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  • Title: Box 20, Folder 20, Complete Folder
  • Text: 0 @) ._ cf '"~;} o 7 1> / December 15, 1967 _/4 regular me e ting of the Urban Renewal Policy Committee of the Board of Aldermen was held on Friday, December 15, 1967 at 10:00 A. M. in Committee Room #4, Second Floor, City Hall. Present: Rodney Cook, Chairman George Cotsakis Gregory Griggs Edwin Sterne Absent: John Flanigen Hugh C. Pierce Frank Etheridge w tr) -< w CL ~ 2; > er: 0 0 co Also present: Howard Openshaw, Director of Redevelopment, Atlanta Housing Authority Les Persells, Associate Executive Director, Atlanta Housing Authority Coll ier Gladin, Planning Director , City of Atlanta Representatives of various other departments, the Department of Housing and Urban Development and members of the press were in attendance also. 0 The Chairman called the meeting to order and the following business was considered: I. "'... Motel Proposal on Parcel 18 (south of new City Auditorium) by Beck Companies, Dallas, Texas in Bedford-Pine Urban Renewal Area. Mr. Openshaw stated the Housing Authority has re ceived a proposal from the Beck Companies of Dallas to construct ci two-story, 800 unit motor hotel on the tract immediately south of the new Auditorium on Forrest Avenue; that they have also e x pressed an interest in ad joining parcels 17 and 19. He said that the prese nt redevelopment plans of the Buttermilk Bottoms - Bedford-Pine Project do n.ot permit motel uses and in order to permit transient housing within the project a Transient Housing Study (in accordance with the Housing Act) would be required that ma kes a finding that additional motel units are needed in this particular vicinity of the City. Mr. Ope nshaw briefly reviewed the proposed uses in this Project as d e si g na ted in the 1965 Market Study by Hammer and Company and stated this is an oppo rtuni ty fo r the City to hav e o facility all the way to th e ex pressway c ompa t ibl e with the Audi to r ium and c ompleme ntary to it and the best use for this prope rty ne e ds to be stud ied in depth . �0 Minutes Urban Re newal Policy Committee December 15, 1967 - Page 2 tI He then stated he understands from the Beck Companies that time is of the essence with them and he recognized Mr. Nelson, a local represental·ive of Beck and Mr. Cleave Wilcoxon of Adair Realty & Loan Company, also representing Beck. 0 ' Mr. Wilcoxon briefly acquainted the Committee with th e Beck Companies ond stated th e ir main purpose in appe aring today is to u rge the accelerated offer in g of Parcel 18 for mo tel use in order that his cli ent could bid on it; that Be c k is prepared to submit, in writing, that they will also bid on Parc els 17 and 19 when they are offered. He said this proposed development will be similar to the Royal Coach Inn in Dallas, developed by Beck. Brochures were presented. Mr. Wilcoxon stated he also agreed that Parcels 17, 18 and 19 should hav e related uses compat ible with the Auditorium and it would be desirable if 18 and 19 were placed on the market as one parcel. This would require an adjus tment of the street-jog at the inte rse ction of Hi9hland and Baker. Regarding the Tran sient Housing Study and the Hammer Mar ke t Report Mr. Wilcoxon stated that he was reasonably positive that any such housing study woul d indicate the need for at -least 800 motel units in th e area; a nd that based on his past experience as a realtor, he did not believe there was a demand for a Research and De ve lopment Par k (as recommended by the Hammer study) in Atlanta at the present time. He cited two similar developments in Atlanta (The Hartford Building and an office development by Cousins Properties, Inc.) which have had difficulty leasing. Mr. N e lson then spoke to the Committee about the financial solvency of the Be ck Compani e s, the ir exper ience. in this development f ie ld, and he then presente d a brief slide prese ntation of their existing Royal Coach Inn. Mr. Cook asked Mr. Nelson what they would propose for Parce ls 17 and 19. Mr. Nelson state d th ey envis ion Parce l 17 for some restaurant~type facility with park in g and Parcel 19 would be exce ll e nt for motel use. Mr. Cook inqui red about the timetable for the housing study and if the re sults of sa id study a re favorable. Mr. Ope nshaw stated it wou Id take a bo ut s ixty (6.0) days to comp le te a Transi e nt Hou sing Study; that HUD approva l of th e Pro je ct Are a and a plan amendment to pe rmit mote l use , if deemed fe as ib le , cou ld be proce sse d w ithin s ix (6) months, prior to su bmission to th e Board of Ald e rmen for f inal adoption. Th ere was then a genera l discussion about the need for futu re expans ion of the Exhibit Hal I space to the north of the e x isting structure and the affe cts th is expans ion would h a ve on traffic c ircu lotion around the Auditorium and Ex hibit Hal I and th e propo sed re-use a s indi cated in th e urban renewal projec t p lans. There w ere no c oncre te conclusions drawn, how e ver , th e re was a genera l fee l ing that an expansio n o f the Exhibit space was warranted and that th is and the question of mote I I I l �0 Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee December 15, 1967 - Page 3 i I I use should be studied in more depth. I 2. II University Center College Expansion. As a point of information, Mr. Openshaw stated he wanted to bring to the Committee's attention that in the near future they will be faced with a request to include additional land in the University Center Project for College e x pansion and take out more housirig; that he has been invited to speak before the Council of Presidents and he would advise them, us this Committee had _done in the past (see Minutes of August 18, 1967) that a request to expand the colleges would not be considered until they developed a Comprehensive Campus Plan. 3. 0 Proposed Addition to the Thomasville Urban Renewal Area. Mr. Gladin stated that last week the President announced the awarding of 95 acres of Federally owned property at the Federal Penitentiary to the City of Atlanta for low cost housing. The extension of the Lakewood Freeway was then discussed as it relates to this 95 acres. Mr. Gladin explained that th e State Highway and the Parks Departments are working together on a connection through the south side of the 95 acres and determining at what angle it will course through the property. The development of the 95 acres was briefly discussed , i.e., housing, parks, a jun ior · · high school, an e lemen tary school, and a smal I addition to the commercial shopping ark a. -. Mr. Gladin exhibite d a generalized sketch plan, "Stating that bette r mapping is being secured for more de tail e d design, and pointed out that th e public uses woul d be loca ted to the north of the roadway, adjacent to the remaining Federal Penitentiary property and the housing would be to the south of the roadway, tying into the existing Thomasvi ll e Proje ct, with a vehicular and pedestrian overpass. Thirteen acres were included in the general sketch plan which is not part of th e property awarded th e City and Mr. Gladin ex plain ed that he and Mr. Baxter of HUD p lanned to discuss the possibility of securing this additional acreage with Warden Black o f the Federal Penitentiary . ********** *** 4. Di spersed Public Housing Site s. Following up the Mayor's Housing Conference, Mr. G ladin stated the p lanning staff had -.. ,I �i· ~ [ 0 t Minutes Urban Re ne wal Policy Committee December 15, 1967 - Page 4 been see king new ways of providing additional low income housin g and on e recommendation made was the dispersed site concept; that the planning staff has simply taken this recommendation another step, strictly for discussion purposes, and selected various sites throughout the City that could be developed for low cost housing. Johnny Johnson, departmental staff member, addressed the Committee briefly on each of the individual sites shown on a display map. Supporting data was presented to -each Committee member that gave Public Housing Distribution by Wards, as follows: (I) number of existing public housing units; (2) number leased; (3) new or proposed units, (4) totals, and (5) percentages. ** ** *** ** ** There being no further business, the meeting ""'.as adjourned. 