofficial word that the requ ested federal financial assistanc e would be forthcoming. Accordingly, the expanded s umme r program outline d by Miss Carmichael seems assured. �-3There was no bias or discrimination in the awarding of the Rockdale redevelopment contract to David Rosen Associates, Executive Committeeman T. M. Alexander, Sr ., reported at the June 21 meeting. Mr. Alexander, chairman of our special subcommittee on rede velopment proposals, explained th~t the developer's plans made good use of the land taking into consideration the entrances, exits a~d transportation. He also pointed out that the Union Baptist Church has become affiliated as a sponsor. NO BIAS IN AWARD ON ROCKDALE, LAND USE GOOD, COMMITTEE IS TOLD MEMBERS OF NATIONAL TEACHERS INSTITUTE TAKEN ON TOUR OF PR OjECTS AND MODEL CITY More than 40 elementary school teachers from all over the U. S. were guests of our committee on a tour of urban renewal projects and the model neighborhood target area June 22. The teachers were attending a Nati.anal Defense Educational Association Institute at Emory University. Since all are engaged in instructing disadva::itaged children in mathematics, one of the objects of the institute is to obtain first hand observation of the kinds of environments in which su.c h children reside. It was pointed out that this enables the teachers to emphasize the sociological concept in their classes. The institute is directed by Dr. Dora Helen Skypeck, of the Emory faculty. Arr2.ngements for the tour were made by Dr. Ann Grant, of the Morehouse sociology faculty, who is working with the institute. Mrs. Margret Ross, Atlanta Housing Authority information officer, and Wilson McClure, West End project director, acted as "barkers" on the bus. At the luncheon stop at Paschall's restaurant, Executive Director Howland spoke briefly, explaining our committee's activitie s and str e ssing the emphasis being placed on the enhancement of human values as w ell as the improvement of property in urban renewal projects. Mr. McClure outlined the progress of the West End project. ALEXA NDER VOICES COMMITTEE'S CONGRATULATIONS AT ROCKDALE CONTRACT SIGNING CEREMONY Executive Committeeman T. M. Alexander, Sr. and· Executive Director Howland represented our committee at the signing of the Rockdale redevelopment contract, June 15. Mr. Alexander expressed congratulations to David L. Rosen Associate s of New York, upon winning the competition for the single largest project to date in Atlanta's urban renewal program. Said Mr. Alexander, "I congratulate the David Rosen gr oup for their fine concept of a very complicated plan. Of all the four proposals submitted -- and all were excellent -- this was the most outstanding. We are happy that the Union Baptist Church is a sponsor. 11 In a press statement Mayor Allen said: "I cordially congratulate David L. Rosen upon being selected to carry out the largest single development in all eight years of our urban renewal program. In arriving at its decision, the Atlanta Housing Authority was aided by the thinking of a wide variety of individuals, representing the city government, professional and citizen groups. I would like to express my appreciation to all." Commented Rodney M. Cook, Chairman of the Aldermanic Planning and Development Committee: "This development will add an entirely new community, well.:.planned and designed to meet the needs of the people who will live there. " Just before sitting down to sign the 17 page contract, Edwin L. Sterne, Chairman of Board of Commissioners, AHA, said: "We are pleased to award the contract for the rc tlcvclopmcnt of the Rockdale Urban Redevelopment Project to David L. Rosen. We \Vere d e lighted with the superior quality of all four proposals received. They were all s u bstantial and any one of them would be a credit to the Rockdale community.'.' Picking up the pen to affix his signature, Mr. Rosen, with a smile, said to Mr . Sterne: "Now I owe you almost $900,000." He referred to the price of $896, 000 fixed for the 154.12 acres of residential land and the 9.14 acres for commercial use. The Rosen proposal calls for the construction of 1, 386 dwelling units, of which 85 per cent will be apartments and 15 per cent townhouses. The total will include 140 one bedr oom units, to rent at from $60 to $68 monthly; 830 two bedroom units to r ent at from $70 to $78 monthly; 416 three bedroom units, to rent at from $80 to $90 monthly. The housing is designed in clusters in the different sections on relatively level "island communities!' along the ridges of the hills. PROPOSAL CALLS FOR l, 386 DWELLING UNITS; PRICE OF $896,000 ESTAB LISHED FOR LAND �lf lH!!E IREIN[E\1\/EIR NEWSLETTER OF THE Cl Tl ZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL Vol, 5 No. 6 Atlanta, Georgia June 1967 DETERMINED TO KEEP FAITH VllTH BEDFORD-PINE Despite the difficulties PEOPLE ON HOUSING; PERSELLS ASSURES COMMlTTEE of obtaining federal . approval for public housing in "racially identifiable" areas_; the Atlanta Housing Authority is determined to keep faith with the people of the Bedford. Pine area and install housing there, That was the assurance given our executive coinmittee by Lester H. Persells, AHA redevelopment director, in a discussi9n following an updating summary of the far fro~ rosy housing picture given by Gilbert Boggs, AHA director of housing, Said 1\1-i, Persells: 11 The policy bf HUD and the Public Housing Administratioh is that they do not choose to finance housing in 'racially identifiable' areas, bu~ housing will be built in the Bedford-Pine area. The federal agencies are not delaying us, Vl e are going full steam aheaa. v.~e are going to keep our faith with the Bedford-Pine people. " In answer to a question from Herbert Y!aldrip, chairman of the Bedford.Pine associate citizens advisory committee, as to what action would be taken if the federal agencies refuse to finance housing in the area, Persells replied, "They are not going to say No." FECERAL DECISION ON BEDFORD. PINE V.' ILL HAVE BEARING ON OTHER AREAS Mr. Persells further pointed out that there is talk that no more public housing can be built in the western two thirds of Atlanta because it is " racially identifiable" since it has a large percentage of Negro population. Asked he: 11 How can you write off 6 6 and Z / 3 per cent of the population? 11 He then pointed out that in urban renewal areas the population seemed always to be almost 100 per cent white or almost 100 per cent Negro. Said he: The Bedford-Pine area is also 'racially identifiable' as almost 100 per cent Negro. But these people want to remain there in better living conditions." He added that the Bedford-Pine application had been delayed for some time while federal agencies are considering this problem. He also mentioned that the conditions in Nash-Bans and Model City areas are shnilar to those in Bedford. Pine. Accordingly, the federal answer to the Bedford-Pine application will have bearing on these projects. Mr. Persells also added that, in the two year program emb1·acing more than 9, 000 housing units, from ten to 25 different sites will be required, He made the final point that our committee could be of service in encouraging the federal and city governments to locate low rent housing in various sections of Atlanta. In discussing the immediate housing efforts, Mr. Boggs said that emphasis was being placed on the new turnkey plan, but that turn downs on sites by the regional HUD office were slowing progress, He explained that tentative approval had been given to four sites which would provide room for 1,125 units, but six sites which would have provided for 1, 650 units had been rejected. Summed up Mr. Boggs, Vi e are continuing to submit sites, V.'e are hopeful that we can produce the housing that is needed. Y.' e can provide more housing more quickly under the turnkey program, but we face another difficulty because such housing is not approved unless the costs are ten per cent under costs for other housing." A final point made by Mr. Boggs was that applications have been filed for 500 mol'e units of leased public housing. SITES APPROVED F OR 1,125 UNITS, BUT SIX FOR 1, 650 ARE TURNED DOWN In a question and ans'Ver exchange, Edgar Schukraft urged that 300 additional units for the elderly be constructed adjoining the John O. Chiles building. He also suggested that churches should join in sponsoring apartments. Executive Committeeman Calloway sounded a note of optimism, saying that Atlanta is now realistically facing the housing problem which has been building up over several years. Said he, "We have the spirit now and it is the .spirit that will conquer. 11 �- 2- U.S. POLICY, ZONING AND AVAILABLE LAND DISRUPT HOUSING EFFORT, JONES DECLARES Asked by Chairman Sommerville to comment . on the crash program on housing, Col. Malcolm D_ . jones, housing resources coordinator, linked zoning and availability of land with federal policy as having disruptive efforts. He explained that on the previous day the Housing Resources Committee had asked the City Planning Department to furnish a list of tracts of land embracing five or more acres that could be zoned for multiple family housing. Col. Jones also pointed out that the present trend was toward cooperative housing. Chairman Sommerville requested Col. Jones to update our committee at the July meeting. COMMITTEE INSTRUCTS CHAIRMAN TO ASK Following Col. Jones' MAYOR TO EXPEDITE AVAILABLE LAND LIST talk, the executive · committee adopted a re solution requesting Chairman Sommerville to wri!:e Mayor Allen asking that the information on available land tracts be expedited. Mr. Sommerville said he would do so promptly, CITY COUNTING ON FEDERAL AID TO EXPAND SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM, DIRECTOR SAYS Atlanta again is counting on financial help from the federal government to enable it to step up its recreatioh program to meet the extra needs of the summer season, Miss Virginia Carmichael, city director of recreation, explained to our executive committee June 21. Said she: "For many years, Atlanta has carried on a very fine all year recreation program for all ages, but our funds are insufficient to meet the extra needs for the summer. Last year we received funds from the federal government which made it possible for us to expand our regular progra1n in such ways as leasing and staffing playlots and "operation champ" areas. '\'/ e were able to conduct an all around program, including picnics, tours to industries, to ball games and many other activities. So last year we had one of the best summer programs we ever had. We received $25, 000 for an intensive swimming instruction program. This reached more than 20, 000 children, 12, 000 of whom were taught to swim. But all these funds were cut off on Labor Day, so since then we have had to carry on the playlots out of regular funds. Now we have gone to the federal government again. While we have not heard from them yet, we are going ahead on faith. Vl e plan to operate and staff 25 play lots and 22 champ areas. Last year, we did not get the word until July 4, but we had gotten ready and so we went into operation on July 6. We can do that again. " In the questions and answers that followed Miss Carmichael's talk, it was brought out that the Metropolitan Foundation of which Executive Committeeman A. B. Padgett is director had been most helpful in sustaining a residence camp for children at Lake Allatoona. Miss Carmichael also stressed the success achieved by four portable swimming pools obtained with $30, 000 given by the Rich Foundation. These are being operated in "hard core" areas and may be loaned to the school department after the summer season. Summed up Chairm.an Sommerville: "The donation of four portable swimming pools is not a small thing at all, but it was done at the time it was needed. If things like this can be done when there is need, a great deal can be accomplished. " In the discussion there were also several comments regarding the city's prompt action to improve conditions in the Dixie Hills area following the recent disturbances there. Said Mr. Calloway: "Agitators always pick areas which present them with an opportunity to 'get the show on the road'. Let us give thought to providing facilities immediately in areas where we know they are needed. 11 Commented Chairman Sommerville "I wish the city could avoid putting itself in the light of r ushing bulldozers to work after these incidents. It's ridiculous. If we know of these places, let's put our fingers on the m and b e in there doing something before incidents happen. 11 FEDERAL FUNDS NOW SEEM ASSURED Two days after our meeting, city recreation officials rec e ive d unofficial word tha t the requested federal financial assistance would be forthcoming. Accordingly, t h e expa nded summer program outline d by Miss Carmichael seems assured . �-3There was no bias or d1scrimination in the awarding of the Rockdale redevelopment contract to David Rosen Associates, Executive Committeeman T. M. · Alexander, Sr., reported at the J-tine 2J me~ting. Mr. Alexande:t 1 chairman of our special subcommittee on redevelopment proposals, explained that the developer's plans made good use of the land taking into consideration the entrances, exits and transportation. He also pointed out that the Urtion Baptist Church has become affiliated as a sponsor. NO BIAS IN AWARD ON ROCKDALE, LAND USE GOOD, COMMITTEE IS TOLD MEMBERS OF NATIONAL TEACHERS INSTITUTE TAKEN ON TOUR OF PROJE CTS AND MODEL CITY More than 40 elementary school teachets from all over the U. S. were guests of our committee on a tour of urban renewal projects and the model neighborhood target area June 22. The teachers were attending a National Defense Educational Association Institute at Emory University. Since all are engaged in instructing disadvantaged children in mathematics, one of the objects of the institute is to obtain first hand observation of the kinds of environments in which such children reside. It was pointed out that this enables the teachers to emphasize the sociological concept in their classes. The institute is directed by Dr. Dora Helen Skypeck, of the Emory faculty. Arrangements for the tour were made by Dr. Ann Grant, of the Morehouse sociology faculty, who is working with the institute. Mrs. Margret Ross, Atlanta Housing Authority information officer, and Wilson McClure, West End project director, acted as 11 barkers II on the bus. At the luncheon stop at Paschall' s restaurant, Executive Director Howland spoke briefly, explaining our committee's activities and stressing the emphasis being placed on the enhancement of human values as well as the improvement of property in urban renewal projects. Mr. McClur e outlined the progress of the West End project. Executive Committeeman T. M. Alexander, Sr. and· Executive Director Howland repre sented our committee at the signing of the Rockdale redevelopment contract, June 15. Mr. Alexander expressed congratulations to David L. Rosen Associates of New York, upon winning the competition for the single largest project to date in Atlanta's urban renewal program. Said Mr. Alexander, 11 I congratulate the David Rosen group for their fine concept of a very complicated plan. Of all the four proposals s ubmitted -- and all were excellent -- this was the most outstanding. We are happy that the Union Baptist Church is a sponsor. 11 In a press statement Mayor Allen said: 11 I cordially congratulate David L. Rosen upon being selected to carry out the largest single development in all eight years of our urban renewal program. In arriving at its decision, the Atlanta Housing Authority was aided by the thinking of a wide variety of individuals, representing the city government, professional and citizen groups. I would like to express my appreciation to all. 11 Commented Rodney M. Cook, Chairman of the Aldermanic Planning and Development Committee : 1 This development will add an entirely new community, well-planned and designed to meet the needs of the people who will live there. 11 Just before sitting down to sign the 17 page contract, Edwin L. Sterne, Chairman of Board of Commissioners, AHA , said: 11 We are pleased to award the contract for the redevelopment of the Rockdale Urban Redevelopment Project to David L. Rosen. We \-:ere delighted with the superior quality of all four proposals received. They were all substantial and any one of them would be a credit to the Rockdale community. '. 1 ALEXANDER VOICES COMMITTEE'S CONGRATULATIONS AT ROCKDALE CONTRACT SIGNING CEREMONY Picking up the pen to affix his signature, Mr. Rosen, with a smile, said to Mr. Sterne: 11 Now I owe you almost $900,000. 11 He referred to the price of $896, 000 fixed for the 154. 12 acres of residential land and the 9. 14 acres for comme rcial use. The Rosen proposal calls for the construction of 1, 386 dwelling units, of which 85 per cent will be apartments and 15 per cent townhouses. The total will include 140 one bedroom units, to rent at from $60 to $68 monthly; 830 two bedroom units to rent at from $70 to $78 monthly; 416 three bedroom units, to rent at from $80 to $90 monthly. The housing is designed in clusters in the different sections on relatively level 11 island communities! 1 along the ridges of the hills. PROPOSAL CALLS FOR 1, 386 DWELLING UNITS; PRICE OF $896,000 ESTABLISHED FOR LAND �~3/N---'<~-' ~~ lflHI[ IR[IN[ ~V[EIR NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZE NS ADVISORY COMIViITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL Vol. 5 No. 5 Atla nta, G·e orgia April 1967 - ...·- ··------ ------- --~-- ·- -~~-- - - .. --·- ---· ·-- - CAN COUNT ON ONE PROJ E C T APPROVAL ANNUALLY DESPITE FUNDS SQUEEZE, EDMUNDS GIVES ASSURANCE Speaking informally to our executive committee for the first time May 24, John T. Edmunds , HUD a s sis tant regional administrator for renewal assistance, told us that -Atl.a nta c ou l d reasonably expect approval of one new urban renewal project anmrally, ~despite the ex isting s queeze in federal funds. Said Mr. Edmunds: "It now looks as though Congress will appropriate $750,000,000 for urban renewal nationally for the new fis cal y ear . This is the same amount as for the past two years. That would s eem t o mean t ha t Atlanta could count on one additional project being approved each year, exc lusive of the model neighborhood program. As it now looks, the second Georgia Tec h p roject probably will be financed. Administrator Edmunds added that HUD is seeking to work out a priority plan for financing of projects in this region. He pointed ou t tha t t he demand for federal financing of urban renewal in the region already is three times t he supply of money available. He stressed the point that top priority would be give n p rojects which are designed to center on residential reuse with low and m od erate income housing. Institutional projects, such as Georgia Tech and Geor gia State w ould receive moderately high priority. The code enforcement type programs offer cities new opportunities for action, Mr . Edmund s also mentioned. He pointed out that the federal government assumes two-thirds of t he cost of these programs, plus site improvement. He explained that particularly suitable for such programs are areas where little demolition i s required. He singled out Grove Park area in Atlanta as suitable for this type of progr am. M r. Edmunds stressed the point that HUD's regional headquarters is eager to s ee Atlanta's pioneer projects closed out and that it now appears that this may be possi b l e f or But ler Street, University Center and Thomasville within the coming year . CODE ENFORCEMENT TYPE PROGRAMS PRESENT NEV\T OPPOR T U NI TIES, ADMINISTRATOR POINTS OUT In reply to a question at the May 24 executive committee meeting, Lester H. P e r s ells , AHA redevelopment director, said that the work of combining the Butterm ilk Bottoms and Bedford-Pine projects into a single project now is in the last stage of i t s f ir s t part. The proposal should be turned over to the regional HUD headquarters w ithin two months, he estimated. Mr. Persells also made the point that the city should re ceive a non cash credit of two and a quarter million dollars in the combined p r oje c t for the new municipal auditorium and exhibition hall. He also called to the attention of ou r ex ecutive committee that the Citizens and Southern National Bank had obtained a ruling from the comptroller of the currency that bank funds may be used to assist non profit organizations in building low rent housing and 221 D- 3 type housing. This opens up an e ntir e ly new f inancing channel, he explained. WORK OF J OINING BEDFORD-BUTTERMILK PROJECTS APPROACHING FINAL STAGE, PERSELLS REPORTS Shortly before noon on May 18, R. Earl Landers, administrative assistant to Mayor Allen, Collier Gladin, city planning director, and 'William S. Howland, our executive director , ste pped into Room 645 of the Peachtree-Seventh Building to deliver a most important document with illustrative maps to Ed Baxter, regional HUD a clrninistrator. The blue bound docume nt, which weighed one pound and was threefourths of a n inch thick, was Atl anta ' s application for recertification of its workable p rogram for community improve m e nt. T his i s the basic "charter" under which federal urban re n ewal fund s are made availab le. LANDERS, GLADIN, HOW LA ND HAND DELIVER V:' ORKABLE PROGRAM DOCUMENT TO ADMINISTRATOR �, .. -2 With Regional Administrat or Bax ter to receive the ~pplication were S. Frederick Smith, assistant regional admini s trat or f or program coordination and service, and .,.,t George Papageorge, director of workable program bra.~ch. As Mr. Landers handed the document to Mr. Baxter, it was pointed out that deHvery was being accomplished 14 days ahead of the June 1 deadline • . Included in the application was a four page condensed summary of ou r c ommittee's activities. supported by various data and photographs . The summary pointed out that during the past year Memphis and Jacksonville had sent their a dvisory directors to Atlanta to study our citizen participation methods and that a l a r ge delegation of South Carolina officials had come to Atlanta for a program ar ranged by our committee~ l NASH-BANS AREA MEET ING JUNE 6 Our executive committee was informed that a meeting of citizens of the Nash-Bans area (formerly called Vine City) will be held at 7: 30 p . m . on June 6 in the Cosmopolitan Church. Purpose is to determine if citizens are inte r e sted in a nd will support future designation of the area as an urban renewal project. Mayo r Allen and Alderman Cook will be among the speakers. HOPES F OR M ODEL CITY WORD JULY 1, FEELS CHANC E S GOOD, GLADIN SAYS Saying he thought that Atlanta's chances of obtaining a planning grant are good, Collier Gladin, city planning engineer, told our executive committee he hoped to receive word on the model neighborhood program by July 1. Mr. Gladin also briefly discus s e d the city's application for recertification of its workable program. He expla ined that the a nnual application had become more of a progress report th'an in previous ye ars and, a s such, it was put together this year by two Planning Department staff m embers. He also expressed appreciation of the cooperation shown by other departments . Referring to the model neighborhood application, Mr. Gladin explained that the type of program to be launched would depend on the amount of money made available. He t old our executive committee that the Community Improvem e nt Prog ram is now in i t s h ome s tretch. The aldermanic planning and development commit t e e i s holding three special m eeting s to review final CIP reports. Mr. Gladin also r eported that during the m o r ning of May 24 he had joined Mayor Allen and Rodney Cook, chairman of the alderm a nic pla nning and development committee, in taking Charles Haar, assistant secretary of HUD for metropolitan development, on a tour of Atlanta and a discussion of the city ' s problems. In a discussion following Mr. Gladin' s talk, it was brought out that many problems for which solutions are sought in Atlanta reach out over areas that do not have workable program s . Pointing out that two of these are housing a n d transportation. Mr. Gladin mentioned t o M r . Papageor ge tha t such problems w ere a matte r of concern to the planning departme nt. Dan E. Sweat, city director of gove rnmental liaison, joined in t o empha size the point that the city is directly affected by what takes place all over the metro a rea and stressed the importance of getting other parts of the area to formulate workabl e programs. He also made the point that areas that receive federal assistance for other p r o gr a m s should share in efforts to solve the housing problem. REGIONAL ACTION SEEN AS ESSENTIAL ON PRO B LEMS REACHING BEYOND CITY Following his remarks, Mr. Edmunds p a rticipate4 in a live ly que stion a nd answer session. Executive Committeem a n B ob Bive ns ask e d why r eside ntia l renew a l w a s be ing given preference over hel p t o central core a r eas . In reply, Mr. E dmunds said that central city projects were v ery costly, but added that cities which have a good record in low rent housing s tand be tter chance s of getting h e lp for core projects. Member John Wilson requested clarificat i on on p olicies fo r locating low i nc ome housing. He asked why such housing should not b e pl aced on l and presently vacant, suc h a s in the Nash-Ba ns area (formerly known as Vine City). In reply Mr . E dmunds m ade the point tha t present policy seeks to put new housing in areas other t han t h ose known to be preponderantly occupi ed by one race. CORE CITY HELP, VACANT LAND USE DISCUSSED IN SPIRITED Q & A SESSION �-3Executive Committeeman William L. Calloway offered the comment that one thouJht regarding the Nash-Bans situation was that there were other areas available for such housing. Said he "What is known as ghettoing, and I'll not try to define that word, contributes to the continuation of old slums or the formation of new slums." Mr. Calloway recalled that when the Butler Street project went into execution, his realty company alone transferred a thousand families to the Carroll Heights section. In reply to a second question from Mr. V.Tilson as to what becomes of vacant land, Mr. Calloway emphasized that this was an old problem to which we are continually seeking solutions . Said he with a smile "There is no finger pointing at anyone". Chairman Sommerville concluded the discussion by commenting "Sooner or later, we are going to have to come to a policy of open housing. Over a long period of time, that will sort of work out a solution to the entire problem, but it is not a short job. " ATLANTA PROGRESS IN CODE ENFORCEMENT WINS HIGH PRAISE FROM PAPAGEORGE "Atlanta is really moving forward. That note of hi 6 h commendation for the city's advance in code enforcement was struck by George Papageorge, regional HUD direct or of workable pro 15 ram branch, in speaking to our executive committee May 24. Said he 11 \ \ihen the federal housing act was revised three years ago, the housing code provisions gave the cities three years to ~et set and put their plans into operation. That's just what Atlanta has done. The budget for code enforcement has been raised from $690, 000 to $1, 028, 000. The staff has been increased from 99 to 128 employes. We can recall that previously there had been some prodding from HHFA -- and this has not been without results. The records for the eight states in this region shows that 117, 000 units have been brought into compliance with workable program standards and that 32, 000 additional units unfit for human habitation have been demolished. Ri 6ht here in Atlanta, 24, 000 units have been brought up to code standards and 3, 500 units have been demolished. It is very significant that 24, 000 units have been brought up to standards. This is the practical way of protecting neighborhoods from deterioration. Rehabilitation is better than demolition because it does not reduce the number of units a.nd displace people. That figure of 24, 000 includes only those reported by inspectors. In addition, many have been repaired by property owners without receiving citations." Mr. Papa3eorge concluded on a warning note saying "There can be no let up on the program of rehabilitation. It must be carried on permanently. For once a neighborhood has been rehabilitated, it is necessary to go back and reinspect it to keep it from deteriorating again. This should be done every two to five years. 