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Box 2, Folder 25, Document 10

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  • Title: Box 2, Folder 25, Document 10
  • Text: METROPOLIT/'J l i\.TLL\NT/i. YOUTH OPPORTUNITY COUNCIL'S PL~~ FOR THE 1969 YOUTH OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM MR. CLl\RENCE E. ELSAS, GENERll.L CHAIRNL\N MRS. Cf.RR.IE B. WRIGHT, GENERAL CO-CHAIRMi\N �CONTENTS I. II. General Introduction Planning 3 III. Employment 11 IV. Recreation 17 Camping 37 Education 39 Arts 54 Social Services 70 v. VI. VII. VIII. IX. x. Special Events .. 75 Volunteers 77 Transportation 79 XII. Special Programs 80 XIII. Public Relations 82 XI. Summary �GENERAL INTRODUCTION In 1968, The City of Atlanta, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., The Community Chest and several other private and public agencies and organizations sponsored a Youth Opportunity Program. More than 65 agencies and •rganizations participated in this program (See Attachment 1). The overall objectives cf the Youth Opportunity Program are to provide needed services to the poor, unemployed, socially retarded, culturally deprived and academically delinquent youth in the Metropolitan Atlanta Area. The majer efforts of the Youth Opportunity Program are aimed at eliminating these conditinns. Through the outstanding efforts and accomplishments of EOA, The City of Atlanta, The FEB, The Community Chest and several other agencies and organizations, the 1968 YOP yie lded the foll owing: 1. 14,990 youth attended sunnner school; 2. 3,000 youth received special remedial aid; 3. 1,400 youth received special tutorial help ; 4. 2,500 youth were contacted and urged to return to school ; 5. 1,500 youth participated in enrichment programs ; 6. 5,000 youth participated in Fine Arts prcgrams and activities ; 7. 525,000 youth par ticipated in Recreational Programs ; 8. 1,100 federa l employees volunteered to hel p in the YOP; 9. 20,000 youth participated in camping activities ; 10. Private businesses donated $237,000 in cash, equipment or services to the YOP. Although the 1968 YOP wa s a general succe ss, some gaps and omissions did oc cur. These were identifie d as follows : �-21. Recreation activities for youth ages 16-21 were virtually non-existent; 2. Ge nerally, no programs operated on week-ends; 3. Several agencies and organizations did not fulfill their employment commitments for poor youth; 4. Coordination and communication between some agencies were generally lacking; 5. The location of programs was widespread. However, areas such :1s Capitol Homes, Blair Village, Hentown, StewartLakewood, Cabbagetown, Mill Village, Knight Park, Adamsville, Mechanicsville, Peopletown, Joyland, Blue Heaven, Bush Mountain and Bass received little or no program input; 6. Resident camping opportunities for poor youth were woefully lacking ; 7. The more attractive and de sirable special eve nts resources were not enough to meet the need; 8. Tr ansportation remained a serious and difficult problem to deal with. The s e we r e the major problems which occurre d during the 1968 YOP. �PL..:\NNING 1969 In December, 1968, Vice President Hubert llumphrey sent a telegram to Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. i :::.r:!ic c. tin:: that federal funds will be provided to the City of Atlanta for YOP Planning. Mayor Allen promptly designated the Youth Council as the agency responsible for coordination of the Metropolitan Youth Opportunity Program. In addition, Mayor /,llen appointed Mr. Clarence Elsas, Chairman of the 1969 Youth Opportunity Program. t,_ chart of the Metropolitan Youth Opportunity Council is attached. The major agencies involved in the 1969 YOP Planning are EOL., The City of Atlanta , The Community Chest, The Feder al Executive Board, The Georgia State Employment Servoce, The Na tional Alliance of Bus i nessmen, The Atlanta f.rt s hlliance, Fulton County Government, DeKa lb County Government, The Community Chest Agencies , WAOK Radio Sta t ion , WSB Radio Station, The Georgia Arts Commiss i on, The DeKalb County He a lth Department, The Chr i stian Council , Li ller, Battle, Nea l and Lindsey, The Chamber of Commer ce, The Junior Chamber of Comr.1erce, The Atlanta Pol i ce Department , Mor ehouse Co llege, The nt l ant a Ur ban League , Emor y University , Atlanta Unive rsi t y , The At lant a Youth Congre ss , The Of f i ce of Government a l Lai son, The Metr opolitan Cornniss i ou on Crime and Delinquency , The At l anta Chi l dren and Youth Service s Couns il. A Technica l Executive Committee was created to assist and direct the overall Youth Opportunity Program Pl anning. Major decisions made by the Technical Executive Committee are as follows: 1. That the Atlanta Pub l ic Schools will concentrate on educational programs, and not be responsible for operating special recreational programs; �-!,..- 2. Tho.t the /1.tlanta Public Schools will make their facilities available to any group wishing to utilize them provided such group assurae full responsibility for custodial and administrative costs; 3. That the Public Schools will indicate in early spring, those schools where summer programs will be located; ~-. That the Parks and Recreation Department will indicate in early spring where surmner programs will be located; 5. That the Parks and Recreation Department will submit a listing of desirable school facilities which they might utilize; 6. That EOf, provide a listing of locations and programs which comm rmmity residents indicate are more desirable; 7. That the Chest agencies provide the Technical Executive Cornmittee with a listinr; of programs which will be operai::ed with summer funds, as well as, a listing of summer prograras and locations which will be operated on their regular budget; 8. That the Georgia State Employment Service be respons i ble for most YOP employment screening, processing and recruitment; 9. That the Georgia State Employment Service locate the Summer Youth Opportunity Center by Harch 15. (136 Marietta Street) Planning fo r the 1969 YOP centers around the implementation of t he above recommendations in addition to regular and ongoing activi ties. In late 1968, EO~ be ga n holding planning meetings i n al l of the ECA neighborhood service centers. At these meetings, residents and youth of the EOn service ar eas made valuable suggestions concerning the types, locations , and hours of operation of summer pro gr ams i n the i r neighborhoods. The suggestions of ne ighbor hood re s i dents provided a va l uab le guide f or YOP planning . These mee t i ngs we r e planne d and implemented by Mr. Duke Harris on, Recreation Coordinator, EO~ . Based on the recommendations abov e, a s wel l as sug8es tions by residents and youth, the Executive Technica l Committee set the following priorities: �-51. Employment a. b. 2. Recreation a. b. 3. c. d, b. b. b. Free passes and admi s sions t o place s of ente rtainment and enrichment for youth of all age s. Volunteers a. b. 9. Couns el ing and thera peutic s ervice s for all youth 13-21 who mi gh t need such Establ ishment of such a s ervice which pre sen tly does no t exist in t he Metropo l itan area . Spe c ial Events a. 8. Re siden t camp i nc exper iences for inner city poor youth of a ll a ges Day camp oppor tunities for inner city youth . Soc ia l Services a. 7. Special programs i n the Fine Arts for inner city poor youth ll~-21 years of a ge Es t abl i shment of a broad based Community /ir ts Pro gram. Camping a. 6. Tutorial and study hel p ? r os raQS Remedial programs i n poverty schools Cultura l e nrichment programs Special enrichment a nd tutorial programs for socially and academically reta rded youth. /ir ts a. 5. Organized athletic activities for inner city youth; Organized activities for older teenagers 16-21 during evening hours. Education a. b. l~. Youth 14-21 years of a8e Poor Youth EnGendering ~o l untccrs to assist operating agencies in areas of need. ~ggressive recruitment of youth vo l un teers. Transportation a. b. Centralize the transporation funds and dispa tching of buses Provide adequate transportation for all program components ~:e ed i nt i t • �~ 1 -6- 10. Public Relations a. b. 11. Widespread distribution of progran locations, operation, requirements, cost, etc. to utilizers of services through the various medin Effective publicizing of program achievements to total com• munity. Urban Corps a. b. Provide meaningful employment for poor college youth, who need money to return to school Provide agencies with an additional personnel resource at low cost. In addition to the suggestions concerning major programming, the Committee suggested that special attention be given to unemployed youth, 16-21; socially and academically retarded youth, 6-18; culturally deprived youth, all ages, and youth leadership and development ages ll~-25. The Technical Executive Committee also a greed that effective program planning depends upon the availability of funds and resources for prograr~aing. In this respect, the Committee agreed t o work toward an early coP.1r1itment of funds for prograrrnning. Such funds i nclude planning funds $45,000, OEO-EOA, $612,000, City of Atlanta $300,000, The Community Chest $15,000. funds have been c orrnnitted . J\.11 of these �-7- / 1"1ETROPOLITf.N COUNCIL ON YOUTH OPPORTUNITY Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Honorary Chairman DeKalb Cormnissioner, Clark Harrison~ Honorary V. Chainnan Fulton Conunissioner, Walter Mitchell - Honorary V. Chairman Mr. Clarence Elsas, General Chairman Mrs. Carrie B. Wright, General V. Chairman Program SubCommittees - Employment - Mr. Harding B. Young - Recreation Mr. ~ . B. Padgett, Chairman - Camping Mr . Frank Player, Chairman Mr. Charles Green, Chairman - Education Dr. Hilliard Bowen , Chairman Mrs. Mary Sanf ord, Co-Cha irman - nr ts Mrs. Rhodes Perdue , Chairman Mrs . Harold Bar r e t t , Co-Chairman - Soci al Services Mrs . Benj amin Brown, Cha irman - Special Events Mr. Waymon Wright , Chai rman - Volunteers Mrs . Frances Parham, Chai rman - Transportation Mr. Robert Woods I, - Public Relations Mr. Zenas Sears, Chairman Technical Executive Committee - Mr. Dan Sweat Mr. James McGovern Mr. Peter White Mr. Jerry Luxemberger Mr. Jack Delius - Mr. John Cox - Mr. Alan Koth - Mr. Lyndon Wade - Mr. Clinton Rogers - Mr. Thomas J. Par ham ~Mr .Richard Hicks - Dr. John Letson - Mr . Nicholas Novak - Mr . J ame s Rogers - Dr. Harmon Moor e - Mr . Michael Hollis - Mr . A. B. Padgett - }1r . Harold Barr e t t - Mr . I r win Lewis - Ca pt. Howard Baugh - Mr . Ermne tt Lee �- 8- Agencies and Organizations Providing Planning - Coordina tion l\.ssistance to the Metropolita n Council on Youth Opportunity Federal Agencies Federal Executive Board Defense Depa rtment Labor Department Housing and Ur ban Development Health, Education and Welfare Interior Department Commerce Department Department of Justice (CRS) .L\.griculture OEO Civil Service Commission Department of Transportation State L\gencies Offi ce of the Governor Defense Family and Ch i ldre n Service s Educa tion Hea l t h Governor Commis s ion on Cr ime and Justice .L\.r t s Commis sion Recr eation Connnis s i on University of Georgia Ge or gia St a t e Co l l ege Georgia De pa r tment of Labor Me ntal Health Ins t itu te Scholar ship and Loan Commission County Fulton County Commissioners Fulton County De partment of Family a nd Children Services Fulton County Schools DeKa lb County Department of Family and Chi ldren Services DeKalb Count y Schools Fulton Count y Juve nile Cour t Fulton County Hea lth Department DeKalb County Recreation Depa r t ment DeKalb County Heal th Depa r t ment Suicide Prevention �-9- City of l'i.tlanta Office of Mayor Palnning Department Personnel Public Works Dc p~rtment Recreation and Parks Comptroller Children and Youth Services City Service Coordination Connnunity Relations Cormnission Police Department Atlanta Public Library Model cities Fire Department Other Public Agencies Economic Opportunity Atlanta Board of Education Atlanta Housing Authority Clayton County Board of Decatur Publi c Schools Private Non-Profit Health Education and Welfare l\.gencies Community Chest··Uni ted Appeal Corrnnunity Council of Atlanta Atlanta Menta l He alth Associa tion f..merican Social Health Association l\.nti-Defamation League Camp Fit e Gir ls Atlanta Employment Eva luation Services Center I;c/3<'.l l f',i d Society Atlanta Univer si t y School of Socia l Work Atlanta Urban League Bethlehem Wesley Cormnunity Centers Bi g Brothers Associa t i on of Atlan ta Atlanta Univer s i t y Multi - pur pose Training Center Cancer Socie ty of Atlant a Ge or gia He art hssoc iat ion Me tropo l i tan Cr i me Connniss i on Goodwi ll Industry Boys Club, Inc. of At l ant a Boy Sc outs, At l anta L\rea Counci l Butler Street YMCA Camp Fire Gir l s, I nc. Carrie Steele Pitts Home s Catholic Social Service s of Atlanta Children Center of Metropolitan Atlanta Greater Atlanta Connnittee on Crime and Delinquency �-10Grady Homes Conununity Girls Clubs Kirkwood Christian Center National Youth Courtesy Foundations Paul P.nderson Youth Home Planned Parenthood fi.ssocintion of L"..t lanta Emory University Metropolitan YMCA Metropolitan YWCfi. Travelers Aid Society of Atlanta Women in Community Services St. Vincent DePaul Society Salvation Army .! • / · '· c--,~.: ,. Religious Christian Council of Metropolitan Atlanta Metropolitan Council of Churches liME Ministers Union Inter-Denominational Ministerial Alliance Baptist Ministers Union Atlanta Archdiocese Georgia Council of Churches Business, Civil Right Services and Educational GrouEs Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Merit Employers As sociation Retail Wholesale Merchants Association Frontier Club National Congre ss of Colored Parents and Teachers National Conference of Christian and Jews Atlanta Bar Association Optimist Club of Atlanta Y's Club Butler Street YMCA Rotary Club of Atlanta Kiwanis Club Jr. League Emory University Atlanta Traffic and Snfety Council Junior Chamber of Commerce Council of Jewish Women Apartment Owners Association NAACP Metropolitan Commission on Crime and Delinquency Georgia Labor Council /\FL-CIO �EMPLOYMENT Mr. Harding B. Young - Chairman The major emphasis of the 1969 Youth Opportunity Program is youth employment. An employment sub-committee is now working to deal with the problems in this area. Several agencies will assume major r esponsibilities for the Youth Employment phase of the YOP. Ge orgia State Employment Services The Ge orgia State Employment Services will be generally responsible for the processing , sc r ee ning, referring and follow-up for the following agencies : The Nationa l Al l iance of Busine ssmen, Fulton County, Rent-A-Kid, Fe de ral Agencie s, AFL-CIO, miscellane ous pl acements , NAACP, and the Atlanta Youth Congre ss. additional t a s ks. In add i tion , the Employment Se rvice has undertaken seve r al The s e inc l ude : 1. Ma i le d 13,000 Job Solicitations Le tter s to pr ospective employe rs in the met r opolitan area; 2. Loca te d the Summe r Youth Opportunity Cente r at 136 Marie tta Street ; 3. Es t ablis hed l aison be t ween NAB and the GSES ; 4. Me t with t he At l a nta Brave s and Atlanta Chie fs a nd arranged f or 10,000 free t icke t s ea ch to a Ba s e ba ll Game and a Soccer Game. The GSES has a s s i gned Mr . J im Wa ite s t o s erve a s direct or of the Job So l icitation Sta ff. The e nti r e s taff will be on board and ope rating by May 19th. Nat iona l Al l i a nce of Busine ssme n The Nat i onal All iance of Bus i ne ssme n wil l devel op summer j obs f or youth who will be return ing t o s choo l . -11- Such j obs are being developed in t he �I -12various industries and businesses through out the Metropolitan Atlanta Area. Mr. Henry Reid is the contact for the NAB Program. RENT-A-KID A unique and imaginative employment program will operate in the Sunnner of 1969. This program is named Rent-A-Kid. The Main Office of Rent-A-Kid will be located in the State Employment facility at 136 Marietta Street . Rent-A-Kid is designed to provide part-time and domestic type employment for youth 14-16 who, because of laws and other reasons, cannot get jobs. It will fill the employment gap between the 14 year old to 16 year old youth. The various locations, contacts and other information concerning Rent-A-Kid is as follows: 1. Bedford Pine 547 Hunt Street, N.E. 2. Gr ant Park 645 Grant Street , S.E. 3. West End 1040 Fair Street, s . w. Agency Affiliations Contact St. Vincent de Paul Joe Flannagan 523-5431 Ga. Ave. Presby. Church Jim Hicks 688-0871 M. Agnes J ones School Ge ne Ruyle 758-8326 Phone 4. Forest Park 4871 College St reet Fore st Park, Ge or gia Clayt on County EOA Jane Tap p 366-0516 5. Conyers 929 Connnercial Street Conyers, Ge orgia Roc kdale County EOA Ed Gamble 48 3-9512 6. Techwood 840 Marietta Street Ce nt ral City EOA Tonnny Hess 873-6759 7. N.W. Perry Extension N.W. Perry EOA 1927 Hollywood Road 1 N.W. George Dodd 799-9322 8. Dixie Hills 2913 Verbena Street West Central EOA Amos Parker 799-0331 9. Kirkwood Edgewood EOA George Wilborn 378-3643 �-13Mr s. Joy Rue l is coordinating the Rent-A-Kid Project. Earn and Learn Anothe r unique and innovative employment project is the Earn and Learn Proj e ct. This pr oj e ct is also de signed to pr ovide employment for youth 14-16 years of age. Earn a nd Learn is sponso red by several churches. 1. Trinity Me thodist Church Rev e r e nd Frank We athe rsby 265 Wa shington St ree t , S . W. 688 - 1567 2. Pe achtree Pre sbyt e rian Church Re verend W. W. Wi ll i amson 3443 Roswe l l Roa d, N. W. 237-157 8 3. North De catur Pre sby t e rian Church Reve r end T. W. Tuc ke r 611 Me dlock Road De catur , Ge org i a 63 6-1 06 9 4. Hillside Pre sbyt er ian Rev e r e nd Rola nd Perdue 18 79 Col unvia Dr i ve De catur , Ge org i a 289- 3092 5. Ea s t La ke Me thodis t Chur ch Rev e r e nd Phi l Barnhar t 2500 Bouleva r d Drive , N. E. 377 -1 505 The se are : Economic Oppor t unity At l a nta Ano ther youth empl oymen t activity t o be under t ake n thi s sunnner will be t he EOA Summe r Youth Employmen t Pr ogram . I n a dd i tion to youth be ing employed t hrough the EOA f unde d proposa ls, EOA wi l l h i r e 253 youth this s ummer . The s e j ob s will be pr ovide d t hr ough the EOA Neigh bor hood Serv i ce Center s. Fe deral Agenc i e s The various f e deral a genc i e s will be hi ring youth aga i n t h i s s ummer . �-14In addition to Civil Service Jobs, youth will be provided with other types of employment. City of Atlanta As a spe cial surrnner e ffort the City of Atlanta will be hiring youth in part-time and full-time jobs. Fulton County The Fulton County Department of Family and Children Services and the Fulton County Personnel Departments will be hiring youth this summer to work in various jobs. Urban Corp Urban Corp is a special project which provides sunnner jobs for college and unive rsity youth. Such youth will work in branches of government or with privat e , non-profit agencies. AFL-CIO The AFL-CIO will provide jobs for youth 18 and over . Such jobs will be ava ilable in construction and bui l ding t rade s. Neighborhood Youth Corp (In-school) NYC (in- s chool) wi ll ena ble 1,200 youth to earn money dur ing the summer months. Mr . Wi l liam Mars hall coordina tes the in-school pr ogram. At lanta Police Department The Atlanta Police De partment will hire yo ut h th is summer to work as Corrnnunity Service Off icers. NAACP The NAACP will sponsor a Youth Employment Project. will serve youth ages 16-22 . This project The project will unde ttake its own job develop- �-15ment and recruitment. cost. In addition, job referrals will be provided free of This project proposes to place 200 youth during the summer 1969. project will be located at 136 Marietta Street. The Contact Miss Angela McClung at 577-5821 or 577-4399. Atla nta Youth Congress The Atlanta Youth Congress will solicit jobs from small neighbo~hood businesses. In addition, the Youth Congress will provide volunteers to the Ge orgia State Employment Services to pe rfor m job placeme nt tasks. The Youth Congress expects to develop 200 jobs. The goals and commitments of the various agencie s providing and/or soliciting jobs a r e a s follows : AGENCY National Alliance ,·of · Businessme n EMPLOYMENT GOAL 2 , 500 EOA 253 EOA Funde d Pr oposa ls 331 Urban Cor p 300 NYC City of Atlanta Fulton County Rent-A-Kid 1 , 200 830 36 2 , 000 Earn a nd Learn 100 Federal Agencies 638 AFL-CIO 150 Atlanta Police De partme nt 50 Miscellaneous (GSES) 300 NAACP 200 Atlanta Youth Congress 100 TOTAL 8,988 �• -16The employment aspect of the Youth Opportunity Program is well ahead of the 1968 program. 