0 Approved: Respectfu 11 y submitted: (/ jp Joanne Parks, Secretary �Sep t eQbe r 22 , 1967 A re gu la r me e t i ng of th e Urb - 1 Renewa l Policy Commi ttee was held on Fri ay, Sep t embe r L2 , 1967 cJ t 10 : 00 A. rr. . in Committe e Ro om #4 , Se con d .,loo r, City· a 1 . The f o llo ii .g 1c1 he rs \ve r e pre s ent : Mr . Rodney Coo k , Cha i rman Mr . Z . Gregory Gri gg s Mr . J ol n . Flani ge n Ab sen :. : 1' r . Hugh Pie rc e · r . Fr ank Ethe ri dge Mr . Edwi n L. Sterne M_ , George Cots a cis lso p· esent we re : Hr . ·Ho\,1ard Open s h.:n-1, Di re c tor o f Red eve lo pmen t, Atlanta Housing Authori t y Mr . Le s Pc rs e ll s , As s ociate Exe cutiv e Di r e ctor, AHA Mr . Coll i er Gladin , Pl anning Dire ctor , Ci ty of Atla n t a ·r . Don Ingram, Ce ntra l Atla n t a Prog ress , Inc . 1r . Byro n Att ridge and J oh n Iza r d , Attorney s f or th e Atlant a Hou s i ng Au t hor it y The r e we r e a lso othe r staff members of t he Atla nt Ho u sing Au thority p res ent; the pre ss and r ep r esentativ e s of othe r c i ty departme nts . The Chairman c a lled the mee ing o rder and th e f ol l owi ng bus ine s s wa s con sid e r ed : 1. Par cel D- 19, Motel s ite a c ross fro m Fulton County Juvenile Court , Rawson - Washin~ton Urban Renewa l Area . Mr . Openshaw brief l y re c apped t he sequence o f events re lativ e to this prope r ty leading up t o thi s meet ing and sta t ed t ha t t he o rigin a l c l o sing da t e of January 10 , 1967 h as been e x t e nded tw ice with an addi t i onal 5% of the pui chase pric e b e i ng paid \vith each e x ten s i o n, p lus a n additiona l 6% of the unpaid balanc e s o t hat up t o the present time , they hav e paid $156 , 000 earnest money on the property and $1 0, 352 i nte r est . He then read a letter from The Edwards Comp a nies requesting approval t o assign their entire interest in Parcel D-1 9 to the American Realty Service Corporation w o proposes to construc t an Admi ral l3enbou Inn on the property consistin;; of 252 units at an estima t ed cost o f $2, 500,000. The origi na l proposal by The Edwards Companies was for a facility of 470 uni ts at an approximate cost of $6 , 000,000 . (For complete details of lette r from The Edwards Companies see copy atta ched he reto and made a part o f these minutes ) . Hr. Openshaw stated the Hous i ng Authority Board o f Commi ssioners, before acting on th i s ma t ter , \vould like a r e commenda tio n f r om t he Po l icy Coramit.-:ee . j �/ Ninutes U b n ~enc,>al Policy Corn, i - ee Septe .. ber :C: 2 , 196 7 Pa ge 2 0 Mr. odensh w pres ent ed site pl a n s and photographs oft e Admiral Benbow Inn ends ate i - is a considerable step downward in compa rable developments . ~r . Gla ins ate this site . he did no- feel we s hould compromise the development of C. airn an Cool· asked abo ut the le g al status of an assignment of this property to me ric an neal ty Servi c e Corpor tion . Mr . Iz rd s tate d this \rnuld be within the discretion of the committee . There 0as the n some d i scussion about t he possibility of a motel being able to ecure a liquor lic ense sinc e a church was lo c ated withi n 40 feet (to the rear) of Pa rcel D- 19 . Tis question was not resolved, but it was the feelin g of Le CO i1'.ITl l. t ee th 2t develo nme nt of the site would be doubtful unless a , ote 1 could ob o in such a license . 0 _ fter othe b rief di s cussion, it \-i as the consen sus of the committ ee that they wo ul d not obje ct to The Edw a rds Companies a st igning their interest in Parcel D- 19 to .merican Se c urity o _ some other company if the quality of development is not to be compromised . It was the op inion of the committee, however , that the second proposal f or the Admi ra l Be nbow Inn wa substantially i nfer ior to t he original proposal and it was reje c ted . 2. St a tu s of \Jest End Shopping Center . In compliance ,.-iith the action of the committee at the August 18 mee ting , Nr . Opensha ·I s ated he had mai led a l etter to t h irty maj or sho pp ing ce nte r developers throu ghou t the country inviting their commen son the proposed redevelopment of the West End shopping fa ci lity . A copy of this letter, al ong with a listing of the thirty companies , had previously been f urn i shed the Chairman and other r.,embers of the Pol icy Commit tee. Mr. Op enshmv st ated some did not respo nd for vario s reasons, fi ve needed additional informat!on and others were interested in being kept informed. The discussion then centered around the following qu es tions: 1. \Jhether or not to alloi, the Star-Te.- group t o proceed with their proposed motel development on property north of Oak Street , across the street from the proposed We st End shopping center ? It wa s the consensus of the committ ee that the Star - Tex group should be given a n opport unity to re design their propos al and before making a final dec i sion, t hc t Mr. Herbert Rin gel, Attorney for the gro up, would be allo\·J ed to appe .: i r wi t h h is clients at a specia l meeting set for Friday , September 29 at 10:00 A. to discuss the matter with the committee . 1. �--:::.-. ~l Minutes Urbar~ ene,,ia l Poli cy Commit ee Sep·embc r 22, 1967 ? Should Parcel s 22 and 23 be offered as one tract a nd as a part of this de ci sion , should the Adalaide pa trnents be acquired and offer in co njunct ion with these two parcel s? The co~nitt~e concluded t hat t he Ada laide Apa rtments should be acqui red and included in the deve lopment o f th e mtel parcel in a y event . It wa s pointed out by Mr . Op e nshaw t hat Karl Bev ins , City Traffic En•inee r , h as insi s t ed that Oak Street be left open and one way as it now is . He stated also that if the Sta - Te,~ propos a 1 oesn' t go through , the Housing Au thority would acquire the Adalai e Apartmen sand offer it in conjunc tio n with Parcels 22 and 23 . i t.:: 0 0 m 3. ?eq est by Gulf Oil Corporation to exclude f om the ~es t End Plans an addi tionai 50 foot pa rcel on Lee Street fo r expansion of the c isting sta tion at t he corner of Oak and Lee Streets, a l ready e xcluded f rom t e Plan s; whether or no t he statio n should be included int e We st Enci Plans nd acquired for the proper dev~lopment of the shop ping ¢ente and faili ng a cqu isition of the station, t he question of upgrading i to blend with the redevelopment of t ·e a rea? Th e committ ee voted una nimous ly to defer a de cision on this matter pending an appeara ce of the Gulf people before t he committee at t he special meeting previously set for Friday, September 29, 1967 at 10 : 00 A. M. 4. Offe~ing of Parc el 20 , lyin~ at the off-ramp to 1- 20 , f or mo tel developmen t . T, c committee requested that the Housing Author ity pro ceed to i IDL~ediat ely place this p r ope rty on the market for motel dev•elopment . ~ If!::} ·k*;~··Jddn'd:·k* ~ fS:,~ I T' ere being no fu rther business, the meeting was adj ourned . .. •~I .,=1· -d "J:d.."7~·' l~k**"1: ~--;, (-=a " '= Approved : Respectfully submitte d , ( I I jp 1 / I I I Jo anne Parks , Secreta ry �'0;) ,,... ~ ,I:~ , Au gust 18 , 196 7 ~! ..,, 0 ~ --, "> w U) < Lw 0... A regu la r meet ing of the U ba n Re newal Policy Commi t tee Vv'Cl S hel d o n Fr iday, August 18, 1967 a t 10:00 A. M . in Commi ttee Room #4, Second Floor , C