11 Explaining that Atlanta's application for recertification of its workable program was now being reviewed, Mr. Papageorge praised the city's action in making increases to its code inspection staff and comrr~ented that there would be no question about approval of the codes section of the application. Then he paid our committee a high tribute. Said he "And there is no question about citizen participation. Atlanta's record on this is excellent. A substantial part of the credit for this excellent record is due to this committee's work. 11 HUD OFFICIAL ACCLAIMS COMlV~ITTEE FOR "EXCELLENT CITIZEN PARTICIPATION 11 EDITORIAL COMMENDS CHAIRMAN'S POINT Saying that he had been impressed by evidences of individual fixing up that he had seen in the Summerhill area, Chairman Sommerville made the point that all over Atlanta there were little things that could be done by private citizens on their own as well as by the city. On M~ 28, the Atlanta Journal and Constitution commended our chairman's point. Said the editorial in part: "Little things mean a lot as the song, always, and Robert Sommerville, sometimes, reminds us. Mr. Sommerville issued his most recent reminder of that fact as chairman of the Citizens Advisory Committee on Urban Renewal. The city is apparently making some progress on providing equal service to all citizens. Many things do get done that should be done. It is not a bad thing, however, to be reminded that a better job should be done. And Mr. Sommerville has done the city that service admirably. " FULL COMMITTEE MEETING -- JUNE 21 •••• : •• DETAILS LATER �7r. / ? L ~ lflHl[E IRlEIN[~N[IR NEWSLETTER OF THE CiTiZENS ADVISORY COM?v'ilTTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL Vol. 5 No. 5 · ------·- ··--- Atlanta, Georgia April 1967 ---·- --~---- - -·---- ·-- - CAN COUNT ON ONE PROJECT APPROVAL ANNUALLY DESPITE FUNDS SQUEEZE, EDMUNDS GIVES ASSURANCE Speaking informally to our executive committee for the fir st time May Z4, John T. Edmunds, HUD assistant regional administrator for renewal assistance, told us that Atlanta could reasonably expect approval of one new urban renewal project annually,, despite the existing squeeze in federal funds. Said Mr. Edmunds: "It now looks as though Congress will appropriate $750,000,000 for urban renewal nationally for the new fiscal year. This is the same amount as for the past two years. That would seem to mean that Atlanta could count on one additional project being approved each year, exclusive of the model neighborhood program. As it now looks, the second Georgia Tech project probably will be financed. Administrator Edmunds added that HUD is seeking to work out a priority plan for financing of projects in this region. He pointed out that the demand for federal financing of urban renewal in the region already is three times the supply of money available. He stressed the point that top priority would be given projects which are designed to center on residential reuse with low and moderate income housing. Institutional projects, such as Georgia Tech and Georgia State would receive moderately high priority. CODE ENFORCEMENT TYPE PROGRAMS PRESENT NE Vi OPPOR TU NI TIES, ADMINISTRATOR POINTS OUT The code enforcement type programs offer cities new opportunities for action, Mr. Edmunds also mentioned. He pointed out that the federal government assumes two-thirds of the cost of these programs, plus site improvement. He explained that particularly suitable for such programs are areas where little demolition is required. He singled out Grove Park area in Atlanta as suitable for this type of program. Mr. Edmunds stressed the point that HUD's regional headquarters is eager to see Atlanta's pioneer projects closed out and that it now appears that this may be possible for Butler Street, University Center and Thomasville within the coming year. In reply to a question at the May 24 executive committee meeting, Lester H. Persells, AHA redevelopment director, said that the work of combining the Buttermilk Bottoms and Bedford-Pine projects into a single project now is in the last stage of its first part. The proposal should be turned over to the regional HUD headquarters within two months, he estimated. Mr. Persells also made the point that the city should receive a non cash credit of two and a quarter million dollars in the combined project for the new municipal auditorium and exhibition hall. He also called to the attention of our executive committee that the Citizens and Southern National Bank had obtained a ruling from the comptroller of the currency that bank funds may be used to assist non profit organizations in building low rent housing and 2.2.1 D-3 type housing. This opens up an entirely new financing channel, he explained. WORK OF JOINING BEDFORD-BUTTERMILK PROJECTS APPROACHING FINAL STAGE, PERSELLS REPORTS Shortly before noon on May 18, R. Earl Landers, administrative assistant to Mayor Allen, Collier Gladin, city planning director, and Vdlliam S. Howland, our executive director, stepped into Room 645 of the Peachtree-Seventh Building to deliver a most important document with illustrative maps to Ed Baxter, regional HUD administrator. The blue bouftd document, which weighed one pound and was threefourths of an inch thick, was Atlanta's application for recertification of its workable program for community improvement. This is the basic "charter" under which federal urban renewal funds are made available. LANDERS, GLADIN, HO\i' LAND HAND DELIVER Y'ORKABLE PROGRAM DOCUMENT TO ADMINISTRATOR �-2Vl ith Regional Administrator Baxter to receive the application were S. Frederick Smith, assistant regional administrator for program coordination and service, and George Papageorge, director of workable program branch. As Mr. Landers handed the document to Mr. Baxter, it was pointed out that delivery was being accomplished 14 days ahead of the June 1 deadline. Included in the application wa.s a four page condensed summary of our committee's activjties. supported by variou.s data and photographs . The summary pointed out that during the past year Memphis and Jacksonville had sent their advisory directors to Atlanta to study our citizen participation methods and that a large delegation of $outh Carolina officials had come to Atlanta for a program arranged by our committee~ NASH-BANS AREA MEETING JUNE 6 Our executive committee was informed that a meeting of citizens of the Nash-Bans area (formerly called Vine .City) will be held at 7: 30 p. m. on June 6 in the Cosmopolitan Church. Purpose is to determine if citizens are interested in and will support future designation of the area as an urban renewal proje ct. Mayor Allen and Alderman Cook will be amorig the speakers. HOPES FOR MODEL CITY WORD JULY 1, FEELS CHANCES GOOD, GLADIN SAYS Saying he thought that Atlanta's chances of obtaining a planning grant are good, Collier Gladin, city planning engineer, told our executive committee he hoped to receive word on the model neighborhood program by July 1. Mr. Gladin also briefly discussed the city's application for recertification of its workable program. He explained that the annual application had become more of a progress report than in previous years and, as such, it was put together this year by two Planning Department staff members. He also expressed appreciation of the cooperation shown by other department s. Referring to the model neighborhood application, Mr. Gladin explained that the type of program to be launched would depend on the amount of money made available. He told our executive committee that the Community Improvement Program is now in its home stretch. The aldermanic planning and development committee is holding three special meetings to review final CIP reports. Mr. Gladin also reported that during the morning of May 24 he had joined Mayor Allen and Rodney Cook, chairman of the aldermanic planning and development committee, in taking Charles Haar, assistant secretary of HUD for metropolitan development, on a tour of Atlanta and a discussion of the city's problems. REGIONA L ACTION SEEN AS ESSENTIAL ON PROBLEMS REACHING BEYOND CITY In a discussion following Mr. Gladin 1 s talk, it was brought out that many problems for which solutions are sought in Atlanta reach out over areas that do not have workable programs. Pointing out that two of these are housing and transportation. Mr. Gladin mentioned to Mr. Papageorge that such problems were a matter of concern to the planning department. Dan E. Sweat, city director of governmental liaison, joined in to emphasize the point that the city is directly affected by what takes place all over the metro area and stressed the importance of getting other parts of the area to formulate workable programs. He also made the point that areas that receive fede:r al assistance for other programs should share in efforts to solve the housing problem. Following his 1·emarks, Mr. Edmunds participatep in a lively question and answer session. Executive Committeeman Bob Bivens asked why residential renewal was being given preference over help to central core areas. In reply, Mr. Edmunds said that central city projects were very costly, but added that cities which have a good record in low rent h ousing stand better chances of getting help for core projects. Member John Wilson requested clarification on policies for locating low income housing . He asked why such housing should not be placed on land presently vacant, such as in the Nash-Bans area (formerly known as Vine City). In reply Mr. Edmunds made the point that present policy seeks to put new housing in areas other than those known to be preponderantly occupied by one race. CORE CITY HELP, VACANT LAND USE DISCUSSED IN SPIRITED Q & A SESSION �-3- Executive Cotnmitteerrlan William L. Calloway offered the cott'l.ment that one thou 6ht regarding the Nash-Bans situation was that there were other areas available for such housing . Said he "What is known as ghettoing, and I'll not try to define that word, contributes to the contihuation of old slums or the formation of new slums." Mr. Calloway recalled that when the Butler Street project went into execution, his realty company alone transferred a thousand f~mi1ies to the Carroll Heights section. In reply to a second questioh from Mr. V.7ilson as to what becomes of vacant land, Mr. Calloway emphasized that this was an old problem to which we are continually seekihg solutions. Said he with a smile "There is no finger pointing at anyone". Chairman Sommerville concluded the cliscussion by commenting "Sooner or later, we are going to have to come to a policy of open housing. Over a long period of time, that will sort of work out a solution to the entire problem, but it is not a short job. " ATLANTA PROGRESS IN CODE ENFORCEMENT WINS HIGH PRAISE FROM PAPAGEORGE "Atlanta is really moving forward." That note of hi~h commendation for the city's advance in code enforcement was struck by George Papageorge, regional HUD director of workable program branch, in speaking to our executive committee May 24. Said he 11 \Vhen the federal housing act was revised three years ago, the housing code provisions gave the cities three years to ~et set and put their plans into operation. That's just what Atlanta has done. The budget for code enforcement has been raised from $690, 000 to $1, 028, 000. The staff has been increased from 99 to 128 employes. We can recall that previously there had been some prodding from HHFA -- and this has not been without results. The records for the eight states in this region shows that 117,000 units have been brought into compliance with workable program standards and that 32, 000 additional units unfit for human habitation have been demolished. Right here in Atlanta, 24, 000 units have been brought up to code standards and 3,500 units have been demolished. It is very significant that 24, 000 units have been brought up to standards. This is the practical way of protectL.-ig neighborhoods from deterioration. Rehabilitation is better than demolition because it does not reduce the number of units a.nd displace people. That figure of 24, 000 includes only those reported by inspectors. In addition, many have been repaired by property owners without receiving citations." Mr. Papa3eorge concluded on a warning note saying "There can be no let up on the program of rehabilitation. It must be carried on permanently . For once a neighborhood has been rehabilitated, it is necessary to go back and reinspect it to keep it from deteriorating again. This should be done every two to five years." Explaining that Atlanta's application for recertification of its workable program was now being reviewed, Mr. Papageorge praised the city's action in making increases to its code ins p ection staff and comrr~ented that there would be no question about approval of the codes section of the application. Then he paid our committee a high tribute. Said he "And there is no question about citizen participation. Atlanta's record on this is excellent. A substantial part of the credit for this excellent record is due to this committee's work." HUD OFFICIAL ACCLAIMS COMMITTEE FOR "EXCELLENT CITIZEN PARTICIPA TION 11 EDITORIAL COMMENDS CHAIRMAN'S POINT Saying that he had been impressed by evidences of individual fixing up that he had seen in the Summerhill area, Chairman Sommerville made the point that all over Atlanta there were little things that could be done by private citizens on their own as well as by the city. On Ma.y 28, the Atlanta Journal and Constitution commended our chairman's point. Said the editorial in part: Little things mean a l ot as the song, always, and Robert Sommerville, sometimes, reminds us. Mr. Sommerville issued his most recent reminder of that fact as chairman of the Citizens Advisory Committee on Urban Renewal. The city is apparently making some progress on providing equal service to all citizens. Many things do get done that should be done. It is not a bad thing, however, to be reminded that a better job should be done. And Mr. Sommerville has done the city that service admirably. " FULL COMMITTEE MEETING -- JUNE 21 ••• •••• DETAILS LATER �CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303 PHONE 524-2745 ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE CHAIRMAN WILLIAM S . HOWLAND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MRS. EVELYN DODDS SECRETARY May 18, 1967 Dear Executive Committee Member: Three timely topics top the program for our Executive ~ommittee meeting at 2 p. m. Wednesday, May 24 in the Fulton Federal Savings and Loan Directors Room, at Pryor and Edgewood. I. George Papageorge, special assistant to the regional administrator, HUD, on Community Relations, will give us some up-to-date comments on code enforcement and other points pertinant to Atlanta's workable program. 2. Collier Gladin, city planning engineer, will bring us abreast of deve lopments on our city's urban renewal program and associated activities, such as the model neighborhood program, which barely escaped extinction in the Congress this week. 3. Chairma n Sommerville and members of our Rockdale-University C e nter Subcommittee will have something to say about the e x cellent de v elopme nts p r opos a ls pr es ented for these two p r ojects . We al s o h ave invited John T . E dmunds , assi s tant regional a dmini str a t o r f o r renewal a s sistanc e H UD, to s p e ak to u s b riefly a b ou t how his office views our present and proposed proj e cts . Ch a irman Sommerville and l are looking forward to meeting with you n ext Wednesday afternoon. Sincerely, 1;~t7/u4.IJ William S. Howlan:-r �R[ N[W[EIR NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZENS ACVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEVl AL Vol. 5 No. 4 Atlanta, Georgia April 1967 PAS SURVEY STUDY LEADS TO REDUCTION IN CITY DEPARTMENTS, MASSE LL REPORTS The number of city departments is being reduced from 22 to 18 as the result of recommendation~ made by the Aldermanic Government Study Committee, Vice Mayor Sam Mas sell, chairman of that committee, told our full committee meeting April 26. Mr. Massell pointed out that the committee which he heads had been appointed in April, 1966 to study the survey of Atlanta's city government made by the Public Administration Service, the first of many surveys completed urlder the Community Improvement Program, now nearing its termination. In addition to Chairinan Ivlassell, the committee includes Alderman Rodney Cook, John Flarti3en, Richard Freernan, Gregory Griggs, Everett Millican and Hugh Pierce. He explained that the committee had devoted considerable time and thought to studying and discussing the 100 plus page PAS survey which included more than 100 recommendations whose complete implementation would cost several hundred million dollars ~ In addition to the slice in the number of city departments, other government study comtnittee recommendations being put into effect include such items as: l, a resolution to investigate the use of city owned houses and vehicles; 2, increase the authority of the city purchasing department; 3, put city parking tickets on a computer system (which is expected to increase revenue by some $300, 000 a year); 4, reorganize the police internal security division; 5, eliminate apartments for city prison personnel; 6, review the business license system; 7, amend the city charter to revise method of promotions and hirings in city departments; 8, prepare a report on mechanical changes required to develop a city department of administration; 9, improve coordination among departments on annual reports. Discussing the development of a central city department of adminis tration, as recommended by the PAS survey, Government Study Committee Chairman Mas sell expressed strong endorsement of such action. Said he -- "The most important recommendation made by the PAS survey is for the creation of a department of administration. Our staff has prepared a study of how this could be done. Vdth a department of administration in being, this committee of ours would not be needed. The department of administration could implement the PAS recommendations. It also could coordinate the administrative functions of the city 3overnrnent. " As the discussion with our committee members continued, :M r. iv:Iassell made the point that the city charter was not exact in defining the powers of the mayor and the powers of the aldermanic board. Said he -- "Members of the board of aldermen enjoy directing item s of administration that come to their attention. The general situation is that if the aldermanic committee chairman is a stronger individual than the city department head, he more or less runs the department and vice versa. Minutes of all department meetings are open to the public. Sometimes it would be embarrassing if they were read and disclosed how much time had been spent on minor details, such as the type of decoration s f or ban<.l stands." AD!vUNISTRA TION DEPARTMENT, AS RECOMMENDED BY STUDY, FAVORED BY COMMITTEE CHAIRW.LAN In response to questions from committee members, · 1v1r. r,1.iassell expressed the opinion that the creation of a department of administration would not take place soon. Explained he: "For the department to be effective, it must have power to act. This power would have to come from the Board of Aldermen. It does not appear likely that the Board would relinquish such powers to the new department. So far our full committee has not recommended creation of a department of administration. PROSPECTS ARE NOT SEEN AS BRIGHT FOR NEV·.-· DEPART i\tIENT IN NEAR FUTURE �-2. "I think that a departme nt of administration would make for a better city government, but the feeling is that we now have a good city and a good city government. Unless a crisis should occur, it is not likely that the board would turn over its powers to a department of administration. Also, by reducing the number of departments, the need for coordination also is reduced. " In further Q & A session, Mr. Massell pointed out that since the mayor has the power to appoint all committee members and committee chairmen, along with the power to veto aldermanic action, the present authority of Atlanta's mayor is not so weak as sometimes portrayed. Asked Mr. Massell -- "How much power should a mayor or a board of aldermen have? That is a hard question to answer definitely because no two cities in the United States have the same powers vested in the mayor and board of aldermen or council." In response to a question from Executive Committeeman Hearle, Mr. Massell expressed the opinion that eventually an administration department will be created, as the city's growth demands more time of aldermen. Noting that the city hall was closed on April 26 (in celebration of Confederate Memorial Day), commented Mr. Massell -- "The thought has occurred to me that we should stop closing city hall on this date when nearly' all other city halls are open. " METRO GOVERNMENT, CITY MANAGER IDEAS ALSO RAISED IN LIVELY DISCUSSION The possibility of Atlanta eventually combining with Fulton County in a metro government and the potential of adoption of a city manager plan were points also raised in the lively discussion which followed Mr. Massell's opening remarks. In reply to a question, Mr. Massell said that we have good people in the city and county 3overnments and accordingly could make a good combination of the two governments. Alderman John Flanigen, a member of the government study committee, joined in to say that he felt that such a merger could not be effected so long as part of Atlanta is in DeKalb county. He added that he thought eventually there would be some form of consolidation. With regard to the possible creation of a Department of Administration, Alderman Flanigen raised the question of how the head of such a department would be chosen. He pointed out that this was as important as determining where the department head's responsibility would lie. In response to a question from AHA Redevelopment Director Les Persells as to the estimated "several hundred million dollars" cost to implement the PAS recommendations, Mr. Mas sell poibted out that the proposed pension system revisions alone would cost at least $100 million. Asked about the present status of the Government Study Committee, Mr. Massell smiled and said, "It has just about 6 one to sleep. It has no meetin~s scheduled. He explained that it was still in active existence. Commenting on Mr. Mass ell's remarks in general, said our Chairman Robert L. Sommerville -- I would regard what Mr. Massell has said as very solid. I am not one of those who believe that we always must have something entirely new, costing a lot, all neon lighted and chromium plated 11 • In the designation of future urban renewal projects, the desire of the neighborhood for such treatment will be 6 iven primary consideration, Rodney Cook, chairman of the aldermanic planning and uevelopment committee told our full committee n1eeting April 26. NEIGHBORHOOD WISH FOR URBAN RENEWAL NOW REGARDED ESSENTIAL, COOK EXPLAINS "This is a change of policy", he explained, ' 'In the past we have undertaken urban r enewal as a physical tool. Now we feel that the people in a neighborhood must d esire and ask for urban renewal. In the past there has been a major problem in that people have not been included in the planning. We have started to chang e this in the Bedford-Pine project. West End has gone all the way in this respect. Now in Vine City and other areas, we are in the process of settinJ up meetings and discussion groups. If the neighborhoods want urban renewal, they must ask for it and then participate with the city in planning the projects. 