6,100. For example, in 1968 the job commitment was In 1969 the commitment is 8,988 or 47% more than 1968. �RECREATION Mr. A. B. Padgett, Chairman There are approximately 500,000 youth in Metropolitan At lanta. Most of these youth will be seeking ways to spend their leisure time during the summer months. Unfortunately , the lack of recreational and leisure time activities is most acute in the poverty communities. City of Atlanta Parks & Recreation Department To meet the acute shortage of whole some recreation in poverty communities the major a gencies are pooling their resources . Forsmost among these agencies is the Atlanta Parks and Recreati on Department. The Parks Department i s a ssuming the larger portion of operating responsibilities f or the Youth Opportuni t y Recreation Program. The Atlanta Parks a~d Recreation Department will ex pand the r egular program during the months of June , July, and Augus t with particular emphasis on provi ding needed recreationa l faci l ities and ac tivities f or the peop l e living in the disadvantaged areas of t he city. Leadership i s provided at twenty-four locations in the target areas on a twelve mon th basis. wi ll be opened . For the summer of 1969, forty-ei ght a ddi tional areas The use of t wenty-seve n differ ent school f acilities has been requested and, granted. This will give a tota l of ninety-nine supervised re- creati on areas f or t h is summer. AB added requests are anticipated, it is most probable t hat over one hundred areas will be in operation before t he end of t he summer . Block parks will be open from 9:00 .'i.. M. until 9:00 P.M. a r.d connnuni ty -17- �-18center buildingx from 10: 00 A.M. until 10 :30 P,M. Monday through Saturdya. An additional staff of approximately t wo hundred and seventy-five trained in various recreation skills will be employed. There will also be one hundred and seventy youth assistants (age 16-25) employed from the target areas. They will be placed in job slots in their own neighborhoods. Another five hundred youth a.ssi:.tants will be given an opportunity for a camping-work experience at Wi lderne ss Camp. Fifteen At lanta Concentrated Employment Program (ACEP) workers will a lso participate in the program. Close coord ina tion has been maintained throughout the fall and winter with Economic Op portunity Atlanta and the ~tlanta Youth Council. Members of the Recreation Department staff have attended meetings with members of the various neighborhoods in the ~ity to determine thei r needs and desires in the type program to be offered this summer. Activities t o be offered wi ll include the f ollowing: Ar ts a nd Crafts Paint ing Drawi ng - pencil , crayon Sculpture Ceramics Clay Pa pier-Mache Crepe paper projec t s Block pr inting Weavi ng Stitcher y Jewelr y making Wood working Puppetry Camp Crafts Swimming Tennis Go lf Archery Badminton '.::anoeing Drama Chorus Singing game s Music appreciation Physical Fitness S limna s tics Wrestling Boxing Weight Lifting Gymnastics Tumbling Se lf De fense Judo Softba ll Ba seball Basketball Volleyball Soccer Track <'x Fie ld Tab l e Tenni s Day Camps Re s ident Camps Wilderne ss Camp Nature Programs Golde n Age Clubs Teen Clubs Charm Cl asses Low organized games �-19Folk dancing Modern dancing Tap dancing Baton twirling Cheer leading · Social Recreation Sewing Flower arrangements Table games Quiet games Horseshoes Box hocke y Model boats Model cars Mode l airplanes Photography Movie s Trips - Kennesaw, Six Flaes Over Ge orgia , Baseball and Soccer Games, Zoo, Cyclorama, Stone Moun tai n , Coca Cola Company, Lays Potatoe Chip, General Motors, and other points of interest in Atlan ta. Tournaments - Softba ll, Baseball, Basketba ll, Te nnis. Wilderness Camp - fifty underpr i v i ledged boys per day for ten weeks - earning $1.60 per hour for five hour pe r day. Track and Fi eld Meet - Boys and Girls. Swimming Me ets - Boys and Girls. Contests - Hula Hoop, Horseshoes, Car r om. Picni cs, Parties, Da nces Play Day - Ci ty-Wide Guitar Le ssons - Ba ttle of the Bands Airplane Flights Free mi lk, f ru i t ,j u ice, and c ookies Sprink l er s The f irst week of June will be devoted to a training session f or al l new per sonnel. t:,.11 areas wi ll b e open a nd a full program in effect starting June 9 a nd wi ll con t i nue through Labor Day~ September 1. Parks , Playground s & Recreat ion Ce nt er Area I Twe lve Month Ooe rntion Home Park Howell Park J. A. White Summer ~'(Ashby Circ le '>'(Madd ox ~'(Mc'.lgnol ia & Maple �*Central City (717 Marietta) 'cHaynes \-Ladd Street 'cMoz ley Park ,',Techwood .,,,University ',Vine Ci ty Strong & Kennedy '<'Thurmond '<'Hctshington \-Wes t End Park ',Tnrget Areas - lt'.~ Total 17 Area I I Twelve Month Operation Summer Orchnrd Knob Pe r kerson S outh Bend ',Adair \-Joy land 7•Pittman 'c (Thomasville - not open) (Under Construction) \-Bethlehem Center \-Brown Avenue \-Carver Georgia-McDaniel \-Mary-Coleman \-Park Av enue -Lansing 7·Plunkettown ', Target Areas - 11 Total lliArea III Twelve Month Operation Sunnner Go.rden Hills E. P. Howell Knight Peachtree Hills 'cBedford-Pine \-Butler ,'<'Forrest & Fort ·k666 Pa rkway .,,,Angier & Pa rkw-ay 'cBoulevo.rd & Auburn Boule v ard Place & Gle nn Iris \-Daniel Street Hanover* Renfr oe Perry Bou levard - Lively \-Piedmont Park \-Sampson & East ,'<-Vernon Street Wylie - Tye >\-618 Invin Stree t ·k Tnrge t Areas - ll} Total 19 Area I V Twelve Month Opera tion Summer Ad ams Adamsville Ben Hill We st Manor Anderson >'rEnglish Park >'t- A.: dington Circle >',Center Hill Mary George Ave. - Perry Homes '<"Radc liffe ',Perry Boulevard - Habershall .,,,Tremont Drive �-21'>'(Wilson Avenue 2185 Verbena Street '""Grove '"'Gun Club Area Target Areas - 12 Total 16 V Twelve Month Operation Sunnner Brownwood East Lake '"'Bass ,'(Branham ,'(Cook ,'I-Daniel Stanton '>'(Dodd Avenue 71 Little Street '>'(Capitol Avenue ,'l'C:apitol Homes Center ,'<'Connally Street '"'Gilliam ,':Grant Park ,'<'Haygood-Crew Ira ,'<'Pryor ,'<'Richardson Street Center Stadium Walker Park Washington-Ryder '"'Wesley Windsor-Ri chardson Target Areas - 20 Tota l 22 Swimming Pools The f ollowing are opened dai ly for those wishing to swim. Lessons are scheduled from 10: 00 A.M. - 12:00 Noon, Monday - Friday for individua ls who come t o the parks and register. Adams Cand ler Chastain Memor ial Garden Hills J oyland South Bend Washingt on Wesley Avenue John i'. , Wh ite These pools are opened dai ly. 10:00 A. M. - 3:00 P.M. , Monday - Friday: Gun Club Maddox Mozley Lessons are offered to groups from �-22Oakland Piedmont Pittman · . .• l PORTABLE POOLS Area I Marvin Billups Thurmond Street Magnolia & Maple (moved from Rhodes) Ladd Street (new-if available) /i.rea I I Mollie Wagoner Georgia Avenue - McDanie l Plunket town Thomasville Area I II Pending Bu t ler Hanover - Renfroe .Sampoon East (moved from Wylie-Tye ) Bedford Pi ne (moved from Nerritts ) Irwin St r ee t (new - if available) /:..rea I V David Knowlton Verbena Street Perry - Habershall Ar l ington Circ l e (new - if available) !1.rea V Eddie McLemore Li tt l e Street (moved fr om Connally ) Haygood - Crew Washington - Ryder Wa l ker Park (new - if avai l ab l e ) Rec r ea tion in the El ementary Schools Recreat i ona l and enrichment pr ograms will be sponsored at some of t he At l anta Sch ools by the City Parks and Recreation Depa rtment. The program wi ll consist of a variety of recreationa l activ ities and enrichment programs such as: arts and crafts, drama, singing for fun, entertai~,ment, fie l d trips, swimming, etc. The recreation program in the fo llowing schools will bogin June 9, 1969 and terminate August 23, 1969: �-23- Area I I II II II III III III IV IV V V V V V I III IV V V School Craddock Hardnett Blair Village Gilbert Harper But l e r Forrest Hill Scott Walter 1.iJ hite Cook Hubert Johnson Pryor Toomer Hashington Grady West Fulton Bass Murphy Saturday Daily Hours L} :00 L:-:00 4:30 4 : 30 4:30 4:00 /+ :00 L~ :00 4:00 L} :00 1:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 4:00 L~ : 00 4:00 12: 00 12:00 P.M.-9:00 P.M. -9: 00 P.M.-9: 30 P,M.-9:30 P. M.-9: 30 P;M.-9:00 P.M. - 9 :00 P.M.-9:00 P.M.-9:00 P.M.-9 : 00 P, M.-9 : 00 P .M. - 8 :00 P.M.-8:00 P,M.-3: 00 P. M.-8 :00 P.M.- 9 :00 P . M. -9 :00 P. M.-9: 00 P.M.-8 : 00 P . M. - 8 :00 P.M. P.M. P,M. P.M. P.M. P. M. P.M. P. M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. p . M. p .M. p . M. P.M. p .M. p . M. P. M. P. M. 1: 00 1:00 9:00 9 :00 9 :00 9: 00 9:00 9:00 1 : 00 1:00 1:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 1: 00 9:00 1 :00 12 : 00 12:00 P.M.-6 :00 P .M. -6 :00 A.M.-9:00 A.M.-9:00 A.M.-9: 00 A.M.-1:00 A.M. -1 :00 A.M.-1:00 P .M.-6: 00 P .M. -6 :00 P . M. -6 :00 P.M.-8 :00 P. M.-3: 00 P.M. - 8: 00 P, M.-3: 00 P.M.-6 :00 P. M.-6 :00 P.M.-6:00 P. M.-8 :00 P.M.-8 :00 P.M. P.M. p .M. P.M. P.M. p .M. p .M. P.M. p .M. p .M. p .M. P.M. p .M. P. M. P. M. P. M. p . M. P. M. P. M. P.M. �Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. Another large recreation component for 1969 will be the EOA Recreation Program, This program will operate through the 14 Neighborhood Service Centers of EO.i\ . I't will cover most of the poverty areas in f,tlanta and the Metropolitan Area, These programs are as follows: EOA Central City Neighborhood Service Center will operate a summer recreation program. locations: This will be operational in the following Central City Youth Center, Salvation Army Red Shield facility, area playlots and the neighborhood service center. Youth will be employed as assistants for the program. These youth will be recruited. from the Central City target areas. The following activities are planned: Field trips, dances, sports, counseling, employment referral, arts and crafts. Activities will also be offered t o young adults in the evenings. This program is de• signed to meet the demands of all age levels in target area. EOA East Central Neighborhood Service Center will offer programs involved in employment, cultural, and recreaticnal activities, Referral and program assistance will be gi ven to other agencies operating programs i n the target areas of East Central. The program will consist of sports, r e creation activitie s , youth center , cul t ur al ac tivities, arts and cra f ts, and f i eld t ri ps. Youth wi ll be employed t o assist in t hese projects. These yout h wi ll be r ecr u ite d fr om the EOA t arge t areas . EOA Edgewood Neighbor hood Ser vice Ce nt er wi ll organiz e a r e creation, cu l tural and empl oyment pr ogram. Programs wi l l include recreati onal sports, dancing classes (balle ts), tours, drama experience, trips �-25to the then.ters, plays, musicals. skating, anc! horseback riding. Other activities are bm;1 ling, Other aspects of the program includes referral to other programs offered in the t a rget areas, coordination of resident camping and day camp programs, establishment of a target area youth council. L campmobile will also tour the areas of high population on a weekly schedule. Youth and young adults wi ll be employed to assist and direct these l)rograms in the target areas of EO.'.,.• EOA Gwinnett Coun ty Ne ighborhood Service Cen ter will organize r ural and semi-rura l recreational spor ts, league plan, playlots, field trips, camping, sewing, personal hutiene, water and heating, safety, first aid, drama, musical activities. councils wi ll be organi zed to assist i n these programs. project will be operated in the EOil. target a r eas. Youth Thi s Youth and young adults will be employed t o assist and direct these programs. EOA Nt~ H~Washington Neighborhood Ser vice Center will organi ze recr eat i on, cultur al/educati onal , and employment programs. Pr o - grams wi ll include sports , clinics, dances, dram.a, t he ater, and organizat i on of youth c ounci ls . Youth and young adu l t s wi l l be hired t o as s i s t and direct thes e programs. The pr oj ects uill be located and operated in the EOA target areas . EO/\. North Fulton Neighb orhood Service Ce nte r will organize rural and semi-rural programs f or youth and young adults. Programs will include recreational sports, indoor and out-of-door activities, arts and crafts, fishing, bicycling, trips and tours, and organization of youth council. Youth and young adults will be employed �-26- to assist and direct these programs. These programs will be in the target areas of Eo:·t , E01\ Northwest (Perry Homes) l'eighborhood Service Center will organize recreation, education, and employment programs. Programs will in- clude recreation , sports, art , ar ts and crafts, music trai ning, drama, teenage clubs, tJa ll of Pr ide (paintings of famous heroes for ar t part i cipants) , and all types of r ecreational acti vities. way house will be established for school drop-out s. h half- This project will a ttccpt t o h~vc youth r e turn to school via sports, education, and counseling. Yout h and young a dults will be employed to assist and direc t the many varied programs offered, All programs will be conduc ted i n the EOA t a rge t a reas. EOA Pittsburgh Neighborhood Service Center will organize recreat ion, counseling, a nd employment programs. Pr ograms offered will be re- crea t i oruil spor t s , ar ts and crafts, cult ural tours, youth councils , expa nding a ctivi t i es, and program referral. Youth and young adult~ wi l l be employed t o assis t and di r e ct these programs offered. These pr ograms wi ll serve in the t arget areas of EOA. EOA Price Neighbor hood Servi ce Center wi ll or ganize recrea t i onal, cultura l and e ducationa l programs. Activ ities offered wi ll be re- creational sports, boxing , bowling , swirmning, league spor ts, t rips, arts and c rafts, drama , danc ing, ba llet l essons, campi ng t rips , baseball c linics , and pr ogram r eferral. Yout h and young adults wil l be employed to assist in t hese programs. Programs wil l be operated in the target ureas of EOt .• EOA South Fulton Neighborhood Se rvice ~e nter will organize a recreation and employment program for youth in the rural and semi- �-27- rural South Fulton target areas of EOi.\ . The activities will include recreational sports, arts and crafts, playlots, pro3ram referrals, employment and employment referral, personal hygiene and grooming, cultural activities, drama and field trips. The youth recruited for these programs offered by the Neighborhood Service Center would not have any extensive surrnner programs were it not for t he EO!. Neighborhood Service Center and volunteer residents of South Fulton. Youth and young adults will be employed to direct and assist the many varied programs offered by the Neighborhood Service Center. EOA Summerhill-Mechanicsville Neighborhood Gervice ~enter will organize surrnner recreational, educational, and employment programs, educational programs, dance, arts, tutorial project, sports, leagues, trips, dances, economic workshops, scouts, boys and girls and teenage referral. Youth will be employed in these programs to assist the professionals. This program will be in the EOf.. target aree.s. EOA West Central Neighborhood Service Center will organize a recreational, educational program for the Neighborhood Service Center target areas. Programs offered will include recreation, sports, arts and crafts, tours, cultural and educational activities, employment referral and counseling. Youth and young adults wi.11 be employed to assist in program activities offered by the Neighborhood Service Center. Volunteers will be organized to assist in programs not fully staffed due to lack of funds. This program will operate during the twelve weeks of the local school vacation in the EOt. target areas. EOA We st End Neighborhood Se rvice Center will conduct a recreational, educational, cultural and employment program. Programs will include �-28sports, playlots, arts and crafts, cultural activities, record hops, outing, teen town, art workshops, field trips, referrals to other agency programs. Employment referrals~ youth cent ers, and counseling and still other aspects of the program. Partici- pants will be recrui ted from the target areas of West End Neighborhood Service Center. Youth will be employed to assist i n t he operation of these projects. These projects will operate in EOA target area. EO/i. Rockdale-Conyers Ueiehborhood Service Center will organize a rural and semi-rural recreation project. The EOA Neighborhood Service Center will be the only agency providing r ecreation in the county. The program consists of a youth center, use of a school, and playlots. This program will also provide recreation sports, night activities for teenagers , dances, leagues (baseball) , tutorial program, camping , trips, and counseli ng. Youth and young adults will be hired to assist the professionals in these projects. Community Chest c, Other 1:.genc i es In addition to the specia l recrea tional activities to be undertaken by EOL He ighborhood Service Centers, EO/', has cont racted wi th sever al ot her private age nc i es for r ecr eat iona l ser vices in the tar ge t a rea s lis ted below. The :\.t l anta Gir ls ' Club , Inc ., wi ll oper ate e xpanded pr ograms at three clubs. The Gir ls ' Club wi l l offe r sports, c ounse ling, coed programs, homemaking , r es ident camp ing, trips and outings, arts and crafts , educational and cultural activities , recruit girl s from the target areas of EOL. The program will Ten young girls 14-21 �7 -29will be hired to assist the professionals during the summer. The hours at these clubs will also be extended. The Atlanta Area Boy Scouts will recruit 150 non-scouts and 150 youth who a re non-scout members to Day Camping two days per week for five weeks . Transportation wil l be provided, m8als and equi_p- ment to insure the youth having a good experience . This camp is a resident camp and offers more than the normal day camp program. Youth recruited will be in t he age r8nge of 11-13 . Recruitment will be made via the EOA Service Cel!ters i n the target areas. A youth (16-21 ) will be hil.-ed for every 10 boys attending camp. The Butler Street YMCA will ex pe.nd its norII'.al progr ams during the summer months . The~1 will a lso employ 100 area youth a s lock.er room attendants, program assistants, and send 300 youth to resident camp. Part of the day would be in re pairing building , cutting trees, grass, etc. for recreation. The .reoninder of the day wi ll be used Youth will a lso be hired as kitche n helpers, junior l eaders, and assistant cabin counselors. fl t een program will be operat ed during t he evening hours for dances, pool, swinnning, movies, field trips , ycuth forum discussions, and lectures. Other facilities being u ti l ized by the Butler Stree t YMC~ will be the Sumrr.er hill 'll1CA Branch, Perry Home s YMCL and the Butler Street Re sid ent Camp, ll.llatoona. The Grady Homes Girls' Club, Inc. wil l expand their program in the conmrunity in hours of operation, 500 add i tional gi rls, and employment of youth ( gir ls) 14-21 , from the community being s erved. grams wili be normal Gir ls 1 Club activities. Pro- f,n expanded day camp will be operated for gir ls 6 .,14 years of age from 9 :00 A.M. to 3 :00 P .M. and youths (g~_r l s) employe d as program assistants. The �-30Day Camp will offer outings, etiquette, dramatics, films, record hops , and plays by the participants will be from the EOll. target areas. The Metropolitan ll.tlanta Boys' Clubs will operate six clubs in the target areas of EOA. The clubs wi ll expand their hours during the sunnner months from 9: 00 l1. . M. to 10: 00 P. M. six days per week. In addition, the Boys' Club will hire 62 youth to a ssist the professional staff. The Boys' Clubs will expand thei r programs in areas of spor ts, counseling, education, workshops, and normal Boys' Clubs programs for disadvantaged poor youth. The Metr opolitan YMCA of Atlanta and The Southea stern YMC~ will conduct a r ecreational program i n swimming. will be to teach youth to swim. The Swimning Program The normal YMCA program will also be expanded during the sunnner months. n-ie Northwest Georgia Girl Scout Council will ope r a t e day camps for girls which will include sports, hea lth and safety, citizenshi p , i nte r national scout program, arts, cooking , outdoor living, s e l f government, housekeeping, ri1oney management, family re l a t i ons , na ture and natura l scie nce. I n a ddit i on , 32 girls wi ll be t ake n t o re s ident camp (age s 10- 15 ) f or a two week period. This program will be operated in t he target areas of EOA. The Roya l Knights Foundati on, Inc. , will organize recreational programs f~r you th in the Vine City L\rea. The program wi l l be sports, trips, counseling, indoor and outdoor activities, day camp, teenage program --until 9: 00 P.M. , boxing, employment referral and pool. Youth will be employed to assist i n the programs. This pro- ject will operate i n the N.1'.SH-Washington EOJ.\. area. The YMCL\ of �-31Atlanta will operate expanded prograns for girls in the poverty areas of At lanta. Program activities will include preparin8 girls to pro- perly seek employment, how to dress .'.:!.nd act during an interview, how to answer an e:mployer, ·· fi lling out applications, refe:rences, what relat ions of employer and employee should be, and introductions to new job openings. A phase of the project will also be in working, training, office filing, business machines, and cash registers. '.nether progrQm offered will be a training program for girls to work with children in Heads t ar t programs. .A operated prior to the summer operation. sur.nner day camp ·will be Twelve young girls will be given in-service training to a ssist the professiona ls during the da y camp operations. L i.o ther program will be an enrichment (cultural a nd tutorial) , drana, sewing and grooming program with group discussions in history and contributions of famoun /imer icans. These programs will be operated in the EO/\. target area s. The U.S. Army Youth Opportunity Program is a spe cia l project opera ted by the U.S. Army. 'TI1is program operates t o assist disadvantaged youth in the EO,:\ East Central Neighborhood Service Center area of At l anta. I t wi ll operate year round and wi ll serve about 100 youth. The project offers recreation, sports, indoor activities, ganes, trips, tours, charn classes, movies , sewing, reading, music, arts a nd crafts, drama, health educa tion a nd driver education. youth recruited and referred by the /:..ges of EOI\. Ea st Centra l Nei ghborhood Service Ce nter t o this project a re 11- 18 boys a nd gir ls. The only cha nge i n the sur:u:ner of f ered will be more outd oor activ it ies. The Vine City Founda tion wi ll . h ire youth a s rec reation organizers to r ecrui t youth for you t h progrnn s that be s t fit their nee ds. Pro-- �-32grruns will also be organized by youth in the following areas: creation, tutorial, and cultural. re- A group dynamics program will be organized by hard core youth and supervised by the Vine City Foundation staff. Four hard core youth will be hired to work in this project. The WAOK Ra dio Station will conduct street dances, record hops for youth during the suP..10.er months. Ten youth will be hired as Disc Jockeys to conduct their prograr.ts. WJ.'..OK will conduct its program in the target a rea s of EOA. The Wesley Community Center and Bethlehem Center will c onduct a n expanded summer recreational program. Trips, outings, crafts, camping , and gar:ies indoor and outdoors are sane features of the prograra . main feature of this project is snall group participa nts. will be recruited fr or.i the EO/\. tar get areas of ,'\.tlant a . The The youth The program will a lso be operated in an EOn tar get area. Corm:1Unity Chest L'..gencies (Re gular Surrnner Programs) Most of the Cor.ununity Che st Agencies and other group service a ge ncies will conduct on-goi ng progr ams during t he sufJille r. Such progr ams wi ll be ava il- able to childr e n and youth through out the metropolitan a rea . The a ctivities of t he sa pr ogr ar.ts wi ll be generally available t o regular members of such agencie s . In a dd it ion , the se agenc i es have i ndi cat ed t hat t hey wi ll make e ffor t s to expand their regu lar programs and ext end t hem t hrou gh ou t the Summe r Vacation Period. These agencies are l isted a s f ol lows: 1. 2. 3. Campfire Gir ls /\.tlanta Girls Club, Inc. Bethlehem Community Center ~- o Boy Scouts �-335. 6. 7. 8. 9~ 10. 11 . 12 . Bu tler Stree t YMCA Grady Homes Girls Club At lanta Boys Club Gir l Scout s Savannah Stree t Neighborhood House Wesley Hous e Centers Me t r opol itan YMC~ Me t ropolitan YWCA DeKalb County EOli.