ity Ha ll . A ll members we re presen t as follows: .. Mr . Mr . Mr . Mr . Mr . Mr . Mr . -:- .,__ , er: 0 0 ro Ro dne y M . Cook, C hai rm an Hugh Pie rce G rego ry Gri ggs George Cotsa k is Joh n M . Flanigen Edwin L. Sterne Frank Eth eridge Also pre se nt were: Col I ie r G lad in , Plann ing D ire c tor , C ity of At lanta . Le s Perse ll s, Associate Ex ecutiv e Direc tor , At lanta Housing Authori ty. Don Ingra m , Planner , Ce ntra l A t lan ta Progress , Inc . W ill iam How land , Ex ecu t ive D ire c t o r , C ACUR. Howard O pe nshaw, Dire cto r of Re de ve lopme nt , Atlanta Housi ng Au th or ity. He nry Fil !mer , Department o f Housing and Urban Development Severa l o ther sta ff me mbers of the Housing Au th or ity were also present. Th e Cha irm an c al led the meet ing to o rder and the fo ll ow i g business was considered : @) I. Pu b I ic Hearing on Amendmen t to Roc kdale Urban Red e velopmen t Pla n . "" "' ~ .i , I .raj Li ,::;, "" '" w U) -< w a.. co c;:,.. ""::> c:: 0 0 QJ 0 Mr . O pe nshaw expla ined that the awarding o f the d ispos it ion of th is land to Davi Rosen Assoc iate s o f New York for mul t i-family housi l'\9 a nd c omme rcial de v el o pment has been made and the only pu rpose in br ingin g the matter be fore the Comm ittee t oday is to corre ct th e re c ord . He sta te d that the orig ina l Rockda le Plan was ad o pted by the Mayor and Board of Alde rmen on Apr i I 6 , 1960 a nd there ha ve been no am endments to th is plan . In the course o f offering this pro perty fo r d isposi t io n c erta in pro ble ms were e ncou ntere d (street la you ts, mu lti plic ity o f stree ts, re lat ive ly sma ll si tes, bu ild a b le and un buil dab le site s , etc. ) and su bseq uent plan c hanges w e re made to a ssist dev el o pers w ith these prob le ms. This a me nded plan was su bm itted to HUD and approved, bu t through a tech nicali ty , it has nev e r re c e ived offici a l a p proval of the Mayo r and Board of A lde rmen . Mr . Openshaw state d the p lan a mendment consi sts o f th ree ma ps a land a cq uisition and bou nda ry ma p; a z o nin g c hanges map , a nd a la nd use map, plu s a 13 page narrat ive . He reque sted the Comm ittee's a pprov a l in ord e r to corre c t the re cord . He a lso po inte d ou t that the proje ct bounda ri e s had bee n ex t ende d to Procto r Cre e k , pl us the addi ti on of a ha lf parc e l o f property and the delet ion of the Le e property on the sou th side of Dobbs Stree t in orde r to a vo id severa nce payments; also , the addi t io n of a se co nd sch ool. N o one appe ared to speak on th is matte r , �,' Minutes Urban Re newa l Policy Commit ee August I , 1967 Page 2 In Exec utive Session , motion was made by Mr . Sterne, seconded by Mr . G r "ggs and una nimously c a rried tha t the amended Rockdale Plan be a pproved . "I."*~:* ·k 1: ·): ·k·k -k •/: ·k ·): ·k 2. Morehouse Co llege re9u est to purchase Parcels 12 , 13 and 14, Unive rsi ty Center Urban Renewal Area. Mr . Openshaw pointed ou t th e parcels in q uesti on on th e project ma p . Cha irman Cook read a letter from Hugh M. Gloster, President o f Morehouse Co l lege , requesting that Moreh ouse be al lowed to purchase subject property , pointing ou t the ir pressing need for additio nal land for fac u lty and student h ous ing , as wel l as their inab i li ty to expand in any d ire c ti on , except in to Parcel 12 . Mr . O penshaw stated that the reuse pans indi cate_this property for hou sing so no plan chan ge would be re9 ui red; that it is his u nderstandin g they would purchase these properties a t the go ing rate of $40 , 000 per acre , al th ough he doesn't have this in writing. In Executive Session , the Committee unan imous ly approved the pu rc hase of Parce ls 12 , 13 and 14 by Morehouse Co llege and in so doing , re9 uested that a le tter be sent to all membe rs of the Coll ege Council of Preside nts conveying that: The Policy Committee recognizes that the Negro coll ege complex is one of Atlanta's greatest asse ts and desires to make available land to meet the long range needs of these vi ta l insti tutions of h igher learning . The -C ommittee further re cogn iz es that several of the a d joining co ll eges are also interested in. acquiring. additional urban renewal land for similar e x pansion purposes and it is the feeling of the Committee, the refore , that prior to a ny fur ther a pproval of such purc ha se of land, that an overall de ve lopme nt pl a n for the six co lleges be prepared and presen ted to the Commi ttee for review, a nd since th e University Center Proje c t is well into the exe cu t ion stage , it is felt tha t · such a plan shou Id be prepared as soon as possible . The Comm ittee the n continu e d to discuss the Un iversi ty Cen ter Pro ject a s a whole and severa l prob le ms which mi gh t de lay its consumma t ion , spe ci fica lly th e contemplated interc hange at the interse ction o f Northside Drive a nd Hun ter Street. The Centra l AME Church loca ted at this intersection desires to ex pand their prese nt facilities and air-co nd it ion them bu t up to th is poi nt , they ha ve been persuade d to delay the ir expans ion program; pendin g some determ inat io n abou t t he interch ange . Th is property, as well as the property at the corn er of Stonew all a nd Northsid e (for poss ib le rel ocation of th is churc h) hav e been taken out of the offer ing awa it ing some deci sion . It was also po inted ou t tha t some de c ision needed to be made on th e property on th e north side of the intersection of N orths ide a nd Hun ter before it becomes una vail a ble . �0 Minui·es Urban Renewal Pol · cy Committee Augus t 18 , 1967 Page 3 The Committee indicated their awareness of the fa c t that funds were not now avail bl e to purc hase the properties for th e in ter c hange , however , they were also aware of the fa c t that th e C ity is making monthly in te rest payments on ·rhe ent ire pro ject and sin c e it is we ll in to exe c ut ion , the t ime is rap idly approa c hi ng when the inter c hange will be come a c riti c al issue , perhaps be ing the o nly o bstac le to f inalizing the pro ie c t , and at this point the C ity w ould ha ve to make some determinati o n as to the feasib" ity of this interc hange . The Commi ttee c on c luded that the Housing Auth ority wou ld co ns u lt w ith their a ttorn e y's on ways to a ccomp l ish what is needed in th is a re a and a lso investigate the poss ib: ' :ty of a cq ui ring , as soo n a s possible , the no rth side of th e interse c t io n of Nor hsi e and Hu nte r. '~·k*""* * *-A··k·k *·k·k 3. Repo rt on Land Dispositi ons Mr. O penshaw gave the fo l low in g repo rts: BUTLER STREET PR O JE CT Parc el B- 11 -a , Auburn Avenue - so ld to Haugabroo ks Funeral Home to be pav ed and used for parking . Purc hasing pri c e - $26, 500 . Parc el E- 1 - to be a cq u ired by White Motor complex fo r $11 0,000 and expanded into th e ir present ho ldings . As a pa rt of the ir pro posal , the y wi ll re q uest the C ity to c lose a portion o f O ld Wheat Street. · Mr . Openshaw pointed o ut o n the pro je c t map the few remai n ing tra c ts to be so ld, sta t ing th ey are al I o n the market . RAWS ON-WASHIN GTON PR O JE C T Parcel A-5 , Mem o rial Drive - to be a c q u ired for a wh o lesa le fl o ral business. pri ce - $48 , 600. Purchasi ng Parc e l A-4, Memorial Dri ve - to be a cquired by the CMS Realty for parking for the adia cen t Briarcliff Mills. Purc hasing pri c e - $21 , 000. Mr. O penshaw po inted out on the project map other s ites schedu led to be acquired. THOMASVILLE PR OJECT Recently, in three se parate offerings , a total of 69 lots have been so ld , wi th 84 remaining �0 M i u i·es Urban Re ewa l Po li c y Comm ii" ee Au gus t 18, 1967 Page 4 to be so ld . Tw Ive (1 2) lo ts have been purc hase d by Preferred In ve stmen ts , head e d by Willie Wagn o n , at a tot a l c ost of $20 ,200; imp· ovement c os ts - $11 4-, 000 . Fo ur (4) lo ts ha ve been purc hased by Kingsber y Homes at a to tal c os t of $6 , 900; improveme nt costs - $36 , 000 . Fi fty - thre e (53) lots h av e been purc hased by Na t ional Homes a t a tota I c os t of $89, 950; improvement c os·rs $ 85 , 000 . Total de ve lo pm ent c os ts of 69 lo ts - $117 , 100; to tal improveme nt costs - $635 , 000 . Pl ans , site e le va t io ns and pho to graphs o.r: typ ic al home s to be bu ilt were prese nte d for review o n these pro posals. The Committee u nani mo us ly a pproved a ll sa le s e nume ra ted above . REPO RT O STAT US O F PU BLI C HO USIN G Mr. Pe rse l Is sta ted the re has bee n no c ha nge sin ce the las t report; bids are expe c te d t o be put ou t the lat ter pa rt of N ovembe r for 350 u nits. ~:* ·k * ·k * "k** ·k ·k * 4 . We st End Shopping Ce nter a nd Mot el S ites (See M inu te s of J u ly 14 , 1967 , Pages 3 th ru 6) . Mr . Perse ll s presente d each Committee me mbe r with a 11 Sum ma ry of Fi ndings , We st End Sho pping Cen ter" , pre pa red by Hamme r: & Assoc iates a nd br ie fl y c om me nte d o n e a c h re commendation in the repo rt . (See atta ched I ist). Also o n disp lay was a n arc hite c t ural model depi c t ing the terra in of the la nd . Mr . Persel ls no ted tha t pa rt o f Item 6 , re c ommending that we sh ould not inc lude either site o r c o nstru c t io n desig n c riteria in the dev el o pm e nt of gene ra l design c r iteria , was a t varian c e with the Comm itte e •s las·r di sc uss io n o n t he matte r . Mr . Eth e ridge fe lt very stro ngly that thi s area has trem e nd ous trading power and is eq u iva le nt to the c e ntral core of a fairl y large c ity and he adv oc a te d th e co nta c tin g of firm s wh o o pera te on a nat io n-wide basis to get their o bse rva ti ons and sugge sti o ns fo r thi s dev el o pment be fo re we make an y de c ision o n the o ffering . Mr . Coo k stated th a t fr om a psycho logi c a l sta ndpo int we ne e d to ma ke an immedi ate move in We st End a nd fo r thi s rea son he expresse d c oncern tha t Mr . Eth er idge• s pro posal w ou ld be too t ime co nsum ing . He sta ted he also fel t tha t mini mum deve lo pme nt standards shou Id be e s tab I ishe d and the succe ssfu I b idder req u ired to meet o r exceed them. �0 Minu tes U· ban en ewal Policy Committee August 18, 1967 Page 5 Mr . C oo k th en read a lette r from the Star Te x group requesting an irn rn e dia '- e de c ision o n th e release o f 85 1, 869 an d 885 Oa k Stree t. In the dis cu ssion t at followe , the Committee felt that an ear !y de cisio n committ"ng this area to motel use might pre c lude ·he proper development or th e entire area planned fo r commercial use, bo h nor th a nd sou th of Oak Stree t; further , th e Committee is ve ry a nx ious 'i" o insure that 1·h e bes poss ible c om merc ial redeve lopment of this area o f the West End Prn je ct take place and to th is end, the Committee must c onsider_ the of ect, a d verse or o t, erwise , o f remov·ng that property nodh of O ak St eet from the to ta l area available for commerc"al develo , ent; co nsequen t ly , the Cornmit'- ee d e c ided that it was no t in a position, at this time , to grant the request for immed ia e acf on and i t was requested tho th e C hairman forward a letter to the St ar Tex group adv ising them that thE: Commi'-tee is sympa th etic to the ir si tuation a nd has instruc ed the C ity Planning De partmenl" a nd th e Atlanl·a Housing Au th ority to res tudy the feasibili ty of offeri ng this entire_ t rac t of land for development as a uni fied commer cial c enter. Until the resu lts of such a study a re kn own , the Comm it tee wi ll not be in a position to o ffer the area north of Oak Street o n a separate basis . Also , the Committee c oncluded that the Housing Au th or ity, w o rk ing with Mr . Ether idge , wou Id draft a proposa l to req uest f om national developers su ggest ions fo r th e proper development of thi s property , subsequent t o the approval o f the Ch ai rman . Also , th a t Mr. Cook would wok wi th the C ity Planning Staff and o thers in prepar ing minimum development standards for th e property . ·k***,;.·,· ·k ** *** ·A' *"A' There being no further business , the meeting was adjourned a t 12: 05 P . M . Approv ed : Respe c tfully submitted: (I 'J Rod ney M . f_,'.3ok, Cha rman jp 1 / Joanne Parks, Sec retary ,,1/ J �V inu:-es Urba n enewal Po l ic y Committee August 18 , 1967 0 WES EN D SHO PP! G C E 1-ER SUMMARY OF F!NDI !GS BY HAMME & ASSO C . I. Shopping c enter should inc lu de all land possible sinc e m rket stud y show s mo·e need th an land in o i inal bloc ks. This is true whether or not Oaks Street is closed (C i'y Traffc Engin . states that Oaks St . c annot be c losed) . 2. Fo· above reasons , Adelaide Apts . should be a c9 u ired and include d in shopping c enter area . 3. Gulf Station , sin c e a serv·ce station should be inc luded in Cen"er, shou ld remain "as is", expans·on and possi ble re -orientation shou ld be a su b ·ec t of negotiation between Gu If interests and the · fu ure redeveloper. 4. Construc ti o n of cente r ca n be staged sa tisfactorily and can be begu n befo e demo Iit ion of Lee St. School . 5 . Su ff icient o th e business along Gordon St. can and should be re located to the firsts age of construc ti on that it is desi rab le to provide for th is o po·tunity. 6. General design c riteria should be included in the Invitation to Bid but these shou Id not inc lud e either site o r construc ti on design . 7. If deve Iope rs do not propose to use the area north of Oa k St . , then a mo te I reuse would be desirab le . The project area and the market wi l I support two motels . It is essential that the area north of O aks St. no t be develope d to include fringe area businesses to the detriment of the center itself . 8. - ere is no dire ct relationship betwee 'he o·oj ct mot I site and t' e shopping �( I M in uJ-es U ·ban Ren e\val Policy Committ e Aug us-:· i8 , 1967 0 c ente r . Ne i ther is esse nf to the o the r . Ea c h would comp lem ent th e other . The v isual rela tionship would be between 1·he proposed projec t motel a nd th e exis ' ing Sears building and i ts park ing garage ra •h er than to new c onstruc t ion in th e new sh o pp ing c enter . 9. I 0. 0 s •aff pro posals w i ll be ready w i th in 30 days . Initial advert ising of th e projec t motel si te c an begin a t o nc e , if auth or ·zed . �-· ~ 1::,_lar meeting of the Urban Renewal Policy Committee combining three public hearings was held on Friday, July 14, 1967, at 10:00 A. M. at the City Hall, Committee Room 2. All members were present as follows: Mr. Rodney M. Cook, Chairman Mr. Hugh Pierce Mr. Gregory Griggs Mr. George Cotsakis Mr. John M. Flanigen Mr. Edwin L. Sterne Mr. Frank Etheridge Also preser+t were: Alder.man G. Everett Millican Mr. Collier Glad.in, Planning Director, City of Atlanta Mr. Robert Sommerville, Chair.man, CACUR; President; Atlanta Transit System Mr. William S. Howland, Executive Director, CACUR Mr. John Izard, Attorney, King and Spald1ng Mr. Les Parsells, Director of R0 development, Atlanta Housing Authority Mr. Howard Openshaw, Chief, -Planning and Engineering Branch, Atlanta Housing Authority Mr. James Henley, Atlanta Housing Authority Mr. Cook called the meeting to order and expl ained the purpose of this meeting is to have three public heari ngs. They will include (1) an Urban Redevelopment Plan for t he North Avenue - Boulevard Urban Redevelopment Area (part of t he Bedfor d Pine Urban Redevelopment Area); (2) a pr oposed Amendment to the Urban Redevelopment Plan for the