11 During April our committee was host for two urban r~newal On April 13, more than 60 members of the Federal Executive Board were our On April 20, the Georgia State College Women's Club combined with Dr. E. Garren's Urban Complex class to fill a bus. Mrs. Margret Ross, Jim and Tom Kresbach of AHA served as guides with Director Howland. FED BOARD, COLLEGE GROUPS TOUR GUESTS tour s. guests. Robert Henley �-3MERGING OF TWO PROJECTS VIEWED AS WAY TO PROVIDE TEMPORARY HOUSING The biggest problem in all urban renewal projects is the relocation of the people already living in these areas, Alderman Cook reported to our full committee as he explained that Vine City and East Atlanta are being considered as next in line. "The rehousing of people should be in the same area that is being cleared", he continued, "therefore, temporary housing must be provided before demolition takes place. This can serve u ntil permanent housing can be constructed later. With that in mind, the thinking now is that the Buttermilk Bottoms and Bedford-Pine projects should be combined to provide a:nple space for temporary housing. Another possibility is to have vacancies in public housing adjacent to urban renewal projects." Mr. Cook also mentioned the redevelopment of a project by stages as a method to allow for temporary relocation of displaced persons . He also stressed the importance of greater utilization of public housing resources. MORE MARKETABILITY EVIDENCE SEEN AS VITAL TO DECISION ON PROJECTS In talki'ng of Atlanta's ftiture program, Mr. Cook emphasized the importance of having adequate evidence on marketability of the land to be cleared for any project. Also in mind, he said, is the thought of sale of land prior to its acquisition for clearance. He pointed out, by way of illustrating the need for land marketability evidence, that four excellent proposals for Rockdale were now being studied. Returning to projects in execution, Mr. Cook explained that Lee Street School is presenting a problem in West End. The location of the present school is in the middle of the proposed shopping center as set out in the redevelopment plan. Since the present school cannot be demolished until a replacement is built, a delay of a year or more is indicated. A possible solution is to begin developing the section of the shopping center farthest away from the school site and proceed by stages. Mr. Cook also stressed the point that increasing weight is being placed on good design in the criteria for redevelopment. Speaking of the area for which Atlanta is seeking a model neighborhood planning grant, Mr. Cook asked t hat our committee give thought to how housing code enforcement could be best handled during the interim period. An honor guest at our full committee meeting was John T. IS HONOR GUEST AT APRIL 26 MEETING Edmunds,who takes office May 7 as assistant regional administrator for renewal assistance in the Atlanta HUD headquarters. A native of Hopkinsville, Ky., and a graduate of Vanderbilt University and Yale Law School, Mr. Edmunds has been serving as acting assistant regional administrator since the retirement of R. Bruce Wedge December 31, 1966. For the previous 11 years he has been in the regional office and has become thoroughly familiar with urban renewal in his role as a chief attorney on urban renewal matters. NE¥l ASST. REGIONAL UR ADMINISTRATOR OUR COMMITTEE PARTICIPATES IN ROCKDALE PROPOSALS HEARINGS At the request of Lester H. Persells, Atlanta Housing Authority redevelopment director, our committee took an active part in surveying the four proposals submitted for the redevelopment of Rockdale urban renewal project. Chairman Sommerville appointed a special subcommittee, consisting of T. M. Alexander, Sr., Chairm a n, A . B. Padgett and Mrs. Grace Hamilton to s tudy the written proposals and to listen to the verbal presentations by the would-be deve lope rs at two four - hour h earings April 11 and 13. Chairman Sommerville and Director Howland also attended the hearing s. Our subcommittee then made its comments for the recommendations which are now under final consideration. MASSELL TALK SPARKS EDITORIAL The day after Vice Mayor M assell a ddres sed our committee, the Atlanta Journal had a lead editorial on his remarks. Said it in part: "Sam Massell, the fireball vice-mayor who seems to be everywhere at once, has spoken up about the Government Study Committee of the alder manic board. Mr. Mas sell says the committee 1 h as just a bout gone to sleep '. Somebody s hould nudge the committee awake. The a ldermen may b e s l eepy, but t he p:t"·oblems of runnin g the city of Atlanta are as awake as a bright n ew day. " EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING MAY 24 -- DETAILS LATER �CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY HALL-ATLANTA. GA. 30303 PHONE 524-2745 ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE CHAIRMAN WILLIAM S. HOWLAND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MRS. EVELYN 00005 SECRETARY )1't' ,w µf'~IJ! A ~ ~ V . ~ ~cJJ-< !/-'(~ ) ,vi" i,I, lr"I Ir:oJ ~ (' {;t ~ ' o.JA' April fr ZO, . ~ 1967 We are going to celebrate Confederate Memorial Day, April 26, with a progr m for our second full committee meeting of 1967. time is 2 p. m.; the place is the Atlanta Room of the Citizens and So thern National Bank Building, Marietta and Broad Streets. am Massell, Jr., vice mayor and president of the Board of will be our first speaker. Mr. Massell, who is chairman of manic Government Study Committee that has been evaluating Administration Service survey of Atlanta's city government, us up to date on his committee's findings and ideas. Aldermen, the Alderthe Public will bring Rodney Cook, chairman of the Aldermanic Planning and Development Committee, will be our second speaker. He will discuss conditions affecting areas being considered for futui;e urban renewal projects. Chairman Sommerville and T. M. Alexander, Sr. , chairman of our special Rockdale Proposal Study Committee, will give us the latest information on the Rockdale situation. Chairman Sommerville and I hope you will be able to be with us from 2 to 3: 15 p. m. Wednesday, April 26. Sincerely, �CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303 PHONE 524-2745 ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE CHAIRMAN WILLIAM S. HOWLAND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MRS. EVELYN DODDS SECRETARY April 12, 1967 Dear CIP Subcommittee Member: Just a reminder that we are meeting again with CIP Director George Aldridge on Friday, April 21 at noon in Committee Room No. 4 in City Hall. A Dutch treat box lunch will be served.Please call your reservation - 522-4463, extension 233. Chairman Sommerville and I are looking forward to meeting with you then. Sincerely, /, nJ;J . , //)/1. /J /) 1f>!F!/!!!~ i fDMt William ~- Howland �Maroh 29 , 1967 tr . Robert L. Sommerville ~ Chairman ..::9itizena Advisory Committee For Urban Renewal Office of the Mayor City Hall A Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Sommerville: Due to y illness for the past six weeks and by orders from my physician restricting my activities, I regret to say that I will have to resign as a member of the Citizens Advisory Committee For Urban Renewal . y I would like to recommend, Mr . R. J . Butler, 250 Tenth Street, N. E., Atlanta, Georgi, 30303 who succeeded me as President of the Atlanta Georgia Labor Council AFL-CIO, to take my place on ti..!:s Committee. Thanking you, I am Sincerely, o. oore cretary Georgia State AFL- OIO J. S JOM/glo cos Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr . / Mayor, City of Atlanta cc: R. J. Butler, Pr sident Atlanta Georgia Labor Council AFL-CIO opeiu 21 afl .. cio �rch 28, 1967 M~ • Ivan M . .Jenkin 1618 C nt . ri1 · Driv , S . W. Atlanta,, G :0r,g ia Sincei- ly y IAJ'r/b~ CC: Mr. Bill Howland a, �CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY HALL-ATLANTA. GA. 30303 PHONE 524-2745 ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE CHAIRMAN WILLIAM S. HOWLAND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MRS. EVELYN DODDS SECRETARY Enclosed with this RENEWER is a reprint of Bruce Galphin' s story on Georgia State College from the current Atlanta magazine. Because of Georgia State's extensive involvement with urban renewal, both in the present campus and future expansion plans, I believe you will find "Anatomy of a Super School 11 interesting and informative. The reprints were made avail- able to us by Executive Committeeman Harold Davis, Georgia State Public Relations Director. ~{1 Williams. Howland �ttlHI (E IREIN{EW[EIR NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL Vol. -5 No. 3 Atlanta, Georgia March 1967 FOUR ROCKDALE REDEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS ARE VERY GOOD, PERSELLS TELLS EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE All four proposals for the redevelopment of the Rockdale urban renewal project received when bids were opened March 15 offer excellent potentials, Lester H. Persells, Atlanta Housing Authority redevelopment director, informed our executive committee March 22. Said he: "Of the 14 requests for documents upon which to make bids, we received only four proposals. We cannot go wrong on any of them. All are very good proposals from responsible develop~rs. All bidders are from out of town, but all have local associates. We feel very much encouraged by what is happending in Rockdale. You might say that an area that nobody seemed to want, first was sold for nearly a million dollars (A fixed price of $896, 000 was established for the area. ) Now we have four bidders trying to break · down our doors to get in and carry on redevelopment of approximately $20, 000, 000. All four proposals offer good site plans, and good architectural plans." Mr. Persells explained that all proposals center on providing 1500 units of 221D3 housing for low and moderate income families. Two proposals call for cooperative sales housing to be included. He listed the bidders as David Rosen, New York; Marvin Warner, Cincinnati, Ohio; Douglas Arlen Organization, New York; and Robert Chuckrow, New York. He pointed out that all four bidders have records of outstanding past performance. OUR COMMITTEE WILL BE ASKED TO HELP IN ROCKDALE REDEVEOPMENT SELECTION Along with a number of other civic and professional organizations, our committee will be asked to help in making the final selection from the four proposals to redevelop Rockdale, Mr. Persells said. He explained that when the bids were opened, each bidder was given ten minutes to explain his proposal, but no questions were permitted. The plan to determine the ultimate choice is to allow each bidder one hour to explain all details of h is bid, at meetings to be held within the next two or three weeks . Our committee will be invited to participate in these meetings at which the bidders will be questioned on the proposals and their explanations of the proposals. Mr . Persells emphasized that the Atlanta Housing Authority is determined to expedite action on redevelopment of Rockdale. The schedule calls for final selection of the developer within 60 days. Then the developer is to get construction under way within 12 months and completed within 48 months. He cautioned that such a speedy schedule could be slowed up by time required for federal processing of 221D3 applications. This usually consumes 270 days but he expressed hope that this could be accelerated. Mr. Persells also pointed out that FHA probably would not permit over 500 units to be constructed at one time. Mr. Persells further explained that the area in Rockdale offered for sale and redevelopment totaled 157 acres, with nine acres reserved for a regional type shopping center. Two church sites also are specified. AHA already has reserved one church site. The existing school is to be enlarged, as is the existing County Health Center. Answering a question from Executive Committeeman Richard H. Rich about adjacent housing, Mr. Per sells pointed out that land sold or being offered for sale under the same conditions as Rockdale included 13 acres in Univers ity Center (bids to open April 12) and 7.6 acres in Rawson-V/ashington (bids to apen May 1). Also in the Q & A session, he explained that the nature of the Rockdale terrain, along with market angles and community acceptability had contributed to the long delay in Rockdale. REDEVELOPMENT AREA EMBRACES 157 ACRES; SHOPPING CENTER, CHURCH SITES INCLUDED �-2BANKER JACK GLENN ASSUMES POST AS HOUSING AUTHORITY COMWtlSSIONER To fill the position left vacant by the death of John O. Chiles, on M arch 20 Mayor Ivan A llen, Jr. administered the oath of office to Jack F . Glenn to the Board of Commissioners of the Atlanta Housing Authority. Mr . Glenn since 1951 has been assistant president of the Citizens and Southern National Bank. Mr. Glenn is a native Atlantan and following his graduation from Georgia Tech in 1932, Mr. Glenn held a number of positions with the Coca-Cola Company before becoming associated with Courts and Company, investment bankers. He was a general partner in this firm for several years before assuming hi s present high exe cutive position with the C & S National Bank. For many years, M . .·• Glenn has been a ctive in civic and charitable affairs. During ·v.r w 2 he served as a lieutenant in the United States Naval Reserve. He is married and the father of four children. A ppointment of Mr. Glenn brings the Housing Authority Board to full strength. Other commissioners are Edwin L. Sterne, chairman, George S. C r aft, J. B. Blayton (a member of our executive committee) and Frank G. Etheridge. HOUSING RESOURCES GROUP RECEIVES 59 PROPOSALS TOTALING 11, 4 90 UNITS The Housing Resources Committee has received 59 proposals, Col. lV.a.lcolm D. Jones, city supervisor of inspection services on loan to the committee as staff associate, reported to our executive committee. The 59 proposals include 11, 490 housing units, which he separated as follows: reasonably firm proposals, 3372 units; probable, 4237 units; under consideration, 2489 units; doubtful, 1392 units. Col. Jones added that the reasonably firm category included 1140 units of public housing presently under construction or in planning. He listed them a s 650 in the McDaniel Street area of the Raws on- v. ashington project; 140 adjacent to Perry Homes. Under the new leasing program 144 units will be leased as they become vacant. He also reported that since last October 654 units have been rehabilitated. Sa id Col. Jones: "VI e will not be able to make the goal set by Mayor f llen for 1967 but by combining the 1967 and 1968 figures , we hope to be able to r e ach the quota set for the two years. t1 He explained that a total of 1322 units will be available in 1967 which will be short of the ye ar ' s quota, but the 5133 units in s ight for 1968, would be 233 m o re than the 1968 goal. The combined total still would be 3345 short of the two year goal but the c ommittee hopes to close this gap. Col. Jones said. Commenting on the figures report, Chairman Sommerville pointed out that the McDaniel and Thomasville units had b een in the making a long time. To meet the changing challenges of our expandin3 urban re newal program, the A tlanta Housing Authority is putting into effect a revised line and s taff system of operations, Lester H . Persells, AHA re deve lopment dir ector, toid our executive committee , Mar ch 22. Explained Mr . P e rsells: t1 The purpose of this re organization is to decentralize operations and put more responsibility on the field (project)offices. The plan is for the director of a proj ect to be responsible for a ll that is g oing on in that project. This has been tried out in We st End and has proved v ery s uccessful. The central office w ill exerci se overall s uper vi sion a nd will provide technical advice and a.ssistance . The centr al office a lso Y. ill h andle special relocation s ituations , but relocation in general w ill be under the s upervision of the project director. As we see it, this new plan of operation w ill be very helpful in the Model Cities Program. 11 FIELD OFFICES HA VE lvi:ORE R ESPONSIBILITY IN REORGANIZED HOUSING I UTHO RI TY SETUP As Atlanta's t1CI P 11 ent ers the hom e s tr e tch l eading to its June completion, our subcommittee will resume work conferences to e va luate the 11 CI P ' surveys and as sist in making final recommendations. The s ubcommittee , headed by A . B . Padgett, now fully recovered from recent minor s ur gery at Emory Hospital, will hold its first work confer e nc e in Committee Room 4 , City Hall, at noon A pril 5. C h airma n Sommerville, :Cirector Howland and Sec y. Dodds will attend also . The c onferences are being resun1ed at the request of George I .ldri?g e , "CIP 11 director. OUR SUBCOMi'v:iITTEE TO RES UME CO NFERENCES AS 11 CIP 11 PROGRAM SPEEDS TO COMP LETION �CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303 PHONE !524-2745 ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE CHAIRMAN WILLIAM S. HOWLAND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MRS. EVELYN 00005 SECRETARY March 3, 1967 Dear Executive Committee Member ACHTUNG ! As our German friends put it, Or in American Navy terms, 11 NOW HEAR THIS! 11 Our March meeting is postponed one week, from Wednesday, March 15, to Wednesday, March 22, at the same hour - 2 p. m., in the same place Fulton Federal Savings Directors Room. Chairman Sommerville and I have not worked out the full program, but our lead-off speaker will be Les (Lester Herman) Persells, who says he now has his organizational ducks all in line for pushing Atlanta's urban renewal program. That is what he is going to talk about. All of us who have hear d him previously know that he will present some inter esting and stimulating facts and figu r es. Chairman S ommervill e and I a r e looking forwa rd to m eeting wit h you on March 2 2. Sincerely, . ll!/hu-t ( }/r1kw~ William S. Howland WSH•• bea �CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA . 30303 PHONE 524-2745 ROBERT L . SOM M ERVILLE CHAIRMA N WILLIA M S . HOWLAND EX E CUTIVE DIRECTOR MRS. EVELYN DODDS SECRETARY February 8, 1967 Dear Executive Committee M ember: As you have p r obably r ead, seen or heard that Atlanta is in the process of an all out effort to be included in the federal government's brand new M odel City Program (in which Uncle Sugar Able starts off by putting up 80 percent of the cost). So fo 'I: our e x ecutive committee meeting at 2 p. m., Wednesday, Febr uary 15, i n the Atlanta Room of the Citizens and Southern National Bank w ill centa r i t s a t tention on this new p r ogram. Bill Ba s sett , w ho i s h e ading up the cit y Planning Department's task for c e prepari ng Atlanta ' s a pplication to be included in the federal prog r am, will t e ll us about the area s e l e cte d fo r p r oposed d evelopment as a model neighborhood . He will al s o b rin g us up to date on the p r og ress of putt i n g together Atlanta ' s a pplic ation fo r a f e deral planning g r ant . Cit y Planning Engineer Collier Gladin als o w i ll b e on h a nd t o an swe r questions. Al s o o n our pr ogram will b e a d i scu s s i on o f a pr opo s ed con stitu tiona l amendment to provide tax relie f t o p r o perty ow n er s w h o reh abilitate the ir buildings . Our fellow commi ttee membe r, Mrs . G ra c e Ha m ilt on, who is doubling in b r ass as a member of the Ho u s e of Repres e ntative s, has been as k e d to t ell us a bout this propo sed amend ment. Cecil A l e x a nder , chairman of the Atlanta Housing Resources Committe e , who was unable to be w ith u s a t the last meeting, has been asked to bring us up to d a te on his com mittee's activi t i e s . Chairman Bob Somm e rvi lle and I h ope you will b e with us on We dne s d a y, February 15 . �ATLANTA DIVISION E . A . YA TE S . JR. VICE PR ESID E N T 15 FORSYTH STREET. S. W. February 1, 1967 Dear Ivan: Thank you for your kind invitation to become a member of the Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal, under the leaders hip of Chairman Bob Sommerville . I accept this appointment with pleasure and hope that I can carry on the fine example set by George Brodnax. Sincerely yours, Cf~ E. A. Yates, Jr. Honorable Iva n Allen, Jr . Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, G e orgia 30303 �January 12, 1967 Mr . Eugene A . Yates, Jr ., Vice President Georgia Po r Company Box 4525 Atlanta, Georgia Dear G ne: At the suggestion of Chairman Bob Sommerville,. I would like to invite you most cordially to become a member of the· Citizens Advisory Commit.tee for Urban Renewal. A you doubtless kno ., Geor e Brodnax wa a highly valued member of thi committ e for a .i.number of years prior to his xetl rement last month. I hope that you will be able to ace pt this ppointment ith thi important com.mitt and carry on th tradition of b d pful dvice and coop ration that s be n e t bll hed by Geol'gia Po er. Sincerely your , Iv n Allen, Jr. �lr[HHE [R[E N[E W[E [R NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE F OR URBAN RENEWAL Vol . 5 No. 1 Atlanta, Georgia Jamary 1967 MUST NOT BEQUEATH OUR HOUSING PROBLEM TO NEXT GENERATION, lViA YOR ALLEN DECLARES Atlanta I s housing situation is no more serious than that in any large city, but we must do all possible not to leave it as an unsolved legacy to t h e ne:<:t generation. That was the challenge laid down by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., at the b e ginning of his address to our first 1967 full committee meeting, January 19. Sai d Mayor Allen: "In American cities in years past, no consideration was give n to where p e ople lived and the "do or die" attitude prevailed. Until the middle of the p re sent century, there was no positive planning about where people should live and the growth of cities was haphazard. In the past nobody cared what happened to the unfortunate. Now there is a greater public conscience. Now we have the awareness of the federal government about the problems of people. The planning techniques which first brought raised eye b r ows. and tongue in cheek attitudes are accepted. It is realized t h at out of planning, comes the only hope of solving our urban problems. 11 Mr. Allen then focused his remarks on Atlanta. He pointed out that the city has been struggling with limited funds and some federal aid to upgrade its planning in g eneral. He emphasized that young men are taking the lead in the city's planning, mentioning Collier Gladin, Bill Bassett and George Aldridge as examples. Then he stressed t h e importance of Community Improvement Program, disclosing the specifics of Atlanta's problems. He cited that the CIP has shown that some 17, 000 out of Atlanta's 175,000 housing units are substandard and that some 16,000 families must be relocated because of government actions. Said he: "Our city, and other cities, are now beginning to face up to the responsibility of taking care of displaced people. ltn Atlanta, public housing has made a great start toward solving our housing problem. It is a thrilling sight t o see what the Housing Authority has accomplished in the last few m o nths. We already have more than 9, 000 units of public housing and soon will have another 1, 000. This has been supplemented by urban renewal, which covers more than 2, 500 acres. People from urban renewal projec ts have been moved into better housing, even though it is not all standard. Urban rcne v,al has been the catalyst that has br ought such great prosperity to our cit y. " HOUSING A UTHORITY'S A CCOMPLISHMENTS ARE HAILED AS "THRILLING SIGHT" In pushing its all out effort to solve the housing problem, the city is going to stir up hornets nests, and will continue to need the strong support of our committee, Mayor Allen declared. He pointed out that under present financial conditions private enterprise is reluctant to invest in low income housing, but that the housing problem cannot be solved without the support of private resources. Said he: "The people of Atlanta wei-e s tunned by the magnitude of the task disclosed by our Housing Conference held in the latter par t of 1966. 11 He pointed out that the Board of Aldermen had approved a request for a federal reservation of 3, 000 additional housing units. Summed up Mayor Allen: "To solve our housing problem, we must do more than just replace worn-out units. The purpose of this committee is to further the aims of good planning and to obtain fac tual information to help rebuild the deteriorated portions of this city and keep other sections up to standard. Our goals are known. We simply must get on with the job. The city needs this committee's support and help". CITY TO STIR UP HORNETS NES'T S, NEEDS OUR COMMITTEE'S STURDY SUPPORT �-2. CHAIRIV.tAN PLEDGES COMMITTEE SUPPORT TO CITY IN ITS STEPPED UP SLUiv! WAR The city will have our committee's full support in its all out effort to solve the housing problem and to eliminate slums, Chairman Sommerville assured Mayor Allen. Said he: 11 Our Committee will help in any way possible, We have spent a long time in studying the reports of the CIP which have made clear what we have in the city. Now we know where to go and how to do what needs to be done. Working with CIP is to be one of our main businesses this year." Chairman Sommerville added that our committee can exert strong influence. Said he : 11 This Committee now has weight in this city. 11 HOUSING AUTHORITY OFF TO FAST START IN PUBLIC UNITS, SATTERFIE LD SHOWS The Atlanta Housing Authority has responded quickly and effectively to Mayor Allen's call for action toward solving Atlanta 's housing problem, M. B. Satterfield, AHA executive director, demonstrate d in a talk to our January 19 meeting. He first pointed out that the November 15, 1966 housing conference disclosed that 16,800 families would be displaced in five years and that Ivlayor Allen had set a goal of 9, 800 housing units for a two year crash program. This breaks down into 2940 private units, 1274 of 221D3 units and therest or 57 percent, 5586 public housing units. This total is in addition to the 8874 units now in operation, but included the 1140 units now presently under development. These embrace the 650 units under construction in the McDaniel Street area, 140 adjacent to Perry Homes and 350 in Thomasville. The McDaniel Street program calls for 248 units to be ready in 12 months, 154 units for the elderly in 17 months, the rest in 22 months. Our speaker said bids for the 140 units adjacent to Perry Homes would be advertised for in a matter of days and that they should be finished in some 18 months. He explained that the se units would be designed to meet the demand for large families, all having 3 or more bedrooms. The 350 Thomasville units are awaiting final plans from the architects. These also will include some units for the elderly. In addition to these units now under development, reservation has been made for 1, 500 additional units - 1, 200 for construction, 300 for lease, Ivir. Satterfield said. Major emphasis will be placed on utilization of the new "turn key" program under which a develope r builds the units and then sells them to the Housing Authority. he explained. One site for such development on Harwell Road has been: approved. Another site on Hollywood Road is being studied for 250 units. Still another is a ten acre tract near the present Bowen Homes which could accommodate 125 units. £1.'ir. Satterfield also expressed hope that 375 units will go into the Bedford-Pine project now in planning stage . Sites already approved or being surveyed will use up the present reservations. The city has requested a reservation for 3, 000 more units. Said he: "The present difficulty in making use of the "turn key" plan is uncertainity about the cost of land. Y!e have asked that the federal rules be amended to permit acceleration of appraisals." I\1r . Satterfield also told our committee that the Authority is getting started on leasing units for use as public housing. The first project includes 65 units in East Atlanta which ar e being made available as vacancies occur. On the day of our meeting, the Authority signed for 48 adjacent units and is hopeful that 36 more will soon be available. i'.1 r. Satterfield further reported that 31 units in Yanira Street, near Capitol Avenue, had been converted into large units and that another 27 units had been brought up to standard. He added that he hoped this will set a standard for leasing more units in the area. Turning t o the 221D 3 program, he showed that this can be employed anywhere. in the city. He pointed out that interest has been shown in Rockdale advertisements but that progress has been slow. As sites for 221D3, he said that the University Center project could handle 208 units and about 150 units could go in a section of the RawsonV/ashington project. NEW 11 TURN KEY" PLAN TO BE USED IN 1,500 UNITS UNDER RESERVATION �-3NEED M UCH MORE PRIVATE I N TERES T TO MEET CITY GOAL, JONES REPOR TS So fa r some interest in p r oviding low rental private housing is being shown by private investors, but still far t oo litde t6 tneet the 1967 goal. Col. Malcolm H. Jones, supervisor of inspection servic es now on loan t o the Housing Resources Committee, told our January 19 meeting. Said Col~ Jones: "Some investors are looking, some have taken options and some ar e acquiring property, but not nearly enough to meet the city's requirements . It looks as though we'll get about one-third the number of units we need this year. Next year we should be close to reaching the goal of 4, 900 units. 