- RecrGnt i on Depar t men t The DeKalb County EOh and Recrea t ion Depar tment have pool ed their resources in efforts to prov ide additional service s to DeKa lb County ' s You th dur i ng t he surmner months. Sever a l programs are pl anned t o effec t a more comprehensive surmner program . The areas planned for are a s follows : filea Location Supervisors Chamblee Dorav ille Church lot at Peachtree Industrinl Road 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Clarkston The end of Clark Street 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Tucker Peters Road 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC worke rs Washington Park Tobie Grant Park To be prov ided by DeKa lb Recreation Department 3 NYC workers nee ded Redan Rednn Elenentary School 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Lithonia Bruce Stree t Element a ry or Lithonia High School 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Bouldercrest Boulder cre s t Elementary Schoo l 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Mil l er Grove Mi ller Grove Bap tis t Church 1 - $900 pl us 3 NYC workers Stone Mountain Stone Mountai n Par k Stillhous e 1 - $900 pl us 3 NYC workers �-1 The YMCL\ will handle this aren 3 NYC workers needed Oakhurst Lynwood Park Lynwood Park Eler.1entary School 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Oglethorpe f'l.partments 08lethorpe f'l.partments 1 - $900 plus# NYC workers County Linc To be provided by DeKalb Recreation Departraent 3 NYC workers needed DeKalb l1emorial Park 1 - $900 Check with YMCL\ to see if they can operate it $9,900 Total amoun ts needed: ~tlanta Junior Chamber of Commerce L\nother privately spons ored summer program will be the various activitie s of the At lanta Junior Chamber of Commerce. There proGrams will be : Vacation Days, a series of daily r e creational and educational fie l d trips for younger chi l dren from several poverty areas; The Little Street Community Center, a multi-purpose recreation fac ility l ocated in the Sur.merbill neighborhood . Several Metropolitan Public Recreati on de partments wi ll be offering special programs during the summer . These i nc lude College Park, Ea st Poi nt, DeKalb,County , Cl ayton County and Fulton County . Communi ty Schools The L\t l anta c oE1munity schools will offer a ctivities for children, you th , and a dults in each of t he communities listed below : �-35- Elementary Schools High Schools Bethune Bryant Capitol Avenue Coan Middle Cooper Street Gideons Grant Park Jerome Jones M. Agnes Jones Ware Archer Brown Dykes Howard Parks, Jr. Price Smith Special enrichment and recreational activities will be planned according to the interest of the community participants. Some of the activities might include: Archery Ceramics Cooking for Fun Creative Crafts Creative Dramatics Creative Writing Gymnastics Judo Modern Dance Photography Puppetry Quiet Games Sewing Softball Tab le Tennis Tailoring Track and Field Typin::; The enrichment activities will be scheduled for an eight-week period be ginnigg June 9, 1969 and ending A~gust 2, 1969. The recreational activities will begin at the sane time but will be extended until ~UGUSt 23, 1969. The EO~ Recreation Pr ogram is cooperati on with Parks and Recreation Department and the Community Chest will provide widespread distribution of programs activi ties • •mother significant factor of the 1969 Recrea tion pro3ram i s that it will cover the areas of unmet and new needs as identified by the Technical Executive Corrnnittee dur ing the planning process. Morehouse College Morehouse Col le ge wi ll sponsor a Summer Sports Program for dis advantaged youth. This program is funded by the National Collegiate .l\.thletic �-36Association for approximately $35,000. Two hundred fifty youth will participate in this program, most of which will live in close proximity to Morehouse College. The program will provide a hot lunch. It also provides youth with training in the various athletic skills. EOn, Parks and Recreation, The Community Chest and the Youth Coun~il will refer youth to the project. The project will operate four hours a day (9:30 - 1:30) for six weeks. The Youth Opportunity Recreation Program as presently planned shows nruch potential and improvement over 1968. program ever. Hopefully 1969 will have the best �l CAMPING Mr. Frank Player, Jr. - Chairman Mr. Charles Green - Co-Chairman In 1968, only 5% of the inner city poor youth participated in resident campi ng activities. In order to prevent the scarcity of camping opportunities for poor youth from reoccuring in 1969, a Camping Sub-Committee was created in January, 1969 to deal with the problem of resident camping opportunities and cnmperships for poor youth. The camping sub-committee has sent camping questionnaires to all groups which operate resident and/or day camps. The purpose of the question- naire is to find out how agencies utilize their camps and camperships to benefit poor youth. Several of the agencies have indicated that they will provide camping opportunities for poor youth. These are as follows: RESIDENT l\GENCY LOCLi.TIONS Camp Fi re Girls Camp Camp Camp Camp Camp We s l ey House - - -CAMP Toccoa Eluta- Mt. Par an Rd.• Tawasi•Mathis Da iry Farm Cobb- Mt. View Comm. Cen . Wohelo•Mt. Gilead 464 295 Camp Wesley, Fairburn Bethlehem Cent er 275 Bert Adams (Hon. Scout ) Camp Orr 420 Salvation .1rmy Camp Grandview 300 Boys Club Camp Kiwanis 600 Grady Girls Club Friendship Day Camp Herndon Day Camp Carver University Day Camp John Hope Bowen Day Camp Perry Day Camp Grady Metropolitan Boy Scouts -37- ~'i DAY CL\MP 150 80 800 �-38Kirkwood Community Camp Calvin Church's Christian :camp Michael Center YWCA (72 Edgewood) Cc.np High lnnd I-Ii - neighbor 75 1.:-5 7 80 YWC.l\. (599 Tatnall) Phyllis Wheatley & 1\ tlanta Parks Recreation Lake .L\l toorra, Ackw'Orth, Ga. Wilderness-Barton County 1.:-00 350 /'. tlanta Presby. Camp Calvin, Route 2 , Calvin 138 Butler St. YMCA Lake Altoona Eastside Day Camp--22 Butler L,, OO Girl Scouts Girl Scouts (City) Day Camps Girls Club (City) Jaycees Camp Timber Ridge, Mableton Camp Pine Acres-/i.ckworth, Ga. Camp Gazelle Dew-/'.rmuchee, Ga. 200 800 616 Stone Mountain Washington Park Dunwoody Fairburn-Kiwanis Club Lake Spivey Jones Chastain Park Fairwood 2,900 Donnelly /'. venue Grant Park Techwood Project-116 Pine Tri-Cities-Bachelor Camp Wesley 225 Lake L\.ltoona 300 (overnight ) 900 In addition, t he Camp ing Sub-Committee has contacted every service club and civic group in the Metropolitan Area asking them to increase the number of camperships they are providing t o agencies. The Thomas Beverage Company, the local who lesaler for the Schlitz Brewing Company is sponsoring a unique camping-incentice program. will provide 30 youth with Camperships for one week as a beginning. This program �iii EDUC11.TION Dr. Hi lliard Bowen - Chairman Mrs. Mary Sanford - Co-Chairman The major Youth Opportunity Program educational activities will be operated by the various school systems. Objectives: 1. To provide needed remedial and tutorial programs for youth; 2. To provide vocational information and educational activities needed by youth to enter the labor force; 3. To allow creative and innovative educational programs not possibl~ during the winter months; 4. To offer programs and courses not genera lly available to poor youth during the regular school year. Special Goals: 1. To provide surmner remedial programs for 2,000 students; 2. To provide vocational, technical and occupationa l information for 2,000 students; 3. To provide tutoria l services for 1 , 400 students; 4. To provide enri chment and advance programs for 1,000 s tudents; S. To launch an inte nsive back- to-school campaign to ge t 2, 000 s tudent s to retur n to s chool . The Atla nta School System h~s a lready i ndica ted that it will c oncentrate only on e ducationa l a cti v i t ie s i n the summe r 1969. In addition, the Atlanta Schoo l System has indicated t hat one experiment a l pr ograms will be undertaken this sunnner, which wi l l uti l ize students in curriculum planning activities. In addition to obtaining the above c ommitment, the educational subcommittee has also contacted parochial and private schools. The committee was informed by such schools that they will not be operating any summer programs, but they might let agencies utilize their facilities for special educational activities. -39- �-40Atlanta Public Schools 'nle Atlanta Public School System has indicated that there will not be tuition charge for students attending regular elementary summer school or the fourth quarter sessions of high school. Summer school programs will be offered at the following elementary schools: Area I .i\rea IV Bethune Carter Couch English ./\venue Hardnett Harris Herndon M.A. Jones Lee-Rusk Luckie Ware !inderson Park Grove Park Kimberly Peyton Forrest Towns Venetian Hills Walter White Williams Area II .i\rea V Gideons Gilbert Guice Harper Perkerson Sloter Capitol Avenue Coan Cooper East Lake Hubert Milton Avenue Pryor Reynolds Slaton D. H. Stant on Toomer Wesley Grant Park Primary Area III Fi nch Goldsmith Hil l John Hope Jacks on Morni ng side Pitts Rivers Whittaker EMR programs will be offered at those schools designated by an asterisk .. �In addition to summer school, Head Start programs will also be offered. These programs will be offered in the following schools: t..rea I Lee-Ruck Luckie Ware Bethune Ca rter English Avenue Primary Hardnett l1.rea II Harper Slater Dobbs Gideons Gilbert Area III John Hope Pitts Goldsmith Hill .£\rea IV Mayson Williams Anderson Park Carey Grove Park .£\rea Capitol i\venue Cook Cooper Grant Pa rk Primary V Pryor Slaton Toomer Wesley �-42SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES A number of special programs in addition to the regular summer programs will be offered at schools throughout the city. Students interested in these programs but who attend other schools may enroll .as space permits. J\.rea I Bethune Carter English l\.venue Hardnett Harris Herndon M.A. Jones Lee-Rusk Ware Band, 1\rt, and Choral Music Spanish, Typing, and Band Band, Typing, Sewing, and Woodshop Choral Music Music and Art Art, Band, and Typing E.I.P. Projects l\.rt, Music, Speech E. I. P. Projects Area II Gideons Gilbert Guice Harper Perkerson Slater Art, Instrumental Music, Physical Education,Typing Art, Physical Education, Vocal Music 1\rt, Physical Education, Vocal Instrument Music !\.rt, Typing, Physical Education, Vocal Instrumental Music Art, Typing, Vocal and Instrumental Music J\.rt, Physical Education, Vocal and Instrumental Music, Typing ,\rea III Finch Goldsraith Hill John Hope Jackson Morningside Pitts Rivers Vocal Music, Typing Vocal Music Typing, Vocal Music Drama, Vocal Music Dancing Class, Vocal Music Typing, Vocal Music Vocal Music J\.r t, Drama, Speech Therapy, Vocal Music �-43SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES (CONTINUED) Area IV Instrumental Music ••• Individual, small ensemble, and group instrument will be offered for band and string instrumentalists. Classes will be for beginning, intermediate, and advanced students. <' Anderson Park Cascade Continental Colony Kimberly Towns Instrumental Music Instrumental Music Band Creative i\rts, Instrumental Music Creative i\rts, Instrumental Music Area V i\rts and Crafts, Instrumental and Vocal Music, and Speech Therapy will be offered in all sunnner schools in this area. Coan Middle School will offer: Guitar Home Economics Indus trial 1\rts a course that involves music and mathematics (5-8 grades) (5-8 grades) A special course in model cars tha t includes experiences in language arts and 1Tlll.thematics. Pryor Street will offer: Ceramics Home Economics (Sewing, Cooking a nd Home Decoration) Dramatics Public Speaking Typing �-44HIGH SCHOOLS All high schools will operate the fourth quarter schedule beginning June 4, 1969 and ending August 15, 1969. Special Opportunities Listed below arc courses other than regula r quarter offerings which will be available a t specified high schools. Students in any school may rP Bi Bter for these cours es. Arts and Cra fts •• • Dougl a ss Hi gh School of fe r s Arts and Crafts for students adults. 5 quarter hours AviaUon,,.Primarily a fl i ght training program taking advantage . of the best flying s eas on wi th re lated ground school. The beginni ng stude nt will have a n opportuni ty to get in a s much flyi ng a s poss i ble while star ting the regular erounc school. The adva nced s t udent may continue worki ng toward Pilot Cert i fic a t e requirements . Cost of flying : $11.00 per hour , Cessna 150 , Link tra iner time may be avai l ab le at a reasonable cost of $5.00 per hour . For a dd iti ona l i nformation call Mrs . Ge orgia Kingdom a t 755-2231. Grady ~ Price - Washington 15 quar t e r hours Computer Progr am (APL) .•• A course in basic Computer Techni ques will be offered a t Washi ngt on High School . 5 quar ter hours Cla ss Piano .• • nn opp ortunity to study the piano a nd to l ear n to pla y s i mple nrusic will be offered a t Smi th Hi gh School. 5 quarte r hours Dance • •• Mode r n Dancing wil l be a par t of t he 4th quar t er a ct i vities a t Washi ngton High School . 5 quarte r h ours Drive r and Traffic Safety Educat ion, • • Driver a nd Traff ic Sa fe ty Education consists of two closely articulated phases: (1) Classroom instruction ( Driver Education 301 ) in driver and traffic safety education cohsists of t hirty hours of instruction dealing with driver, the vehicle, the roads, other users of the roadway, traffic laws, insurance, and defensive driving . (2) Practice driving (Driver Education 302) refers to six hours of incar instruction in the skills necessary f or safe driving. �-45Driver and Traffic Safety Educat::.on (continued) . •. Practice driving for those pupils who have corapleted the classroom work will be available a t all of the high schools ope rating the 4 t h quarter , providing enrollment is sufficient to warrant the course " Student&, not t a king other subjects, may reque s t to be s cheduled fo:i: either t he first f ive weeks or the last five weeks of t h e L'.-t'h qu a rter. S tud e.nt taking other ;: ,;.b j e ~ts will be scheduled to d1:ive at reg~l m·: inter vah, during the 10 -,week period . The complete program, con:3 i s ting of the clas s r oom phase a nd practice r~r i:uj_ng, will be offered cit p:zk~ and £2..uB_lass_. Engl:i.sh as a Second Lc1.n gun8e •. • Thj_s c O!Jrse wi ll be of ferecl on the high school level for no c re~i t t o t Los e s tuclentn of :forc=>i.gn b ackgr ound tvho are I1aving d i f ficult y 5.n t:1.0:t :.· c l.ao oeG becau se: of a de f:i. c i er:..::y i n English. QE~dY..non credit. Health Occ.upationnl __':[rain:be -~ -~fl.!,.• , 'ilii& c ou:::-se wi ll b e offere d .:1t Douglass High School. Thie wi U :i.ncl1.1ce (a) Work S tL:: 1c1.·.: cn iu t h~s e , '.l!'.'t; ['.r". u t iliz~.nc the f i:. :_; h :-F ~1.: n.n t:.:. 5. Assignme nt of a coor dina t or t o cooperate fully wi th Ci ty Services Coor dina tors in a nsweri;:ig compla ints and grievance s that come under the jurisdi ction of the Fire De partme nt �-82PUBLICITY Mr. Zenas ~eo..ro - Chairman Liller, Neal, Battle and Lindsey, Public Relations firm has agreed a3ain this year to serve as publicity consultant for the Youth Opportunity Pro3ram. The plan is as follows: 1. To secure a part-time public relations intern be13innin3 May 4, who will become full-time July 10, 1969. Under the close supervision of Liller, Neal, Battle and Lindsey, the intern will operate a Mock Public Relations L'\cency to provide service for participating acencies in the YOP. The intern 1 s initial activities in the YOP will include: developing a brochure, contacting the News Media, developing materials for Nl\B, YOP, and Rent-A-Kid programs, setting up an effective referral and information system
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 25, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 2, Folder 1, Document 1

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_001_001.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 1, Document 1
  • Text: ” ®) TEAR cn iw BOORUM ® PEASE “FB — AR” a Sz bs id. & PEASE “RK BOORUM ba NN iv Planer ney July 18, 1969 A meeting of the Planning and Development Committee was held in Committee Room #2, Second Floor, City Hall, at 2:00 P. M., Friday, July 18, 1969. Committee members present: Rodney Cook, Chairman Q. V. Williamson Jack Summers John Flanigen Committee members absent: Gregory Griggs Charlie Leftwich George Cotsakis Hugh Pierce Edwin Sterne, ) Housing Authority Frank Etheridge ) The Chairman called the meeting to order and the following business was considered: 1. A. PUBLIC HEARING - ANNEXATION PETITION BY JULIUS SCHNEIDER MEDICAL FOUNDATION, INC., COLUMBUS UNION CONFERENCE ASSOCIATION OF SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST AND EUGENE A, ANDERSON. Charles Watkins, First National Bank Building, was present representing the three property owners involved. Two other persons were present in support of the annexation. There was no opposition. The staff presented a detailed report to each committee member present relative to this petition, certifying that it meets all requirements set forth by the State Enabling Legislation and applicable city ordinances, and recommended its approval. The property in question lies in Land Lot 29 of the I4th District of Fulton, formerly Fayette County, and involves 69.1 acres; of the total acreage, 46.6 acres is zoned A-1 apartments; I7 acres is zoned R-3 and a smaller C-1 tract lies in Fulton County. Mr. Gladin explained the city would be annexing this property under the zoning most closely related to the existing county zoning, which in this instance is practically identical to the county's. All city services to the area are available, or can be provided upon request (letters to this effect from the appropriate city departments are included in the report). In answer to questioning by Mr. Summers, Mr. Watkins stated the owners wish to come into the city for the services that are available and to make their land more marketable for housing and sale of apartments. Minutes Planning and Development Committee July 18, 1969 - Page Two The committee expressed its concern about a tract immediately to the north lying in unincorporated Fulton County which, upon approval of this annexation petition, would become landlocked and asked if it could be included along with this petition. Mr. Gladin explained this is one type of problem you incur in the petition route and it could not be legally included, but could be brought up at the next filing period in May, 1970. The committee felt this would be highly desirable and should be encouraged ai that time, Mr. Eugene Anderson, part-owner of the tract which would become landlocked, appeared speaking for himself and Mrs. Schneider, also part-owner, stating they would be willing to have their property annexed; that, however, he could not officially speak for Mr. Steinmetz, another owner, but Mr. Steinmetz had told him he would be willing to be annexed. In answer to questioning by Mr. Cook, Mr. Anderson stated the C-1 zoning approved by the county was done so as part of an overall Medical Complex proposal which subsequently fell through much to their regret and loss, and there is no commercial development in the area presently. There being no further discussion, the matter was referred to Executive Session. In Executive Session, upon unanimous vote, this petition was approved by the committee. KRREKEEEEEE 1. B. PUBLIC HEARING - ANNEXATION PETITION BY JOHN E. LIVADITIS - GARMON ROAD. There was no opposition present. A detailed report relative to this petition certifying its compliance with State Enabling Legislation and applicable city ordinances was presented to each committee member present and the staff recommended approval. The property lies in Land Lot I77 of the I7th District and is approximately 2 acres in size. Mr. Gladin stated the property is presently zoned R-1 (Residential) and would be annexed as R-1; that all services are available, or can be provided upon request (letfersto this effect are a part of the report). Mr. Livaditis was present along with his representative, Robert Smith. Mr. Smith acknowledged they were aware of the fact there are no existing sewers to the property and the present plans are to use two septic tanks, but they are hopeful of working out an easement agreement with the adjoining property owner to connect with an outfall a %, / ' Minutes Planning and Development Committee July 18, 1969 - Page Three sewer 150 feet from Mr. Livaditis' property line. Mr. Cook called to Mr. Smith's attention a letter in the report from the Public Works Department stating that sanitary sewer is not available for the property to be annexed on Garmon Road and would not be available until approved by the property owners along this section. Mr. Smith stated they realized securing the easement would be difficult but were still hopeful it could be worked out, and in the meantime, the septic tanks are an alternative. Mr. Smith stated Mr. Livaditis is ready to begin bricking the house and doesn't have any water; since thereis a charge to tap onto the water for property outside the city, he wanted to know if final approval of this petition by the Board of Aldermen would be expedited to relieve him from having to pay this charge. A check with the Water Department indicated that if this committee approves the annexation petition today, they would not charge Mr. Livaditis to tap onto the water prior to final approval of the petition. Messrs. Smith and Livaditis expressed their appreciation to the committee. The matter was then referred to Executive Session, and upon unanimous vote, this petition was approved by the committee. KEKKKEKEKKE o 2. STATUS OF RECERTIFICATION OF WORKABLE PROGRAM Pierce Mahony explained that the Planning staff is progressing rapidly toward completion of work for recertification of the Workable Program for a two-year period, rather than one year which has been approved in the past. He stated there have been considerable revisions in the requirements of the program for recertification, making it much more difficult to put together and committing us to a much more solid approach. He commented briefly on some of the new aspects of the program, such as the housing and relocation element and the department's anticipated participation in the HUD 70! planning program. He explained a federal requirement for participation in the 70I program is that one portion of the planning studies be a housing study; further, the personnel situation throughout the city, especially in the technical and professional level, is getting serious and the Planning Department hopes to solve some of its