Auditorium Urban Redevelopment Area; (3) a proposed Amendment to the Urban Redevelopment Plan for the Thomasville Urban Redevelopment Area. A fourth item, separate from the publi c hearings, is a Star- Tex pr oposal for di sposition parcel 22, West End Urban Redevelopment Area . Chairman Cook intr oduced Mr . Howard Openshaw, who was to make t he presentations f or t he Housi ng Authori ty. Mr. Openshaw began by orienting t hose present t o the Nor th Avenue - Boulevard Urban Redevelopment Project. A map was on di splay out lini ng t he boundaries. Mr. Openshaw s t at ed there were t wo r easons f or requesting appr oval of a por t i on of t he Bedfor d Pi ne Urban Redevelopment area at this time. The first being that it will pr ovi de, even while t he pr oject is still in planning, permanent public and privat e housing f or the resident s who will be displaced through the Urban Renewal process and who want to re.main in the general area. Subsequent to the appr oval of the Plan, the ·. Authorit y will file with the Federal Government an application f or an Earl y Land Acquisi t i on Loan to secure Federal funds to begin acqui s i t i on of a limi t ed area. Secondly, to provide rehabilitation assistance through Federal funds to resid.ent s along Boulevard who are now being subjected to rigid code enforcement by the City. H~ continued that the Authority will concentrate its acquisition, relocation and demolition efforts in the blocks bounded by North Avenue, Parkway Drive, Linden Avenue and Nutting Street to make public housing available at the earliest possible timee �i The Urban Redevelopment Plan for the Committee's consideration consists of a six page narrative document, a boundary and acquisition map, and three exhibits marked Minimum Property Standards. Secondly, consideration to authorize the Mayor to enter into an agreement with the Authority to bear any loss resulting from early land acquisition activities in the event the area acquired is not included in the total urban renewal area. Mr. Openshaw stated that reuse of this area will be residential, consisting of public housing or 221 (d)(3) housing. Mr. Cook opened the floor to anyone wishing to comment or ask questions. Mr. Robert Sommerville asked if there is any assurance that the area on North Avenue will be approved. by HUD for public housing. Mr. Openshaw replied that we have had initial meetings with representatives from public housing, HAA and RAA and have preliminary indication they will go along with public housing, although we ,have not had official word it will be approved. The Committee heard from Reverend Searcy, Chairman of URF.SCU, State Representative J. D. Grier and Reverend Dorsey, all of whom endorsed the Plan and expressed their desire that permission be granted to imple~nt the Pl.an. Tommie Weeks, a lay member of URESCU, spoke for the people of Bedford Pine expressing their desire that the area remain re~idential. Mr. Openshaw added in a final note that 77 families are to be relocated in the area outlined in this Plan. Relocation surveys that have been conducted indicate that the predominance of people to be moved want to remain in this area; therefore, included in the application to be filed with the Federal Government, is a request of funds to provide temporary relocation facilities in the immediate area. For clarification, Reverend Searcy stated that even before construction starts, living space will be provided. for those who will be displaced and can live in temporary housing until public housing is complete. Mr. Cook replied this is correct and explained there is an open space in the Auditorium project area where temporary housing may be placed. Mr . Sommerville requested .maps showing this area be made available, and Mr. Openshaw assured him they are available in the Project Office for anyone wishing to see them and have been made available to Reverend Grier and w~ll be made available as needed. Alderman Pierce asked what the nature of the temporary housing will be and expressed concern for using something of this nature. He stated he would never go along wi th this solution unless there is assurance it will be temporary. Alderman Griggs moved the Committee approve the two resoluti ons and bring them to the Board of Aldermen Monday~ The vote was unanimous. Chairman Cook stated the second publ ic hearing is on the proposed amendment to the urban redevelopment plan for the Aud.i tori um Urban Redevelopment area. Mr. Openshaw stated this Plan was ad.o pted in ·1 964 to get the Audi tori um under way and has been amended various ti.mes since, primarily for auditorium parking and street widening. This amendment is to permit acquisition of three properties at the southeast corner of Forrest and Piedmont Avenues. The reason to acquire -2- �i these at this point is to facilitate widening of Piedmont Avenue south of Forrest on the east side, and to relieve hardship or owner of Parcel BB 4-5. The Plan must be amended to acquire these parcels. Alderman Griggs moved the Committee accept the amendment to the Plan. The vote was unanimous. Chairman Cook stated the third public hearing is on a proposed Amendment to the Urban Redevelopment Plan for the Thomasville Urban Redevelopment .Area. Mr. Openshaw explained that this . project is nearing completion of its execution stage. On March 15, 1965, this area was designated by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen for public housing. This amendment will designate public housing as a permitted use in the area north of McDonough Road. It will also include acquisition of two properties located at 1043 and lll9 Isa Drive. These properties have not been rehabilitated and are a blighting influence on the surrounding redevelopment. The original plan designated duplexes as a buffer between the proposed commercial and single-family development. However, the Zoning Committee turned down the rezoning application to permit duplexes at the request of the area residents. Mr. Openshaw pointed out a site designated for school vse and stated the School Board doesn't have money to buy the entire site. A portion will be donated as a park site, which will serve the school as well as the community at large. Also ihcluded will be proposed project funds to build a chain link fence along Moreland Avenue to protect the children in the area. Mr. Cook stated he has been told final plans should be ready in a few months and let for public housing by the end of this year with construction underway the first of next year. Mr. E. V. Mosby, a resident in the Thomasville area, stated he felt this proposal to be very good and asked that work get started as soon as possible. He thanked the Committee for looking into this situation. Alderman Griggs moved this amendment be approved. The vote was unanimous. Chairman Cook presented the next item for consideration and turned the meeting ove r to Mr. Herbert A. Ringle to make his presentation. Mr. Ringle explained that he i s attorney for a group of d.e velopers interested in a por tion of property north of Oak Street between Ashby and. Lee Streets . This . property is across the street from the proposed West End shopping center. His clients have purchased the Adalaide Apartments along with 12 of the 15 other parcels in that block. They want to develop a motel facility consisting of 296 rooms plus 4 penthouse apartments totaling 300 units. They have hired an architect and have developed preliminary plans for this facility. He stated his awareness t hat Urban Renewal has also projected a motel site in the same general vicinity; but according to his thinking, more than one motel type facility is needed in the area. He continued that with the acquisitions they have made and.