11 PROMPT PAVING OF SIDE WALK PROMISED; BEDFORD-PINE CITIZENS MEET INFORMED Following a conference with Paul Weir, city water depart1nent general manager, prompt a c tion to surface t orn-up sidewalks on Boulevard was promised to Chairman Sommerville, Director Ho w land infor med a mass meeting of Bedford-Pine citizens at Mt. Zion Second · Baptist Church Januar y 23 ~ He read a letter from Chairman Sommerville to Herbert Wa ldrip, B ed fo r d-Pine associat e committee chairman, in which it was explained that M r . We i r had given assurance that laying of temporary asphalt paving would begin J anua ry 27. T h e sidewalks had been removed to install new water mains. Mr. Howland al so reported that Chairman Sommerville and he had inspected the area earlier that day and had found that g r avel had been spread over the soft spots to furnish better footing u n til paving coul d b e laid. Main speakers at this latest meeting of Bedford-Pine proj e ct area c itizens w ere Lester H. Persells, redevelopment director, Howard Openshaw, chief planne r , and David IvfcNair, project director, all from the Atlanta Housing Autho rity, a nd Ernest Hicks and the Rev. John D. Grier, Jr., representing the neighborh ood c om mittee. C ITY PIC KS 3, 000 A C R E "DEMONSTRATION TARGET", Atlanta is making every effort WILL A PPLY FOR PLANNING FUNDS Wi.ARCH l to be among the first to be chosen as participants in the new 11 M o d e l cities" fede r al program, Mayor Allen told a meeting of city officials, representatives of federa l and county social services and other interested agencies January 24. Our c on1mitte e was represented by Chairman Sommerville and Director H owland. As exp laine d by Mayor Allen and City Planning Engineer Collie r Gla din, the cit y h as c h osen as a "demonstration target" an area embracing some 3, 000 acres in southeast A tlanta. Now under way are surveys to provide specifics for the city app lication for f e deral pla nning funds. Also efforts are being m a de to involve the residents of the area i n planning. Target date for submitting the city's application to regional and Washingto n H UD offic e s is March 1. The are a proposed to b e redeveloped is bounded o n the north by I- 20, on the west by Lee Street, on the s outh by the A & WP railr oad and on t he east by the belt line railroad. This area could set standards for the e ntire city, Mayor A llen emphasized. A final figure of $100,000,000 would not be beyond reason , Mr . Gla din explained, adding that no firm estimates of any costs were available. On the following d a y, Cha irman Somme rville and Dire ctor Howla nd atte nde d a southeastern regional c onfe rence at which H. Ralph Taylor, HUD assistant secretary for Demonstrations a nd Int er -governmental Relations, outlined the aims of the new program and discussed details in a Q & A session. M r. Taylor made the poi n t that applications for first fiscal y ear pla nning funds w ould not b e cut off b efor e May 1 a nd that applications would no t b e c on sidered s imp ly on a firs t come , fir s t serv e d basi s. Earl H. Metzger , J r. , forme r A HA r edevelopme nt dir e ctor , will b e i n charg e of the new program for H UD ' s s outheaster n region. FDR'S DAUGHTER LAUDS 'CH UC K ' PALM ER Speak ing a t the d e d ication of the Palme r House , n ew h igh r i se public housing for the elderly , Mrs . Anna R oo sev e l t Hal sted, FDR I s dau ght e r, paid high tribute to our committee m embe r Charles F . P alme r for hi s effecti ve trail blazing in slum clearance. Speaking only a few hundr e d y a rds from where Techwood Homes, the nation's first public housing proj ect w as d e d icated by h er father Nov. 29, 1935, M rs. Halsted said, 11 ! have always felt that m y parents w ere a part of T echwood a nd had a d eep inte r est in Iv1r. Palmer ' s concern over s lum clearance. 11 ••• E XECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETS WEDNESDAY, FEB. 15 - DETAILS LATER • • • �January 16~ 1967 Mr. John C . Wil on Horne - Wilson, 111c. 163 Petel"s Str et, S . W. Atlanta, Georgia 30313 Dear John: Thank you. for your willingne to continue serving on the Citizens Advis ry Cornrnitte for Urban R. new l. We bav made great progress and I m. sure will 1:ontin.ue a long as we hav men like yCftl who .a re illing to help. Thanks so much for th picture which I · m pleased to dd to my crapbo.ok. Sincerely yours, Ivan Allen, Jr. · yor lAJr/br �HORNE-WILSON, INC. DISTRIBUTORS PLUMBING METALS - HEATING - AIR CONDITIONING ROOFING - APPLIANCES ATLANTA, GA. CHARLOTTE, N. C. TALLAHASSEE, FLA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. ORLANDO, FLA . ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. TAMPA, FLA. MIAMI, FLA. 163 PETERS STREET, S. W . ATLANTA, GA. 30313 January 10, 1967 Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georg ia 30303 Dear Ivan: During the period that I have served on the Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal I have come to admire Bob Sommerville, Bill Howland and the contribution which the Committee is making to t h e welfare of the City. I am pleased that you have aske d me to continue to serve as a member of the Committee a n d I am deli ghted to accept . The attached photographs were taken by Charlie Horton on the occasion o f our selection as Wh olesaler of the Year. We thought that you might like to have these for your records. Warmest regards and best wishes for a most successful year. Sincerely, JCW :tc Attachment /( GA. ALBANY, �CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303 PHONE 524-2745 ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE CHAIRMAN WILLIAM S. HOWLAND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MRS . EVELYN DODDS SECRETARY January 16; 1967 Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor, City of Atlanta City Hall 68 Mitchell Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Ivan: I am delighted to hear from Bill Howland that you are going to be able to attend the Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal on Thursday. I think you know that you have solid support in this Committee and I hope you will not hesitate to tell us how best we can help you in the general area of housing in which we are involved. You know that we were much concerned last year with the CIP program. There are probabiy aspects of this that should be emphasized during this year. There are certainly angles that should be clarified and we hope to be of use to you in this matter. yours, RLS : s g s �January 5. 196j Mr. John. C . Wil on Horne - Wilson, I c . 163 P ter Street, S. W. Atlant , Georgia Dar John: Information h reached me that ince you h ve been elected Vice President of the Atl Chber of Commerce you hav d to relinquish th chairma hip of the Cham er'• Urban Renew l Commltte • B ing mindful of all you baVi done to help the pro r e:le ance nd red velopm nt p:ro rams, I don' t t the city to b d priv d of the b it of your expe:d nc nd thlnkin • Accordingly~ I i vit you mo t cordl lly to b com th. Citiz ns Advitory Committee for Urb Re,...,............ Bob Sommervill J in it me in th earn st hop b bl to ace · pt nd conttnu the :faithful tt nda c t it me tin bich you carried 1'1 x-offlcio in your former c_hainnan•hip. Sin.c rely,. Ivan All n, Jr. 1AJr •• ea cc •••• Mr. R. L. Sommerville Mr. W. S. Howland �f �
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 24, Folder topic: Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 18, Folder 30, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_030.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 30, Complete Folder
  • Text: I Civil Rights Cause Loses A Friend I SIR: I am opposed to any <'ausa they were random mPr:-, further extension of civil rights bers of a hated group, was bar to Negro cltilen11, no mat.fer that ' bari.sm 11t i~ worst. The !vi: they may be entJtlPd to them. bloody enormity of the w ., t;; I would atrongly hope that this occurrence ls beyond exaggera- j sentlmertt comes as a shock to tion. · the Negro community, and par- I cannot accept then, as a ' ticularly to my many Negro 1 human being, the manner in friends of years' standing, for my I which Negro leaders have clra wn credentials over the years es a the Walts carnage to their bo5clvil rights advocate are unas- oms ; and have dedared it to he. 11allable. not their Ehame, hut their I was a member of the N.A.A.- glory. So be it. I have heard C.P. in 1945, when few white Germans boast of Dachau, also. ' penons would stand up and he But I wish such persons In counted on the subject of civil kncrw that they will not, until rights, while at the same period killing has been forsworn as a I was both anti-Communist enough i polit1<'al w1>apon. ha\'e my i.ymto be called a red-baiter by ' µathy 01 my support , or my good ~ome friends, and anti-McCar- ' will. thy enough later, when he came I will not be moved by the along, to have been the author of I threat of harm to myself, m a practical joke denouncing him j Joved on~ and my possPssion; . . upon the occasion of t'1e unveiling . to yiclri up anything to thoM• , of a monument in his honor in I who !hre.i trn me-no matter what- I Baltimore city at the height of his e\,cr whether or not I am entitled popularity. I am a longtime mem- to hold ba<'k that which I will not ber of the A.C.L.U. Legal Panel, yield . To yield In threats of and have been a member of the horror is both Immoral ar1tl dan - ! Legal Assistance _Co~mittee of gerous . ' I the N.A.A.C.P. I live I.II • th ree- I would bl•lieve tirnl tears and ' quarte~, Negro dblhock, _ nextndto 8 remorse would be the fitting re- 'j Negro .,um, an app11y l'C my . f d h. h . int ted action o Negro 1ea ers 1p to t e children to • 50-.,0 egra deat h conscious . Iy perterror and elemen tary 1chool , whi ch h appens ed b in 1 d to be the best In town · I have petrat Y co ore p~rs?ns . ' the courlie of despoliation of run for public office on a slate W tu. 1 will not ace t the in- 1 beaded by our present Negro a cp_ S •-- Verd W I human savagery, th~ simple af. Sta•.. enawc, a e come, fro t t h d" ·t __., 1 In ested .th . rt t n o um an 1gm y, th e unh oly auu was v WI unpo an f h . · t' d h 11 responsibility 1n the campaign of ev o_ 11ving no mg an arm H p b I h brandished at me, or at anyone, I enry ar · t dave,_ alls a . ah~~ as an alternative to giving way_ 1 yer, represen e <'n· rig ~ . demonstratora in the courts, I, for one. will not g1\'e w~~ - I ahd I have most recently raised have seen lhe social and pohl!cal the question, with apparent Im- ron~ltion of the Negro advance, mediate success which should cul- during the IRter y1>ars of my minate 1n a rapid correction, of adulthood, _more, by far than ~E'Y the long-standing evil 111 Baltimore advanc~ 1n al•. ~f the prenous city of petit jury panels inherently years aince the Civil War. discriminatory agai nst Negroes. l have worked for It, I have . . wanted this, and as a human But t.he Watts nots disgusted b in 1 would ...-ant it to con.. , and kfllNi me as a human / g ti.Mli. mhuma nity of un- mue. dia(T1 lttMing iming and kill- But, ,e,1tlem• n ing by .N.,_. of buman beings col"Ullunity. by " l' who ~ performed no iq,ecific complacency, or ..... aaaJmt eny Ne•sro, but who the Watt.a riot! , yot. were attacked, and butcher!'., Baltimore. I I I I I i 1· I I �\ ,·vcUJ-· - ?_(tf\.- . r ~ ~'(_,\_~L~\__L, , i1Jil\G\  ?'c./\JJCf'- ~ ~ \ ,1Yt,l\J G/L'C. cl (.,\l, Cr "{(:' �- - -· -- --- - ·----- - - - - - -- -- Wimes 'JU,eralh C01>Yri11ht (e) 1966 T he Washington Pos t Co. WEDNESDAY, SEPTE MBER 7, 1966 �STRE ET STRIFE-An Atlanta policeman on the roof or a police car at right as be nrearing a gasmask carries two children to attempts to disperse the angry crowd that safety fr~ m a Negro home filled "ith tear· gathered to protest a policeman's shooting gas, at left, while :Wayor"JniJ tan -.....;a • ;.__ f •::.;; su:;; spec ~ t~;n~ t~h;;_. e ;;_. th__,r__t __,r__,__n~a., ut"o" '. = =>I ATLAl'iTA- From Al Police Rout 1000 Rioters In A.tlanta onto the vehicle, apparenl~y unhurt. The rioters calmed down momentarily, but the disturbance started lo spread again when a Negro man leaped atop another car and joined Allen in his Plea for peace. About 15 Negroes pulled the Negro down and beat him . It was then that Allen ordered the crowd dispersed. "Tear all the houses down if necessary," said the usually mild-spoken Mayor. "I want the people dispersed . Tear the place up." Allen gave the order calmly and without show of anger. One police car was overturned at the height of the melec, and two others were badly damaged. The rioters also tried, hut failed. to overun1trd Preu Intemauonal turn two police paddy wagons SAVED- I\ Y.ecplng mother holds her child after pohce The Negro car thefl suspect, rescued hve youngsters from a te11rgas fi lled home ~~f!:c:,rre~;sto143.215.248.55 16:37, 29 December 2017 (EST)fir~J 1 during a brief outbreak of violence 1n Atlanta H arold Prat.her, 25, Police· ] ~ said they opened fire when leaders and has worked to and SC\"Cn other r.cgro min::143.215.248.55 16:37, 29 December 2017 (EST) t~ehdalt nd ignored a play down racial incidents. islers approached ~ lien after Although hil twice, Prather Atlanta's schools were to· the riot and promised to col· , made it to his home and when tally i ntegr at e d. Business lect grie\'ances and discuss police attempted to arrest him houses have many Negro em- them with Allen. they foun d the way blocked by µloyes. City facilities are to- The Rev. Martin Luther ~! ~~:~~/~~:e;~:e;143.215.248.55s-~~n~ ~:l~r ~tit::e~ 5Tt~\~~t~tl~~! forcements were summ?ned. Jcgislafure. g Later, Stoke;y Carm1chael, Only this morning, the prochairman of SNCC, announced gressive Mayor had welcomed that _ther~ would be a d~m~n- carmicliaeJ and about 20 or st ration m the ~egro district his supporters into his offi ce to Pro t es I the arrest of for a conference. They came Prather. to protest alleged police bruThe cro\•·d started gather- tallity to SNCC members in in 1; ¥'hen ,a S.'!CC sound truck the city jail. entered the area. Officers took The Rev. W. Clyde Williams the two m2n manning truck into custody and charged them wi th operating the truck without a permit. The crowd 1 tipped over the police cruiser and tri ed to overturn the wagon. Up until th is point, only 50 1 Negro officers had !iren on the scenr, but 50 morp pol:re11ien wt!n• ~uinmoned, Including 30 Negro and 20 white officers. The presence or white om cers incen!IPd the youths, who began shouting "Kill the white bastards, kOI the white cops." It was at this i>oint that ~Iayor Allen arrived and tried to reason with the mob, but he was shouted down Following thP riot, Allen held a street corner news conference and vol'.erl that police ~ing Sr., father ~f the ~ahona lly · known mt~grabon leader who makes his home in Atlanta: urged Negroes to stay in their homes. "Noth ing can be ga ined by this," he Warned . "Whal do they want? The I\Jayor came down. He tried to speak to them. TbeYwouldn't listen . What do they want? thP:,------~- ~- ~-~-----= would kec.p the ' 1 by he c-amp to l'l'at·1•, .\skc·d the 5i.:cne personally, the Mayor replied; ·'J am concerned with the problems of Atlanta. Any 1eatlerhas:iC'cesstotheMa\·or and I would welcome an ·opportunity to ta!k. Allrn can take much of the (·n•dil for \tlanta'1 previou~ racial Pt'arl"' and has h11d almo:,;t 1-c'llid \egro i;upport at thl' poll HI.' wa:1 one> of the fo\ South(·J nl·rs to t sll v for the 19ti4 el\ 11 ri ht~ b1 1.· Ht further mtcgr.itr.d the i\.tlnnta police fortl" onal co11fc He hit.~ held J)t'f cm· wit' \:esro �I 000 Riot After Arrest in Atlanta; J Mayor _Is,Felled Pleading With Mob I • ' • By Ann Mohr , ATLANTA, Sept. 6 (UPI) Police routed about .1000 rioting Negroes with tear gas and warning shotgun blasts today after they attacked officers with rocks and bottles and knocked the mayor, who was pleading for peace, t o t he ground. Officers chased the fleeing 'legroes down side streets, hur ling tear gas canisters at their heels. At !'east 25 persons were ar- 1:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;;;:====::::::::::=:=::::::::::::=-;;;;;=====-- rested and nine injured, including fi ve Negro children in a t ear-gassed building and a white b t h n h" f th ., . oy cu w e IS a er s car was stoned. The outburst was touched off after police wounded a Negro suspected, of car theft . Leaders of the militant Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee were in the forefront of the rnelee. State troopers and all offduty city policemen were summoned to help deal with the racial outburst- the worst this progressive Southern city has experienced in moder n times. Mayor Ivan Allen J r. climbed atop a car in the r iot-torn Negro district to try and reason with the crowd, but was greeted with taun ts of "white devil" and "black power." The Mayor was finally toppled from his perch when the crowd surged against the car, knocking him off. He landed in a kneeling position on the pavement, but climbed back See ATllANTA:, :A3, Ool. 1 Pi ctures on Page A3 I �1 - ----~\- -,--------~·-··-------~===========-=-=---, A~l_ anta Mayor Says SNCC Provoked Riot By Jack Nelson Los Angeles Times ATLANTA, Sep,t. 7 - Mayor riot that injured 15 persons Ivan AUen Jr. today accused here Tuesday rught. members of t~e ~tudent No~- The Mayor , who pel"sonally violent Coordmattng Commit- . . . . tee of deliberately provoking a directed police m restormg order aTter a mob of Negroes b==-===·=======,: attacked them with rocks and bottles, said, "Hundreds of norma.Uy good citizens were inflamed out of thek normal good senses. They were victims of those who sought to incite violence." . Meanwhile, two SNCC members who harangued the Negro throng from a "Black Power" sound truck before the disturbainces weve charged with inciting to riot and held in lieu of $5000 bonds. They were identified as William Ware, head! of the local SNCC chapter, and Bobby Vance Walton, 20. They were among 73 persons arrested during Tuesday's disorders. The fil"St of those arrested were sentenced to terms of is to 27 days in the City Stockade today. Police Chief Herbert Jenkins also blamed the SNCC for the riot. He said the organization "is now the nonstudent violent committee - and we must and will deal with it accordingly." He said that the group had fallen into the hands of "irresponsible . . . leaders." [Stokely Carmichael, chairman of S CC, today denied that his organization began Tuesday's riot, United Press International reported. ["The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee cannot start a rebellion just like that," Carmichael said in a See ATLANTA, A4, Col. 1 �A4 T hur5day, Se pt. 8, 1966 , , • Rl . THE WASHING TON POST ATLANTA-Fron, Page Al SNCC Is Accused Of Provoking Riot t aped inter ~iew with radio j having a national meeting station WAOK. here befo re Tuesday's out["It is started by conditions break. of oppression," he said.] A city police source said Mayor Allen, pledging that SNCC members from New the d oters and their instiga- York, Philadelphia and the t ors will faee criminal charges, Watts community in Los Ansingled out Carmichael for geles were believed to be at criticism and said if he causes the meeting and in the vicinfur ther trouble he "will b,e ity of Tuesday's riot. met wherever ~ ~ comes under Th Atlanta summit leadwhatever conditions he seeks e to impose." ership conference, made up Police continued to patrol I of leaders of the city's top the r iot area just south of the 1civil rig hts organizations, isnew Atlanta Stad ium today. 1 sued a statement declaring Duri ng the afternoon they , that while Atlanta is not perarrested 10 more egroes in fe et " It is too good t o be putting down another brief destroyed by simpleminded distur bance .attributed to two bigots." SNCC m e mbers. To night. I The conference declared cgi;o police and moderate that t he wounding of a Negro Negro leaders r ushed into au O theft suspect b,v. a white Vine City, one of the city's Ipoliceman was "unfortunate, e- 1 but not sufficient grounds for wors t slums, when 400 groes c r o wded in~o !he 1 anyone or any organization to streets. Some were fighting I go in to a co mmunity and ineach other. About 10 police- cite the people." men restored order. The shooting of the suspect, SNCC's Increasin g involve- Robert Prather, triggered the ment in violence and _its bel- SNCC-inspired demonstrations ligerence toward poh ~e. _au- l:lgainst "police brutality." thority have drawn cnt1c1sm The summit conference, from civil rights leaders, but which discussed but decided most of them still refrain against naming SNCC in its from direct attacks or un- statement noted that Prather equivocal breaks with t he or- was shot by "an officer in the ganizati~n. . . . pursuit of his du ty." The six-year-old civil rights Prather shot in t he hip an_d organizat!~n has pursue~ a side, was' reported in sati smore . m1htant course sm~e factory condition at Grady Carmichael was elected chair- Memorial Hospital today. Beman last May to r eplace John fore Tue s da y's outbreaks, Lewis. Carmichael recently SNCC members told Negro h :s made statements about demonstrators Prather h a d "tearing ,up the country," been "murdered while hand" bl.lr ning down courtho uses," cuffed." Actually he was shot and fighting violence with while fleeing police. violence. Top leaders of SNCC, which has purged most of its wh ite members and lost most of its white supporters si nce emb ar king on belligerent pol1c r b-y " la~ OW· er slogans, repor tedly wer e I I 0 r �-I 1 AIO Sunday, Sept. 11, 1966 . . . Rl THE WASHINGTON POST > - ·:, \. ;'·.;". ,::,~1:-fr: t:t:rt::~.'t·~:;:,~1;1trif\ ~ ·;:;t ~~- .·'~· SNCC Is LQsing Support of Atlanta Negroes By Rober t E. Baker Washi.J:lgton Post Stat! Wri ter 1 ATLANTA, Sept. 10-This was the week that Atlanta declared unconditional. war on the Studen t Nonviole nt Coordinating Committee. By t he end of t he week, Black Power, SNCC style, was reeling from the assault. s GC's leader was in jail. The Mayor was a hero. The p olice force was riding a wave of praise. ·egroes were r evolting against SNCC's ere br and of r evolt and threate nin g SNCC with violence. "A n ational conspiracy t o d est:roy us," cried s JCC. This f irst battle was a defeat for s cc. But it was a ba.t Ue and not th i~ r~ The spark that set off the war came last Tuesday, the d ay after Labor Day, with a white-cop an d ' egro-suspect inciden t, the same kin d of spark that has set off a score of riots in Nor the rn ci ties over the pa t fe w summers. But Atlan ta's riot was differe nt. It was . maller by far than th e Watts and Harlem riots . • ' o looting, no shootl ng, no l\1olotov cocktails. And Mayol" I va n llen Jr, a South ern liberal, we nt to t he scen e and mixed with the crowd, trying to talk to angry people. The police • u sed no firearms, wielded no bi.lly clubs. And u nlike t he orth e rn riots, whe re agitators arc generally blamed but unn amed, .\tla nta put the fi nger of blame on Stokely Carmichael a nd his wild UJJ'.\.L\ lV£U! signs of i mage-smashing. It and white, this was a misprone little b and of racists." had changed its own image. The Summit · Leadership take in tactics, fearing it may provide a cloak of m ar No longer was it t he idealConference of Negro leaders itrrdom for Carmichael. To istic integrated youth movehere warned Negroes to official Atlanta, t his was a m ent struggling to change "r efrain from cooperating gamble worth taking. society's i nstitutions to let SNCC vowed to fight on. with those who would make t he Negro in. Now it is .,. vou the tools and victims of Said i -0 ~ O" 0 eP 8- . �CLASS OF SER'>:ICE This is a fast message unl ess its deferred char, octer is indicated by the proper symbol. WESTERN UNION W . P. MARSHA L L CHAIRMAN OF THC BOARD TELEGRAM S_YMBOLS DL = Day Letter NL= Night Letter R . W . McFA LL PRESIDENT LT.!.. lntcrnacional - Letter Telegram The fi ling time shown in the date line on domestic telegrams i, LOCAL TIME at point of origin . Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME or point of destination 147A EST SEP 9 66 AA082 LA033 L LLE441 NL PO TOL SOUTHGATE CALIF 8 MAYOR AL~EN ATLA ~ SYMPATHIZE Wlll-t THE FINE CITIZENS OF ATLANTA AS WE HAD THE HORRIBLE R-IOTS HERE IN L.A. BUT HUMPHRESYS TOLD NEGROES TH AT HE WOULD DO WORSE ANO ~HEY ARE MRS PROWER 2713 LIBERTY BLVD SOUTHGATE. "SF1201(R2-65) �dltf.'I.