problems by hiring temporary personnel on 70! planning programs who could moveinto permanent planning vacancies as they occur. He went on to say these new requirements, particularly housing planning for low and moderate income families, points up the critical need for the Urban Information System Minutes | Planning and Development Committee July 18, 1969 - Page Four | for the city, because of the various and sundry data which can be obtained from it on immediate notice, and he urged the committee's support in implementation of this system. He presented a draft of "Workable Program Five-Year Goals" and stated the city will be committed to these goals and emphasized the need to begin considering an advance two-year budget. Considerable discussion then ensued about the status of the Mayor's Housing Program. Colonel Jones of the Housing Resources Committee stated that the city is about halfway through the initial five-year program. He cited figures for the two and one-half year period, stating we have under construction and completed approximately 8,000 units, and we have in the pipeline more units than the original goal of 17,000. He stated, however, a lot of the units in planning are being lost because we do not have properly zoned locations to put them on. Mr. Cook asked on what basis units are classified as being in the "planning stage". Mr. Jones explained they are put in this category when a rezoning application is filed and a proposal is submitted; if the zoning is denied, they are taken out; that more zonings for this purpose have been denied than approved. He cited the loss of 21,000 units through recent rezoning denials. Mr. Cook stated this doesn't concur with figures he obtained from the Planning Department. Mr. Gladin explained the staff analysis referred to was done about a year ago and at that time the zoning approvals were running about 80-90%; that the staff is in the process of preparing an up-to-date analysis of the housing program. Mr. Cook asked for and was furnished with a copy of Mr. Jones' latest housing report. After a cursory examination, Mr. Cook expressed concem about the discrepancy in figures contained in the report and those stated orally by Colonel Jones. Being a member of the Zoning Committee, he stated he was tired of charges being made that the city's housing goals were not being met because of rezoning denials as he did not believe this to be the case, and he finds it very confusing and frustating to be unable to justify his position when he is unable to secure reliable statistics; that he would like statistics differentiating what percentage of the 8,000 units quoted by Colonel Jones is actually low and moderate income housing. Mr. Kennedy stated he had very strong reservations that this percentage was quite low, that as stated by Mr. Gladin, the Planning staff is in the process of analyzing the Housing Program for the last two and one-half years and he felt this report would produce the type statistics Mr. Cook is looking for. ) BOORUM & PEASE “ Minutes Planning and Development Committee July 18, 1969 - Page Five Mr. Gladin stated he realized the problems in working with the housing figures, and again this points up the need for good management procedures, which need to be standardized, and the Urban Information System for quick delivery of these statistics over a period of time. He also commented on the need for more emphasis on the city's total housing needs. Mr. Cook directed the staff to prepare a letter for his signature to Colonel Jones requesting clarification on the following: 1. Is the actual number of units under construction and completed for the last two and one-half years the 8,000 oral figure given by Colonel Jones, or the 12,000 figure in his report of May 15, 1969; 2. What percentage of this figure is for low and moderate income housing; 3. The method used for determining what is low and moderate income housing, the name of the projects and the number of units in each project. He stated that in looking at the May I5 report and oral figures by Colonel Jones, it would appear we are moving backwards and this prompted Mr. Flanigen to remark he had no doubt but what the program is "slipping". With additional reference to the housing question, Mr. Mahony stated that at the last meeting of the Housing Resources Committee, the Legal Panel discussed the need for establishing a Housing Planning Agency within the city government to relieve the Housing Resources Committee members who are presently spending an inordinate amount of time doing surveys and research in the field of housing. He stated the logical place for such a housing function would be in the Planning Department, particularly in light of the 7Ol planning program; that the staff would like the committee's support; and he presented a letter for Mr. Cook's signature as Chairman of the Planning and Development Committee supporting the department's position. Colonel Jones stated that the Legal Panel has been studying this matter, but they have not submitted a position report to Mr. Alexander and he does not know what type of report will be submitted if and when if is, and he felt any action by this committee on this matter would be premature at this time. Mr. Gladin stated the letter does not request any final action; that it merely makes a recommendation for the Housing Resources Committee to consider in making their recommendation. Colonel Jones stated he still felt the letter was in anticipation of something and premature. er Minutes Planning and Development Committee July 18, 1969 - Page Six Mr. Mahony commented that the Planning Department feels very strongly about this and consequently wanted to take a positive approach, rather than waiting for a proposal from the Housing Resources Committee and reacting. The committee unanimously approved the letter and Mr. Cook appended his signature thereto. Referring back to the status report on the Workable Program, Mr. Gladin stated the staff hopes to present the final draft to this committee July 28, 1969 for review, and will request committee approval at a meeting on August |, 1969; it will then be forwarded to the next meeting of the Board of Aldermen where, hopefully, it will be finally approved and hand delivered that same afternoon to HUD. This will give HUD ample review time prior to the October expiration date for last year's recertification. REEKEKKEEEE Mr. Mahony explained the City of Mountain View, Clayton County and the City of Atlanta have common problems in the Plunkettown area which require joint study and action to solve. The following Resolution to initiate such action was approved: - A RESOLUTION BY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE WHEREAS, the City Planning Department is presently studying the Plunkettown neighborhood for inclusion in the Atlanta 1970 Neighborhood Development Program, and WHEREAS, the Plunkettown neighborhood extends south of the Atlanta City Limits into the City of Mountain View and Clayton County, and WHEREAS, Clayton County, Mountain View, and the City of Atlanta face common problems in this area. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta that Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. requests the Board of Commissioners of Clayton County and the Mayor and Council of the City of Mountain View to participate in a joint study designed to slove the problems of the Plunkettown neighborhood. The committee heard from Charles Stinson, President of the Federation of Southwest Clubs, a report on the first phase of the Southwest Community Study, being done for the Federation by graduate planning students from Georgia Tech. A copy of the first study phase was presented to each committee member present for information and no action was requested. REEKKEREEE R” ® 2fE i BOORUM & PEASE “ R” ®) EASE “Note x Pt Minutes Planning and Development Committee July 18, 1969 - Page Seven Mr. Gladin informed the committee members that the Sign Ordinance had been approved by the Zoning Committee and he anticipated submitting it to the full Board of Aldermen for approval Monday, July 21, 1969, and would like this committee's support at the Monday meeting. He further informed them we will be working toward recruiting personnel to implement the ordinance, that he has requested by letter that Mr. William H. Wofford, Building Official, and the Personnel Board prepare a joint study on such personnel needs. RREKEREKER Mr. Gladin stated he had received a communication from the BOND (Bass Organization for Neighborhood Development) Community requesting to appear before the committee to discuss being included in the 1970 NDP program; that he felt they should have this opportunity and he would like authorization to notify them to appear at the next meeting of the committee. In answer to Mr. Flanigen, Mr. Gladin stated the freeway ramp question in the BOND area had not been resolved, but there are continuing discussions with Ray Nixon and the State Highway Department on the matter and he felt it could be worked out. The committee concurred for the BOND group to appear at the next meeting. RREKEEEEEEE There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. KRREKKREERESE Approved: Respectfully submitted: Rodney /Gook, Chairman Joanne Parks, Secretary
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 1, Folder topic: Planning department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 4, Document 17

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_004_017.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 4, Document 17
  • Text: ATTITUDE SURVEY OF THE RESIDENTS OF PLUNKETTOWN City of Atlanta Department of Planning August 11, 1969 This report presents the results of an attitude survey conducted among the people of the Atlanta section of Plunkettown by the City of Atlanta Department of Planning at the request of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen. The purpose of this survey was to explore, on a broad base, the attitudes of the people toward living in Plunkettown versus living elsewhere, and to discover which aspects of life in Plunkettown the people consider to be major problems. The ultimate purpose of this report is to provide information concerning the people's desires toward remaining in Plunkettown to help the Board of Aldermen in making the decision as to whether or not an urban renewal project in Plunkettown will be a residential rehabilitation and rebuilding project. Interviews were conducted during the daytime hours on Friday, August 1, and Monday, August 4, and during the evening hours on Tues- day, August 5. The group of interviewers who conducted the survey included two members of the Planning Department staff and five summer interns from the Mayor's office. All interviewers were white. (A list of interviewers appears in Appendix A.) Methodology The survey was conducted through use of a door-to-door oral inter- view. An attempt was made to conduct at least one interview in each household. Contact was attempted at each household at least three times: morning, afternoon, and evening. In all, interviews were con- ducted in eighty-two households, or 85% of all households. The interview questionnaire contained two basic types cf questions, The first type asked for factual information such as place of work, travel time to work, number of persons in the household, and ownership of property. The second asked attitudinal questions about the desira- bility of Plunkettown as a place to live as compared to other places. General Results The factual results of the survey show that: 1. The workers who live in Plunkettown have an average reported travel time to work of twenty minutes by car; and that over half (26 of 41) work within two miles of Plunkettown, 2. Thirty-eight per cent (38%) of the present housing is over- crowded, having one or more persons per room, 3. Of the eighty-two households surveyed, thirty-two (39%) owned their houses while the remaining fifty (61%) are renters. The results: 1. as 3. Ten of the interviewed families own property other than that upon which they are living. Six own other property in Plunkettown. Four others own property in Clayton County, Northwest Fulton County, East Point, and East Atlanta. These four owners reported plans to build new homes on this property. Forty-two of the eighty~two interviews were conducted during aircraft peak traffic periods. These forty-two interviews lasted an average of seventeen minutes and were interrupted an average of seven times for an average of eighty-one seconds per interview, e.g, 84 of the interview time was lost due to aircraft noise. attitudinal results of the survey show the following major A majority of interviewees would prefer living elsewhere to living in Plunkettown as it is presently constituted. (See Question 11.) A majority of the interviewees consider aircraft noise, a problem which cannot be fully solved, to be a major problem to living in Plunkettown. (See Questions 10a, 15, and 17b.) There appears to be a desire among some of the interviewees to move together to a "New Plunkettown". At this point in time, fully reliable attitudes on this issue cannot be expected as the people do not now have a real opportunity to consider this choice. (See Questions 12 and the "Many of my friends live here" response in 17a.) If they were to move, there is a definite desire among the interviewees to remain in an outlying area, as opposed to downtown, where they can occupy single family type houses. (See Questions 12a and 13.) Detailed Results This section presents the complete interview form and the tabu- lated results for each question asked. Interview instructions are pre- sented in Appendix B. 1. Questions and Responses How long have you Lived in Plunkettown? Average length of residence among interviewees. - 24.5 years 9. 10. How old are you? Average age of interviewees - 50.5 years Range ~ 13 years to 90 years Where do you work? Within two miles - 26 Further than two miles - 15 How long does it take you to get to work? Average - 19 minutes Range - 2 minutes to 1 hour How do you get to work? *Car - 35 Walk - 4 Bus =-2 How many people live in this house? Average - 3.4 How many rooms in this house? Average - 4.0 (31 houses with one or more persons per room) Do you own this house or rent it? Own = 32 *Rent - 50 IF OWN: Do you own any other property? Yes - 10 No = 22 IF 80: Where? Plunkettown - 6 Elsewhere =- 4 Do you like Living here? *Yes - 50 No - 31 a. What do you like about living here? *{it's home - 14 *I've been here a long time - 11 *I like the people - 11 *It's close to work - 9 *Nothing - 9 *Low Rent - 8 It's better than where I lived before - 4 The play area - 2 I own my house = 2 It is a convenient location - 2 I like single-family houses - 1 It's close to church - 1 b. What don't you like about living here? *No sewers - 40 *Unpaved streets - 22 *Houses - 20 *Planes - 19 No mail service - 8 Poor bus service ~ 6 No inside water - 6 Poor police protection < 5 No health service - 4 Nothing - 4 Uncertainty about future - 2 Traffic problems - 2 Inconvenient Location = 2 The people who live here - 1 Poor street lights - 1 Taxes - 1 The railroad nearby = 1 Everything - 1 c. Why have you chosen to live here? *Came to live with relatives - 20 Low rent - 11 No other place available - 10 Close to work - 8 Opportunity to buy a house = 7 It used to be a nice area - 7 I like the country - 7 I like the people - 7 Born in the area - 3 It's a better house than before - 3 This is the best I could do - 1 LL. How would you feel abort living somewhere else? *Like to very much = 33 Like to - 14 Not mind - 18 Not want to - 1] Not want to at all - 6 a. IF NO: Why not? I'm too old to move - 2 I've been here a long time - 1 My relatives are here - 1 I don't know of any other place - 1 b. If this were overcome, would you like to live somewhere else? Yes - 3 No = 2 12. In the past few years, several groups have come to Plunket- town and suggested to the people that they all move out together to a new location. What do you think of this idea? *It's a good idea - 20 *The idea is "o.k.'' = 33 The idea is "o.k."' 1£ the people can buy a new house - 1 The idea is "o.k.'"' 1f the people can move to single-family houses - 1 No opinion - 17 It's a bad idea - 10 The people should be able to move where they want - 1 12a. IF THE INTERVIEWEE RESPONDS THAT HE WANTS TO MOVE: What locations do you think would be good if everyone moved out together? *No idea - 26 *Poole Creek - 14 *Atlanta fringe - 17 East Point = 5 West Side - 2 Southwest - 1 Downtown - 1 Harper Town - 1 Thomasville - 1 Carver Homes - 1 ' Perry Homes - 1 12b. IF INTERVIEWEE WANTS TO STAY IN PLUNKETTOWN: What problems need to be solved first to improve the neighbor- hood? *Sewers - L1 “Houses - 9 *Pave the streets - 6 Better police protection - 3 Inside water = 3 Stop the planes - 2 Railroad noise - 1 Better street lights - 1 13. If you could live elsewhere, what general area would you like the most? Don't know - 13 Poole Creek - 9 Atlanta fringe - 7 Downtown - 7 Same general area - 4 East Point - 4 A project - 4 Gilbert Road - 2 West Side - 2 Hapeville - 1 Stadium - 1 Wilson Road - 1 Clayton County - 1 N. W. Fulton County - 1 Forrest Park = 1 Alpharetta - 1 Decatur - 1 Gordon Road - 1 Washington, D.C. - 1 14. Can you afford to buy a house somewhere else? Yes - 16 *No - 50 Don't know - 16 How much could you pay? Nothing - 7 $16/month - $30/month - $40/month - $50/month - $60/month = $70/month - $80/month - NWR ree Receipts from sale of present house - 11 Don't know - & 15. Does living here with the airplanes flying over bother you? *Very much ~ 57 Some - 10 Hardly at ali = 5 Not at all - 10 16. What kind of place do you think Plunkettown is for children to grow up in? Very good = 2 Better than most other places - 5 *Same as other places - 24 *Not as good as most other places - 21 #Very bad - 25 No opinion - 5 17a. Wow, I would Like to find out exactiy what you like and dis- like about living in Plunkettown. Here is a card which lists some things we thought you might like about living here. Would you please pick the two you like most. If there is anything you like, but is not on the card, go ahead and pick it. (Read card aloud before showing, } a. I am close to work - 26 *b. The rent is low - 38 *c. Many of my friends live here =- 39 d. I have lived here a long time - 27 e. I own my home - 27 f£. Anything else - I like none of them = 3 Away from downtown = 2 Good bus service = 2 I have a good home = Ll b. Here is a card which lists some problems we thought you might have in Plunkettown. Would you please pick the five you think are the biggest problems? If there is any problem you would like to pick but do not find on the list, go ahead and pick it. (Read aloud before showing } a. Not close to shopping = 23 b. Not close to work = 3 c. No recreation - 12 *d. No mail service - 61 *e,. No sewers - 63 *f£. Too much noise - 56 g- No health service - 28 h. Poor water service ~ 30 *i. No street paving - 66 j- Unemployment - 7 k. Housing - 34 1. Education - 8 m. Police protection - 41 n. Anything else - Bus service - 3 Street lights - 2 Speeding = 2 Too far from church - 2 Not a good place for children - 1 Old wells are caving in - 1 Yards are not kept up - 1 There are no problems - 1 APPENDIX A List of Interviewers James M. Bruce, Office of the Mayor Daniel K. Christenbury, Office of the Mayor Thomas Isaac, Office of the Mayor Joseph Menez, Office of the Mayor Meg Sowell, Office of the Mayor Mostafa Howeedy, Department of Planning John Matthews, Department of Planning APPENDIX B Interview Guide = Plunkettown A. General Instructions, 1. This is a general guide for conducting a house-to-house survey in the Plunkettown neighborhood. Make sure that all questions included are answered; however, if a respondant refuses to answer any questions, go on to the next item on your questionnaire. Record reason for no response if possible. You may include other questions; record them as well as the interviewee's answer. 2. Please record all answers as accurately and carefully as pos- sible. 3. Let the interview continue if the interviewee wishes to talk. However, one hour should, in most cases, be the maximum time re- guired for the interview. 4. Record the date of the interview, the time at which the interview begins and is completed, and the total amount of time the interview lasts, Record the number of times the interview is interrupted by aireraft noise, and the approximate length of such interruptions, B. Introduction. The following general introduction should be used in the interview situation: "Hello, my name is - IL represent the City of Atlanta (show your identification card). The Mayor and Board of Aldermen are concerned about the people living in Plunkettown. Many different suggestions have been made about what the people of Plunket- town want from the City. However, we feel that it is necessary to talk directly to the people of Plunkettown. For the next few days we will be talking with all Plunkettown residents and asking them questions to help us find out exactly what the people want. Could you please take a few minutes to answer these questions? If subject refuses to participate in the interview, try to find out why. If he indicates he is too busy, try to make an appointment to inter- view him at another date. If he has another reason, try again to get the interview. However, if he absolutely refuses, do not persist. Record a response and, if possible, the reason. If more than one member of a household wants to participate in the interview session, record their responses separately. Each interview record should contain the responses of one person only. However, if this is not possible, indicate that responses came from two or more people. Remember that the main purpose is to get answers to the basic questions contained in our questionnaire. Lf the interviewee has questions to ask of you, try to delay this discussion until the end of the formal interview. DO NOT, under any circumstances, attempt to answer questions of which you are unsure. The purpose of this inter- view is to find out what che people in Plunkettown think and want. If people ask questions you cannet answer, refer them to Mr. Johnny Robinson or George Aldridge. (You will have a supply of their personal cards to pass out to everyone.) Cc. Close Close the interview by answering any questions you can, and by thanking the interviewee for his cooperation. State again that if he has any additional questions he should call Mr. Johnny Robinson or Mr. George Aldridge. Also, if he has any additional comments, attempt to record them on the answer sheet. (Give Mr. Aldridge's and Mr. Rob- inson's cards.)