·the offers for development they have received from national motel chains they are ready to go with the redevelopment -3- �of the site. He stated it will be an Urban Renewal development by private interest and private money. According to Mr. Ringle, they are ready to enter into any legal covenants that this pro{6rty will be developed strictly in accordance with plans specified by this Committee, and that they are not buying to resell but for development. Mr. Ringle introduced Mr. Henry Calb who stated the cost figures they have assembled. For the entire facility, the cost was estimated to be $2,921,000. It was Mr. Ringle 1 s wish that the site they are interested in be changed from-a to-be-acquired status to a not to-be-acquired status and give them an · opportunity in purchase the three parcels acquired by the Housing Author~ty. At this point the Chairman recognized Mr. Wilson McClure who read a r esolution passed by the West End Citizens Advisory Committee recommending, (1) '(That a plan change be submitted to include the acquisition of the Adelaide Apart·ments and vacant tract of land adjacent to the Adelaide along the expressway; (2) That the plan change on the north side of Oak street be deferred to see what interest is shown by a proposed developer of the shopping center." Mr. Tom Oxnard, &iitor of the WEST END STAR, stated that the primary consideration is the status of the West End Urban Renewal Project. A fine job has been done with rehabilitation; and with the proposed shopping center some time off, the psychological effect of a motel would be immeasurable so long as the type structure erected can be supervised. This would put a tremendous visual impact on the community if strict standards are followed. Mr. Cook asked Mr. Persells if he has any dates or figures for the shopping center which is the top priority area. Mr. Parsells replied that it will be advertised for sale by the end of this year. A date in mid August is being aimed for, but will probably have to be postponed. The shopping center has to be advertised for a considerable length of time, a minimum of 6 months and probably 8 months. He continued that the major delaying factor in the shopping center development is the presence of the Lee Street School. The replacement school is to be bid on and construction started in September . The Board of Fducation usually projects about a 15 month construction period fo"r such a school. If the school can be demolished after 15 months, the shopping center can get underway immediately. Mr. Cook stated that the relocation of Lee Street School will not affect t he Northern part of the sector and continued that construction of the northern porti on must be i ncluded as a part of the Plan. He said this is the main priority area in Urban Renewal, and hopefully some visual efforts will be evi dent within the next f ew months. He asked Mr . William Greenleaf fo r the actual status of acqui sition i n thi s block. Mr . Greenleaf r eplied that all par cels except one bet ween Zachery and Oak Str eets have been bought or ar e under option. In r eply t o Mr. Gr eenleaf ' s quest i on to Mr . Ringle regarding the number of parcels his clients have acquired, he r eplied that t en have actually be purchased and t wo are under option. Alderman Flanigan asked Mr. Gladin what t he eff ect of the shopping center will be on the motel. Mr. Gladin replied t hat this has not been looked into yet. He added that up to this point estimates that have been made are not projecting two motels, although he realized these estimates are out of date. I', --"'-- - --r--. �' . At this point, Mr. Cook turned the meeting over to Mr. E. S. Robinson, a Real Tutate Representative for Gulf Oil Corporation in Atlanta. Mr. Robinson .was interested in acquisition Parcel 11-1, located at the corner of Lee and Oak Streets, on which a Gulf Station is now operating. The Gulf Oil Corporation is interested in leasing Parcel 11-39 which fronts 50 feet on Lee Street. This property is now in a to-be-acquired status; they request it be designated not to-be-. acquired to enable Gulf Oil to lease it from the present property owner and facilitate expansion of the Station. Mr. McClure read a· resolution passed by the West End Citizens Advisory Committee recommending that, 11 ••• The property be acquired by the Atlanta Housing Authority and Guld Oil Company negotiate with the developer of the shopping center for additional space." Mr. Everett Millican said he spoke as an individual, not as a member of the Board of Alder.men, when he stated that if the station is to remain in this location the additional room is needed to make it an asset. Mr. Millican stated he has assurance from Gulf that the area will be cleaned up, removing arry debris that has accu.mmulated. Mr. Cook asked Mr. Mullican if the Committee approves this · request for the add.itional 50 feet would Gulf be any less likely in the future to move across the street if it was shown to be in the best interest of the shopping center. Mr. Mullican stated it is not the d.esire of Gulf to move across the street. He felt the position they presently .occupy is better than being directly on the Interstate. Mr. Oxnard pointed out that the West End CAC's discussion was not reflected in the resolution ready by Mr. McClure. He continued that the general feeling of the Committee was that the station should not be there. Rather than allowing it to expand, it should .move across the street. The general feeling was that it should not have been there in the first place and expansion would merely cut that much .more from the shopping center. Mr. Robinson countered that he ·met with Mr. McClure and the CAC July 11th and told them their plans were to beautify the station by landscaping and adding facilities to it, proposing to make that corner a credit to the area as a whole. Mr. Robinson believes this can be done by providing the additional .frontage. Mr.• Cotsakis moved the Com.mi ttee take this up in Executive Session. This was agreed on unanimously, ani the public hearings ended and the Committee moved into Executive .Session. When the Committee was called to order in the Executive Session, Mr. Cook stated in regard to the Star Tex proposal there is need for more pre-planning rather than just offering f or sale and. leaving it to the developer to draw the plans. He felt additi onal ground work should be laid before letting the site f or bids, and stated this is initially what must be done. Mr. Cook said. an immediate start must be made on the northern sector of the shopping center. He doesn't want to see everybody .moved out then take years to move them back. New buildings should be ready for occupancy before demolition begins on the old. structures. He thought this is s01nething ·· that must be required in developing the site. Mr. Cook asked Mr. Openshaw what happened to the idea of moving Oak Street. Mr. Openshaw replied that Mr. Karl Bevins, City Traffic Engineer, would not permit Oak Street to be moved because it would interfer with the expressway ramp. I -5- �•• . ',·""· Mr. Edwin Sterne commented in connection with Mr. Ringle I s proposed motel development that apparently Urban Renewal had already planned a motel and asked what effect another .motel development will have on this one and if it would make our proposed motel less saleable. Mr. Etheridge stated it would tend to create another constructive activity, and he did not believe there could be an adverse effect. Mr. Cook expressed more concern about its effect on the shopping center than on another motel. He continued that when we d.o have an opportunity to really put a plan together with something that looks good and can set the tone for the entire area, we ought to make every effort to tie it together. We ought to go further than setting a fixed price, then selecting the best plan submitted by