~ . didm:y -t/JrTLe.i&)) Z) ,() .,r, Dr . Cla r enc e F . Holme s ~ . D. S . Pr e s i dent , Denver Cosmopoli t a n Club CFH/ s s �21230 Kipling Oak Parl-., .Michigan 4823 7 September 16, 1966 The Honorable Ivan Allen Mayor City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: Eugene Patters on 1 s beautiful editorial of September 9th about you during the recent riots was reprinted by The Detroit News, and I felt it necessary to tell you how very proud we were of your marvelous display of courage and dignity during that difficult timeo My husband and I are Atlantans who moved to Detroit a year ago. He, a recent Emory graduate, is now a professor at Wayne State University, and we have sung the praises of our home town since the day we arrived here., It is a great city, and you have done well by it. We just wanted you to know how much we appreciate y ou., Betty e C. Sha r tar (Mrs ., I . M a rtin Shartar) bs ��1/4 ~uZ: c:vn,cP ,,c( -~ e - r _-z~r ;;r~ ~ 143.215.248.55 - £ d ' ~ ~ ~ ~ 3 / ~ / 7 ? ~r ~ ~ /4 ~ d1' ~ ? J a-rn ~ ~ ~ ' : z ; / 7 4 t 7 ~ 4 ~ a,,--u:_~ ~ ~u~ 7 ~ J k / ~/u-~ µ ~~//143.215.248.55 ~ ~ 5/l/,i~cll< ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e- ktLLEI-<_ ~ ~ ~ / 4 - 143.215.248.55 ~ c/~ ~ ~ ~ - k,, ..-Z= 143.215.248.55CVVL16:37, 29 December 2017 (EST)p, dr-~ /J72-.c-- · ~ ~ .zr- ~ ~ . / 4 , ~ ~ ~- ; ; ; ( ? - ~ C L 4 2 / 4 _ ~ a.r~¥ ~ , «"'-4- ~ ~ ~ ~ J .A-'--/~,<- ~ ~ ~ ~~ a16:37, 29 December 2017 (EST)/4143.215.248.55 ~ ~ ~ ~/4 . ~o/·~ ~~ ~J~/4143.215.248.55 r/4u-~ ~l~ J A3C jV/i t:, f/ll~J_ ,F:1 £51<~w t:. R EoX, 2 12'1 tAiRc 1-1; 1- !? /1.F, B fVl WA 5 #/JV(} 10 rJ, 9'1 o JI - 143.215.248.55 ~ ��I - . - . .( �i GfRBLD GOlDBfRG 112 WEST NEWKIRK LANE , OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE September 13, 1966 Hon. Ivan Allen, Mayor City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: I have been a frequent visitor to your fine City and plan to return on October 9th for a Narch of Dimes Conference and again on October 21th to attend a short course at Georgia State College. My reason for writing, however, is to offer my congratulations on the fine job you are doing in -attempting tG ease the strained racial situation which now exists. }zy- interest is somewhat involved. I moved to Oak Ridge from New York City some 18 years ago. To me, the closest thing to Cosmopolitan progress and living in the Southeast is your fine City. LocaJ.ly I am a Research Chemist for Union Carbide. I am also a Colonel on the staff of Gov. Frank Clement. Ab0ve all, I am serving as Chairman in my third year on our City Council appointed Human Relations Advisory Board. My interests are many and varied, you see. Because of this I can more fully appreciate what you are doing. May your efforts meet with the success that they deserve. Yours sincerely., 143.215.248.55 16:37, 29 December 2017 (EST) Ger ald Gol dberg �~htitib'¼'ilttt QJ:.(111.t;g.t 1@.a:hw-~.im.~xrt-tfy Q}~.o:litta: OFFICE OF THE PRE S IDE N T September l 4, l966 Dear I van: We displaced Georgians have been proud of your performance in the very trying time through which you have gone recently. I have watched from a dis tance the exceptional service you have rendered to the great City of Atlanta all through the years and have always had a fee l ing of pride in the accomplishments which you and your associates have made possible in the city which meant so much to us for a few years while we lived there, and has continued to mean much to u s all through the years . I had t he pleasure of mak i ng the Commencement address at Georgia State College last spring and I spoke on "The Importance of the Moderat e in Society . " I hope t hat you did not object t o t h e fact that I u sed you as an example of a moderate who had made possible t he gr owth and development of the Ci ty of Atlanta in the way it has devel oped under your l eadership. It would give me a lot of plea sure t o have you spea k to our student body at Davidson s hould you ever have an oppor t unity t o come t o the Charl ott e area . You have our b est wishes f or a succes s f ul r es olution of the probl ems which you have been facing recently and our deep admiration f or your courage and wisdom. JI;: D. Grier Martin The Honorable I van Allen Mayor of the City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia �1fi~ise t@rmtiu_g @ahfo,cffe!{~ ~ _ 1660 ~ouilr J\rm1rore J\bettUe 1fios J\ngcles 6, filnlifontia: ��September 7, 1966 Mr. Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor Atlanta City Hall At lanta, Ge orgia Dear Mr. Allen: As a native Georgian and graduate of Georgia Tech, I was very proud of th.e way you attempted to control the race demonstration yesterday. The bravery you exhibited in the face of danger leaves no doubt in my mind that you are well suited to lead the people of Atlanta. I have been proud of the lead Atlanta has taken with this terrible p roblem, but I am confid ent that I shall oontinue to say with pride tha t I am from Georgia. I wish for y ou wisdom and s t rength during these trying times . Yours Dan T. Hughs, Minister The Master 's Presbyterian Church 1636 Masters Drive Dallas, Texas 75217 �MR . AND MRS . AUBREY 1627 W A SHINGTON MILAM STREET HOLLYWOOD , FLORIDA 3 3 0 2 0 Sept ember 10, 66 De ar Ivan: iy -ri f e die almost t wo years ago, and I have r e centl married a charming lady , ·mo has a b autiful home her e and we are living most happily . Thi s doe s not by any mans indicate I h ave lost inter est in my home cit y, as I have the morni ng paper mailed t o me and r ead it as closel y as I vd , ays have . I wa s shocked at the di stre ssing incident you have r e centl under gone wit an el ement of Negroe s, and no one doubt s i t was from out side int erfer ence . You will r ecall that some years ago I commended you heartily for your p osition be f ore a Committee in Washi ngton Tihen many others disagr eed . Enclosed are e~itorials fr om both Miami papers commending you and t he ci t y of Atlanta and I have heard f av orabl e comment her e on your appearance be for e a Committee on city neens , Be assured of m be st wi she s ~ �PHILLIPS PETROLEUM COMPANY BARTLESVILLE , OKLAHOMA September 9, 1966 Mayor Ivan Allen Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor: I have followed with interest the recent racial difficulty in Atlanta. I wish to commend you on the position you have taken. The near riot having been incited notwithstanding your moderate attitude and leadership in solving the complex problem in Atlanta and the achievements made by Atlanta to this end is all the more disturbing. I believe you have and certainly deserve the wholehearted support of a great majority of all people both black and white. Sincerely yours, 'M1H6~ Robt . B. Burgess 2050 South Osage Bar tlesville , Oklahoma 74003 RBB:lj �Irving McKinley Levy 75 Central Park Weat N -!".'I! °¥Q!'.~ Qlb: 23. New.York SUaquehanna 7-8885 September L4, 1966 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of Atlanta Georgia My dear Mayor Allen: As. an old friend, it is with great interest that I follow all the news of the City of Atlanta during your Mayo ralty. I have recently seen you on television which prompted me to write and expres.s m_y admiration for the brave and outstanding manner in which you rise to· m ·eet the problems of your· City. May you be granted good health and many yea r s to continue in just and ,patriotic leadership. Sincerely yours, IML:rkc �Se•astopol calif-P. O. ~ox 31 ~sept 12-66 95472 Dear Mr . Allen . ltho there may not • e rnan1 ~a ho , ill ~rite you-- I want 1 ou to know there are ~ood decent people who a re I salute J'OU Respectful l ;yJames Roa inson proud of sir . J' OU for ,;,hat you haYe done . �r THE \XTESLEY FOUNDATION Th e Me t hodist Chu r ch at the College Ca mpu s Alfred, New York 14802 ORV I LLE w. J OHNSTON, Chap lain Phon e: 587-4353 September 19, 1966 Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Atlanta, Georgi a Dear Mr. Allenj May I commend you for the courageous nd enlightened l eadership that you are giving your f i ne city . I have l on been a stron~ exponent of civil rights f or a l l people and have often referred t o Atlanta as one of our most progressive cities i n dea ling with her probl ems., The kind of le adership that I believe you and your administra tion are giving is the thing that wi l l ult :im.iltel y provide the solutions to our problems in the fie l d of human r i ghts . Keep up the fine work and may your number increase with Godspeed. most sincerel ~ 1t.~ ~ Orville W. ohnston Methodist haplain �, _ b'"'f-- ~ \ \ ~ ~ - ~ < t 0 . , ~ ~.,, -.---,. :_o-JL ~ s~~ "t-fi7_~cr-y ~ ~ \-\..., , "\ 6 6 c__~ +-,--"1~ ~ ,, c:,._:~ ...... r • - _____,. - - • _~ p ~' I r9.~ ~ - , : , ~---s=;, ~ \, ~~ , ~ ' - ~-~ ~~ ~~ ~ ~~ ~ ~ d O ~~ 143.215.248.55 16:37, 29 December 2017 (EST).Lu.. ~ ' ~ ~ ~ . 143.215.248.55 ~ \ c.'.r-,... .....--0-- \~ ~ ~ ~ .,,..,--...~ ~ ~ \ I1'-,7_ ( ~ ~ ~ ~~ '--\ ~ , 0 • ' \ c,-{" l ~ ~~ ~~"'-L~- l 143.215.248.55 \ . - .,..___,, ~~J. a o ..\ '~+~ ' ~ %.::s::; . .~ ~ \ ~~ I. ~ ~ i, ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~- \ c:... ~ \-SL. G- "---"..- I ~~ ~ ~ Maude Cooley Barnes 437 West Sixth Street San Bernardino California 92401 ~--.,...-<" , ~~ ~ ~ ..,........, ~ \ I IOI, I.>..) -=- - ~ \...,.;::G.. ~ ~ < - . S L '--\ ~ ~ 143.215.248.55 '\~ ~(:!'.) �ARCH! E M. RA LJB 56 1 4 JORDAN ROAD BETHESDA ~cw 14 , MARYLAND /41.~eq J2f--t= ·~ 1.~ 4/'2-'I' ~ r7 ~ m~~ . ~ Leh jG . ---e l"1 ~ ~r~/d'vQ_JZ__ w 143.215.248.55cu,/~ -&,,,/ ~ ~/ ~ ~ N , ' .. I , t ' \ •r • I .. • ' . r ·...l ~ . .;,. ' ' I•• �ept. 7, 1966 Ivan Hill Mayor All..lanta, Ga o Dear Mr. Hill: You and many of your fellow mayors have really been on the f iring line in the racial disorde:es t 1is summero Of all the people involved, as seen on t elevision, you strike me a s having acquit ~ed yourself with the most courage, dignity, and r esponsib:1.11.ityo It took real guts to go down in t he midst of a riot and to stay there until it was over. And then to talk about it in a calm and dispassionate, even compassionate way. Atlanta is lucky .u. to have you. I 'm a born-and-bre North Carolini an who has lived in .Pennsylvania for 10 years now. I've oft en been embnnsassed by t he conduct of white Southerners these past few years. But I'm proud of you. Our Negro fellow Americans are going to try our patience for a while .. They and all Ar.:ericans are lucky t have courageo~s public officia ls like you on hand to keep order without resort to cruel oppression; to press for progress without caving m to emotional excesses and unrealistic demands .. Sincerely, New �THE MILAN G. WEBER ASS OC IATES AEROSPACE MANAGEMENT CONSULTING OUR CLIENTS DO NOT BELIEVE THAT THE AEROSPACE MARKET I S DECLINING �WEAVER, RADZIK, ELIAS & STRICKLEN ATTORNEYS SUITE 1212 ROBERT C. W EAVE R JOSEPH C. RADZIK BETTY L. ELIAS AT CONT INENTAL 408 SOU TH L AW BUILDIN G SUITE 633 CAL1F'ORNIA FEDERAL SAVING S BU I LD ING SPRING. STREET 1695 CRESCENT AV ENUE LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 900 13 CHARLES W. STRICKLEN MA DI SON ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA 9280 1 AREA CODE 714 6-6611 TELEPHONE 776-2430 JAM ES J . WALSH WILLIAM D HU CLARK PLE ASE REPLY TO: September 8, 1966 The Honorable Ivan All·e n Mayor of Atlanta, Gerogia My Dear Mayor: I saw you and your city on the news cast last night, during and after the riot. I was very much impressed with you and I was deeply moved by your reflections as you strolled amid the ruins left by the riot. You showed great understanding of the problems that face your city. At the same time your courage and determination must be a great source of comfort to the people of Atlanta. I salute you as a great leader and offer my deepest sympathy to you and all of the good people of Atlanta. I trust that your courage and wisdom might serve as an inspiration to the leaders of other American cities. Yours respectfully_, ' / - [ 1/ "L Mrs. Robert '- c. 1 ( . • ~l Weaver -t!. /i.t.,L4./ �605 enn J-..ve , SE tJ a sh ;s , D • C • Dear Mayor I van ~ ll en f!!.. j ust, l i stenFH1 t o t he even5. ne; ne~rn #.. a nd heard yon eak , anc c1ec l cu·1~ ~ro n r st anc1. on t he p re1-rnn t s i. 1;uat 5.on in Atl-:n t a , .h.nd m~ wan t v er? rnuch fo:r :rou to know 1 t hat ?OU ham;. a very bi~ follow:i_ng here .\n the v api. tHl of the uni tecl Stat es o o O And I wish that I c ould express l1ow ver? ranch rH~ , ancl riy fclm5.l~r a dmire ~1 ou for you s t ·u1el on the si 1; m t 5. ons FLX).sting ; and having t ·1e guts t o speak ou t , ·~ncl let M:r Carr-1ichael know what t iE1bre e i.s in opposition with • •• T. ank5. !lf1' ~rou irer~, sincere]. ~, HrH L , Srn:,_t h and f P..rnily fa Hh ' DoCo �17 FIFTEEN FIFTY BISCAYNE BOULEVARD MIAMI , FLORIDA 33132 TELEPHONE 377-4781 MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE FEDERAL DEPOS IT INSURANCE CORPORATI ON September 8, 1966 The Honorable J. P. Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta City Hall, Atlanta, Georgia Sir: Let me commend you on the handling of the recent riot in Atlanta. There is enclosed a pamphlet which I think you will appreciate reading about Communists and the manner in which they operate. I think you will see a close relation with the statement of Gus Hall, General Secretary, Communist Party, USA and the riot that was held in Atlanta. You will probably remember I was with the Federal Reserve in Atlanta for twenty years and am thoroughly familiar with your family background and I know you have and are doing a good job. The reason for this letter is simply to congratulate you on seeing and understanding the real cause of the riot. J EJB : ek Etrn st J. B a rber , !E>fe sident �TNE W ACKENNUT SEC UR~TY REV ~E W / August 1966 Vol. 6, No. 8 COMMUNISM and YOU! "Fronts are things of the past. We don't need them. We've got the ••• DuBois Clubs, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee , and Students for a Democratic Society going for us ••• " Gus Ha 11, Genera I Secretary, Communist Party, USA COMMUNIST ATTACK ON YOUTH - XVII When the Democratic National Convention was being held in Atlantic City, continued attempts to disrupt the convention were made by Negro demonstrators who kept up their demands, despite compromise attempts, that the Mississippi Freedom Democrats be seated. The demonstrators were members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC - pronounced SNICK), often described in the press as one of the largest, most militant and radical organizations of the New Left. In Selma, Alabama, in early March 1965, fiery SNCC leaders wanted to continue their march to lvbntgomery despite a court order forbidding it. Only intervention by Federal Conciliator LeRoy Collins prevented it. A few weeks later, despite a voting rights speech to Congress by President Lyndon B. Johnson, SNCC continued to picket the White House and threatened further demonstrations. This induced the "Washington Post" to say SNCC members appeared to be "driven by folly to demonstrate for the sheer, sterile sake of demonstration." S NCC and its demonstrations go back to 1960 and the first lunch counter sit-ins, when the organization was formed to foster the growth of civil rights agitation. According to the II New York Times , 11 S NCCwas born April 17, 1960, by about 300 people, almost all of them Negro youths, and has since become the inspiration for all the organizations of the new student left. "The Saturday Evening Post" of May 8, 1965, reported that SNCC "is a wonder, perfectly desi gned to fit the anarchic student temper. It has a full-time staff of 230 but no membership . Its broad base is a separate group called Friends of S.N . C.C., which has 150 chapters, two th irds of them on campus ." The arti cle says SNCC leaders travel a far - left dinner circuit, "where they are sometimes lucid, sometimes totally bewildering, 11 and it quotes a government investigator as saying th a t SNCC has been "thoroughly infiltrated by Communists." A report by the Louisiana Joint Legislative Committee concurs , saying SNCC is "substantially under th e influence of the Communist Party. 11 SNCC officials admit no effort has been made to pu rge Commu nists from the membership. "We have no political test fo r membership and we never will have," a SNCC Washington official said. 11 Newsweek" quoted another official as admitting that Communist Party members had gone to Alabama and Mississippi to work with S NCC. SE C URIT Y RE V IE W AWARDS : GEORGE WASHINGTON HO N OR MEDAL . FREEDO M S FOUNDATIO N AT VALLE Y FORGE , 1962 ; VIGILANT PATRIOT AWARDS . ALL-AMERICAN CONFERENCE TO COMBAT COMMUNISM . 1963 AND 1 965 . �The Washington Star 11 revealed that the organization hoped to establish "Friends of SNCC 11 groups in "uncommitted" nations around the world. "Such foreign affiliates of SNCC, 11 reporter Walter Pincus wrote, "could present Communist parties around the world with a ready-made organizational weapon for stirring up anti-American sentiments." lvbny troubled observers have pointed out that it makes little difference whether or not SNCC radicals are Communists: 11 lf they do the same things, it may not make much difference what kind of cards they carry." 11 This emphasizes the interesting transition SNCC has made from the civil rights field, for which it was organized, to its invasion of the field of foreign policy. It was one of the leaders in the Washington demonstrations August 6-9, 1965, when sit-ins were staged at the Capital, the White House gates were blocked and Communist publications, such as "The Worker, 11 were distributed. A SNCC leader was among those arrested by Washington police. SNCC made its position clear in a statement in the March-April 1966 issue of" Insurgent" published by the DuBois Clubs: "The Student Nonviolent Coordiroting Committee has a right and a responsibility to dissent with United States foreign policy on any issue when it sees fit ••• We maintain that our country's cry of 'preserve freedom in the world' is a hypocritical mask behind which it squashes liberation movements which are not bound, and refuse to be bou-na~... by fhe -expedierici es of United States cold war policies . 11 SNCC on the draft: "We are in sympathy with, and support, the men in this country who are unwilling to respond to a military draft which would compel them to contribute their lives to United States aggression in Vietnam in the name of the 'freedom' we find so false in this country. 11 The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People immediately disassociated itself from the SNCC position and pointed out that some SNCC workers are becoming disinterested in civil rights and are turning to peace demonstrations. But SNCC's radical approach evidently was not radical enough. United Press International reported from Atlanta May 17, 1966: "Two of the nation's most militant civil rights leaders, John Lewis and James Foreman, have been deposed by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). One source said they were considered 'too moderate.' SNCC ormounced the changesc Stokeley Carmichael, a founder of the all-Negro 'Black Panther Political Party' in Alabama, was named to succeed Lewis as SNCC chairman and he promptly announced the orga'"'ization would ' intensify its efforts in the area of independent politics.'" A "Miami Herald 11 story of July 1 quoted Carmicha e l as saying: "We inte nd to disrupt every pi ec e of (political) machinery in this country. 11 Later in May, Carmichael snubbed President Johnson's invitation to a White House conference on civil rights, announced SNCC will continu e to organi ze all - Negro political parties under the Black Panth er emblem and refused to bar Communists, saying: "We are requiring no loyalty oaths. " During the Meredith Mississippi Norch in June, he espoused a "black power" doctrine and another SNCC spokesman threatened a deputy sheriff in one town that if he didn't behave, the marchers 11will burn that courthouse, baby." On a television program, Carmichael stopped just short of advocating that Negroes resort to any means to achi eve equality: "I've never rejected viol enc e as a means to obtain an end, " he said. Columnist Joseph Alsop summed up th e situation: "In the person of Stoke ley Carmichael extremism has active ly taken over SNCC ••• " Communist Gus Hall, in summing up the records of the DuBois Clubs, Students for a Democratic Society and SNCC, said: "They're just part of the 'respons ibl e left' - that portion of American yo uth that reali z es society is sick." Responsible] Sick? Who ? Th e Wack e nhut Corporation is a national investigative and security organi zation with 26 offices extending from Puerto Rico to Hawaii. It also operates in Venezuefo through a 50% owned subs idiary company . Acutely aware of the threat of Communism, it prese nts this series of articles to its friends a nd employees as an educational servi ce . For additional copies, contact: THE W ACKE N H U T CORPORATO N . 3280 P ON CE DE LEON BOULEV ARD . CORAL GAB L ES. FLOR ID A . TELEPHO N E: H I G HLAND 5 - 148 1 . �T H E B A N K SECURITY A . H . NORRIS, PRESIDENT H . K. MORGAN, CASHIER W . W . TOMPKINS , VICE PRESIDENT RICHARD T . NORRIS, ASST. CASHIER EDGEFIELD, SOUTH CAROLINA Sept ember 9 , 1966 Hon . Ivan W. Allen , Jr. Ma yor of Atlanta Atlanta , Georgia Dea r Mr. Mayor, Congratulations to y ou on your sensible sta tement on t h e preserva tion of l aw and orde r i n Atlant a. I s hould like to nominate y ou fo r America ' s Mayor Number One. Sincerely yo urs, 7 ~ 7 f • r ~~ R.H . Norris Pre sident �Lines Lane Woodbridge, Connecticut September 9, 1966 The Hon. Mayor Ivan Allen City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: While the "urban problem " is very real and can be associated wi th conditions of misery, misfortune, and frustration, it is not so great that it cannot be overcome by sincere, honest, and diligent leadership such as you are affording to the City of Atlanta. I regret that only my thoughts can be there with you at this time. Cordially, H O· ~ if Hugh O. Brock, III Yale Law 1 67 College Park, Ga. �THOM.AS G. LEE P . 0 . BOX 2:U3 ORLANDO, FLORIDA 32802 September 8, 19 66 The Honorable Ivan Allen Mayor, City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Sir: you for the stand you have taken in the recent . I commend ,.. race riots in the city of Atlanta • • for one thing, I admire your courage. If more of our public officials had the fortitude and courage of their convictions, and were willing to support the local police force, the race riots would have been halted long ago. I further concur that the riots are promoted by outside agitators such as those connected with SNCC and other pro-communist organizations and not by the colored citizens of the respective areas. It is time our country, and our national leaders awakened to this fact before it is too late. Again I commend you for your courage and convictions and I know that the majority of the American citizens stand behind you. Q 143.215.248.55T.G.tee TGL:lcw �INTERNATIONAL FINE ARTS COLLEGE OF FASHION 1737 N O R TH BAY SHORE DRIVE • MIAMI , FLORIDA 33132 • TELEPHONE : 373- 46 84 Monday evening, August 29, 1966 ... at home, 4736 North Bay Road Miami Beach, Florida - Dear Ivan, This is a personal letter. destroy it and acknowledge it. I would hope that you would ·read it, It takes much courage to write it, for it is a most unpleasant subject. A vision concerning you haunts me. which later came true. I have had dreams before, But I have never had a waking vision or picture. I am not psychic or a visionary, but I do have a vivid imagination. In my mind there appeared, five days ago, a picture of a young man. He is killing you. I think he is shooting you. He is up close, in a crowd, and standing slightly below you, facing you. place. You are speaking. Atlanta, or the South. Where ••. ! don't know. His skin is fresh and clear and his complexion is naturally tanned or brunette. of 25 to 28 years of age. He is a young white man He has a fresh, open face. He has dark eyes He has thick, straight, rich brown hair •• long on top and close cut over the ears. His lips are parted. It could be other than The young man kills you. His face is so clear before me. (or so they seem). You are in a public He has deep dimples or a mole on his cheek. His eyes are rather close set. He has a full (almost fat) nose that is straight, with full lips always slightly parted. He wears a clean, white shirt open at the throat with no tie. trousers are nondescript . He has a chunky, stocky build. His I am behind you (though really not there) and all I see is this young man's face ••• �[f . I I I open and listening. And he kills you. or tries to. That's all I saw---all I know. Edward would be disturbed if he knew that I wrote this letter to you, Ivan. Perhaps this was just a very bad dream on my part and I am being quite foolish to relate it to you. But the terrible feeling stays with me that what I have described has either happened to you , or will happen to you within the next three years at the most. At the risk of losing your respect, your friendship and your affection, I am compelled to write this to you. Take care of your dear self and know that Edward and I count you as a wonderful friend. God love you~ ~k Mrs. Edward Porte r �9 o4- .Ec15-/ C;q;Ji.iol Sr., W<1.,5'"h / ~g -i..o n/JJ, C.,. Se;ac.. .9/ /9~& /~ J~ ~ / lr?~ Cc/-Jc;.~.£L ,I ~~; c-1/~ . (2~ ?n,_, mo/(YI,.'~ ~~ApeKipling» in his poem "MacDonough's Song," laid it out clean when he wrote, in part: "Whatsoever for any cause:, seeketh to take or give, Power above and beyond the Laws---suffer it not to live! Holy State, or Holy King, or Holy People's Will-Have no truck with the senseless thing; Order the guns and kill1" And ~ , Your Honor, is exactly wha t we white Americans must do, if our nation and law and order are to surviveo I'm ready1 )2 ~uT Chet Schwarzkopf J Box 445 Tehachapi, Calif. 