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 4, Folder topic: Planning department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 4, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_004_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 4, Document 13
  • Text: ATTITUDE SURVEY OF THE RESIDENTS OF LIGHTNING City of Atlanta Department of Planning November 13, 1969 This report deals with the results of an attitude survey conducted in Lightning. The section of Atlanta known as Lightning is bounded by Northside Drive, Hunter Street, and Simpson Street. Lightning is zoned for industrial use, This survey was conducted by the City of Atlanta Planning Department upon the request of the citizens of Lightning. The citizens voiced their support for this survey or a community meeting held Tuesday, October 14, 1969, The Lightning attitude survey was conducted for several reasons. First of all, the questionnaire is aimed at securing two basic types of information. The first group of questions, one through nine, deal with the attainment of factual information, such as the number of persons in each household, The second group of questions, ten through seventeen, explore the attitudes of the people toward living in Lightning and the problems involved. In addition to securing information, a second purpose of this survey is to let the citizens of Lightning know that the City of Atlanta is con- cerned and interested in their problems. A third purpose of the Lightning survey is to get both the citizens of Lightning and the City of Atlanta to start thinking about the short and long range problems of this area, This includes the exposure of short range problems that can perhaps be solved in the near future, with the people of Lightning and the city working together. The survey was conducted Tuesday, October 28, 1969 through Thursday, October 30, on a door-to-door verbal interview basis. Twelve interviewers, black and white, were used to conduct the survey: One City Planning Department employee, two City Planning Department interns, one Model Cities employee, and eight HUD interns. (A list of interviewers appears in appendix A). They interviewed a total of 105 households, which is 77% of the total number of households in Lightning. Contact at each household was attempted at least three times: Morning, afternoon, and evening. General Results The factual results of the survey show that: 1. Forty-four per cent (44%) of the respondents live in housing which is overcrowded, having one or more persons per room, 2. Of the 105 households surveyed, eighty-one per cent (81%) rented their residences and the remaining nineteen per cent (19%) were home-owners, Seventy-five per cent (75%) of the renters and eighty per cent (80%) of the homeowners stated that they could not afford to pay more for housing. 3. Seventy-four of the interviewers, or seventy per cent (70%) were unemployed, due to disability, retirement, household responsibility or simple lack of ability to find work, 4, The average length of residence in Lightning of the respondents was nineteen years, with a range of 1,5 months to sixty-six years, 5. The average age of the respondents was 52.4 years, with a range of twelve to eighty-two years. The attitudinal results of the survey show the following major findings: 1, The majority of interviewees (85%) like living in Lightning. However, of the ninety-eight respondents saying whether they would Like to live elsewhere (See question 12), fifty-three per cent (53%) answered affirmatively, with the remaining forty- seven per cent (47%) preferring to remain in Lightning. 2. Ninety-one out of the 105 interviewees feel like they are members of the Lightning community and belong with the people there. 3. Housing was the most frequently-mentioned problem in Lightning, with fifty-two per cent (52%) of the respondents Listing it. (See question 13). Detailed Results The complete interview schedule and tabulated results for each of the questions in the interview are presented in this section. Questions and Responses 1. How long have you lived in Lightning? Average length of residence - 19 years Range - 1.5 month to 66 years 2. Where do you work? Number of respondents unemployed, due to disability, retirement, household responsibility, etc. - 74 number of respondents employed - 29 3. How long does it take you to get to work? Average travel time to work - 30 minutes Range - 5 minutes to 14 hour fis 3 10, ae How do you get to work? Car - 8 *Bus - 15 Walk - 8 Taxi - 1 How old are you? Average age of respondent - 52.4 years old Range - 12 - 82 years old How many people live in this house? Average - 3.5 How many rooms are in this house? Average - 3.7 (46 houses with one or more persons per room) Do you own this house or rent it? Own - 20 *Rent - 85 If you are a renter, could you afford to pay more rent for a better house? Yes - 20 No - 64 Den't know - 1 you are a home owner, could you afford to buy a different house? Yes - 3 No -16 Don't know - l Do you like living here? *Yes = 89 No = 46 Why do you like living here? Nice neighbors - 14 Like the neighborhood - 13 ll. ae It is convenient - 13 All my friends live here - 10 Raised here or lived here a long time - 9 . Economic reasons = 8 No trouble or no one bothers me = 7 Nice landlord - 2 Why do you dislike living here? Dislike the people - 4 Dislike the neighborhood - 4 Sub-standard housing - 3 Not a good neighborhood for children - 2 Don't like living alone - 1 Do you feel like you are a member of this community and belong with these people? Yes - 91 No = 9 Guess so - l No answer - 4 Would you Like to Live somewhere else? Yes - 52 No - 46 Don't know - 4 No answer - 3 Why would you like to live somewhere else? Would like a better neighborhood - 13 Would like better housing - 12 Dislike people here - 3 Want a garden - 3 Not quiet here - 2 See a change as good = 2 Wants a bath or hot water - 2 Want to move for health purposes - 2 Don't like living alone - 1 Why would you not like to live somewhere else? This is “my home!" = 6 Would be hard to get used to new people and church - 4 Friends or relatives are here - 3 Close to church = 2 Close to work = 1 Like it here - 2 Couldn't afford to move - 1 13, What problems need to be solved first to improve the neighborhood? Housing Inadequate water service - 11 Traffic problems - 8 Street repairs - 8 Poor sanitation - 8 Inadequate facilities for children = 5 Crime and poor police protection - 4 Bad people in neighborhood - 3 Poor bus service = 1 Lack of job opportunities - 1 We have no problems I can think of - 15 No answer - 14 14. If you were to live elsewhere, what general area would you like most? Nowhere else - 21 S.W. - 2 N.W. - 10 ALHA project - 1 Griffin St. - l Dixie Hills - 2 Any nice place - 10 Hunter Homes - 2 Kirkwood = 2 Bowen Homes - L West side - 12 Out of state - 1 N.E. A&1l-1 Hunter & Mitchell - 2 South side - 1 University Homes - 1 Decatur - 1 High Rise for elderly - 1 Cascade Hts. area - 1 Howell Dr, - 1 Bankhead & Hightower =- 2 Scott crossing - 1 Simpson Rd. = 1 In woods - 1 Adamsville area - 1 Around here = 3 McDaniel project - 1 Vine St. = 1 15; 16, 17, What kind of place do you think Lightning is to grow up in? Very good- 3 Better than most - 8 Same as others - 42 Not as good - 24 Very bad - 16 No answer - 12 What do you like and dislike about living in Lightning? Here is a card which lists some things you might like about living here. Please pick the two you like most. If there is anything you like but it is not on the card, go ahead and pick it, A. I am close to work - 15 B. The rent is low - 34 C. Many of my friends live here - 55 D. I have lived here a long time - 43 E. I own my own home - 10 F. My relatives live in Lightning - 13° G. Other reasons Convenience - 6 Like the people People take care of me when I'm sick, better than last place I lived in There is nothing I like = 5 No answer = 5 This card lists some problems or things you might dislike about Lightning, Please pick the five you think are the biggest problems, If there is any problem you would like to pick but do not find on the list, go ahead and pick it. A. Not close to shopping = 27 B. Not close to work - 7 C. Lack of facilities and programs - 35 D. Inadequate bus service - 17 E. No health service - 24 F, Inadequate water service - 18 G. Unemployment - 18 H. Housing - 65 I. Education =- 3 J. Police protection - 34 K. Rat control = 42 L. Traffic and parking problems - 44 M. Other reasons - L. “WAL wr » «6 Trash collection and yard maintenance =- 5 Not close to any shopping centers = 4 Crime and juvenile delinquency - 2 Absentee landlords - 1 Need a laundromat - 1 Outside help is hurting us - 1 Cab fare is too high - 1 APPENDIX A List of Interviewers Frank Biggins, HUD Intern Gary Brown, HUD Intern Bill Hammer, HUD Intern John Hiscox, HUD Intern Louise Klaffner, HUD Intern John Matthews, Department of Planning Dot Metcalf, Department of Planning Intern Nancy McKnight, Department of Planning Intern Sonja Pevey, HUD Intern Steve Steinart, Model Cities Patricia Williams, HUD Intern APPENDIX B Interview Guide - Lightning A. General Instructions 1. Make sure that all questions included are answered; however, if a respondent refuses to answer any questions, go on to the next item on your questionnaire. Record reason for no response, if possible. You may include other questions; record them as well as the interviewee's answer. 2. Please record all answers as accurately and carefully as possible. 3. Let the interview continue if the interviewee wishes to talk. However, one hour should be the maximum time required for the interview. 4. Record the date of the interview, the time at which the interview begins and is completed, and the total amount of time the interview lasts, B. Introduction, The following general introduction should be used in the interview situation: “Hello, my name is + I represent the City of Atlanta (show your identification card). The Mayor and Board of Aldermen are concerned about the problems of the people living in Lightning, Mary different suggestions have been made about what the people of Lightning want and need from the city. However, we feel it is necessary to talk directly to the people of Lightning, so for the next few days we will be talking with all Lightning residents to help us find out exactly what the people want. Could you please take a few minutes to answer these questions?" If subject refuses to participate in the interview, try to find out why. If he indicates he is too busy, try to make an appointment to inter- view him at another date, If he has another reason, try again to get the interview. However, if he absolutely refuses, do not persist, Record a response, and if possible, the reason. If no one is at home, try to contact the household three different times. If some interviewees are not available at certain times, a convenient time will be worked out in the interviewing schedule so these people can be contacted, If more than one member of a household want to participate in the interview session, record their responses separately. Each interview record should contain the responses of one person only. However, if this is not possible, indicate that responses came from two or more people, Remember that the main purpose is to get answers to the basic questions contained in our questionnaire. If the interviewee has questions to ask of you, try to delay this discussion until the end of the formal interview. DO NOT, under any circumstances, attempt to answer questions of which you are unsure, The purpose of this interview is to find out what the people in Lightning think and want. If people ask questions you cannot answer, refer tnem to Mr. Johnny Robinson (you will have a supply of his personal cards to pass out to everyone). C. Close Close the interview by answering any questions you can, and by thanking the interviewee for his cooperation. State again that if he has any additional questions, he should call Mr. Johnny Robinson, Also, if he has any additional comments, attempt to record them on the answer sheet,
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 4, Folder topic: Planning department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 24, Document 12

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_024_012.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 24, Document 12
  • Text: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AIDE PROJECT { Rodent Control ) Progress Report on the Community Development Aide Project Grant Number 43040-01-69 FACILE TIES : The project is headquartered at the Atlanta Mmicipal Auditorium, 30 Courtland Street, N.E. and also has field centers located in the Pittsburgh and Northwest Perry EQA Centers. STAFE:. The following staff positions have been filled: 1 Director 1 Assistant Director 1 Clerk II 5 Pulletime Crew Chiefs 10 Full-time Environmental Health Trainees All Crew Chiefs and Environmental Health Trainees are non-professional indigenous residents of the two target areas. the staff persons listed above have received training in the following menner: 1. One week training session- Conmmicable Disease Center 2. Orientation and On-The-Job Training- Fulton County Health Department 3. Orientation and On-The-Job Training- City of Atlanta Public Works Department Sanitary Division Further assistance oe eer nae tate ¢ Gina dee Gee Health Department, Public Worke Department ( Sanitary Division ), Comprehensive and the Greater Atlanta Pest Control Association. Most of the administrative matters relating to thia project have been established through the Personnel Department of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. ine ip Reena ap dna ida pe he tape send cag lee ely ar ir hing a bogarde the cooperating agencies involved in this progran i. Mr. a A. Cantrell etter teeeeea e Fulton County Health ( Environmental flealth } 2. Me. John &. Gremmor ......-.++-Pulten County Health Department 3. Mr. Melvin Dolob....e..s+++.Fulton County Health Department 4 Mr. J. E. Kent.......cee0e0. Public Works Department ( Sanitary Division ) 5. Mr. Ernest Bathke......++.-. Atlanta Housing Authority 6. Mr. James A. Smith.......... City of Atlanta, Office Of Inspector of Bldg. 7. Mr. Louis Becker............Comprehensive Health 8. Mr. John Taylor.......sce... Ga. Department of Public Health Seca. 9. Mr. James Wright.......2...- Model Cities, Physical Planning Meetings are held occasionally with this group. ‘Two Rodent Control Committees have been established in the Pittsburgh and Nortimrest Perry commmities. The Chairmen are: Mra. Thelma Durden, Pittsburgh, Mra. Olivia Pullins, Northwest Perry. These comnittees are composed of approximately 10 members. Expansion of these committees are planned, EXPENDITURE INFORMATION: An approximately monthly rate of expenditure for January, February and March has been Twenty-One humdred dollars ( $2100 ). Plans are being made to obtain the full cooperation of the Pulton County Health Department and the Sanitation Department in expanding and maintaining this project after the first year of operation. However, the project will be requesting a second year of funding. ‘The project has begun operation. ‘The activities of the operational program at this point has been: (1) Project staff orientation and training (2) Commmity organization and surveying. the project will reach a normal level of operation approximately May Ist. However, Community organization which is felt to be a most important and during part of this program will be obtained hopefully by the end of April. Very little formal publicity has been given at this point. However citizens in the target areas have given enthusiastic support to the project ideas and goals and constitute the working committees. A general tentative timetable is enclosed COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AXDE PROJECT € Redent Contrei ) GENERAL TENTATIVE TIMETABLE~o+-eceenne Opientation and On-‘The Job Training ( Fulton County Health Department ) Orientation and On-The Job Training ( Sanitation Department conmonnenenAor iL = ana - 3-11 ¥ormal Publicity cvewecewnonlpril 14825 ‘Training- Organization Skills Establish Information Centers cocneevmewApril 25 Planning analysis, ani tebulation of ~~ + Poisoning Program aconnannonMany 5 Rat-Proofing Paint Campaign
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 24, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 4, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_004_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 4, Document 3
  • Text: INTRAOFFICE MEMORANDUM DISPOSITION To: Collier Gladin and George Aldridge Distribute From: Jack, Helen Hold File Info. Only Subject: = Schedule for Completion of Housing Conditions Survey DATE February 18, 1969 February 19: February 19: February 21: February 28: February 2: February 26: As first step in beginning housing conditions survey, approval for use of data processing time, personnel, and equipment must come from Mr. Milton Farris. This cipproval must be gained prior to ordering cards and other tools for the housing inspectors to use in the field. Since it will take three to four weeks after the order is placed to receive this equipment, it is imperative that approval from Mr. Farris be gained at the earliest possible date. Order cards and other data processing equipment. The actual date for this assignment will correspond to the date final approval for computer use is gained. Rough draft of procedural manual for field inspections will be submitted to George, John Watson, Collier, Jim Smith, and Bill Wofford for approval of form and information. Procedural manual will be completed, printed and distributed to housing inspectors and other interested persons, such as training personnel and non-inspecting members of the Housing Code Division and Planning paparieene, Definitions pertaining to housing conditions that are now in use by various agencies involved in the city's housing problems will be collected and assembled. From the assembled information, the Planning Department will prepare a list of definitions resulting from a consensus of opinion ai mail these definitions to the interested agencies by this date. OOOO MEMORAND UM February 18, 1969 Page Two February 28; Representatives of the agencies involved will meet to discuss the standardized March 3: March 3: March |7: March |7: June 20: June 23: definitions and reach final agreement. Final listing of standardized definitions will be submitted to the Housing Code Division to be used in the training program and actual survey. Intensive two-week training program for Housing Code Inspectors will begin. During these two weeks, the use of punch cards and check lists will be explained to the inspectors, cost estimation procedures will be standardized through field observation, and the standardized definitions will be explained in the field to the inspectors. The inspectors, after completing the two-week intensive training program, will enter the field to begin the actual survey. Data Processing Division will have cards printed and ready to take into the field by the inspectors. Mr. Steve Carlson of Data Processing will supervise the printing of original cards and programming of collected information back into computer. , Completion of field survey for entire city will take place on this date, allowing the inspectors 14 weeks in the field. By this date, collected, standardized information on every housing structure in the city will bie been submitted to the Data Processing Division by the Housing Code. Running of computer program to give information necessary for developing Housing Code Compliance Program will begin at this time. MEMORANDUM February 18, 1969 Page Three July 14: Computer printouts of necessary housing data will be presented to the Housing Code Division. That is, complete original information on conditions of structures within the city will be in the hands of the Housing Code Division at this time. August |: Housing Code Compliance Program for next five years wili be prepared jointly by Planning Department and Housing Code Division by this date. September |: Housing Code Compliance Program will be incorporated into application for Workable Program Recertification by the Planning Department.
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 4, Folder topic: Planning department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 24, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_024_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 24, Document 8
  • Text: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE | MARCH 17, 1969 Office of the White House Press Secretary THE WHITE HOUSE STATEMENT BY THE VICE PRESIDENT ON THE NATIONAL SUMMER YOUTH SPORTS PROGRAM Captain James A, Lovell has joined me today to announce a new program on earth rather than in space. While most Americans are familiar with astronaut Lovell's part in the successful Apollo 8 mission, he has another role and another mission as the President's Consultant on Physical Fitness and Sports. We believe he will be equally successful here. Today I am pleased to announce the establishment of a national summer youth sports program which will provide summer day camp experience for an estimated 75, 000 young people living in urban areas. The program will enable disadvantaged youngsters in 40 metropolitan areas across America to attend summer day camps which will be held on the campuses of 120 colleges, universities and junior colleges. Colleges will contribute their gymnasiums, swimming pools, tracks, playing fields and special purpose rooms as well as a full-time program director and capital sports equipment at a cost of $1.55 million. The balance of the program's cost will be financed through a transfer of $3 million in OEO funds to the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare which will assume responsibility for the program. The program will be administered by the National Collegiate Athletic Association under contract to the Department of HEW. The President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports which I chair as Vice President, has been assigned by HEW Secretary Finch to supervise the program. Captain Lovell directs staff activities for the Council. This national program is modeled after the highly successful summer sports program conducted last year at the University of Southern California for youngsters from the ghetto area near its campus. The 40 metropolitan areas have been chosen on the basis of population size and percentage of poverty level families, Our prime target is to reach the inner city youngster who has no recourse but the streets during the long, hot summer. Obviously we cannot reach every child we want. We hope to reach many in the heart of these c'ties' poverty areas to provide at least a 5 week respite of recreation and relaxed education. This is a beginning. We are tapping resources heretofore unused and reaching youngsters he retofore unknown. As Captain Lovell knows from experience, you cannot reach vhe moon on the first flight. But you can never reach the moon if you will not try. This year's success will pave the way for greater participation and expand horizons of hope where hope is most needed -- rignt here at home. 7a OF
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 24, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 24, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_024_019.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 24, Document 19
  • Text: GAMBRELL & MOBLEY 3900 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 DAVID H. GAMBRELL JOHN H. MOBLEY ALBERT SIDNEY JOHNSON J. ROBERT OWENS June 17, 1969 404/525-8571 ROBERT D, FEAGIN Ill JEREMIAH LUXEMBURGER LEON L. RICE III Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. City Hall 68 Mitchell Street, S.W. ~ Atlanta, Georgia 30334 Re: tlanta Youth Council Dear Mayor Allen: John Cox has tendered and the Executive Committee of the Youth Council has accepted his resignation from his job as Executive Director as of July 31, 1969. John is leaving the Youth Council to take Frank Thomas' job as Executive Director of the Butler Street Y. The Executive Committee of the Youth Council feels that John has served the Council diligently and effectively during his tenure as Executive Director. Before attempting to recruit a successor to John Cox, we wanted to ask you if you had any suggestions for a suc- cessor that we could offer to the committee in charge of selecting such a person and also to ask you if your con- ception of the Youth Council or of the job to be filled had changed. As you may remember, there was some talk last Fall of consolidating the Youth Council with another group such as the Crime Commission or the Community Re- lations Commission. At that time, we were anxious to get the Council functioning and its programs underway and did not want to get involved in a re-examination of its pur- poses or its place in the structure of City Government. That is still a fair assessment of the sentiment of the Executive Committee. Nevertheless, if changes in the status of the Council are contemplated, the Executive Committee felt that these changes should be known to it and taken into account in its process of recruiting a successor to John Cox. Very truly yours, ATLANTA CHILDREN & YOUTH SERVICES ao A “4 / { Lerces b Z lhe pte J¢@rry} /tukxemburgt rE Chairman JL/kt Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. June 17, 1969 Page 2 Ces Mr. Dan Sweat Mr. John Cox Mr. Michael Trotter Mr. DeJongh Franklin Mrs. Margaret Perdue Mr. Fletcher Coombs
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 24, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 4, Document 18

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_004_018.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 4, Document 18
  • Text: A RESOLUTION BY FINANCE COMMITTEE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE WHEREAS, the City has just completed a Community Facilities Plan which indicates the need and desirable location for many capital projects throughout the City, and WHEREAS, the City expects to complete a transportation plan in the near future in conjunction with the five county region and the State Highway Department of Georgia, and WHEREAS, this transportation plan will indicate the need and desirable location for new and improved transportation facilities throughout the City and the region, and WHEREAS, the City has engaged in a capital improvement programming effort for a number of years and has become increasingly effective in this activity, and WHEREAS, for the first time a means of financing a limited amount of capital improvements on a continuing basis has become available, and WHEREAS, the implementation of plans and projects to reach the City's goals and objectives requires adequate financing and continuing scheduling according to realistic priorities as well as close coordination. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that those departments and agencies of the City of Atlanta aiding in preparation of the 1969-1973 Capital Improvement Program make every possible effort to ensure that their projects and proposals for the coming five-year program reflect accurately and realistically their goals, objectives and plans as expressed in the Community Facilities Plan and the soon to be completed Transportation Plan. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that this effort be on a comprehensive, continuing, coordinated and cooperative basis.
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 4, Folder topic: Planning department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 24, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_024_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 24, Document 3
  • Text: METRO - ATLANTA YOUTH OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM 68 MITCHELL STREET, RM. 1201-B ATLANTA, GA, 30303 522-4463, EXT, 437 or 525-8275 Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr., Hononary Chairman Clarence E. Elsas, General Chairman Mrs. Carrie B. Wright, V. Gen. Chairman John Cox, Executive Secretary Mr. Dan Sweat Mayor's Office City Hall Atlanta, Ga. 30303 Dear Mr. Sweat: Liller, Neal, Battle and Lindsey has again this year agreed to serve as the publicity consultants for the Youth Opportunity Program. As we have reviewed and evaluated the 1968 publicity effort, I feel that the generous resource of Liller, Neal, Battle and Lindsey has not been effectively and fully utilized. This is especially true of publicizing, promoting and reporting the various activities to the media for maximum coverage. We have set up a meeting with Mr. 0. B. Moore, Consultant from Liller, Neal, Battle and Lindsey and other agencies to discuss developing guidelines and procedures for reporting activities to the various media. The meeting will be held Thursday, April 24, City Hall, Committee Room #4 at 10:00 a.m, If you cannot attend, please send a representative, Sincerely, Laon feats Zenas Sears, Chairman Publicity Sub Committee, Y¥.0.P.
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 24, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 24, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_024_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 24, Document 5
  • Text: PRESIDENT’S COUNCIL ON YOUTH OPPORTUNITY WASHINGTON , 20006 April 22, 1969 Dear Dan: I want to express to you my deep appre- ciation for your participation in the recent Conference of Youth Coordinators. Your experience and your personal insights were a major factor in the success of the conference. Thank you for all that you have done to expand opportunities for disadvantaged youth. We look forward to working with you in the continuing effort. Sincerely, Gerald W. Christenson Executive Director Mr. Daniel Sweat Director of Governmental Liaison Room 209, City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 YOUTH OPPORTUNITY CAMPAIGNS: JOBS «SUMMER CAMPING - FEDERAL CAREERS - SHARE YOUR SUMMER = STAY IN SCHOOL
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 24, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 24, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_024_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 24, Document 20
  • Text: THE KENTUCKY YOUTH CONFERENCE The Kentucky Youth Conference was begun in 1967 by former Attorney General Robert Matthews to seek among the young people of Kentucky the leadership necessary to curb Kentucky's juvenile delin- quency problem. In 1966 Kentucky got, for the first time, a roughly accurate look at its juvenile delinquency problem. In that year, the Attorney General's Office, in cooperation with the Department of Child Welfare, developed a voluntary and uniform juvenile offense reporting system. They found the over-all picture bleak, showing little end in sight to the rising tide of juvenile crime in the state of Kentucky. The Kentucky Youth Conference was designed to do something about this problem. It is based on the theory that young people, if given the opportunity, can themselves develop solutions to the problem of juvenile delinquency; that their energy, insight, and imagination can- not be overlooked; and that they should seize the leadership in dealing with this problem. These concepts of the Conference became a reality in August of 1967 and again in August of 1968 when more than 800 high school age people from all parts of Kentucky gathered at Eastern Kentucky University in Richmond to ask themselves what they could do about juvenile crime in their local communities. Their discussions, stimulated by excellent speakers, programs, and the most compre- hensive data on juvenile crime available, sparked many ideas for local projects. Youth Conference delegates have organized a teen jury in Henderson; a three-county Central Teen Council in northern Kentucky involving county judges and police judges; a youth employ- ment service in Versailles which, in its first year of operation, found jobs for some eighty young people in the area; and a Boyd County program which has involved pre-teen children of indigent parents in the area in picnics and horseback riding, Many such programs throughout the Commonwealth have met with such great success, unprecedented community interest and widespread support that the annual Conference will now remain a permanent institution in Kentucky. Delegates to the Conference have been sponsored in the past by more than twenty thousand Kentuckians representing corporations, labor unions, civic clubs, schools, and church organizations. These groups, along with various other foundations and youth organizations interested in the development of Kentucky youth and the prevention of juvenile de- linquency, lend financial support to the Conference efforts. The Ken- tucky Youth Conference is now sponsored by the privately financed, non-profit Kentucky Juvenile Delinquency Prevention and Youth Devel- opment Foundation of Louisville, Kentucky and has begun a Sustaining Member Program intended to broaden its financial base, while giving Kentuckians a chance to participate in its efforts in an important and essential way. Throughout the entire state businesses, organizations and individuals recognize and support the tremendous potential of the Kentucky Youth Conference, and of Kentucky young people, to mobi- lize the resources of the state in effective combat against juvenile delinquency and to explore new areas of constructive citizenship for the young.