outlining planning criteria and having the developer follow those plans. Mr. Sterne stated he. thought the entire area north of Oak Street ought to be devoted to motel use rather than ad.ding other facilities. Mr. Gladin thought it should be designed as one unit following a set design criteria. Mr. Etheridge suggested we have someone set up the design criteria rather than relying on the architect. Mr. Gladin suggested the City or a consultant make the plan. Mr. Persells suggested the Committee recommend to the Housing Authority that this be included in the Urban Renewal Plan for acquisition and take no action at this time and recommend to the Housing Authority that immediate steps be taken to implement a top notch plan by emplaying an outside Planner. Mr. Cook stated we will need to bring so.me~me in from the outside. Mr. Cotsakis did not think the Housing Authority should be responsible for selecting the consultant, but suggested as a.:possibility the Civic Design Commission. He continued that with an outside consultant, a plan be effectuated relating the entire ~rea. Mr. Cotsakis suggested the Committee defer a decision at this time. The Committee was in general agreement. Mr. Cook concluded that within 60 days the Committee should have some answers on this issue. * *** There being rio further business to discuss, the meeting was adjourned. Appr oved: Chairman Respectfull y submitted: ,. Secretary - 6- �I .r June 12, 1967 0 A j oint meet i ng of the Ur ba n Renewal Policy Committee and the Board of Commi s sio ners of t he At l a nta Housing Authority was held on Monday, June 12, 1967 at 11: 15 A. M. in the Hickory Hill Salon of the Marriot to discuss t he awarding o f the bid in the University Center Urban Redevelopment Area. The f ollowing Members we re pres e nt: w (/) ~ w CL dj ~ J c::: 0 0 ro Mr . Mr. Mr . Mr . Mr . Mr . Rodney Cook , Chairman E . . Gregor y Griggs John M. Fl anigen Hugh Pi e rce Frank Etherid ge Edwin L. Sterne Mr . George Cotsakis Also pre se nt were : Mr . M. B. Sat t erfield, Executive Director, Atlanta Housing Authority . Mr . Le s Pers el l s , Director of Redevelopment, AHA. Mr . Howard Opens haw, Chief , Pl anning-Engineering Depa rtment, At l a n ta Housing Author ity. Mr . J . B. Blayton , Membe r, Boa rd of Commissioner s, Atlanta Housing Au t ho r i t y. Mr . Collie r Glad in, Planning Director, City of Atlanta, Seve n redevelopers submit t e d propos al s , lis ted below, consisting of nar rative st a teme nt s , a ccompanied by drawings showing site plans, floor plans, elevat i o ns and pe rspe ctives , which we r e on display for discussion and examinati on: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Pri nc e Ha ll Mas onic Lodge # 1 Pri nce Hall Mas oni c Lodge # 2 Civic Ho usi ng As s ociate s, I nc . Atl a nt a Bui lding & Deve lopme nt Corporat io n Ce lotex Co r poration Department o f Minimum Salari e s , AME Chur ch Diamond & Kaye Prop erties Mr . Perse lls explained tha t the various reviewers ha d rat e d each proposal f airly equa l ins ofar a s t he i r cla iber of development is conc erned. @) =he committee p r oc e eded to di s cuss each propos a l, pr o and con. ~he question o f modifi cation of plans by FHA ( r e gardless of who the dev e loper is) and what constitu te s a mi nor a nd ma jor change of plans wa s discuss ed at length . Mr . Pe rsell s s a id that in dis cussions wi t h FHA abo ut t hi s particu lar point , the Housing Au t ho ri ty wa s ass ured that any changes requested would be within the or i ginal concept of d eve lopment . Mr . Cotsakis raised the ques t i on of providi ng ai r-conditioning in t he units , stating he felt it would be highly de sirab l e. �Minutes Urba n Renewal Policy Committee J une 12, 1967 Page 2 0 ~rr . Pers e ll s s tated that in 22l(d)(3) developments this is not an FHA requirement a nd the re is no way of subjecting a developer to it; that some co ns i derat ion is being given to this in a development in the RawsonWashi ngt on proj ect area; in the case of the 7 proposals at hand, one propo se s air-condi t ioning and the other six can supply unit conditioners later. Incidentally, Mr. Persells stated this would be considered a minor plan change . Mr . Etheridge st at ed that keeping in mind this property forms the entrance way t o At l anta 's Negro college complex, his concept of development would be t o go h i gh-rise, in order to allow more open space, and orient it to the col lege comp l ex , rather than to the overall housing problem. He · suggested the h i gh-ris e could be placed in the interior of the development with the l ow- r is e structu re s a round it, at the entrance way to the col l ege complex . Thi s concept would tie in with the colleges' proposal to place low- r ise buildings for faculty and students in a fourth of their property. There was f urthe r discussion as to whether or not it would be ethical for the c ommittee t o negot iate with a developer on a plan change after the award was made . Mr . Persells stated tha t minor changes vs. major changes gets to be a matter of opinion , but he fe lt you could negotiate with the winning develop e r within the conc ept of the original development, but as to the question o f hi gh rise, pe r se , he fel t if this was deemed advisable for the area , each developer wou ld have to be given an opportunity to submit plans based on a high- rise concept s inc e , in his opinion, this would constitute a ma jor cha nge . He also ment ioned that no wa ivers were granted in any of the propos a ls. The Chairman then called f or a decision . The Committ ee adopted, by unanimous co nsent, p r oposal number 5 by t h e Celo tex Corporation with proposal number 1 by Prince Ha l l Masonic Lodge 1 a s a second c hoi c e . There be i ng no f urther business, the meeting was adjourned. Approved: me Respectfully submitted, �--··:~~ng of the Urban Renewal Policy Committee and the Board of Commissioners of the At lanta Housing Authority was held on Monday, June 19, 1967, at 8:00 A. M. i n the Hickory Hill Salon of the Marriott Motor Hotel. The following .members of the Policy Committee were present: Mr. Rodney M, Cook, Chair.man Mr. E. Gregory Griggs The follo wing members of the Board. of Commissioners were present: Mr. Edwin L. Sterne, Chair.man Mr. Frank Etheridge Also present were: Mr. M. B. Satterfield., Executive Director, Atlanta Housing Authority Mr. Lester H, Persells, Director of Redevelopment, Atlanta Housing Authority Mr. Collier Gladin, Chief Planning Engineer, City of Atlanta The purpose of this joint meeting of the Policy Committee and the Board of Commissioners is to recommend. and decide which will be the successful redeveloper for Parcels C-1, 3 and 4 in the Rawson-Washington Street Urban Redevelopment Area. Mr . Cook asked Mr. Attridge if there are any irregularities present in any of t he proposals that would. require a waiver. Mr. Attridge replied there are s o.me irregularities, and cited as an example the use of 202 as well as 221 f i nancing in t he Ebenezer Baptist Church proposal. Their proposed high-rise, cons i s ti ng of efficiencies and. one-bedroom apartments would be financed under 202 wi th t he gar den apartments financed. under 221. The developer has been contacted regarding this and has indicated. his willingness to go entirely 221. Mr. Attridge f oresees no difficulty, however, with a waiver of this nature. A di s cu s sion continued between Mr. Cook and Mr. Attridge regarding the restr ic t i venes s of 202 to elderly. It was noted, however, that certain of the other proposals, as Wesley Woods, could. also restrict their rentals to elderly since they cons ist of efficiencies and. one-bedroom apartments. Therefore, this does not seem to be a major factor, There being no further discussions at this