93561 f) �2115 Sherman Ave Evanston Ill 60201 12 Sept 66 Dear Mr Allen You won't remsmber me but about eight years ago I was a guest in your office for a day. For ten years I had been advertis- ing manager of Herders and my superiots thought it would be educational for me to see how you handled your advertising, and it was. Sometime after that Cort Horr showed me some data about your then plan to try for the governorship and I fuink I recall your statement that as of then you were quite dim about integration. These things come back to me as I read about your racial prob- lems and I mnk it in order to write to commend you on the statesmanlike attitiude you have taken in handling them. courage is also noteworthy. Your personal The state of Georgia has much to do to catch up with the procession but the mayor of Atlanta has shown outstanding leadership. Mayor Ivan Allen Jr Atlanta Georgia �AVERY PRODUCTS CORPORATION 415 Huntington Dr., San Marino, Calif. 91108 September 9, 1966 Telephone (213) 682-2812 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of Atlanta Georgia My dear Mayor Allen: In this morning's issue of the "Los Angeles Times," I read with great admiration a rather extended series of remarks attributed to you relative to the problems of desegregation in Atlanta and nationally. I have mentioned this matter to several other executives in our company and find that they, too, were greatly impressed with both the clarity and honesty of your views as well as your fortitude in expressing them. Your forthright acceptance of the responsibility of your community for all of its citizens is refreshing, to say the least. Your equally forthright action against clearly disruptive elements is equally sound and refreshing . Very sincerely, ?.4.~ R. S. Avery Board Cha i rman RSA nl �I /6--d ~ . ~ ,,__,,..,___...~ ry ~ ) ~/ S~J~ /rfa ,;)_ J . Jr &t1 - ~ ~ ~ ~ ' ' - , ~ I r/ J!LrMce t . r v~ M~ 143.215.248.55 16:37, 29 December 2017 (EST)ti: rwr W ~ le cv2/J ~ (1 q ~ j_ -- ~ ~ tQ ~ (!2_~ S"~ -___.. -.,- ~ -- ~~ -~~ D ' ~ / ~ 4JJ L~o A �WASHINGTON OFFICE Director Donald E. Channell AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION Assistant Dir ector Lowell R. Beck Assistant Director lor Public Information Harry W. Sw egle 1705 De Sales Street, Washington, D.C. 20036 Tel. (202) 659-1330 September 12, 1966 Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Ivan: In connection with the recent trouble that you have been having in Atlanta, I thought that you would like to know that the reaction in Washington both by the press and the public has been favorable to our fine City and to its great mayor. papers. Editorials appeared in both of the major Washington Enclosed is a copy of the editorial of the Evening Star. As a former A tlantian, I am very proud of the way our city has progressed under your leadership. Sincerely yours, Donald E. Channell DEC :dg Enclosure \- '"""'\ _ 1. . .... , -~--- �FOUNDED POLICY AUDIT & PROGRAM RATE PLAN ALL EDWARD LINES D , STRUCTURE OF P. W. ALFRIEND, IV A. O. MCMLII ANALYSIS INSURANCE DRAWER & 3S7 PRESIDENT GARDNER VICE LOSS PREVENTION ENGINEERING BONDS INSURANCl!t fS L . BOOTHE, JR. I 8 N O RT H aUILDINO WA S H I N Q T O N S T ·R E E T ALEX ANDRIA, VIRGIN I A PRESIDENT PHONE , KING CABLE ADDRESS ; 9-1223 "SAVINGS" September 12, 1966 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayo r A tlanta, Georgia Dear Friend: The folks up this way are certainly impressed and pleased at the way you are dealing so effectually with lawlessness. Your firm, ye t gloved hand, is a fine e x ample for other municipal officials around the country. Thought you might be interested in the attached front page Washing.a. ton Star story, wh ich mentions that the Vice-President praised you in his recent press conference . With kind personal r egards and b e st wishes. E D W/sa w Encl: news paper clipping �I I _I 6~ 3;:i._- 6 7 -I-It ~ ~~ / /Jd · l tJ /4-jT / 'lt? �( 502-587-1212 BOONE - GUNDERSON CO . 550 SOUTH FIFTH STREET • LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 40202 September 1 4 , 1~66 Mayor Ivan Allen City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Ivan, Enclosed is a c l ipping from the morning paper of the Courier-Journa l and this ar ticle indicate s the high esteem th a t I have had for you in the years passed. Ve admire you for your princi pals for law and order in government affairs. The clipping attached is for you to pass on to your children or grandchildren for testi monial fortitude or wisdom . Kindest persona l regards, OFFICE SUPPLIES • FURNITURE • BUSINESS INT ERIORS �816 Sheldon Road Charleston, South Carolina September 15, 1966 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta, Georgia Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Mayor: Undoubtedly you have received many letters and other communications pro and con with regard to your handling of the recent so called civil rights situation in your good City. II II I am not one of the types that immediately fire letters to newspapers and public officials bn every controversial matter. It may be that I as well as others should do more of it. I do feel compelled to write, commending and congratulating you on your handling of the problem as I have seen it expressed in the newspapers and on television. It is very heartening to know that there are still some elected officials who have a sense of responsibility and obligation to protect the rights and privileges of their constituents as a whole, rather than to pressure groups, purely with the thought in mind of perpetuating a regime. It is quite a paradox for us to be sending our young men to Viet Nam and other foreign countries to guard against insurrection and invasion of the rights of people while permitting it to go along virtually unchecked in this country of ours. May the Supreme Architect of the Universe continue to provide you with the wisdom and fortitude to discharge your responsibilities in the be st interest of all people. Very truly yours, C . W . Mathewes , �• SHEPHERD & CAMPBELL U. S. AND FOREIGN PATENTS TRADE MARKS PENNSYLVANIA BU I LDING PENNSYLVANIA AVE. AT 13TH ST .. N . W. FRAN K G. CAMPBE LL DAVID L. SANSBURY WASHINGTON September 13, 1966 Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Sir: I am writing to suggest what I be lieve would be a practical way _of putting a stop to the incitiilb.g of violence of norm a lly we n behave d colored people by the Brack Power gagg. They were able, I understand to create the riot by outright deception in tha t they stated the suspected auto thief was shot while handcuffed , when the truth was he had ne ver been handcuffed and was trying to get aw ay from the policem an when he was shot. At [e ast, that is what I re ad in the Washington papers. I, therefore, propose that you secure the enactment of leg is lation (by speci al session of your legislature, if it is not now in session) in the nature of the f oUowing: An Act It shall be unlawfu l for any person, or association of persons to create or publish or otherwise disseminate within the State of Georgia any false statement which wou ld tend to create disorder, or to incite riots, or inflame persons against persons, or to incite people of one race against the people of another race, or to incite persons of one religion against persons of another religion. Any person violating the provisions of the foregoing act, shau, upon conviction there of, be fined not less than two thousand dollars or imprisoned for .not less than two nor more than five years, or both. Nothing in the foregoing shau be construed to restrict the freedom of the press in publishing statements that are true nor shaII anything in the foregoing be construed to prohibit the publishers of established newspapers from publishing statements which they have adequa te reason to be Iieve are true, it being the intent of the Legislature to prohibit the promulgation of false information calculated to disturb the public peace. �2014 West View Street Los Angeles, ~a:lif. 90016 9/ 14/ 66 Honorahle Mayor · Iv.an Allen Jr. City Hall Atlanta,. Ga. Dear· Nr·. . Mayor: Ple.as.e except this l e tter.- of tlianks and congratulation t-o you for the wonderful waiy you naV,e handle the p~oblems y,ou have had to face and are facing there in Atlanta, hefore and during a:11 the unnecessary violence. I ·w:ould lik e to say, I am a Ne:gro ·, who had a, father · and mother · that· taught us honesty, decency, dignity, intelligence, respect for the othe-r fellow. Respe ct. f .o r law and orde.r·. Know the law and' stay within it. Always try and do· to the other ' fellow as· you would ha-v.e him do to you . One. of my fath e:r 's favorite sayings was, the wo.rst. man in the wu:rld to do business "With, is an ( educ ated fool), b.ecause he:·Vthinks ne knows: e~e:cything, but: li tt-1.e- or nothing. With ctll the CiviL Right . leaders we have in .America today, we are bound to hav.e some fool.s· miXS'd up ~iii th the better ones.I stand with Dr.·. Martin Luther King,. because I believe as: he does. Violence is definiteiy not the way. I honestly wish we had more :May!ll1'll' 9 Hin,: lI'1IT North Carol ina 90016 Boone- Gunders on Co . 350 South Fifth Street Louis ville, Kentucky 40202 �FAVORABLE - OUTSI DE ATLANTA Mrs . Isabelle H. Mauterer 215 Woodrow Street Columbia , South Carolina 29 205 Mr . J ames w. Dalton 103 Antigua Drive Cocoa Beach , Florida Mr . L. G. Evans 2121 Riverland Road rt . Lauderdale , Florida 33312 Mr s . Ruth C, Fountain Route 3 Box 463-C Albany, Georp,i a Mr . J. Vincent Cook Mr. Gary L. Pler,er Mr, P. Ma urice Boulogne Cook, Pl er,e r & Boul oP,ne 798 Prince Avenue Prince Lyndon Building Athens , Georgia Mr. H, H. Niebruegge 1309 Faraday Place Dec a tnr, Georgia 30033 Mr. and Mr s . Wm, R, Wa r wick 2356 Old Stone Mountain Road Chamblee , Ge orgi a Mr . Quincy B, Powell 347 Peabody Street Athens , Ge or gia 30601 Mr s . Archie T.E . McCormick 330 Pat Mell Road, S. W. Townhouse B-3 Marietaa, Geor gi a Mrs . Roland P. Perdue , I II 245 Riverside Dr ive Athens, Georgia Mr. Cha rles Elliott (Charlie ) 401 Flat Roc k Trail Covinr,ton , Georgi a 30209 Mr. James M, Smith 2070 Sylvania Drive Decat ur, Georgia 30033 Rev . East 2810 East Miss Fredda Lee 4131 Janice Drive East Point, Geor gia Mrs. Gus w. Mann 601 Wi llivee Drive Decat ur, Georgi a Mr. James A. Dunlap ( James ) Gainesville, Georpia Mrs, Anne B. Emery 177 3 Holiday Boulevard Forest Park, Georr,ia 30050 Honorable Jack Hamilton (Jack) Mayor City of Decatur Decatur, Georgia Mr, and Mrs, Carl V, Chelena, Sr, 418 Kenilworth Circle Stone Mountain , Geor~ia 30083 Robert L, McBat h, Mi nis t e r Point Presbyteri an Church Church Street Point, GeorP,ia Rev. Ralph C. Shea, Sr, Minister Jones Memorial First Methodist Church 189 W. Georgia Avenue Forest Park, Geor ia Mr. Max F. lard. President Mar-Jae , Inc. Airport Circle P. o. Box 1923 Gainesvi l ee, GeorFia 30501 Mrs. Paul B. Dye, Jr. 660 Victorv Drive Waynesboro, Georpia Mr. Lee R. Grogan President Georgia Jaycees P.O. Box 616 Peggy, Georgia 31069 �FAVORABLE - OUTSIDE ATLANTA Mr . N. N. Burnes, Jr.(Asa ) President Rome Manuf acturin Co. Rome, ,.eor ia Mr . Frank K. iarti n Asst. Solicitor eneral Office of Solici tor General Chattahoochee Judicia l Circuit uscoP.ee Count Courthouse Columbus , Geor ia Mr . Ear l T. Mayo P. o. Box 2151 Valdos t a , Geor i a Hr . Julian H. Cox (Jul i an ) 265 E. Hancock Avenue Athens , Georgi a Mr . John Mat tison, J r. 727 Courtenay Dr . , N. E. Atl nta , eor ia 30306 Mtt/Ji/~~rt/M~Xla~~ Mr. B. Sanders Wal ke r ( Sander s ) 240 Second Street Macon, Geor g ia Hr . Charl es c • .c ehee 0Charlie ) 16 Eas t Jones St reet S vannah , ~eorgia Mr . Emory Bas s ( Emory) 112 Geor i ia Avenue Va ldos t a, GeorP,ia r . Fra nk Thom s on, President ( f r ank ) Souther n Foods , I nc, 1616 urray St reet P. O. Box 2037 Colu bus, Geor P.i Mr . Howard M. c -1ahon 1716 Beverl y Wood Court Chambl ee, Geor ia Mr . El gin Carmichael Cardin- 1 Gl ove Co •• Inc . 113 Annamrong Stree t Rome, Geor i 30161 Mr. Wi l son M, Har dy ( ~il~on ) Hardy Realty & Deve l opment Co. P. o. Box 1470 Rome , G orr,ia 30161 rs . Ma ry Ri.c:Uey Hi ll 398 fort s on Driv Athens , eor i 30601 Mr. and irs . o. H. Mi mms 3294 Cmbry Circle Ch mbl e, Geor ia Dr, John R. Ber t r and , Pr es id nt Berry College Mount B rry , eo~ ia 30149 Hr . and Mrs . Walter L. W st Sand rsvi l l , Geor ia Hr . J s c s. Howell Sr , 406 Avenue 11 E" W s t Point, eo i 31833 r. and Mrs . W. s. i llian 2756 Mt . Ol i v Driv D c tur , Geo ia Honorabl e Malcolm Macl ean yor City of S v nn h H P. O. Box 1038 Sav nn h , Geor ia Mr, H r v y B. Molan 3564 SQxton Wood. Drlv Ch blee , G or ia 30005 ,r. GeorR C. Turn r Vice Pre ident Hubbard Pant C pany B n, ~eor ia 30110 Mr s . J . w. O' Donne ll 117 Michigan Avenue D c tur, G or 1a Mr . J es Sol Par tin Vidali • Georgi Mrs . H. w. Barn s Griffin , G orgia Reverend lph Lynwood S 1t h Mi ni ter . f i rst Christin Church North Cl ev land at Societ Ave . Albany • G OrP,ie r . John P. ( Johnny ) Milled vill, Georgia �FAVORABLE - OUTSI DE ATL ANT Membe rs of the Episcopa l Church of t he Ascension Carte rsville, Geor ia The Macon N ws 120 Br oadway Macon , eorgia 31208 Rev. Louis Tonsmeire Rector Church of t he Ascens on Cartersville, eor ia The Chattahoochee Bapt ist Conference Chattahoochee Associat ion Hall Count y Gainesvi l le , Geor gi a ~r¢1 r. Quimby Me lton ri fin D i l y ews Grifin, Geor ia �FAVORABLE - OUTSIDE ATLANTA Mr . Geor ge J . We lls I.akemont. -eor ia Mr . Henry J. Miller 6332 67th Court Riverda l e, a r yland r . Wi lli am G. Cox ( Bill) 1872 Colt Drive . iss Eve Blake 3282 Robin Road Decatur, eorgia 30032 Chamblee, Georgia r . 1il ton D. Harper 2115 Sherman Avenue Evanston Illinoi 60201 Mr. Edward W. Alfriend, IV Oresident In urance , Inc. P. O, Drawer 357 Alexandria , Virginia 4rl Charl es G. Abel Senior Vice President The Nat ional Investors Life Ins . Co. I rs , J o Alice Hulley 1030 Bush, #4 San Francisco, California Little Rock, Arkansas 94109 1075 Han l ey Avenue Loa Ange l es 49s California r. Harold C. Hudson 3211 Sandu~ky Drive Decatur, Geo?'P.ia Vit i Raver nd Henly Campbell Union City fe thodist Church Union City, Georp,ia Mr . H. Price 8825 rireston Plaz South Gate• California Mr , Donald E. Channell (Don) Am rican Bar Associ tion 170S De Sales Street W shin ton, o.c. 20036 Hrs . Alfred • Tuck .r 100 L Salle Street New York, New York 10027 Hr. R. I rs . Henry J . Reichman s. Avery Bo rd Chainnan Avery Product Corporation 415 Huntin ton Dr . san M rino, C lifornia 91108 Mr . Stancil KinR King & William R alty Co . 903 w. Main St t Dothan, Alabama Hrs , Paul w. Bumbarg r 548 orth Center ctreet Hickory , North C rolin Mr . L wson L. Patt n (Lawson) Lakeland, G orgia 31635 Mr. Julian H. Harrison, Jr. Julian Harrison, Inc . 1312 Turner McCall Blvd . Rooe , Go 1 30161 {Juli n ) Mr , A. P. Ike 4717 So . w ston Oklah City, Oklahoma r. S. Willin h Willin h m Sash & Door Company S v nth & Ch rry St . Macon, Ceorp,ia Ellen Syk rad nton, Florid Mr • Mr . Chet Schwarzko Box 445 Tehachapi, calJ.forni r. Bens . Gil r (Ben) 195 Bro dw y Hew York, New York 10007 93561 Mrs. P. B. Patt c. Lee Wil on (L e) Silv r Creek P byterian Church P verend 1000 s. on E. 13th St, D rfield Beach, rlor!d Box 176 Lindale, G or ie 30147 Hr. Geor e A. G lli an ~~30 Livin to Rd., S. E. Wa hin ton, D. c. 20032 �FAVORAB LE - OUTSI DE ATLANTA, I N GEORG I A Mrs . Jeanne M. Gregg Route 2 Timber Ridge Road Marietta , Georgia Mr . Charles R. Wa lker 2898 Lynda Pl a ce Decatur , Ge or i a Mr . and Mrs . Louis R. Fr uecht , Jr. 3510 Indian Lane Doravi lle, Georg ia FAVORAB LE - OUTSIDE GEORGI A Mrs . w. H. Brach 103 Wor th St reet Ise l in , New Jersey / 08830 Mr. Roy L. Morgan ( Ro) 3900 Wat s on Pl ., N. W. A artment 2A Towe r B Was hington , D. c. Mr s , Maude Coole Barnes 437 West Si xth Street San Bernar dino , Cal iforn i a 92401 Orvill e • J ohns t on , Cha l ain The esley Foundat ion The Methodis t Church at the College Campus Alfred, New York 14802 Mr, Richard K. Degenhardt (Di ck) !secutive Vice President Asheville Chanber of Commerce , Inc . P. o. Box 1011 Asheville, North Carolina 28802 Mr. Loy s. Braley 1668 Juanita Avenue San Jose , California �FAVORABLE - OUTSIDE ATLANTA ~ Members of the Episcopal Church of the Ascension Cartersville , Georgia The Macon News 120 Broadway Macon 9 Georgia v- 31208 Rev. Louis Tonsmeire Rector Church of the Ascension Cartersville • Georgia .; The Chattahoochee Baptist Conference Chattahoochee Association Hall County Gainesville, Georgia ./ Vitt,i Mr . Quimby Melton Griffin Daily News Griffin , Geor gia ~ �i FAVORAB LE - OUTSIDE ATLANTA . Mr. N. N. Burnes , Jr. ( As a ) President Rome Manufacturing Co. Rome , Georgi a Mr. Frank K. Martin Asst . Solicitor General Office of Solicitor General Chattahoochee Judici al Circuit Muscogee County Courthouse Columbus , Georgia / Mr . Earl T. Mayo P. o. Box 2151 Valdosta , Georgi a ~ Mr. Emory Bass (Emory ) 112 Georgia Avenue Valdosta , Georgia / Mr. Frank Thompson , President ( Frank ) Southern Foods , Inc. 1616 Murray Street P. O.Box 2037 Columbus , Georgia / Mr. Wilson M. Hardy ( Wilson) Hardy Realty & Development Co. P. o. Box 1470 Rome , Georgia 30161 • Mr. and Mrs. o. H. Mimms 3294 Embry Cir cle Chamblee , Georgia • Mr . and Mr s . Wa l t er L. West Sandersville , Georgia Dr. and Mrs . w. .,, Mr . Julian H. Cox (Julian) 265 E, Hancock Avenue Athens , Georgia , Mr. John Mattison , Jr. 727 Courtenay Dr. , N.E. Atlanta , Geor ia 30306 ~tJIJJ/~~tt/~¢Xl,~~ Mr. B. Sanders Walker (Sanders) 240 Second Street Macon , Georgia ~ Mr, Charles C, McGehee 0Charlie) 16 East Jones Street Savannah , Geor ia Mr. Howard M, McMahon 1716 Beverly Wood Court Chamblee , Geor gia I, / Mr. Elgin Carmichael Cardinal Glove Co ., Inc. 113 Armstrong Street Rome, Georgia 30161 v Mrs, Mar y Ridl ey Hill 398 Fortson Drive Athens, Georgia 30601 ., Dr . John R. Bertrand 1 President Berry College Mount Be rr , Georgia 3014 9 / Mrs. Jesse S. Howe ll , Sr • 406 Avenue " E" Wes t Poi nt, Geor ia 31833 S, Millians 2 756 Mt . Olive Drive ~ Mrs. J, W. 0' Donnell 117 Michigan Avenue Decatur , Geor gia v Mr. J ames Sol Part in Vidalia, Georgia Decat ur , Georgia Honorable Malcolm Mac lean Mayor City of Savannah P. O. Box 1038 Savannah , Georgi a }Mr. Harvey B. Moslan 3564 Sexton Woods Drive 3000 5 Chamblee, Georgia Mr. George C. Turner fl ~C, L Vice President -, Hubbard Pants Company Bremen, Georgia 30110 • Mr s. H, w. Barnes Gri ffin, Georgia Reverend Ralph Lynwood Smith Minister, First Christian Church North Cleveland at Society Ave. Albany, Georgia .t Mr. John P. Baum (Johnny) Milledgeville, Georgia �FAVORABLE - OUTSIDE ATLANTA Miss My rna R. Truitt 1680 Commonwealth Aven ue #3 Bri hton , Massachusetts 02135 Mrs. I. Martin Shartar 21230 Ki plin Oak Park , Michigan 4-8237 Mrs. Felder F. Heflin 1600 South Joyce Street Apt . B-4-09 Arlington , Vi r ginia 22 202 M, Sgt. Robert H, Formby 16-B Webb Avenue Westover A,F,B, Massachusetts Mr. Leonard J , Kerpelman Attornev at Law 500 Equitab l e Bu i ldin Ba l tim ore 2 1 Mary land Mrs, Fannie Stark Box 294Clin~on , South Carolina Mrs, R, Martin Helick 752 1 Rosemary Road Pittsbur h , Pennsylvania 15221 Mr. Edwin S, Fern 113 E. Ma le Avenue Ottumwa , Iowa Mrs, Sidney Wilmer 210 Riverside Drive, Apt, 6E New York , New York 10025 Mr. R, V. Ostuni 6935 Trolley Way Playa Del Rey. California Mr. E. Gaines Davis , Jr. Smith , Reed, Yessin & Davis Sixth Floor , McClure Building Frankfort , Kentucky 4-0601 Mrs , Violet Beilby 54-6 Vine Street Sheeveport , Louisiana Mrs. R. H, Brown Rt, 1 Box 3 Hartf or d , Ar kansas Mr, John T, Reeves Bremen , Georgi a M. Mr. J. J , Dani e ll (J im ) Marietaa. Georgia Mr. Delbert W, Coleman ( Del ) Chairman of the Board The Seeburg Corporat i on 1500 North Dayton St r eet Chicago , Illinoi s 60622 Captain John L, Kirk USAF 113 0 West 29t h Street Corona, California Mr. Th oma s Mas t erson 873 No rth Superior Avenue Decatu r, Gear ia 3003 3 A3C Mic hae l F. Eskew CMR Box 2129 Fairchild A, F.B, Washingt on, 99011 Mr. Sidney Simon Maison de Canada 31 Blvd, J ourdan Paris 14, France Mrs. Horatio Luro (Frances) Old Mill Farm Cartersville , Geor gia Mrs. James K, Dobbs 3353 Cottage Way , Apt . 97 Sacramento, California 95825 Miss R. I. Leal 837 1/2 Boston Street Los Angeles, California Dr. H. Claude Hudson President Broadway Federal Savings & Loan Assn. Los Anpeles . Ca lifornia 90037 Mr. James H, Wetherbee 32- 56 35th Street Long Island City, New York 90012 11106 Clarence F. Holmes, D. D. S. 2602 we Q n Street Denver 9 C olorado 80205 �
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 30, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | favorable | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 18, Folder 11, Document 14

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_011_014.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Document 14
  • Text: The three plan studies which follow are taken from Methods of Reducing the Cost of Public Housing. Research Report of the School of Architecture Pratt Institute Brooklyn, New York Sponsored by the New York State Division of Housing New York, N. Y. i | TOWER SCHEME this is the name given to a plan type which is approai- mately ccninra, vith the ecois dheecel sree all four eidag of a central service core, Thos trun used successfully for middle-income housing in Mew York and Chicago since the lala 1940's. As far as could be ascertained, the tower scheme has not yet been used for low-income housing, prebably for the reason discussed below. The tower-scheme has a number of advantages and one serious disadvantage. It is readily apparent that the compact plan results in a minimum of perimeter construction and the shortest possible utilify runs, with attendant economies. Even more significant is the reduction in the amount of expensive putlic corridor space; in the tower scheme the area of public corridor per construction room is about half that in the interior- corridor scheme, and public corridor space is rela- tively expensive as will be shown in Chapter Four. In most cases, the tower plan provides cross-ventila- tion and two exposures for each apartment, a very desirable arrangement as far as livability is con- cerned, The tower scheme also offers advantages in sife-planning. The square plan is easy to dispose, even on an irregular site, and when used in large projects, it results in a greater feeling of cpenness on the site than occurs when long narrow buildings are used, A serious economic handicap to the tower scheme is the high cost of elevators, Providing only four to six apartments per floor, as compared to fen to bwelve apartments per floor in the interior-corridor scheme, ihe cost of elevators per dwelling unit is thus hwo to hwo pnd one-half times higher in the tower scheme. For this higher cost, greally improved livability is pro- vided, This scheme is presented here in the belief that the economies noted in the paragraphs above will offset the higher cost of the service core, thus affording improved livability at no increase in cost. Perspective of Tower Buildings . a a ke Me fy f e Ons. < af sie . ae Sent - = “ah : ME Maaapoastes hai cues eS Ge tt Se spas Bet ae eth Pee ary ee AS ( ——— oo i ee rin Et porter ° a, ‘4 Peg a ay Posteo isin . cee ue m AE). ie =i —{ i {[ bi. witli 4 ¢ “ eebha, pete a TOT INTE 7 WRIGIRVE UE gp gt Cp pre ac en Nie ats the fy Uf... neath aetieenanysM Myf ‘ = “ ¥ ~ 4 a C,i a : . Wee's ao veuaer eee aa » ine ea . ‘a! phen Sart WW otha inv etg Seen, ated ALA, aa ie =" Pies oe en Fee a le @) . (2, OPEN-CORRIDOR SCHEME In this type of building all of the anartments cre reached by means of ouldoor corridors or “slevetied sidewalks,” as they are sometimes called, The char. oye at an af cuch a building is lect thin, corridor scheme has been used for haw vind middle-income housing in many places, both in this couniry and abroad, rect The opcs Improved livability is the outstanding advantage of - this scheme, Every apartment has through-ventilation and two exposures, and every apartment can have the most favorable orientation, All rooms, including bathrooms,- have outside light and ventilation. The interior corridor, which in practice is aften cn un- pleasant space — narrow, dark, and smelly — is eliminated entirely, These gains are partially offset by some loss of privacy for the rooms that open on ithe corridor, The open-corridor scheme climinctes the cost of me- chanical ventilation for the bathrooms and the cost of the interior corridor with its expensive finishes, But the open-corridor, being “single-loaded,” must be at least 1¥% times as long as the interior corridor, Since codes limit the maximum distance from an apartment to a stair, the open-corridor building must either be content with few apartments per floor or, as in the example shown here, it must separate the two re- quired stairs. The open-corridor, of course, need not be heated but’some provision must be made for snow removal; in New York the Building Department re- quires the installation of electric heating cable in the floors of all open corridors. Since all apartment doors open to the outside, these doors must be of the ex- terior type and must be weatherstripped. The long, thin building shape, with its high proportion of per- imeter to enclosed area, is not basically economical, nor, in a high-rise building, is it basically stable; extra cost for wind-bracing must be assumed, In view of all the items noted in the previous para- graph, it might be concluded that the ecenomic posi- tion of the open-corridor scheme is unfavorable, But this is not the case, Recent cost studies for a newly designed public housing project in New York indicate very substantial cost savings resulting from the use of the open-corridor scheme, In the example presented here and on the following sto bch ds po) pages, the open-corridor scheme has been combined l] bn with skip-stop elevators. In this arrangement the ele- ‘oo — 21 vators stop only at every third Moor; tenants on the ; intermediate floors have to walk up or down one “| — 20 floor. The open cerridor occurs only at elevator-stop (7313 ‘3 I A" aparimonts apen of the cerridar; stairs are “i. = within the apartmesis and are maintained by the sey sae tenant, This scheiie has been used in a noted spa ELEMNIOR STOP TOO 7 | 7 = - income project in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and in . Me ody ‘ig a propesed low-income project in New York, 2 (OPEN CORRIDOR) ER i NY 23 —_16 or ‘ Be be = ERROR * ee : i ; i INTERMEDIATE STOP FLOOR = | &SeSeoseS 3 j 14 The skip-stop scheme saves the cost of two out of three RENO. i corriders and elevator doors and controls. Against ee oe 2 ro Ka this seving must be balanced the cost of the private. rare (NO CORRIDOR) OES HN Bee Ses ia ay i t ia | stairs and the fire escape balconies in two out of three a. mes _ of the apartments. A significant advantage