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 24, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 24, Document 43

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 24, Document 43
  • Text: “ch ep FA a -. ATLANTA CHILDREN AND YOUTH SERVICES COUNCIL 1201-B CITY HALL j PHONE 522-4463 - EX. 437 ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 Jerry Luxemburger, Chairman John W. Cox, Executive Director October 2, 1969 Mr. Duane Beck Executive Director Community Council of the Atlanta Area, Inc 1000 Glenn Building 120 Marietta Street, NW Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Re: Atlanta Youth Council-Drug Education Project 14th Street Area Dear Duane: I am presently Acting Chairman of the Atlanta Youth Council, and am writing you in that capacity. The Youth Council, at its September meeting, decided that the Drug Education Project in the 14th Street area was an item which required further study by the Council and the Interagency Committee on Alcohol and Drugs before it could commit wholeheartedly to it. As you know, Lewis Dinkins has been trying to find some space in that community for housing a clinic started last summer, and to date, has been unable to do so. : We will certainly continue these efforts. Also, Lewis contacted Fulton County Health Department in efforts to ascertain resources which they had available for drug education and found that they were not sub- stantial, to say the least. After considerable discussion, the Youth Council Board decided that any drug education activity should be, at present, under the juris- diction of the Interagency Committee on Alcohol and Drugs which was created in cooperation with your organization. AN AGENCY OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA aoe Because of its broader scope, the Interagancy Committee, should consider how such an education project could be handled. For example: 1. What sources should be used for statements about drugs? 2. Which authorities should be considered correct? 3. Can statements be made? When’ these preliminary decisions and guidelines are set by the Inter- agency Committee, the Youth Council will be in a better position to set a course of effective coordination and action for these youth. Sincerely yours, y jt (Mrs) nhgfes Perdue, Chairman (Acting) CC: Dan Sweat / Jerry Luxemburger John Cox Lewis Dinkins Matthew Patton MP: vwp
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 24, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 24, Document 47

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 24, Document 47
  • Text: ATLANTA YOUTH CONGRESS MICHAEL R. HOLLIS PAMELA WILLIAMS President Vice President MERI CURTIN, Corresponding Secretary ALTHEA TURK, Recording Secretary 68 MITCHELL STREET, 1201-B WILLIAM TOLIVER, Treasurer ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 GREGORY McKINNEY, Parliamentarian 522-4463, EXT. 437 BARBARA HARRIS, Reporter DO'S AND DON'TS AT CHRISTMAS TIME With this year's Christmas season already upon us, the youth of this city wants each of you to help make all of us better citizens by eliminating the causes of delinquent acts particularly dur- ing the Christmas season. Don't turn a good youth bad by leaving the doors of temptation open to hin. DONET #12 1. leave keys in car 2. leave packages visable in your car; lock them in the trunk. 3. flash money around 4, leave car unlocked 5. lay your purse or wallet down; keep it in your hand 6. leave your house unlocked, even for a minute DO!!!! 1. leave a light on when you leave home 2.. have an escort at night when you are out (ladies) 3. know where your children are 4. keep your doors locked 5. be cautious of door to door salesmen REMEMBER...-.eOnly a small percentage of our youth are delinquents... let's make this percentage even smaller!!!! “TO SEEK A NEWER WORLD”
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 24, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 24, Document 39

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 24, Document 39
  • Text: MICHAEL H. TROTTER Citizens & SouTHERN National Bank BuILpine ATLANTA, GEORGIA GOS3OS August 11, 1969 The Hon, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor, City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mayor Allen: Ithas been my privilege to serve as a member of the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council since the date of its organization more than three years ago. A great deal of time and effort was required during the early years of the Council's existence to place its operations on a firm footing. I believe that this goal has now been accomplished and that the Council can continue to make a worthwhile contribution to the dis- charge by the city government of its responsibilities to the citizens of Atlanta, Because of numerous other demands upon my time and because I have already contributed to the Council the thoughts and ideas that I have concerning its operation, I hereby submit my resignation, effective September 30, 1969, as a member of the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council, Best regards, Wield W. SreliSior MICHAEL H, TROTTER MHT: jj cc: Mr, Jeremiah Luxemburger
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 24, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 24, Document 34

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_024_034.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 24, Document 34
  • Text: WayYMon S. WRIGHT FO. ORAWER 1734 ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30301 June 9, 1969 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 My dear Mayor Allen: Thank you very much for your kind invitation to join with you on the "Come See Tour" of Atlanta's Special Summer Program and Youth Opportunity activities. I regret deeply that I had to change my plans to attend because of a heavy schedule at the office that I did not anticipate. I am confident that I missed some revealing sights, so at the earliest convenience I will try to see all of the points of interest that are indicated on the schedule. Again thank you and please accept my regrets. Very truly yours, Naps Id Waymon Scott Wright Staff Representative WSW:bs
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 24, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 25, Document 5

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 25, Document 5
  • Text: SENDING BLANK CALL CHARGE LETTERS FT 5/21/69 TO ! = Be er UNION “ffs The Honorable Spiro T. Agnew Vice President of the United States Washington, D.C. Thank you for your wire advising me of the funds now available to help expand transportation in support of Summer Youth Programs. We will be awaiting further ee from the Program Administrator. Ivan Allen, Jr. , Mayor Send the above message, subject fo the terms on back hereof, which are hereby agreed to PLEASE TYPE OR WRITE PLAINLY WITHIN BORDER—DO NOT FOLD 1269—[R 4-55)
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 25, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 24, Document 36

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 24, Document 36
  • Text: June 23, 1969 ste" Mr. Jerry Luxemburger Crm r Chairman, Atla ta Children and Youth Services Council 3900 First National Bank Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 ee Dear Jerry: I have your letter of June 17th regarding the future of the Atlanta Youth Council and the replacement of John Cox. Iam asking Dan Sweat to get in touch with you and arrange a time when you, Dan and George Berry may sit down and discuss the matter, and then we shall decide what course of action to pursue. He ivill be in touch with you shortly. Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. tAJr:am
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 24, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 24, Document 48

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_024_048.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 24, Document 48
  • Text: December 10, 1969 Mrs. Rhodes L. Perdue Acting Chairman Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council 121 Memerial Drive, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia Dear Margaret, i Thank you for your letter of December 9 the appointments to the Atlanta Children ard Youth Services Council. ie This is to approve the request as outlined in your letter. With best wishes for the holiday season, lam Sincerely yours, | Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor IAJr:lrd
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 24, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 2, Folder 4, Complete Folder

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 4, Complete Folder
  • Text: ~ ' --. ·. - AN ORDINANCE BY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE WHEREAS, by ordinance of December 21, 1964, the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta, Georgia, caused to be created a standing committee of the Board of Aldermen entitled Urban Renewal Policy Committee, as set forth in Section 2-40.2 of the Code of Ordinances, City of Atlanta, Georgia effective July I, 1965, as amended, and WHEREAS, it is deemed desirable and in the public interest that the number of standing committees of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta, Georgia be reduced in number and that such action would be in keeping with the precedent established by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen in 1967, and WHEREAS, it has been determined that the functions and responsibilities of the Urban Renewal Policy Committee can readily and expeditiously be transferred to another standing committee of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta, Georgia, namely, the Planning and Development Committee, and WHEREAS, such action should increase and improve communications between and coordination of activities of both the City of Atlanta, Georgia and its urban renewal agent, the Atlanta Housing Authority of the City of Atlanta, Georgia. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta as follows: I. That Section 2-40. 2 of the Code of the City of Atlanta is hereby repealed and the Urban Renewal Policy Committee is abolished. 2. That Section 2-40.1 (b) of the Code of the City of Atlanta is hereby amended by striking said paragraph in its entirety and inserting in lieu thereof the follovving: (b)Membership. The Planning and Development Committee shall be composed of eight (8) members of the Board of Aldermen appointed by th e Mayor and two (2) advis.ory me mbe rs from th e Housing �.---c ~--1-, l I -2- Authority of the City of Atlanta appointed by the Chairman of the Housing Authority of the City of Atlanta. The Housing Authority members of this committee shal I have the power to vote only on those items of housing and urban renewal which are going before the Housing Authority's Board of Commissioners for further action. The Mayor shcil I appoint from the Board of Aldermen the chairman of said committee and the other seven (7) members. The Mayor sh al I appoint the Planning and Development Committee so that a representation is obtained of aldermanic committees concerned with community development, redevelopment, and improvement. 3. That Section 2-40.1 (c) of the Code of the City of Atlanta is hereby amended by striking said paragraph in its entirety and inserting in Ii2u thereof the fol lowing: (c) Functions, responsibilities. Th is Planning and Development Committee shall have the primary responsibility to review and coordinate the short and long range plans and programs of all city efforts in the fields of community development, redevelopment, housing, foe ii ities and improvements, and to make suggestions to other appropriate aldermanic committees and to recommend actions and policies for adoption by the Board of Aldermen to insure maximum coordination and the highest quality of urban community development throughout the City. This responsibility shall include but is not limited to the review and evaluation of the elements of the comprehensive (general) plan development by the Planning Department with guidance from the Atlanta - Fulton County Joint Planning Board; th is comprehensive plan to be composed of at least a �r ~-·rr =-= - -· - - ~ I -3land use plan, transportation plan and a community facilities plan with public improvements program. The committee shal I further be responsible for developing pol icy recommendations on al I other matters concerning the planning and coordination of future city developments including, specifically, the Community Improvement Program (CIP), Open Space, Urban Beautification, the 1962 Federal Highway Act, the Workable Program for Community Improvement, Urban Renewal and Neighborhood Development Program, preliminary and project or execution plans, and other related urban renewal matters formerly under the responsibi Iity of the Urban Renewal Committee or the Urban Renewal Policy Committee. The Committee shall further review all applications for federal grants that are referred from the Grants Review Board for planning considerations to determine their conformity with adopted overall plans and policies for the development of the City. BE IT FURTHER ORDAINED that all ordinances and parts of Ordinances in conflict.with this Ordinance be and the same are hereby repealed. �C IT~Y OF .i\_TL TA. CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 DEPARTMENT OF ~ COLLIER B. GLADIN. Direccor February 20, 1969 MEMORANDUM i TO: Charles Davis and Bill Wofford FROM: CollierG ~ SUBJECT: Schedule for Completion of Housing Conditions Survey Attached for your information is the step-by-step program which our staffs have jointly prepared for the update of our housing conditions data. As I understand Mr. Farris has given approval to our request to proceed with this study, and also I understand that our staffs met with representatives from IBM th is morning and all the equipment and cards have been ordered. I am very pleased with the action to date and want to thank you for your cooperation. CG/jp Attachment �I r T RAOFFICE To: MJE ! ORAiN UM DISPOSITION Collier Gladin and George Aldridge Distribut e From: Hold Jack, Helen File Subject: Schedule for Completion of Housing Conditions Survey D1\TE February 18, 1969 February 19: Info. Only As first step In beginning housing conditions survey, approval for use of data processing time, personnel, and equipment must come from Mr. Milton Farris. This c:pproval must be gained prior to ordering cards and other tools for the housing inspectors to use in the field. Since it will take three to four weeks after the order is placed to receive th is equipment, it is imperative that approval from Mr. Farris be gained at the earliest possible date. February 19: Order cards and other data processing equipment. The actual date for this assignment will correspond to the date final approval for computer use is gained. February 21: Rough draft of procedural manual for field inspections will be submitted to GP.orge, John Watson, Collier, Jim Smith, and Bill Wofford for approval of form and information. February 28: Procedural manual will be completed, printed and distributed to housing inspectors and other interested persons, such as training personnel and non-inspecting members of the Housing Code Division and Planning Department. - February 21 : Definitions pertaining to housing conditions that are now in use by various agencies involved in the city's housing problems wi 11 be collected and assembled . Fe bruary 26: From the assembled information, the Planning Department will prepa re a list of de fi nit ions result ing from a consensus of opinion a nd mail these defin it ions to the in terested agen cie s by this da te . 0 0 0 0 �MEMORANDUM February 18, 1969 Page Two February 28: Representatives of the agencies involved will meet to discuss the standardized definitions and reach final agreement. March 3: Final listing of standardized definitions will be submitted to the Housing Code Division to be used in the training program and actual survey. March 3: Intensive two-week training program for Housing Code Inspectors will begin. During these two weeks, the use of pun~h cards and check lists will be I I - explained to the inspectors, cost estimation procedures will be standardized through field observation, and the standardized definitions will be explained in the field to the inspectors. March 17: The inspectors, after completing the two-week intensive training program, will enter the field to begin the actual survey. March 17: Data Processing Divisie,n will have cards printed and ready to take into the field by the inspectors. Mr. Steve Carlson of Data Processing will supervise the printing of original cards and programming of collected information back into computer. June 20: Completion of field survey for entire city will take place on this bett e r than l a s t pl a ce I lived i n There is nothi ng I like - 5 No answer - 5 17. This c ard lists s ome pr ob l ems or things you might dislike about Light ning . Pleas e p i ck the fi ve you think a r e t he b i gges t pr ob l ems. If t he r e is any probl em you would like to pick but do not find on the list, go ahead a nd pick i t . A. Not clos e t o shopp ing - 27 B. No t clo se to wor k - 7 C. Lack of fa cilitie s and programs - 35 D. I nadequate bu s s erv i ce - 17 E. No healt h serv ice - 24 F. Inadequate water service - 18 G. Unemployment - 18 H. Hous ing - 65 I. Education a 3 J. Police pro te ction - 34 K. Rat control - 42 L. Traffic and parking prob lems - 44 �- 7 - M. - Other reasons 1. Trash collection and yard maintenance - 5 2. Not close to any shopping centers - 4 l. Crime and juvenile delinquency - 2 4. Absentee landlords - 1 5. Need a laundromat - 1 6. Outside help is hurting us - 1 7. Cab fare is too high - 1 �List of Interviewers Frank Biggins, HUD Intern Gary Brown, HUD Intern Bill Hanuner, HUD Intern John Hiscox, HUD Intern Louise Klaffner, HUD Intern John Matthews, Department of Planning Dot Metcal f, Department of Planning Intern Nancy McKnight, Department of Pla nning Intern Sonja Pevey, HUD Intern Steve Steinart, Model Cities Patricia Williams, HUD Intern �APPENDIX B Interview Guide - Lightning A. General Instructions 1. Make sure that all questions included are answered; however, if a responde nt refuses to answe r a ny questions, go on to the next item on your questionna ire. Re cord reason f or no r e sponse, if possible. You may include other questions; record them as well as the interviewee's a nswer. B. 2. Please record all answers as accurately and ca refully as possible. 3. Let the i nterview continue if the i nterviewee wi shes to t a lk. Howeve r , one hour should be the max i mum time required fo r the interview. 4. Record the date of t he interview, the time at which the interview begins and i s comple t ed , a nd the t ot a l amount of time the interview l a sts. Introduction. The followi ng gener a l introduct i on shoul d be us ed in t he interview situation : " Hello , my name i s _ ______ I represent t he Ci t y of Atlanta (show your identi f icat ion card ) . The Mayor and Boa rd of Aldermen a r e concerned about t he problems of the people living in Lightning . Ma~y diff erent s ugge stions have bee n made about wha t the pe ople of Lightning want and need fr om the city. However, we f eel i t is neces sary t o talk di r e ctly t o the people of Lightni ng , so f or the next few day s we will be t a lking with a l l Lightning residents to he lp us find out exactly wha t the pe ople want. Cou l d you p lease t ake a f ew minutes t o answer these que stions?" If sub j e ct refuse s t o participate i n the int erview , try to find out why . If he indica tes he i s too busy, try t o make an appoi ntme nt t o int erv iew him at a nother dat e. I f he has another reason , try again t o get the interview. However , if he abs olutely re f uses, do not per sist. Re cord a response , a nd i f possible, t he r e a son. I f no one i s a t home , t r y to contact the hou:::ehold t h ree different t i me s. I f some i nt e r vieuee s a r e not av ai l able at certain times , a conve nient t ime will be worked out in t he i ntervi ew i ng schedule so t hese people can be co nt a cted. If more than one member of a hous eho ld want t o participate in the interview session, rec or d the i r responses s eparat ely . Ea ch inte rview record should contai n t he r esponse s of one pers on only . However, if this is not possible , i nd icate that responses came from two or more people. �,. Remember that the main purpose is to get answers to the basic questions contained in our questionnaire. If the interviewee has questions to ask of you, try to delay this discussion until the end of the fo rmal interview. DO NOT, under any circumstances, attempt to answer questions of which you are unsure. The purpose of this int erview is to find out what the people in Lightning think and want. If people ask questions you cannot answer, refer theM to Mr . Johnny Robinson (you will have a supply of his personal cards to pass out to everyone). C. Close Close the interview by answering any questions you can, and by thanking the interviewee for his cooperation. State agai n that if he has any additional questions, he should call Mr . Johnny Robinson. Also, if he has any addit ional comments, attempt to record them on the answer sheet. �l INTERVIEW GUIDE -- PLUN KETTOWN A. Genera l Instructions. 1. This is a gen~ral guide for conducting a house-to- house survey in the Plunkettown neighborhood. Make sure thal· al I qu es tions included a re .answered; however, if a respondent refuses to answer any questions, go on J-o the nex l· item on your questionaire. Record reason for no res ponse if possible. You may include other questions; record them as well as the intervi ewee 's answer. 2. Plea se record all answers as accura te ly and carefully as possible. 3. Let the interview continue if the interviewee wishes to talk, Howeve r, one hour should, in most cases, be the maximum time required for the in terview. 4. Reco rd the date of the intervi ew , the time at which the interview beg ins a nd 1s com- pleted, and the total amount of time the interview lasted. Reco rd the number of times the interview is interrupted by air craft noise, and the approx imate length of such interrupJ-ions. B. Introduction. The following general introduction should be used in the interview situation: name 1s identification card). living in Plunkettown. 11 Hello, my I represent the <;ity of Atlanta (show your The Mayor and Board of Aldermen are concerned about the people Many different suggestions have been made about #wo t the people of Plunkettown want from the City. to the people in Plunkettown. However, we feer that it is necessary to talk di rectly For the next few days we will be talking with all Plunkettow n re sidents and ~sking them questions to help us find out exactly what the people · want. . Could · you please take a few minute s to answer these questions? �i If subject refuses to participate in the interview, try to find out why. If he indicates he is too busy, try to make an appointment 1-o interview him at another date. anol"her reason, try again to get the interv ie w. not persist. If he has Howe ver , if he absolutely refuses, do Record a response and, if possib le, the reason. If more than one member of a household wants to participate in the inte rv iew session, record their answers separa te ly. E.ach interview record should contain the responses of one person only. However, if this is not possible, indicate that responses come from two or more people. Remember that the main purpose is to get answers to the basic que$tions contained §1:IOJ:llquestionaire. in If the interv iewee has questions to a sk of you, try to delay this discussion until the end of the formal interview. DO NOT, under any circumstances, attempt to answer questions of which you are unsure. the peopl e in Plunkettown th ink and wa nL The purpose of this interview is to find out what If people ask questions you cannot answe r, refer them to Mr. Johnny Robinson or George Aldridge. cards to pass out to everyone). (You wi 11 have a supply of their personal �l -- @id :E;7· ~ld:i? ,. Wb@l'l'I 4, ~ ll.~q !, lbai c.1{6) o, &.Nu~ ... ~ ~---~------ --- )',o,w.! .ll. ? d1')\t)· ,. t - -- c;:.-:re: ,-. ,, ~ll '.u t:r~ 1..r..,,.{ L 8,. &, ' XI' 10. 11 ~ \!.>.!!111 ? Do yot ilk 1 ~n.n!J a What do 'lo b Wh.at do yau l ii C . l'J be Kow would l E )'0- o r l i 0 I I 't'_..:, ... - ~ ~ . ~ - - - - ... - · ~ .....:::..-..=.... - ..::::.. - �. l b It tht . W4!re ould ynu U v rco r0ople th~c thy sll o-, her 11 t r~l gT u uh v 8e l2 ~uggeat~ to th . dCIV. - __ - ··-~-~= 1._ ---~- --~- . - ~ ~ out together t~ . new locstion .--- ~- - - .. -- ~---·--- .. ,.,. ? coae tor unk .tto.m ~nd Whdlt d,:, y "' think ebou~ th1" id 1e?_ _ _____ . ~~ out togE-th el -- .. ___ _,__,_ ·--- --··-- ------------ - - ~-----' ?) If you could\ v ~lft w t g nerel ar a vould you lik het Why? 14 ~ ~ Vt> y 1'U &rdly ~t wll ' u i 1f ,d o f s ,> f n7 V'°r~ a• f1yfng o'ftir 'bc,,tb r you? the st CMICb Wh t --- Jl.31 · -· _ _ _ llvtng h r ~ ~it T ?6 Can you kou mu h cirn 1. a>•t? 1'1"' IXIUCh ~ X , ~ Joy n •~ &e-t t: r uu,-t'I tl t.h~t p IIC --- ~- -~ - u th n• P urk ttl'flffl l Not 8\l t -=I _J I t ~ t\d .-n t gtow ... fll\)8 t 8 Jio r: s o thtt.t .,9 " t oc,d ---~r- " l8 C V ry t,. d �" Y' .. · ., u • .h J r • .a t I i .,.,. h ... ,' . [ t. tn n .. , 'l .. .. ti .., t ~ ,.. ,. !',l I 'II"•' I �00 0 3 .M.AP 4 II 12 A OF CITY OF ATLANTA IOARD Of AlDERMEN - - -- GRAPHIC SCAL~ ' _,.., -~~ ,.....- - ,; ATLANTA-FULTON COUNTY lGOl.,.,.YGOIGG. . , , .. ., I JAN . • . 0 (.... , . • W:••OD C . - N (ltlllUONtO JOINT PLANNING BOARD ATLANTA - GEORGIA J9e7 C n - w..• "°"""-COO. -......... .. ,........u I ·c I ATLANTA - FULTON COUNTY JOI N T PLANNING BOARD "'" i,~'7';,:.-J,c:!:.. <>• .. ,.,,o~ ..,toPYR•0hT .,. ... ••v,,,o•-C,:,P,R>6 nT-O,S9 o.t,_,.,._c"°"o.'""' ,,..;, oov,,,o.. ..,.,.co,-,.,a.,,.,,., ,,,.,,,o~ ••o=•••••• · D HOUSING COOE COMPLIACE PROGRAM 1970 -1971 1· E H ISTINGNEIGH60RHOOO OCYELOPMENTPROGRU IS ~ UR8ANIIENEWAL J.llf AS COOEtNrORCE:MENT Afl1!:AOIYISIONS .,.,,. . . .. , ~ ,....... .-C;) __ .,.,..- .... ,L'_, F G K ---1 L I M ... I 00 10 1_1_ 12 �ATTITUDE SURVEY OF THE RE SIDENTS OF PLUNKETTOWN City of At l anta Dep artment of Pl anning Augus t 11 , 1969 �- This report presents the results of an attitude survey conducted among the people of the Atlanta section of Plunkettown by the City of Atlanta Department of Planning at the request of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen . The purpose of this survey was to explore, on a broad base, the atti tudes of the people toward living in Plunke ttown versus living elsewhere, and to discover which aspects of life in Plunkettown the people consider to be major problems . The ultimate purpose of this report is to provide information concerning the people ' s desires toward r emai ning in Plunket town to help the Board of Aldermen in making the dec ision as to whether or not an urban renewal project in Plunkettown will be a residential rehabilitation and rebuilding project. Interviews were conducted during the daytime hours on Friday, August 1 , and Monday , August 4, and during the evening hours on Tuesda y, August 5. The group of interviewers who conducted the survey included t wo members of the Planning Department staff and five summer i nterns from the Mayor ' s office . All interviewers were white . (A list of int erviewers appears in Appendix A.) Methodology The survey was c onducted through use of a door -to-door ora l interview . An attempt was made t o conduct at le as t one interview in each household. Contact was attempted at each household at leas t three times : morning , afternoon , and evening. In all, interviews were conducted in eighty-two hous eholds , or 85% of all households. The interview questionnaire contained two basic types of questions . The first type asked f or factu al information such as place of work, travel time to work, number of persons in the household, and ownership of property . The second asked atti tud inal questions about the desirability of Plunket town as a place to live as compared to other places. General Reoults The factual resul ts of the survey show that: 1. The workers who live in Plunkettown have an average reported t ravel time to work of twenty minutes by car; and that over half ( 26 of 41) work within two miles of Plunkettown. 2. Thirty-eight per cent (38%) of the present housing is overcrowded, having one or more persons per room. 3. Of the eighty-two households surveyed, thirty-two (39%) owned their houses while the remaining fifty (61%) are renters. �- 2 - 4. Ten of the interviewed f ami lies own property other than th at upon whi.ch they are living . Six ow-n other property in Plunkettown . four others own property in Cl ayt on County, lorthwest Fulton County, East Point, a nd Eas t Atlanta . These four owners reported plans to build new homes on this property . 5. Forty-two of the eighty-two interviews were conducted during aircra ft peak tra ffic periods . These forty-a~o interviews l asted an average of seventeen minutes and were interrupted an average of seven times for an average of eighty-one seconds per interview, e.g 8% of the interview time was lost due to aircraft noise. 0 The attitudinal results of the survey show the following ma j or results: 1. A majority of interviewees woul d prefer l iving e l sewher e to living in Plunket town as it is presently constituted . (See Question 11.) 2. A ma jority of the interviewees consider aircraft noise, a problem which canno t be fully solved, to be a ma jor probl em to living in Plunke ttown . (See Questions 10a, 15 , and 17b.) 3. There appears to be a desire among some o f the interviewees to move together to a " New Plunkettown". At this point in time , fully reli able attitudes on this issue c annot be expected as the people do not now h ave a real opportunity to consider this choice . (See Questions 12 and the "Many of my friends live here" response in 17 a .) 4. If they were to move, there is a definite desir e among the interviewees to remain in an outlying area, as opposed to downtown , where they c an occupy single family type houses. ( See Questions 12a and 13.) Det ailed Results This section presents the complete interview form and the tabul ated results for each question asked. Interview instructions are presented in Appendix B. uestions and Responses 1. How long have you lived in Plunkettown? Average l ength of res idence among interviewees . - 24.5 years �- 3 - 2. How old are you? Average age of interviewees - 50 .5 year s Range - 13 years to 90 years 3. Where do you work ? Within two miles - 26 Fur t her than two miles - 15 4. How l ong does i t t ake you to get to work? Av erage - 19 minutes Range - 2 minutes to 1 hour 5. How do you ge t t o work ? Car - 35 Wal k - 4 Bus ~·- 2 6. How many people live in this house ? Average - 3.4 7. How many rooms in this house ? Average - 4 . 0 ( 31 houses with one or more persons per room) 8. Do you own this house or rent it ? Own - 32 Rent - 50 9. IF OWN : Do you own any other property? Yes - 10 No - 2 2 I F SO: Where? Plunkettown - 6 Elsewhere - 4 10. Do you like l iving here ? Yes - 50 No - 31 �.- 4 - a. What do you like about living here? ,':It's home - 14 I've been here a long t ime - 11 I l i ke the peopl e - 11 It's ctose to work - 9 Nothing - 9 Low Rent - 8 It's be tt er than where I lived before - 4 The pl ay area - 2 I own my house - 2 It is a convenient loc ation - 2 I like single-family houses - 1 I t' s clos e to church - 1 b. What don't you like about living here ? No sewers - t.,O Unpaved streets - 22 Houses - 20 Planes - 19 No mail service - 8 Poor bus service - 6 No inside water - 6 Poor police protection - 5 No hea lth service - 4 Nothing - 4 Unc ertainty about future - 2 Traffic problems - 2 Inconvenient location - 2 The people who live here - l Poor street lights - l Taxes - l The railroad nearby - 1 Everything - 1 c. Why have you chosen to live here ? Came to live with relatives - 20 Low rent - 11 No other place availab l e - 10 Close to work - 8 Opportunity to buy a house - 7 It used to be a nice area - 7 I like the country - 7 I like the people - 7 Born in the area - 3 It's a better house than before - 3 This is the best I could do - 1 �.. 5 - 11. How would you feel a bw t living somewhere else? - Like to ver y much 33 Like to - 14 No t mind 18 Not want to - 11 No t want to at a ll - 6 - a. IF NO : Why not? I ' m too o ld to move - 2 I ' ve been here a long time - 1 My relative s are here - 1 I don't know o f a ny other place - 1 b. If this were overcome , would you like to l i ve s omewhere e l se? Yes - 3 No - 2 12 . In the past few years , severa l groups have come to Plunkettown and sugges t ed to the peop l e tha t they a ll move out together to a new loca t ion. Wha t do you think of this idea? It ' s a good idea - 20 The idea is 11 0 . k. 11 - 33 The idea is "o.k." i f the people can buy a new hous e - 1 The idea is 11 0 .k. 11 if the people c an move to single-family houses - 1 No opinion - 17 It's a bad idea - 10 The people should be able to move where they want - 1 12a . IF TIIB INTERVIEWEE RESPONDS THAT HE WANTS TO MOVE : Wha t l ocations do you think would be good if e veryone moved out together? No idea - 26 Poole Creek - 14 Atlanta fringe - 17 Eas t Point - 5 West Side - 2 Southwest - 1 Downtown - l Harper Town - 1 Thomasville - 1 Carver Homes - 1 Perry Homes - 1 12b. IF INTERVIEWEE WANTS TO STAY IN PLUNKETTOWN : I �- 6 - Wha t problems need to be so lved f i rst to improve the neighborhood? Sewers - 11 Houses - 9 Pave the stree t s - 6 Be tt er po li ce pr otection - 3 Ins i de water - 3 Stop the p lanes - 2 Railro ad noise - l Better s tre et l ights - 1 13. If you co uld l i ve e l sewher e, wh at gener a l area would you like t he mos t ? Don I t know - 13 Poo le Creek - 9 Atl anta fringe - 7 Downtown - 7 Same general area - 4 Eas t Point - 4 A pro j ec t - 4 Gil bert Road - 2 Wes t Side - 2 Hapevi lle - 1 St adium - l Wil son Road - 1 Cl ay ton Count y - l N• . w. Fu l ton County - 1 Forres t Park - 1 Alpharet t a - l De c atur - l Gordon Road - l Was hington , D.C . - 1 14. Can you a ff or d t o buy a house s omewhere e ls e ? Yes - 16 No - 50 Don ' t know - 16 How much could you p ay ? Nothing $16 / month $30/month $40/month $SO/ month $60/month $70/month $80/month 7 - 1 1 4 5 5 3 2 �- 7 - Re ceipts from sal e of present house - 11 Don't know - 8 15. Does living here with the airplanes flying over bother you ? Very much - 57 Some - 10 Hardly at al l - 5 Not at a Ll - 10 16. What: kind of place do you think Plunkettown is for children to grow up in? Very good - 2 Be tter than most other places - 5 Same as other places - 24 No t as good as most other pl. ac es - 21 ·1cvery bad - 25 No opinion - 5 17a . Now, I would like to find out exactly what: you like and dis like about living in Plunkettown . Here is a card which lists some thi ngs we thought you might like about living here. Would you please pick the two you like most . If t here is anything you like, but is not on the card, go ahead and pick it . (Read card aloud before showing.) a. b . c . d. e. f. b. I am close to work - 26 The rent is low - 38 l.fany of my friends live here - 39 I have lived here a long time - 27 I own my home - 27 Anything else - I like none of them - 3 Away from downtown 2 Good bus service - 2 I have a good home - 1 Here is a card which lists some problems we thought you might have in Plunkettown. Would you please pick the five you think are the biggest problems? If there is any problem you would like to pick but do not find on the list, go ahead and pick it. (Read aloud before showing,) a. b. c. d. e. f. g. Not close to shopping - 23 Not close to work - 3 No recreation - 12 No mail service - 61 No sewers - 63 Too much noise - 56 No health service - 28 �- 8 - h. i. j. k. 1. m. n. Poor water servic e - 30 No street paving - 66 Unemployment - 7 Housing - 34 Educ a tion - 8 Poli c e protec tion ~ 41 Anythi ng else - Bus service - 3 Street l ights - 2 Speeding - 2 Too f ar from church - 2 Not a good place f or children - 1 Old we lls are caving in - 1 Yard s are not kept up - 1 There ar e no probl enIB - 1 �7 APPENDIX A List o f Interviewers James 1'1 . Bruce, Offi c e of the Mayor Danie l K. Christenbury , Office of the Mayor Thomas Isaac , Offi c e of the Mayor Joseph Menez , Office of the Mayor Meg So~ell, Office of t he Mayor Mostafa Howeedy , Department of Planning John Ma tthews, Dep artment of Pl anning �,._ APPENDIX B Interview Guide - Plunkettot·m A. General Instruc tions . 1. This is a general guide for conducting a house-to~house s urvey in the Plunkettm,m neighborhood. Make sure t hat al l questions included are answered; however , if a respondant refuses to ans~er any questions, go on to the ne,ct item on your questionnaire . Re cord reas on for no response if possible. You may inc l ude other questions; record them as wel l as the interviewee's answer. 2. Ple ase record all answers as accurately and c arefu lly as possible. 3. Let the interview continue if t he interviewee wishes to t a lk . However , one hour shou l d, in most c ases , be the maximum time r equired for the interview . 4. Record the date o f the interview, the time at which the interview begins and is completed, and t he total amount of time the interview lasts . Record the number of times the interview is interrupted by aircraft noise, and the approximate l ength of such interruptions. B. I ntroduction . The following general introduction should be used in the interview situation: "Hello, my name is________ I represent the City of Atlanta {show your identification c ard) . The Mayor and Board of Aldermen are concerned about the people living in Plunkettown . Many different suggestions have been made about what the people of Plunkettown want from the City. However, we feel that it is necessary to t alk directly to the people o f Plunkettown. For the next few days we will be talking with all Plunkettown residents and asking them questions to help us find out exactly what the people want . Could you please take a few minutes to answer these questions? If subject refuses to participate in the interview, t ry to find out why. If he indicates he is too busy, try to make an appointment to interview him at another date. If he has another reason , try again to get the i nterview . However, if he absolute ly refuses, do not persist. Record a response and, if possible, the reason. If more than one member of a hous ehold wants to participate in the interview session, record.their responses separately. Each interview record should contain the responses . �of one person only . However, if this is not possible, indi c ate that responses c ame from two or more people . Remember that the main purpose is t o get answers to the basic questi ons contained in our questionnaire. If the int erviewee has questions to ask of you, try to delay this discussion until the end of t he fo rmal interview. DO NOT , under any circumstances, attemp t t o answer questions of whi ch you are unsure. The purpose of thi s interv iew is to find out what the peop le in Plunkettown thin and want . If peop l e ask questions you cannot answer, r efer them to Mr . Johnny Robinson or George Aldridge . (You will have a supp ly of their personal c ards to pass ou t to everyone .) C. Close Close the interview by answering any questions you can, and by thanking the interviewee for his cooperation. State again that if he has any additional questi ons he should c all Mr. Johnny Robinson or Mr. George Aldri dge . Also , if he has any additional c onnnents , a ttempt to record them on the answer sheet. (Give Mr. Aldridge's and Mr . Robi ns on's c ards .) �.. ~ ..... .,_ .... --- . ~ - II II II A RESOLUTION BY Fl NANCE COMMITTEE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE WHEREAS, the City has just completed a Community Facilities Plan which indicates the need and desirable location for many capital projects throughout the City, and WHEREAS, the City expects to complete a transportation plan in the near future in conjunction with the five county region and the State Highway Department of Georgia, and WHEREAS, this transportation plan will indicate the need and desirable location for new and improved transportation facilities throughout the City and the region, and WHEREAS, the City has engaged in a capital improvement programming effort for a number of years and has become increasingly effective in th is activity, and WHEREAS, for the first time a means of financing a limited amount of capital improvements on a continuing basis has become available, and WHEREAS, the implementation of plans and projects to reach the City's goals and objectives requires adequate financing and continuing scheduling according to realistic priorities as well as close coordination. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that those departments and agencies of the City of Atlanta aiding in preparation of the 1969-1973 Capital Improvement Program make every possible ~Hort to ensure that their projects .and proposals for the coming five-year program reflect accurately and realistically their goals, objectives and plans as expressed in the Community Facilities Plan and the soon to be completed Transportation Plan. BE IT .FURTHER RESOLVED coordinated and cooperative basis. that this effort be on a comprehensive, continuing, �OFFICE OF CITY CLERK ATLANTA, GEORGIA A RESOLUTION BY PLANNING .AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE WHEREAS, the City Planning Department is presently studying the Plu.nkettown neighborhood for inclusion in the Atlanta 1970 Neighborhood Development Program and WHEREAS, the Plu.nkettown neighborhood extends south of the Atlanta City limits into the City of Mountainview and Clayton County and WHEREAS, Clayton County, Mountainview, and the City of Atlanta face common problems in this area NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta that Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. request the Board of Commissioners of Clayton County and the Mayor and Council of the City of Mountainview to participate ma joint study designed to solve the problems of the Plu.nkettown neighborhood. AOOPTED by Board of .Aldermen July 21, 1 96 9 APPROVED July 23, 196 9 A true copy, - �OFFICE OF CITY CLF,RK ATLANTA, GEORGIA _., A RESOLUTION BY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE WHEREAS, the City Planning Tupartment is presently studying the Plunkettown neighborhood for inclusion in the Atlanta 1970 Neighborhood Development Program and WHEREAS, the Plunkettown neighborhood extends south of the Atlanta City limit s into the City of Mountainview and Clayton County and WHEREAS, Clayton Caunty, Mountainview, and the City of Atlanta face common problems in this area NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Mayor and Board of AJ.dermen of the City of Atlanta that Mayor I van Allen, Jr. reque st the Board of Commissioners of Clayton County and the Mayor and Council of the City of Mountainview to participate i.rt a joint study de signed to solve the problems of the PlunkettoW!l neighborhood. ADOPTED by Board of Aldermen July 21 , 1 969 APPROVED July 23, 1969 A true copy, - .~ erk . . .- - .i¢JU___....,. . ~~- �- -.-.- -~--.::-::--.,:-.'.".""'..•.::::--- .-_ - -.~-~ --143.215.248.55 12:53, 29 December 2017 (EST)II" ' I· AN ORDINANCE BY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE I , WHEREAS, by ordinance of December 21, 1964, the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta, Georgia, caused to be created a standing committee of the Board of Aldermen entitled Urbar:i Renewal Policy Committee, as.set forth in Section 2-40. 2 of the Code of Ordi nonces, City of Atlanta, Georgia effective July I, 1965, as amended, and WHEREAS, it is deemed desirable and in the public interest that the number of standing committees of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta, Georgia be reduced in number and that such action would be in keeping with the precedent established by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen in 1967, and WHEREAS, it has been determined that the functions and responsibilities of the Urban Ren ewal Policy Committee can readily and expeditiously be transferred to another standing committee of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta, Georgia, namely, the Planning and Development Committee, and WHEREAS, such action should increase and improve communications between and coordination of activities of both the City of Atlanta, Georgia and its urban renewal agent, the Atlanta Housing Authority of the City of Atlanta, Georgia. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta as follows: I. That Section 2-40.2 of the Code of the City of Atlanta is here by repealed and the Urban Renewal Policy Committee is abolished. 2. That Section 2-40. I (b) of the Code of the City of Atlanta is hereby amended by striking said paragraph in its entirety and inserting in lieu thereof the follow ing: (b) Membership. The Planning and Development Committee sh al I be composed of eight (8) members of the Board of Aldermen appointed by the Moyor a nd ·two (2) c1clvisory members from th e Housing �r .. II -2Authority of the City of Atlanta appoinl·ecl by the Chairman of the Housing Authority of the City of Atlanta. The Housing Authority members of this committee shal I have the power to vote only on those items of housing and urban renewal whic~ are going before the Housing Authority's Board of Commissioners for further action. The Mayor shall appoint from the Board of Ald ermen the chairman of said committee and the other seven (7) members. The Mayor shall appoint the Planning and Development Committee so that a representation is obtained of aldermanic committees concerned with community development, redevelopment, and improvement. 3. That Section 2-40.1 (c) of the Code of the City of Atlanta is hereby amended by striking said paragraph in its entirety and inserting in lieu th ereof the following: (c) Functions, responsibilities. This Planning and Development Committee shall have the primary responsibility to review and coordinate the short and long range plans and programs of oll city efforts in the fields of community development, redevelopm ent, housing, facilities and improvements, and to make suggestions to other appropriate a lde rma nic committees ond to recommend actions and policies for adoption by the Board of Alderm en to insure max imum coordination and the highest qua! ity of urban community deve lopme nt through ou t the City. This responsibility shall include but is not limited to the review and evaluation of th e e lements of th e compre he nsive (general) plan deve lopment by th e Pl ann ing De par tme nt with guidance From th e Atlanta - Fulton County Joint Planning Board; th is comprehensive plan to be composed of at lea st a �,, II II -3land use plan, transpor tati on plan and a comm unily foci! ities plan with pub Iic improv ements program. The comm ii-tee shall further be responsible for developing p91 icy recommendations on al I other matters concerning the planning and coordination of future ; city developments including, specifically, the Community Improvement Program (CIPL Open Space, Urban . . Beautification, the 1962 Federal Highway Act, the Workable Progr"am for Community Improvement, Urban Renewal and Neighborhood Development Program, preliminary and project or execution plans, and other related urban renewal matters formerly under the responsibi Iity of the Urban Renewal Committee or the Urban Renewal Policy Committee. The Committee shall further review all applications for federal grants that are referred from the Grants Review Board for planning considerations to determine their conformity with adopted overall plans and policies for the development of the City. BE IT FURTHER ORDAINED that all ordinances and parts of Ordinances in conflict_with this Ordinance be and the same are hereby repealed. �ATLANTA,GEOROIA FROM: d. Dan E . Sweat, Jr. For your information D Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the necessary reply. D Advise me the status of the attached. FORM 25- 4- S �... 4 URB AN RE N EWAL MONTHLY STATUS PROGRAM REPORT February 28, 1970 .ATLANT.A HOUSING AUTHORITY �-I . -J.Ull2lu'J RENEWAL STJ1.'l'US REPORT I ATLlJITA EOUsnm AUT!-IOR.TIY ~ I ~ ACQUISITION I Parc els to bz Acquired PROJECT I Acquired to Date ! Total to b e Yet to be · Relocated Acquired . Fami ly & Ind. - ,. 'i'CY.!-..L B:Jtl er Street R-·9 l' RELOCATION Bus . Rel ocated To Date Fa mily & Ind • DP.·10LITION Remaining to b e ~tructures Relocated to be b'am1J.y & ma. ~us . e molished Bus . Demolis hed To Date 5507 52o6 301 6668 657 6205 573 463 84 4857 4409 600 600 0 1261 103 1261 1 OJ 0 0 594 594 11 14 77 111 4 76 0 1 811 799 1253 79 1253 0 0 987 987 421 18 421 0 0 Yet to :JG Demolis :ic 448 I ' R:v...;:=:on- Wa.s!:1.i n 6 ton R-10 . 820 81 4 Univa~sity Center R-11 866 866 0 ~ R·'.Jckdale R- 21 941 879 62 ~ 6 ~ 79 18 R---22 463 6 457 315 19 315 19 0 0 305 305 . - Goo:rgi a State R- 59 29 29 GE-oq;ia Tech R- 85 335 335 v!cst E0.d 4 l 4. - 2- -1 lI Gi~orgi a Tech II A-2-2 lbdel Ci ties A-2 -J - 0 66. 4 30.- l-1-1 4 16. 32 7 25 398 278 120 -+--- I 48 20 48 o· 0 261 58 261 58 0 0 359 359 480 104 465 87 15 17 476 365 1094 103 896 77 198 26 539 462 77 18 37 12 3 6 34 21 0 21 ·1 1 187 5 244 6 278 51 227 52 52 111 ' I I i-i ·- 431 I I .. 20 0 527· 593 I - ! ! R-90 Be::::.:crd- Pine I 435 435 I 'Ih0T.asv ille 12 ' �Ul1JJAN II.ENE\ AL STATUS IlliPO.RT Pai:;e 2 . I i TITSFOST'T'T O~if Prcject . l ] Acres \:o be Sold I 'T Ol' /~ E·.1.lter Street !i,.:3.1,:son- 1rlash R- 9 R-10 Acres Sol d to Dat e Under Contract 1127 ~o 62402 87.6 81o6 126 .. 0 105 .. 1 15 , h 1 Ol.i., J 93, 8 1 To t al t o be Rehabi litated Not Undsr Contract 175 .. 8 REHABILITATION I TEM- IlLPROVEI'-IBNT S Complete to date ' I Yet t o be Rehab. Budge t .Amount 2221 3,558, 966 5782 2967 786 182 4°5 NA NA 1..it~ 80? 1804 1744 60 32700 I NA ~ o d:c:.2..le R- 21 242 .. 6 56. 3 ·183 .5 2 .. 8 NA NA NA m· R- 22 2o/5 o;) 1BJ.5 69.6 12 o4 92 87 5 G2o r gi2.S t.a te Ke st- End 662,000 1.762.9~h 653,1 80 1 .406 1864 I R-59 807 8. 7 R-85 45. 0 39.4 ,.. . 1..:c orgia.- Te ch -J 2, 786,798 4 R-11 • .., . ... Completed ' D>.ivers ity Cs nter .;,_ ~ C:-"'. C..S TI..!..J..e I R- 90 . 5.o .6 98. 4 20.6 33.6 154.9 _34o2 22o 5 I 44. 2 NA NA NA NA I ~ 653, 914 553, 773 . 2338 ' 698 1640 168, 598 192 58 134 14, 000 168, 598 I I I I I I . 3c:d.ford- Pine A-2-1 98o2 42, 000 GeJ ~6 i a Tee~ II A-2-2 }:cdel Ci ties A-2-3 It I ~7G- · 192 378 255,500 4,383 i i �Urban Renewal Status Report I -- t r ,) Amount Required FR.OJ:;CT ~, CASH A:n.ount Received from City Amount to be Received -- ITEN II - I! Au:ount to Cn:npl etion ~i $ St:-c9t ? :. :tl.er ~-:}_".-:=ot~- ~·. a. s hi~gtcn 1 627,727 $ 791,078 $ (163,351 ' - ~) ,, ,_, t. I ,;. ~ 37 ,046,089 L :i Ye :-.s::. ty Cs::ter 186 , 567 $ 196,468 $ (9,901 ) R-10 I ;~ $ $ ·' ·.P R-11 49,714 ,, C:ecrgi2. State ~- 59 R- 85 G~>JrG ia Tec h R- 9C· \~:-=:st :-:::1d - 3e~orC-Pi.r.e GG J:--r5 ia ·1> R- 22 T :10:::?..s•JiJ.le . Tech I I Ci :.:'..8S 24,293,299 t~,; J 67,202 ,~ ·:> $ $ $ $ ~:; $ ,.p "' $ ,.., 67,202 13, 988 ,; ,. 324,244 .$ $ 189, 1 76 $ 941,479 - $ . 324,244 L 1$ d· p A-2-2 ~ y $ ~µ A-2-3 $ t $ p ~> 995,283 fl~t ,:,,!) $ 4,571, 692 -~ 5,466,679 $ 5,370,008 ·? 3,003,765 $ 616,134 ->' 2,.387 , 631 4,81 9~ 578 ~~ 733,879 $ 4,085,699 11,222 $ 11,222 $ I~ 0 {'-s t (13,988 ) 12, 752, 790 $ f $ A- 2-1 $ (1°39,462 ) $ g $ 1,936 ,762 ~ R- 21 P~ct·c.::._' 9 $" I i $· R-9 I 6, 046,68,2 ~ • ~ _; ,ce .1. A.mount Completed to Date Total Costs i1 ' T:JT.U, 'f NON-CASH I HPROVB-:E~·TTS ~1 !~ t ' E i $ l $ i $ i ~ ! . .., I 96,671 I I $ ~ '. ~ ~ 'l ii $ 5., 292 ., 344 $ 4, 476,857 ' 2,524,521 $ 407.,616 ) I 5,699,960 ~ " 3,060,063 I ~ )J ~ ~µ 5,584,584 -~,, 1 p 3,696 ,478 $ l I ·? g ~ I 1,474, 9.90 L $ I 780,379 lI I I j I �Page 4 Urban Renewal Status Report . ' TOTAL VALUE OF It1PROVEMENTS NJHBER DWELLING UNITS - - Complet ed PRCJJ~CT .. autlc:c S-t:-eet 1095 650 L~n i v er-s i t ~l Ce;1ter P.- 11 431 F~·: k_j3.le R- 21 0 -- R- 22 1; · 0 ia +e ~~+ .., v2-.v R- 59 ~ -=- """~ ..:.r .! \.,; _, -1 J. .::, - !) .__ R- 85 Teer. ·C" .;.. ·,...; ... ... S:!d 1/1" ..- -· - . - -- -- Complet ed $ .. Unde~ Constru ction . Total Proposed - I I d:- 95,370, 792 $ 30,739, 025 $ 89, 248, 41 2 4' 215, 358 ,229 I R-90 I I .I I $ 105 192 0 842 J 25,029,546 .$ 1 3 435 $ 17 , 149,838 ·s 2,249, 000 325 605 33,069,144 .J 1372 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - $ $ 0 '• 3, 036, 800 ~ i I 38, 1 75, 944 8,235, 000 $ 33, 264,546 $ 2, 783, 000 ,p ,~ 22, 181, 838 $ 5, ooo ~b 3,534, 825 r ...- 2, 070, 000 $ I - ' p 1500 1175 351 0 $ 1200 3,797, 964 3,500,000 .$ $ $ 14, 081 , 325 $ 17, 621,150 ~ . 8,700, 000 'J) s 19 , 623,164 4, 250, 000 $29, 000, 000 ,5 11 , 05 0, 000 .$ 1o, 16 2, 000 ~ 23, 71 2, 000 ·' 8., 452 ,050 7,125,200 ii I 1 ., 36, 750, 000 { 0 1 I ! I I I A- 2- 1 0 .-,c. ~; i c. T :~c l1 I I A- 2- 2 0 0 0 > , Citie s A-2 - 3 0 0 0 'I 0 "' •:) 1 353 ., 2,500,000 $ $ 2,013,300 $ 460,000 $ 5, 978, 750 •;) 353 ~ 8,306.000 $ 0 •!) . 7 . ?71 ~17 ·2 0 $ 0 $ 0 s 0 .:J; 0 - $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 .$ 0 - ~ "3 c2 .: :'c~d- ? i ~e i-r ........~,c;; _ . , _._ 5703 2241 0 416 -Gt3: Total I I i R- 9 R-10 Tr:, :,a:::·ville I I E:-.. ·.~s VY!- \·,Tashi :1~:.on 1 :::: I !Proposed 869 2593 · OT.~ - Under Constructi on ' 0 I , .., 15 ,5.77 ,537 ' ) I I I I ' . •} -- ! �PRESENT ORGANIZATION CITY GOVERNMENT OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA ,----------, 1969 I 12:53, 29 December 2017 (EST): ~i!l~oF : L-----r---' I r--------, I I I METROPOLITAN ~ l 0E VEL0PME.HT COUHOL L--- I ATlANTACHILD lf! N AHDT0UTH S!RYICU COUNCIL CITIZEIU ADYl!DR1' COMMlTTfE FOlt URBAN RENEWAL COMMU Nl TT RELATIONS COMMIHID N I I _ _ _ _ .J 0 CHIEF A0MINISTRATN( Of"FIC[R ANO I U LAHTA STADIUM .4.TT0IIH!T AOMIHISTRATIVC ST.UT I I I COORDIH ATOR 7I I I PU!DHHEL DEPAIITM[HT PUIILICHOUSING DIVlSIOH UIIU.N REHEW.U. 0IVl~OH Z0MING COMMITT EE PLAHHIHC AHO 0E VELOPMEHT COMMI TTEE :,I AT LAJrfTA MUN1O PAL COURT auocn COORDI NA TOR FOR COMMUNITY RELATI0HS II I I I L._ I ____ _ OFFICE OF TIU COMPTROL LER COMl,IJUI0H r AnAHTA TRAFflC COURT ( I 7I FIH4HCE COMMITTEE I I I I I I PURCHUIHC C'OMMITTEE , - -- -+ - - - - , , I .----- .l----, _ _____ JI OTT Ct.ERK I TU4UES!DII I L-----------1 IIUILOING COO! 4 0Vl!,011' IIOAR0 40"'-110.0N PLUMIIHCAH0SJ.MIT41 PRl!DN COMMJTTEI! PLUMIIINC E.0.1,UNIHC IOUD PLWillllHC40Vll,OIIYI0UD fll!CTIIC4L UJ.M.ltllHC aouo ELl!CTRICAL40Vl!DRYII0UD Bl!TTU ttOU~ NG COMMIUI0N Hl!J.T.4N 0 Vl!HT,AQVl!DRY COMM. PUIICHUIHG DEP4RTMEHT 7 , -1 -! 1 1 rJHAHC( D[PARTM[H'T 1 ~ IUILOIHG COMM.I TTfE IOARD OF PUIE M4$TUS I I I PUIIL1CWOHS COM.ll.l TTl!I! 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LA TI OHS ADMI HISTU,TI VE U SI STAMT OFFICE Of TME COlolP TROL Ll!R PUSOMH EL DIVISIOH I I I I f ::, I ATL.AH'TA MUHI O PAL COURT PU I LICHOUS/ HG OI Vl~OH IUOG ET C0MMlllJOH OIVL SI OH I I I I II l ~ ZOHIHGCQl,IM,JTT U I I I I IL. r r I ATL,lHTA TUHICCOURT UI U ,H REHEW AL P L.IJ,IH IMG AH O OfVE LOPkE HT CDMMI TTU I I .JI ____..._____ , FlHAH CE COMMI TTEE I I __ _ _ _ I I _ _ ____ JI PURCH .UIHG COMMLTT H I I I ,------ J. ____, I T.UUSE U.011 I L...----------1 I UILDI HG CODE ADVl!oORT IO • • D •DV. 10.0H PLUMIIHG I.M D SAM I T AR PLUMI IHC. U~H JHC ao.u o PLUMII IHG ADVl1,0RY80AIO IE L l!C TRIC AL IE J Al1tlH1H C BO ARD EL ECUICAL A0Vli0 11 YIOARD BETTER HOU MH G awMIUIOH HhT. .UIO Vf HT, AO'IUOIIT (01,U,1 . PUROU ,SI HG DEPA RTMEHT ,l -1 -; -f 1 , "1 ~ TRAFFIC AHO IIU ILOI HC. TRAH SPOIITAT IO H COMM ITTEE COM.MISSIOH I I I P UI LI C WOR ICS COMMITTEI! I I FIRE OEPARTMEHT POLICE OEPA II TME HT TRAFFI C OEPAR TMEH T IU1 LOI HC OU P l! 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IUILDIHGIHSl'(CT IOH Dll"AIUMOH I I I I I _J l'UILICWOIIU COMMITTEE PUILIC 110ltl:S DEPUTW.!HT PARU AHO CEMETUT DEPARTMENT DIVISIOtl Of IHSTIUCTIOH RESEARCH AHO O(V(LOPWOIT OIVIMOH KHOOL PL.4HT PLA.XH IHG .lMO COMSTRUCTIOH SERVICES DI VI SIOH AtMIH1STR.4TIYE SfRVfCUDI VI SIOtl �PRESENT ORGANIZATION CITY GOVERNMENT OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA ~---------, ,--------, I L l ~~t~~ ~:lyOF : L-----r---' I 1969 ATL.UtTA fUlTOH COUHTT 0 ~~:_r_:l~:"~e~•~-! i ATL'1ci,~:12:53, 29 December 2017 (EST)UHTT I I L - - 143.215.248.55 12:53, 29 December 2017 (EST)r_ _ J rJ ELECTORATE f,.rL~~r.tr'143.215.248.55;g:u"n7 L-~ 143.215.248.55 12:53, 29 December 2017 (EST)·~ • -J 11l r-~TYu~~n143.215.248.55 12:53, 29 December 2017 (EST)7 r-s~;;;;;:.-;:.;.:T-7 L_~c~E~l~U2_tto_!~YJ • I ________ L OfEDUCATIOH ..JI ,--------, I 1111!:TIOl"OLITAM SOIDOL I I 0EVEL0l"MfMT COUHOL I L---- ____ J r,:;J===================;,i'========================c==EN=;E=RA=L==M==UN=,c;;,lt=L==Go=vE==R=NM = =E==NT==============*=======~=====================;i: I ~ ATLMITA CH ILOIEH COMMUH I TT ClT!ZflO' AOYIIOIIY ,U,10 l'OUTH SfA VI CU lt ELATI 0 HS COUHCI L COMMI UIOH COloUUTTl!E fOR UIIBAH JIEHfl'.U. 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EMT AlJOIT ORtUW. lNDCITICClNtll I I I I f lMANCECOMM.ITTE E I I IU ILOI HG CO D! ADYU.OIIT IOARO ADY. ID. OH P' LU.WII MGAMD SAM ITAR 7 1 PLU.w l LM G EUMJHIHGIOAI D P' LO.WI IHG ADYISO IY 10.1.10 ELE C TR IC AL l! l AMIM1MG I041f D -1 PURCHASIHG DEPAR TMEHT -i ELECTRIC AL .lOY ISO R1' IO AR D "1 -t IU TU HOU11HG COMMIUI~ HU T. AM DY EMT.AOYISOII YCOMiM. J r lNAHCC OCl'ARTMCN1' ~ IU ILOI HG COMMITT U I I I PUIU C WOIJC.S COMMITTEI! I I IUIL OI HG IM SP ECTIOH OEPA1Tt,1EHT I I zg~::YoF PRESENT ORGANIZATION CITY GOVERNMENT OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA 1969 I I ~I _J PUIL1C WORKS OE PARTt,1EMT WA.TU O[P.lJITt,ifMT PARKS AHO CEMETERY OEP.lR Tt,1EHT OIVUION Of IM ST IIUCTIOH RESEARCH AHO DEV ELOPMEMT OIYL110M SCHOOL PLA.HT PLA.H>IIMG AHO COHSTRUCTI OH URYICESOI VlSIOH .lO..U MISTR.lTIYE SERVICES DIVISION �PRESENT ORGANIZATION CITY GOVERNMENT OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA , ,--------, J L L-----r---• ~ ~:T~ L~:H~l~A.:° I si:~[~~: tgi;~,oF : ,U U.HTA-F ULTOH COUHTT I ~ I AT L ~ ;1!:12:53, 29 December 2017 (EST) ~UHTT I L __~J143.215.248.55r__ J I I 1969 i J ELECTORATE jArl~~rt/143.215.248.55;~fU HTTI L-143.215.248.55s.~11~_j 11 l r r-s-;:;;;;:.: ;:;-7 -jrJu143.215.248.551~; 7 I L ~c~ E~l~U2_H~i.:, J . OFEOUCAT IO H I ,--------, I NETIIOPOLITAH SOtOOL I IL, OEVEL01'NU4T COUMOL _____ _ _ JI ~--~-.---~ ~==================:::::;,;::::=======================G =EN:E::RA:L::M:UN=IC jl _)::LG=O =VE=RN: M [::NT=============:::;:========*=====================;i: l ATLANT A CHILDIIOI AHO TOUTH SERVICES COUHCI L CITIZENS' AOVU,ORT COIIU4J TTEE FOR URIAH IIEN[WAL COM,MUNITT IIELAT10NS COIIU4JUION CH!tf" AOMIHISTRATIV[ ornCCR ANO AOM IHISTRAT1VC ST>.rr I I 1 , I SIJP ERlHTEHOENT PEIISOMH[L 104110 I I PUSOIOI EL DEPAIITNEH T PUBLIC HOUSING OIVISIO H URIAH RENCW.t.L [)I VISIO H :, ATLAKTA TIIAfFIC COURT 1'LAHHIHG AHO OEVEL 01'N EHT COMMITT EE II I 1 J I FIIO.HCE COI.IMI TTU 1 1 ( I 1 I IL ____ _ I I __ ____ J1 ,----- .1 ____, PLAHMIMG DEPAII TMENT OTT CL ERK I i._ _ 9U ILD1HG J.HD ATttLETIC COMMI TTEE PURCHUI MC COl,l,NI TTU I I I 9UILotHG C.ODE AD VUOIIT 90.UD ADV. I Q OM PLUM91 MG.utDSAHIT AR TA X AUEUOR _ _ _______ l J PURCH,U l MC. DEPARTMENT 7 , PLUNIIMC. UAMIMIHC. IOARD PLUM91 HG AOY ISOIIT90U O ELECTRICAL EU.Nl~MC. ao uo "1 ELECTl1CA L ADYISllllT &OARD -1 -I 1 rncAHC[ OCPAAT M[NT 1-:-,: ,;c-:,:-~:..,:::-';'c:,c~~::c:-:::,c::-" -::,cc:-=~«:..=.-I~ ~ aou o oF Fru lolA$Tf:U IUILOIHC. COM.Ml TT EE I I I PUI LI C WOIU COM.NJTTEE I I FI I EOEP..tJITNUU AOMIHISTRAT1V E AUIST .t.MT OFFICl!OFTlll! COlolPTROLLEII PEUONHEL OIVISIOH r 1 ATLANT.t. MUH IO PAL COURT COOROI HATOR FOR CCJM,LUHlTT RELAT IOHS IIJI LDIMC.IMiPECTIOM Of:PAIITNU4 T _J PU 9LJC WORU DEPAIITMEMT PAII U NIO CUIETEIT DE1'AITMEHT OIVISIOMOF IHURUCTIOH RUURCHNIO OE VELO PMU4T otV ISIOM SCHOOL PLAHT PLt.MM1MC. AHO COttSTRUCTIOH SERV1CUOIVI SI OH ADMIHl5TRAT1VE ~EIIV1CUOIVISl0t'I �PRESENT ORGANIZATION CITY GOVERNMENT OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA 1969 ,----------, I s%~~'g! 28~:;YoF ,---------, L-----r ___ , I I Ml!TR0,.OLlTAH SOWOL I I 0fVEL0,.MEHT COUHO L I I I L--- ATL.ulTA CHILDRf:H AHO YDU TH SERVICES COUNCIL CITIZl!MS'ADV ISOIIY CO-a TTEE FOR UIIIIAM IIEMEWAL CDMM.IJMITY RELATIDMS C0M.l(JHID M ____ J CH IEF A0MIH ISTAATIV[ OHICER ANO I ADM IHISTRATIV[ STArr I I I WP ERtHTfHDEHT 7I C:OORDIHAT'OR PU!oOHHEl 110.UD I I I I E JCECUTIYI! DIRECTOR COORDIHA TOR fOR I I I I I COMM UH\ TT UL ATIOHS I 0FFICE0I' TliE COMPTROLL ER I I I - :,I r ( I ATLAHTo\ MUHlOP AL COURT ATLANTA TRAFFIC COURT I I I I L----- flHAHCE C01,11,11TTU: I I I PUR CHASI HG COMWI TTEE 0lVUIOHOf IHSTR LICTIOH I ~----+----~, .----- J. ____ , I I I I J II I ______ JI I TA.XUSESSOR I L---------·- -J 1--------~7 AD'(aD.DH "LUMIIIHGAH0SAHITAR , PLUMlll HG U"-"'lH tHG 110.U0 PLUMII IHG ADVISORY 104110 EL"TRICAL U.U.UHIHG IOARD -j ELEC TRICAL ADYIIORY IOAR0 Hl!AT,AHDYtHT.AD VISORTCOMlit. PUROtA!.IHG DEPARTMENT LAW 0EPARTM(HT -i 1 1 >--"-"-'-' _,._.,_.._._,.... _ ,_,.,_••_. ., rlHAHC[ 0 CPAltTM[Nl , ~ IULLOIHG COMtitlT TU I I I I PUIILICWORU CONiM.ITTfE PARUCOMMITTU PUB LIC WORU DEPARTMf:HT PAU:5 AHO COU! TERT OtPAIITMl!HT I FIRE D!PAR TMEHT AOlr,UHl$TRATIVE ASl!STAHT POLICf. OEPARTMl!HT TRAFF IC 0EPARTM~T IIUI LOIHGIHSPECTIOH DEPARTMEHT _J _____ JI Rf:Sl!ARCH AH O Ol!Vfl0PMOIT DIV IS.OH SOIOOL PL Al(T PLAlfHIMG AHO COMSTRUC TI 0H SERVICES DIVIS.OH ADMINI ST RATIVE SERVICES DIVISIOH �·'" .]_4l.A_ Fjy.~~ r' - .. ',.. THE ATLANT A CONSTITUTION, Tues., July 29, 1969 16,(;~'W"'~9:R·" ' ",~---~·w---:.r-TT"-"'··w~-:n~ "-'"?"t-··~-.,,~·.. ·.--· ......... '-·---~r'?'"'.·~- ~ ":'~.., . ~, ..· · . . '1 .1 ~ 1 ~ . ,i I ~ I tc_: Q~"\.\u s. I. I . ,,l'\j i .I \ i \ \ YOUNGSTERS ENGAGE 1N RELAY AT GRADY STADIUM: Foot Race Is Depicted In 'Swinging Summer' I · -- - - - A § JI 11 1P) 2 PUD1ic II §~
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 4, Folder topic: Planning department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017