of this : SEES ae | scheme is the elimination of most of the privacy prob- ae SE Fc 4 a lem. By placing the larger apariments on the inter- : ‘ INTERMEDIATE STOP FLOOR A eS RS | | | mediate floors, it was possible fo arrange the plan so SON Tod — 10 that no bedroom opens on a corridor, INTERMEDIATE STOP FLOOR B’ ROIS | {" tL _ ? vroneceel | basa ~— 9 — 6 : a =7 Tho structural system employs regularly spaced rein- t forced concrete columns, two per bay, with the floor abicked — 6 slubs cantilevered 4 feet beyond the columns on each side, This framing system is discussed in detail in = § Chapter Two. Stair and elevator towers have been ploced outside the building proper, and designed to ae = 9 supply windbracing for the tall, narrow building, INTERMEDIATE STOP FLOOR | = « Saae 9 LEE NY ssatoe locas — 3 ELEVATOR STOP FLOOR eee > SS niciies id st Required disiribution of apartment types is provided ante pA Bren fe, SS s Pop tn in one building. The two busic floor plans ure detailed sense ETAT a ee eee Sse Sma es the following pages along with alfernate floor Cross-secfion through Open-Corridor | plans required for complete distribution, This distri- pution is explained in chart form on the following “ 9510 13 20 95 SECTION B-B Oo soe poge. SEE PLAN NEXT PAGE Sate ee APRA AP PI RAD CQeliress INTERTOR-CORRIDOR SCHEME - The interior-corridor scheme is now in common use for low and middle-income housing. It is a simple and economical scheme, permitting ten to twelve apart- ‘ a * rite r (tt lanes not heweayer. cre + ress 24 4 - aVGE, LPig8S yontilaten except for the four corner aparincints. In New York City public housing, the requirement of cross-ventilation for cll apartments having more than one bedroom has produced a variation of this scheme in which the service core forms a “pinched waist” * which permits the four adjacent apartments to meet the technical requirements for cross-ventilation, Since in practice the improvement in the ventilation of these four apartments is slight, if any, and the cost of pro- viding it is considerable, this requirement has been ignored in the example presented in the following pages. It is believed that if cross-ventilation is to be considered a primary ‘value, then the open-corridor or the tower scheme should be used rather than the interior-corridor scheme, Like the other examples in this Chapter the interior- corridor scheme is shown with no basement, with regular column spacing, and with the full distribution of apartment types in a single building. In common with the open-corridor scheme, it employs a two- column bay with cantilevered floor slabs, a structural system which is discussed further in Chapter Two. The ground floor plan of the building is shown at the right. Since there is no basement, the facilities usually . found there have been located above ground. The remainder of the ground floor has been left open to provide useful covered space and pleasant vistas through the building. The main purpose of the interior-corridor scheme as presented here is to study the suggestion that the living room might be used also for sleeping. The reasons for considering this idea are discussed in the following pages, along with the suggested planning solutions for putting it into effect. If this idea should be considered feasible from the point of view of livability, the cost savings would be very appreciable, since one bedroom would be eliminated from each apartment. The reduction in area is shown graphic- ally at the right. I | “6 pence tageue sree med eee 1 Geers F Peo | +f i = es | 4 i | | I ‘ 1 4 I GAS TENANT STORAGE j owe SST, we fannie! i ! i | Lee ee eee GROUND FLOOR PLAN, LOBBY BUILDING BLOCK B (As per this study) [ TES pet conca Taso ven Pog) TANK TR ‘ oi, PUMP Re ots Lo. é " : | ‘ r 14 2 My Eg | sd woe NS HAS inc.” (a h ENTRY INCINERATOR a fe etd Fee Ge Why tl <=_-—- —- PERAMBULATOR ROOM The lower block shows the size of the building designed according to usual housing standards, The upper block shows, at the same scale, the size of the building designed for this study, The reduction in length is 47 feet and the saving in floor area is 1927 square feet, or approximately 20%, The reduction in cost would be somewhat less than 20% since plumbing, kitchen equipment, and ele- vators are not affected, but the saving should amount to more than, 15% of the cost of, the building,. .. . (== frawees | be eee -
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 8, Complete Folder

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 8, Complete Folder
  • Text: BETTER HOUSING COMMISSION Committee Room #1 City Hall May 23, 1967 A special meeting of the Better Housing Commission was called to order at 1:30 P.M. by Mr. B. A. Martin, Chairman. Upon invitation from Mr. Martin, Mr. Johnson and Mr. Philmer of HUD were present at this meeting. Mr. Johnson and Mr. Philmer were present to explain Section 312 Loans and 314 Grants which apply only to owners in federally assisted Urban Renewal Projects or Code Enforcement Project areas. They are not available to owners outside of Urban Renewal Projects. The Committee further discussed the possibilities of financial assistance to cases of hardship, where the owner occupants are subject to Housing Code notice to repair or demolish. Out of this discussion came the resolution (copy attached) to be presented to Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Members Present Mr. B. A. Martin Dr. Sidney L. Davis Mr. William Alexander Mr. Harold Dawson Mr. John Cherry Mr. Herbert Millkey A RESOLUTION BY: BETTER HOUSING COMMISSION A special called meeting of the Better Housing Commission, held at City Hall on May 23, 1967, did by unanimous vote, adopt the following resolution: WHEREAS, the Better Housing Commission has for six years functioned as an appellate board for citizens of this community and these appeals result from Housing Code notices to effect repairs and improvements to various properties and, WHEREAS, these appeals are generally from owner occupants and relate to financial hardship and inability to effect necessary repairs or improvements and extending additional time or suspending the Housing Code notice does not overcome bad housing conditions, and, WHEREAS, continued existence of substandard housing poses a threat to the health, safety and welfare of the occupants and the people of the City and, WHEREAS, such substandard housing conditions can be overcome if adequate financial assistance is made available, NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Mayor and Board of Aldermen be requested to investigate the possibility of providing long-term, low interest bearing loans to deserving property owners for the purpose of correcting substandard housing conditions or for the City to purchase properties for demolition purposes; each individual case must have the unanimous approval of the Better Housing Commission, Be it also resolved that a copy of this resolution be delivered to Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor of the City of Atlanta. \"B, A. Martin, Chairman
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 8, Folder topic: Better Housing Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 11, Document 4

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Document 4
  • Text: William W. Gates a Ji 3407 Roswell Rd. N. E. ‘\: Atlanta, Georgia 30305 (oh) 23 March 2h, 1967 Urban America Inc. 1717 Massachusetts Ave., N. We Washington, D. C. 20036 Attention: Mr. James P. Twomey Dear Tir, Twomey: A conference was held with Messrs. Cecil Alexander and Maleolm Jones in the City Hell foday. Me. Alexander stated that he discussed your letter ‘to him dated March 10, 1967 with Mayor Ivan Allen. The Mayor indicated that he is in agreement with your terms providing that no fees are to be col- lected either by Urban America inc. or me for my services in connection with projects submitted to the Housing Resources Committee for guidance or advice. I was instructed to advise you accordingly. The Housing Resources Committee at present confines it's activities to low and medium cost housing within the Atlanta City Limits and therefore in my opinion, in which Messrs Alexander and Jones concur, proposed projects in the five county metropolitan area outside of the City Limits would be considered in the same category as Savannah, Macon and other Georgia cities. Very sincerely yours, ee: Mayor Allen W.W. Gates Mr,. Alexander lr, Jones.
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 11, Document 1

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Document 1
  • Text: Office of the’ Mayor ; nots : ro | TO: , LX Crthbee eS FROM: Ivan Allen, Jr. OY For your information [_] Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the necessary reply. (_] Advise me the status of the attached, * ae Nt n/ fi ftp IE 747 FORM 25-4
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 11, Document 16

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Document 16
  • Text: HOUSING, PUBLIC GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARCHITECTURE LIBRARY THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF PUBLIC HOUSING IN METROPOLITAN TORONTO The Metropolitan Toronto Housing Authority August 1963 - 8s - CHAPTER VIII — SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 1. Basic Premise The conclusions of this study which deal with the attitudes towards ublic housing of families who have moved out are affected by the move-out rate which exists in the projects under the administration of the Metropolitan Toronto Housing Authority. If it is considered that these move-out rates are greater than might ordinarily exist in the private rental market, then the cata takes on more significance, Conversely, if the move-out rates are consid: :ed to be less than the normal privete experience, then the data takes on sser Significance, It should be clearly understood that the findings of this study are based essentially on interviews held with those families who have left-public housing communities in Netropolitan Toronto. Physical Accommodation and Environment It would appear, based on the evidence supplied by former tenants, that the public housing communities are essentially satisfactory places to live, at least as far as the majority of tenant families are concerned, It would also appear that the housing projects provide a reason=bly satisfactory environment for the majority of the families, The major satisfection which tends to keep the family in the public housing project centres around the physical accommocation, As femilies are given housing to meet their renuirements physical overcrowding seldom occurs. The larger units provide accommodation which literally cannot be found snywhere else in the Hetropolitan Toronto area, The housing unit, particulerly the house type, provides the families with their greatest single satis‘ction. eT 7 SST Es, rrr eee es aa TTT Tr i ‘wie TNT speeder ras ch aterm oo Merent tS SN panes odes Sle teens ae ae ner 1h eeernenemer = pa 36 Facilities for Children at Projects This study indicates little dissatisfaction with the facilities prov: :d for children in the housing projects, What was indicated, however, wes 1.2 pro- jects which are densely child populated produce an irritation with the children in the project, The tenant apparently feels that he is unable to get way from the children, This probably accounts for the action taken on the prt of the Tenants' Association in both projects to get oe centres with cnild oriented programmes. This wiconsetcas reaction to the large number of children seems a clear in- aicetion sha mojeets in tae future should not attempt to congregate large numbers of large units in one site as in South Regmt Park, aA larger pro- portion of houses to apartments seems necessary, Attitude Towards Hanagement Perhaps it will be surprising, at least to those who administer public housirz, that there is a very positive fecling towards the public housing expcrierce of those families who have moved out. Only a very sm3ll percentage cf this group felt that no housing should be supplied for other fanilies in simila- circumstances. More than 90% of the families interviewed felt thet some pre-- gramme of public housing is necessary, The majority of families fel» thet they had been helped, at least financially, by their public housing expericice The Housing Authority has for a long time felt that perhaps it interfered too much in the lives of its tenants, This study does not bear out this feeling at all, in fact, there was little expressed dissatisfaction with the control Sse a ae exerted by the Housing Authority. On the contrary, these families indicated “that there was too little control exercised over other femilies in th: com munity. This group felt that the behaviour of the neighbours should be more strictly supervised. In this latter reaction, however, the expression was by a minority of former residents. Mobility of Public Housing Families tC m The annual move-out rete for a family in projects under administratic 1 is proximtely 14%. Sush rates are fouid to be less than that which obt:ins generally in the maivets rmtalL marvct in Canada. iecre sipnificantly probably is that suca raies ars iess toen the nove-tus rates in poblic housizg in the United States which went as high ns 28% in 195i. While satisfaction with public housing living is possibly the major rezsou why tamilies stay, it is also likely that the mobility is somewhat restricted oy the lack of an alternative choice. The private housing market has besn unro.s to provide this alternative.- In order to assess the importance of “hic i ox of an alternative, the satisfactions and dissatisfections of families reme:nir, in public housing might be studied to determine why they senain in puclis housing. This might possibly be the next study carried out by the Metropslivtan Toronto Housing Authority. Social Welfare Considerations One rather disconcorting fact appears in this study which seems to surfest further action bv the Housing Authority. This is the fact that the «-ictad families are substantially the kind of families who should be helped Ly the public housing programme, They are large families with low incomes containing i # Re ee J | i i i i ty i i 7 ae ae both parents. For some reason they have not been able to adjust to living in their new environment. Because these families are probably "troubl«:" or "problem" families, although they represent a very small percent>es * the public housing populétion, it is possible that they require more tim and at- tention than has been given to them up to the present. It would also suggest that greater efforts to reh=bilitate these families are necessary. Co-operation with all essential Welfare Agencies should be established so thet greater sup~ port and assistance can he provided, Rertal 3c¢_e et os a6 =<" oe In theory the frcu that rent is geared to ability to vay should provide a source of satisfaction. The fact thet the monthly rent fits the family's in- come *s that income fluctustes has been thought by many experts to provide tne families with an excellent form of social and economic security which ovhe:- families do not have, In theory, therefore, this should be a major scoursze ci satisfaction. In practice this expectation is not realized, Generally eneskineg there was dissatisfaction expressed on the prt of the move-out families with the rental scale. This might have been expected in the upper incom rances wnere the nenalty rent charged in public housing applies, However, many fami- lies with very low incomes felt that the rents were too high. This feeiing is brought about largely from the establishment of minimum rents, whic. means that many families are paying too high a proportion of their income in rent. The real dissatisfection with the rental scale shows up in those families who refused public housinr. They felt thet the rents asked by the Authority were not low rental. In fact, when the other move-in charges were addec to the first month's rent many families could not afford to move into :' ic housing. ae perenne 9. ws Qe This stated dissatisfaction on the mrt of move-out familics and refusal fami- lies indicrtes that the rental sesle does not wholly perform its function cer- tainly °s it affocts the familics on very low incomes. indications are that the establishment of a new scale, updated to family expenditures of the present time, is an absolute necessity. Such a scaic if devised should be based upon a dynemic situation and changed on review periodically rather than hephozardly. High-Rise Buildings This study does not peoducs damaging evidence against high-rise amrtments ce) within tiself “gf ae’, Ghesstiefaction with living in elevate; builainss is not esDresscd to any Heesu extent. The -nove-out rate from the walle-vp apart- ments in uswrence Heights ij8 greater than in Seuth Regent Park. “This cn be L — acco mted for by the fact that 1 and 2-bedroom families in Lawrence Heishts Dn waste find it easier to move out then the 3-bedroom families in South Regent Cari. A) at + Although hign-rise buildings seem to provide greater management and mr ote. costs to the sdministrstion, the excellent physical layout of the actus. t-«L- ling unit appears to outweigh all problems in the minds of the tenants, iI should be noted that this evidence is bescd on families who heave moved out and not families who continue to live in the projects. Social Stigma In general, while there was some dissatisfaction expressed with a veri yu Cc 3 social factors these did not seem as great as might be expressed by fr: lies who voluntarily moved out of public housing. The social factors do now seri te affect the move-out rate to the same degree as the rent and lack of adenvate shopping and transportation fecilities. Although there was a slight ?. «ling eee a eG lagRpeee Sree 10. a 935 = of stigma attached to public housing it did not seem to minifest itself in many families. Inu fact, it is prob>ble that the social rezctions expressed by these families ere no grester than those that might apply in any nzighbdour= hood, Reasons for Refusal In descending of importance families in apparent need of housing refi. ed for the following reasons:= (3) Rent. toc aigh ie tack of trenspcrtetion 2nd other facilities (33 Fec.ing of social stigma. (1) “rong type of dwelling i.e. apartment instead of house (5) Rules and regulations (6) Personal anc family reasons (7) Condition of unit offered t+ is interesting to note that the first two reasons were fer and away tac most important accounting for nearly 60% of all reasons given. Msi umed bene: tren. Aedes ee SS ie a NL ee FEE eye ee te aren en ee ee rien ree
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 11, Document 31

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Document 31
  • Text: @ Ae ’ Z — 2 27 ly ee M. B. SATTERFIELD EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AND SECRETARY EDWIN L. STERNE CHAIRMAN GEORGE S. CRAFT VICE CHAIRMAN CARLTON GARRETT DIRECTOR OF FINANCE GILBERT H. BOGGS DIRECTOR OF HOUSING J. B. BLAYTON JOHN O. CHILES GEORGE R. SANDER FRANK G. ETHERIDGE TECHNICAL DIRECTOR 824 HURT BUILDING ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 JAcKsON 3-6074 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: This replies to your letter of May 10 transmitting copy of a memorandum submitted by the Housing Resources Committee and requesting our specific comments on items 5, 6 and 9. These comments are as follows: (5) We are unaware of any offers for sale by owners of 103 units on Boulevard resulting from housing code inspections. As a general rule it is not financially feasible to acquire old housing by purchase since necessary financing of the resulting project must extend over a 0 year life. It is preferable to lease units in such buildings since the economics usually do not justify purchase. (6) At the present time negotiations are proceeding concerning the leasing of units in four additional separate sites. We hope to be able to add to the total number of units now under lease. The great difficulty is the low vacancy rate in housing of acceptable standard in the Atlanta area, which has resulted in an attitude by most landlords that there is no financial advantage to them to enter into a lease agreement with the Housing Authority since they already have extensive waiting lists and are not having to make improvements that possibly would be required under the Housing Authority leasing program. Mayor Allen Page 2 The Housing Authority representative is devoting ample time to the investigation of all available leads. All real estate firms listed in the Yellow Pages have been circularized as well as members of the two real estate boards. Constant visual investigations are made in trips to various sections of the city to find out where vacancies might be in existence. The processing of individual tenant leases for occupancy of units in private housing is not greatly time consuming since at only averages about thirty minutes per tenant. It is considered very important for the leasing representative to make very frequent checks of existing leased housing to make sure that the public housing tenants are living up to their obligations affecting the care of the premises, etc. If this program can be controlled so that private landlords see that public housing tenants are better than average tenants this should have an important impact on the availability of additional units for lease. Although the number of leased sites has not increased in the past few weeks, the number of public housing tenants has had a steady growth as dwelling units have become available in present locations. (9) Reduction in minimum price of single family lots for sale in the Thomasville Urban Redevelopment Project below their current minimum has been considered in the past. The staff is of the opinion that such reduction would not encourage the development of these lots because: (a) The price as now set is less than the value of the lots should the developer acquire land at reasonable price and provide the streets, utilities, and other amenities as provided by this project. (b) The Federal Housing Administration will allow as land value only the amount actually paid to us by the developer. Therefore, any reduction in the price of the land would mly result in a reduction in the amount of the loan underwritten by FHA. At the moment it appears to us the greatest opportunity for provision of additional units for low income families lies in Mayor Allen Page 3 May 17, 1967 the 221D-3 Program, and hopefully in increasing the number of units leased for public housing use, although the latter does not increase total housing supply. Sincerely yours, _ ALALL M. B. Satterfield Executive Director MBS/fm
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 11, Document 43

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_011_043.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Document 43
  • Text: s HOUSING RES Aprii 20, 1967 - = Problem Areas : Units Location Program Principal Difficulty Pai 259 West of Hollywood Road Turnkey Gpposed by Facial Relations Section of HUD in letter North of Frecter Creek Vo to liousing Authority. Tentatively denied by HAA P-2 SO Harwell Road South of Turnkey ae’ zoned A-l, poe tet epposed by NAACP in letter te Nayor Bankhead highway filen. Tentatively den ie d Ly HAA P= 125 Jackson Farkway, just Turnkey Zoned A-1, Site not acted on by HAA, Lecause of objection Nerth of Banxhead la to the area by Intergroup Relations Section of hUD f t P-5 156 East of Hollywood Road 221 d (3) FHA nas Geclined to approve. North of Magnolia Cemetery Cxperiment P-6 262 OFF Etheridge Drive East #04 Special Having difficulty in getting FHA approval. of Jackson Parkway or Turnkey C-1 204 Between Hollywood Road and Turnkey or Re-zoned recently for low cost hcusing ,rogram. Housing. Gun Club Road, N.W. 221 € (3) Authority not interested in site; FHA not sympathetic toward it. C-3 i150 Between DeKalb Avenue and 221 d (3) Zoned R=-3, Planning Department is dubious about getting NeLendoa at Hampton Terr. Rent Supl. re-zoned. C-5 106 West of Jackson Parkway 221 da (3) Zoned R-5. Planning Department cool teward re-zoning. North of Proctor Creek C-18 ]| 1,7¢¢ Between Peyton Roac and Willis | Turnkey Zoned R-3. eens Department is reluctant to get re- > ¥y ¥ 3 Hill Road North of Utoy Creek ]221 d (3) zoned. (Housing Authority is e1thusiastic about site) 221 d (2) Otiier C-21 600 Fairburn Road lorth of Turnkey or Zoning change required. Site not acted cn by HAA because Holy Family Hospital 221 da (3) of objection by Intergroup Relations Section of HUD to geueral area in the Northwest. C-22 175 Bankhead Hignway at Turnkey - Site not acted on by HAA, because of objection to the area Szburn Road by Intergrcup Relations Section of hUD. r a : Page 2. Problem Areas : Ho. Units Location Program Principal Difficulty C-23 LEG Nerth of Brownsville Rd. Turnkey Zoned M+i. Site not acted on by HAA, because of Letween Hollywood and cbjection to the area by Intergroup Relations Section Bolton Rds. of HUD. P17 224 Cff Brownsmill Road south 221 4a (3) Zoned ii-1, Objection from some residents of neighborhood. of Oak Drive Co-op. Re-zoning cenied April 17, by Board of Aldermen. D-3 152 South Side Simpson Road 221 d (3) Strongly opposed by citizens residing in Collier Heights i East cf Hightower Road 2 in protests to Zoard of Aldermen. Site is not in Collier Heights Plan Area. D-5 62 Woedbine at Boulevard Turnkey or | Housing Authority not interested in this site for Drive 221 dG (3) Turnkey; FHA cocl toward it. D-8 364 Off Boulder Park Drive 221 4 (3) Zoned K-3. Planning Department is reluctant to have Southwest of Wildwood Lake Townhouses rezoned because not consistant with Eoulder Park Pian. 2-9 160 West of Moreland Avenue 221 d (3) Rejected by FHA as not suitable site South of Constitution Road, SE Co-op D-10 | 280 Custer Avenue East of Chosewood Turnkey Planning Department anticipates strong opposition to Park development of this tract for low cost housing. D-11l | 250 221 d (3) Application on one site submitted to FHA and subsequently 360 withdrawn (apparently because of neighborihieod objection); other application withheld (presumably for similar reason). otal | 650% Tuis constitutes appears 2/3 of tne City's goal for the first two years of the program. Developers who were originally aucnusiuetta are becoming very discouraged and some are suggesting quitting the program.
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 11, Document 26

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Document 26
  • Text: May 31, 1967 HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE Cecil A. Alexander, Architect, Chairman Dr. Sanford S&S, Atwood, President, Emory University, Co-Cnairman Dr, Benjamin E., Mays, President, Morehouse College, Co-Chairman PANELS Legal Cnerles Weltner, Attorney Acting Chairman Donald Holloweil, Regional Director, Equai Employment Opportunity Commission Honorable Luther Alverson, Judge, Fulton County Superior Court Mr, Archer D, Smith III, Attorney, Harmon and Thackston . Mr, Norman L. Underwood, Attorney, Sanders, Hester and Holley Construction and Design Dr. Edwin Harrison, President, Georgia Institute of Technclogy, Chairman Herman Russell, Contractor Moreland Smith, Director of Urban Planning Project, Southern Regional Council, Vice-Chairman Rev, John A. Middieton, President, Morris Brown College Henry F. Alexander, Builder James Moore, President, Atlanta Labor Council Finance & Non-Profit Funds Dean Harding B. Young, Atlanta University Leé Burge, President, Retail Credit Chairman Butler T, Henderson, Assistant to Dr. Mays, Morehouse College Mills B. Lane, Jr., President, Citizens and Southern National Bank A. H. Sterne, President, The Trust Company of Georgia Gordon Jones, President, The Fulton National Banilt Vice-Chairman Joseph Earle Birnie, President, The National Bank of Georsia A. B, Padgett, Executive Director, Metropolitan Foundation of Atlanta Hamilton Douglas Attorney Rev. William Holmes Bordeys, Pastor, Wheat Street Baptist Church Dr. Rufus Clement, President, Atlanta University John Wilson, President, Horne Wilson Company Albert Love, Executive Vice President, The McCall Corporation scott Houston, Jr., Executive Director, Wesley Woods Apartments Public Housing Edwin L.'Sterne, Chairman, Housing Authority of the City of Atlanta Dr.. Albert Manley, President, Spelman College Levnard Reinch, President, Cox Broadcasting Company Clarence Goleman, Regional Director, National Urban League Acting Chairman Charles R. Palmer, President, Palmer, Inc, W. L. Lee, President, Atlanta Gas Light Company C. R, Yates, President, Yates-Milton “Stores Dr. Vivian Henderson, President, Clark College Acting Chairman im E. Land, Ciier Engineer for Georgia, Southern Bell Téiephone Telegraph Co, Social Problems Charles 0. Emmerich, Administrator, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. Duane Beck, Director, Commun Loy Council of the Atlanta BEER y men Mrs. Sujette Crank, Social Director, Neighborhood Services, E.0.A Dy, LT, Jonnson, Professor of Political Science, Morehouse boi lege Dean Wiliiam Jackson, Atlanta University Chairman Mr. Erwin Stevens, Chairman, Citizens Central Advisory Committee, E.O.A. Mr. Lewis Cenker, Attorney Business Par ation Virgil Milton, Retired Atlanta Group Manager, Sears, Roebuck & Company Chairman E. L. Simon, Auditor, Atlanta Life Insurance Company Vice-Chairman Harlee Brancn, President, The Southern Company C. A. "Art" Jenkins, Director of Industri Relations, Lockheéd Roland Maxwell, President, Davison's Department Stores Public Information James L. Townsend, Townsend and Assoéiates Public Information (continued ) Dale Clark, Director of Pubiic Affairs, WAGA-TV Ray Moore, News Director, WSB-TV Jim Wood, News Director, WOAK Vice-Chairman STAFF ROOM 1204, CITY HALL Tel, 522-4463, Ext. 430 Malcolm D. Jones, Director W. W. Gates, Consultant Miss Joyce McKnight, Secretary
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 11, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_011_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Document 20
  • Text: DRAFT June 6, 1967 The Honorable John J. Sparkman The Honorable Wright Patman The Honorable William A. Barrett Gentlemen: This letter is to call to your attention my serious concern with a problem facing the enforcement of housing codes in Atlanta and I am certain in all the nation's cities. In accordance with the emphasis placed on housing code enforcement sought by Secretary Weaver and our own desires, we have moved ahead vigorously with the housing code provisions in Atlanta. As you know, in those areas where an urban renewal project or a code enforcement concentra- tion area exists, home owners in need may qualify for grants and low interest loans. However, there are many areas of Atlanta where we seek to prevent further deterioration by code enforcement that are as yet not covered by either of the above programs. Home owners in these areas are with- out recourse and are in the unhappy situation of having their homes condemned unless they can produce the necessary funds. It seems to me that these persons are entitled to relief. In effect they are in an area covered by U. S. Government action since the re- quired workable program covers the entire city. They should not be unduly penalized. To continue to do so creates an unfair situation which will undermine the entire effort of cities to enforce their codes. I therefore suggest that action be taken to alleviate this situation. We suggest two possible courses. 1. As a minimum approach the F.H.A. should ease up on their re- quirements under 203K and make loans under this program easily avail- able for financially deprived persons who are subjected to code en- forcement expenditures. 2. Much more could be accomplished if the benefits of the $1500 grants and the 3% loan were extended to all persons without resources who are faced with rehabilitation requirements under code enforcement. As stated above the Workable Program is, in effect, a Federal require- June 6, 1967 Page 2 - The Honorable John J. Sparkman The Honorable Wright Patman The Honorable William A. Barrett ment, for the entire city. It seems possible that the law allowing grants and loans could be extended to cover all citizens under a workable program. 2 aa ae fay hatesyor e this problem your most earnest considerationf Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor cc: The Honorable Richard J. Daley, Mayor Chicago, Illinois The Honorable Jerome P. Cavanaugh, Mayor Detroit, Michigan | The Honorable John V. Lindsay, Mayor Neéw :York, New York The Honorable John B. Collins, Mayor Boston, Mass. Mr. John Gunther, Executive Director U. S. Conference of Mayors Mr. Patrick Healey, Executive Director National League of Cities
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 11, Document 37

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_011_037.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Document 37
  • Text: gn TTIW 7 A TIT A te TRY f% : pr ,frn P®s o * £4, Needy, ae a che” Dicincthes: sects ‘chats “Rb antteiindle whe HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30903 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 Room 120), City Hall IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR i ~ f May 235 1907 R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison Dear Committee Member: The next monthly meeting of the Executive Group of the Housing Resources Committee (which would normally be held on June 1) will be held at 10:00 A.M., Wednesday, May 31, in Committee Room #1, Second Floor, City Hall. We especially hope that you can attend this meeting. The low cost housing program is currently running into some major difficulties which I need to discuss seriously with you, with view to adopting a policy position of the Committee 28 a whole and planning ‘a course of action to pursue. We will have at the meeting basic factual data on which to base our conclusions and I hope also a list of land tracts in the City by size and location which are appropriately zoned for construction of multi-family housing. We still have not been informed as to the following: Legal Panel - Chairman and Vice-Chairman Public Housing Panel - Chairman and Vice-Chairman Land Acquisition Panel - Chairmen and Vice-Chairman Social Problems Panel - Vice-Chairman Please be prepared to provide us at the meeting with appropriate information on the above. Also please let us know on the enclosed return address postal card if you plan to attend the meeting or, in the event you cannot attend, the name of some other member of your panel who will represent you at the meeting. Sincerely, Stace? fo Cll entearee~__ Cecil A, Alexander Chairman Enel: Return address postal card.
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 11, Document 22

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_011_022.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Document 22
  • Text: he, (Pattnareg hen , Csreel xy af bran sth, | 6 hts eS | ff Ld Sf ee Oe ees 74 12 wht | _ ft CHrEY OF ALAN IA = HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30308 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 Room 120), City Hall IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR ig r 3 May 235 1967 R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS, ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison Dear Committee Member: The next monthly meeting of the Executive Group of the Housing Resources Conmittee ‘(which would normally be held on June 1) will be held at 10:00 A.M., Wednesday, May 31, in Committee Room #1, Second Floor, City Hall. We especially hope that you can attend this meeting. The low cost housing program is currently running into some major difficulties which I need to discuss seriously with you, with view to adopting a policy position of the Committee as a whole and planning a course Of action to pursue. We will have at the meeting basic factual data on which to base our conclusions and I hope also a list of land tracts in the City by size and location which are appropriately zoned for construction of multi-family housing. We still have not been informed as to the following: Legal Panel - Chairman and Vice-Chairman Public Housing Panel - Chairman and Vice-Chairman Land Acquisition Panel - Chairman and Vice-Chairman Social Problems Panel - Vice-Chairman Please be prepared to provide us at the meeting with appropriate information on the above, Also please let us know on the enclosed return address postal card if you plan to attend the meeting or, in the event you cannot attend, the name of some other member of your panel who will represent you at the meeting. Sincerely, Catced OV Cestode~ Gecil A, Alexander Chairman ° Enel: Return address postal card.
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 11, Document 38

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_011_038.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Document 38
  • Text: Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal Pebruary 27, 1967 Dr. Albert H. Davis, President National Association For The Advancement Of Colored People 859-1/2 Hunter Street N.W. Atlanta, Gépngia, 30314 Bear Dr. Davis: Thank you for your letter of February 22, 1967 concerning the NAACP's iaterest in housing. 68o that you will not feel that I ignored your telegram, I would inform you that I called it to the attention of the Housing Resources Committee at the organizational meeting of that group and publicaily invited further information from the NAACP. At year convenience I will be glad to meet with your committee and will invite any members of the committee whom you think would be bene~ ficial to attend. We will be glad to exchange membership lists with your committee. En- closed is a list of the membership of the Housing Resources Committee and the panels te which they ave assigned. I plan to be out of the city March 1 through the 6th and again on the Sth. Otherwise I am available to set up a meeting at your con- venience, In the meantime I have referred your resolutions to Dean Williem S. Jackson who is Chairman of the Social Probleme Panel of the Housing Resources Committee. Sincerely, Ceeil A. Alexander Chairman, Housing Resources Committee vb enel: cc: Mayor Ivan Allen, Sie De. Sanford &. Atwood Dr. Benjamin E. Mays
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 11, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_011_025.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Document 25
  • Text: COPY Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal Ze" at 4, May 30, 1967 Dr. Albert M.Davis, President National Association For The Advancement Of Colored People 859-1/2 Hunter Street N.W, Atlanta, Georgia, 30314 Déar Dr. Davis: In order that the breakdown of communication you fee] exists can be rectified, may I ask if you would serve on the Land Acquisition Panel of the Housing Resources Conmittee? Since you are so aware of the problems facing the program in this area, I believe that you ean render most valuable service to the city in helping secure acceptable sites. I look forward to hearing from you. Sincerely, Cecil A, Alexander vb ec: Mayor Ivan Allen 7 bee: Mr. Maleolm Jones
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 11, Document 47

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_011_047.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Document 47
  • Text: (Pe MINUTES HOUSING RESOURCES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE APRIL 6, 1967 Members of the Housing Resources Committee Executive Group met on Thursday, April 6, 1967, at 10:00 a.m. in City Hall. The following members were present: Mr. Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman Mr. Lee Burge, Finance Panel Mrs. Sujette Crank, Social Problems Panel Mr. Virgil Milton, Business Participation Panel Mr. Ray Moore, Public Information Panel Mr. Moreland Smith, Construction and Design Panel Mr. Charles L.Weltner, Legal Panel Mr. John Wilson, Non-Profit Funds Panel The following panels were not represented at the meeting: Land Acquisition Panel Public Housing Panel Mr. Alexander reviewed the general functions of the Housing Resources Committee and informed the participants of the Housing Resources Committee Office that had been established in the City Hall. He also advised that Col. Malcolm Jones has been assigned to coordinate the housing program and Mr. William Gates, as consultant on FHA matters, is assisting in the office one day each week. He announced that the City has also just approved a secretarial position for this office to be filled as soon as possible. Mr. Alexander then introduced Mr. M. B.Satterfield, Executive Director of the Atlanta Housing Authority, who briefed the group on the public housing program, Mr. Satterfield reported on the number of public housing units at the present time: 1. There are presently 8, 874 units with virtually no vacancies. 2. 650 units are under construction at the McDaniel Street Project. 3. Abid has been accepted for 140 units extension to the Perry Homes Project. Page Two 4. 350 units in the design stage have been submitted to the Federal Housing Administration for review. The Housing Authority expects to let bids on these units this summer, 5. 140 units are under lease under the leasing program, He pointed out these different projects on a city map to give the Committee members an idea of the location of this housing. He stated that some concern has been expressed for the need of public housing in the eastern quadrant of the city and explained that the main difficulty is in securing any open land in this area that would be useable. Developers are being encouraged to consider this section of the city. He explained that the Atlanta Housing Authority presently has 4, 200 units reserved (allocated) by the Federal Government, He then reviewed the different programs available in providing this low- income housing. These include: 1. Direct construction by the Housing Authority and the Turnkey Program. 2. Purchase and rehabilitation of older and existing houses. 3. Leasing by the Housing Authority of standard dwellings. At this point Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. spoke to the group briefly regarding the housing program. He said that he was greatly impressed with the interest being shown in efforts to get more low-income housing underway in the city. He pointed out, as Mr. Satterfield did, that the main problem he has encountered is in securing suitable and available locations for these units. He expressed a desire to see more non-profit sponsors willing to carry through on a project to construct such housing units. Col. Malcolm Jones then reviewed with the members of the Committee the various pieces of informational material made available to them today and brought these reports up to date on changes that have taken place. He also pointed out the different proposed projects on a map of the city so the members might see the distribution of the units. The following revisions were reported in the February 20, 1967, report: Page Three Estimate When Available Cate gory No. Units 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 Firm 3092 (1226) (1550) (316) Probable 4685 (2573) (912) (500) (700) | Total 7777 (1226) (4123) (1228) (500) (700) Under Consideration 3405 Doubtful 2968 Total 14,150 Col. Jones also distributed a report concerning the problem areas of the program. Currently there are 4,900 units in all categories which are facing serious difficulties for various reasons. This report was to advise the Committee of the situations existing. The Chairman next recommended and requested the following to the Committee: by A monthly meeting date. It was established for the first Thursday of the month at 10:00 a.m. He requested all panels to submit the names of their Chairmen and Vice Chairmen as soon as possible. He requested the Legal Panel to investigate the feasibility of amending and broadening Federal legislation concerning financial assistance to home owners in urban renewal and code enforcement areas whose homes are condemned, At present, home owners in urban renewal areas and Federal approved code enforcement areas are the only persons eligible for such assistance. He feels that such assistance should be city-wide. Mr. Alexander asked that encouragement be given to neighboring communities to have good Workable Programs, Atlanta's program is in good order but this does not apply to all other communities in Metropolitan Atlanta, He asked the Legal Panel to investigate the State tax laws. He feels the present tax laws are favorable to retention and creation of slums, Page Four 10. ll. 12. 13. 14, He announced that the Finance and Non-Profit Panels have been combined. He advised that he and Mr. Lee Burge are looking into the need for formation of a Housing Development Corporation. Suggestion was made that the Chamber of Commerce be asked to look into the matter and to assist. At the present time he is trying to get some information from the City Planning Department regarding the available land in the city. However, it will be some time before this information is complete. He expressed his concern over the difficulties that are being encountered in securing approval of sites. This is caused by various reasons, as indicated in the special report distributed by Col. Jones. He feels that this is becoming a very serious problem and that something must be done as soon as possible to try to provide solutions to these problems. The Committee and office staff have been approached many times by developers requesting that they refer them to lawyers and architects familiar with the housing programs. The professional organizations of these groups have been asked to supply the Housing Resources Office with a list of those persons familiar with and interested in this field and these lists will be furnished the developers upon request. He recommended to the Construction Panel that they take under advise- ment the various codes of the City of Atlanta and other agencies to determine if such codes are practical and feasible. He requested assistance from the Social Problems Panel in providing solutions to the many problems being created in the location of these housing units. There are several areas of the city that have not been touched for additional low cost housing and he feels a much more aggressive pro- gram is needed. He referred to such areas as Vine City and Mechanicsville. He asked the members to consider the problem of relocation of people displaced while units are under construction and to come up with some Page Five workable way to build these units without completely disrupting the neighborhood. 15. He proposed that a task force be set up in the areas of prime consideration to improve communications with the residents. After a short discussion period the meeting was adjourned at 11:45 a.m, Respectfully submitted, 7 “AR, Loe’ ey, lat Malcolm D. Jorie Supervisor of Inspection Services Director MDJ:fy
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 11, Document 64

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_011_064.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Document 64
  • Text: +* James Hl, Finch, FAA. Gall A. Alexandey, FAA, Miller 0, Bares, ALA. Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal January 9, 1967 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor y / City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia ~ Dear Ivan: Enclosed is a resume of Bill Gate's career. He has volunteered to serve our Housing Resources Committee on a one day per week basis as adviser on F.H.A. matters. May I suggest the following announcement? Mayor Ivan Allenfand Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman of Atlanta's Housing Resources Committee, announce the appointment of Mr. William W. Gates as Special Adviser to the Housing Resources Committee. He will be available from 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. every Thursday in the office of the Committee on the twelfth floor of the City Hall. Mr. Gates recently retired after thirty years of service with the Federal Housing Administration serving successively as Architectural Inspector, Appraiser, Chief Appraiser, Chief Underwriter, General Underwriting Supervisor and General Underwriting Adviser. Just prior to retirement he served as Chief Underwriter in Atlanta for a period of six years. He has received the Distinguished Service Award of the Federal Housing Administration, the highest civilian award available from the Department of Housing and Urban a ae If you are in agreement, please announce this appointment as soon as convenient. Sincerely, ec Cecil A. Alexander Bernard B, Rotisbild, FAA, FOSIMP Garaker 0. Paschal, A.l.A, ASSOCIATES Robert 0, Abistrand, R.A, Sidney §, Daniell, R.A, lra Grayboff Thomas 6. Joyce, A.A. H, King MeGain, W.S.P.E. J.J. McDonough William L. Pulgram, AIA, John Steinichen, A.L.A. ec: Dr. Sanford S. Atwood Dr. Benjamin E. Mays Mr. Maleolm D. Jones Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Architects Engineers Interior Designers 44 Broad Street N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Phone 688-3313 Terry-Hutchens Bldg, Huntsville, Ala. 35801 Phone 539-9648
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 11, Document 48

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_011_048.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 11, Document 48
  • Text: HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE Reom 120), City Hall April 1h, 1967 Mr. M. B, Satterfield, Executive Director Housing Authority of the City of Atlanta 82h Hurt Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Sat: The City is attempting to coordinate essential Community Facilities with development of low-cost housing under the accelerated five year program. I have been requested te refer all proposals, when first made, for this type of development to the Planning Department (Collier Gladin) for consideration as to adequacy of Comaunity Facilities, especially schools and parks, and for report back thereon to this Committee as soon as possible. In many instances where "Turnkey" development is contemplated, the propesed lecations are taken direct to your agency before this office is advised about them. In such instances I will appreciate being informed as early as practicable as to the proposed lecations and number of units contemplated, in order that the Planning Department may be called upon to consider Community Facilities, existing or pro« posed, available to serve the development, Sincerely, Malcola D, Jones Supervisor of Inspection Services ec? “hr. R, Marl Landers
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021