point, Mr, Persells introduced Mr . Lou i s Orosz who summarized each proposal as to type of structure, number of uni ts, parki ng spaces , community facilities, and. good and bad features. Mr. Persell s mentioned. that some question was raised regarding the t welve-story buildi ng propo s ed by Ebenezer Baptist Church conforming to the 100 foot height l imi t ation . The architects and engineers have assured the Authority in wr iting that t he bu i lding will be built within this limitation. �As a background for now and. later, Mr. Persells stated that FHA has looked over t he proposals and. in giving .mortgage insurance they would prefer having a great d.ifference in appearance between the public housing and this development. A distinction would work to create a different clientele. Mr. Etheridge stated. that his objection to the Ebenezer proposal is t hat it provides for large family residence; aad with this being a seven ·acre downtown site, he does not feel it is appropriate for this use. Mr. Sterne commented t hat 2/3 of the development is for elderly, leaving a small percentage for larger families. In response to Mr. Sterne's question regarding the demand for larger units in public housing projects, Mr. Satterfield replied. that at this time there is a demand. f or larger uni ts, and there has been so.me remodeling to pro vi de these. Mr. Cook asked for a decision from the Committee and Board. asked that Mr. Pierce be informed of the waiver and racial issue. He also With the entire Committee not being present, Mr. Cook suggested that everyone pres ent vote, then ask those absent to register their vote with him as Chairman of the Policy Committee. Messrs. Cook, Griggs, and Sterne voted for Ebenezer Baptist Church with Wesley Woods as a second choice. Mr. Etheridge voted for Wesley Woods with Ebenezer Baptis t Church as a second choice. With there being a descenting vote, Mr. Sterne su ggested. the decision be left open. Mr. Cook asked Mr. Gl~din to contact the r emai ning members of the Policy Committee today informing them to contact Mr. Cook regarding their recommendation. Mr. Persells stated. that he would like everything completed 10 days prior to July 1st to allow for adequate public notice prior to the closing date. This concluding the business, Mr. Griggs moved the meeting be adjourned. Approved : �May 12, 1967 A regular meeting of the Urban Renewal Policy Committee was held on Friday, May 12, 1967, at 10:00 A. M. at the Atlanta Housing Authority, 824 Hurt Building. All members were present as follows: Mr . Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Rodney M. Cook, Chairman Edwin L. Sterne Hugh Pierce E. Gr egory Griggs John M. Flanigen George Cotsakis Frank Etheridge Also present were: @) w iJ) <( w 0.. «:S ~ J n:: 0 0 co Mr. Collier Gladin, Planning Direc t or, City of Atlanta Mr . George Aldridge, Direc t or, Community Improvement Program Mr. Jim Kluttz, Atlanta Planning Department Mr . Robert Sommerville, Executive Director, Atlanta Transi t Company Mr . M. B. Satterfield, Executive Director, Atlanta Housing Au t ho rity Mr. Les Persells, Director of Redevelopment, Atlanta Housing Authority Mr. Howa rd Openshaw, Chief, Planning-Engineering Department, Atl a n ta Housing Authority Mr. J ame s Henley, At lanta Housing Authority Mr . By r on Attridge and Mr. Lynn Hewes, King & Spalding, At t orneys Mr . J a ck Glenn and Mr. J. B. Blayton, Members, Board of Commiss i oner s , At lant a Housing Authority Chairman Cook cal l ed t he me eting to or der a nd expl ai ned the purpo se o f this meeting is t o hear a p re s entation from Al derman Q. V. Wi lliamson relative to the Rockda le Ur ban Renewa l Project Area . While awa iting his arrival, the committee conside red schedu l ing o f dates f or the deve lo per's presentations on 7.6 a c re s in the Raws on-Washington Proj ec t Area, scheduled for 22l(d) (3 ) development. It was unanimou sly de cid ed t o hear from all developers who had s ubmi tted bid s on Wed nesday , May 31, 196 7 , beginning at 3:00 P. M. It was al so a gr eed that each developer would be given a fifteen minute presentation period, with f i fteen mi nutes al lowed f o r questions and an swers. Each committe e member was presented wit h a synopsis o f each proposal for revi ew. Mr . Perse l l s also rep o rted that developer's presentations had been held on Parcel 73 in the University Center Pro ject Area . At this time, Alderman Williamson arrived at the meeting along with Senator Leroy R. Johnson and representatives of various Negro organiza ti ons. Chairma n Cook stated that a few days ago certain charges were made t o him concerning the Rockdale Project which he felt was of a serious natu r e and shou ld be presented to this com:nittee for consideration and disposition as it sees fit. He then turned the meeting over to Mr. Williamson. Alderman Williamson stated he had discussed this matter with the Mayor on �r Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee May 12, 1967 Page 2 Wednesday; that he had also met with membe r s of the Atlanta Summit Leadership Conference, the NAACP, Op e ration Breadb a s ke t, Atlanta Voters Lea gue and other organizations that are terribly concerned about urban renewal in Atlanta because "Negroes have gotten nothing but the brunt of being kicked off the land"; that they have not been allowed to participate in urban renewal at any level and have not been allowed jobs nor investments in urban renewal property; that the only land Negroes have gotten out of urban renewal was land the colleges bought which "they paid for out of the nose and paid more than anyone else paid for similar urban renewal land"; that the Wheat Street Baptist Church is a prime example - they paid twice what the land was worth for the (d)(3) development they erected on it, to the extent that the project was almost economically unfeasible. Mr. Cook stated that some statements already made by Aldennan Williamson do not coincide with the facts and he asked Mr. Persells if he cared to respond. Senator Johnson asked that they be allowe d to state their position, after which they would be happy to answer any questions or clarify any statements, but to interrupt with questions during the presentation breaks the continuity of thought. Mr. Williamson continued to state that after analyzing urban renewal in At l anta f or the past ten to twelve years, taking into account "what goes on" at the Atlanta Housing Authority, particularly in public housing, these org ani zations wonder if Atlanta shouldn't get out of the urban renewal business; tha t Atla nta mu st let Negroes participate and become a part of urban renewal i f i t is t o survive. He s t ated t hat Negroes a l so have serious problems wi t h e xisting public hous i ng a nd these organizations a l so wonder if Negroes wou l dn' t be better o f f living in slums on the ir own land than in some of the public hou s ing in At la nta. He cited the Ea gan Homes as an example and brief l y d i scussed some of the deplorable conditions e xisting in this p r ojec t , su ch a s r oach and r odent infesta tions and t he Au t hority's refusal to e x te nninate the premise s and de nying the tenants t he ri gh t t o do so at their own expense. He empha s i z ed t he city requires private owne rs t o do this. Other problems he mentioned were t hat t e nant s we r e not a l l owed to have a te l e phone extension upstairs and e ntry ways to the a pa rtmen ts are rec e s s ed and do no t have adequate lighting ; a case of r a pe was cit ed a s be i ng a t tributab le t o this. He stated further that t e n an t s a r e r eluc tant t o compl ain f o r f ear of being ev icted by the manageme nt; that these tenants , in many i ns tances , rather than live in this proje c t under bondage , would be better o ff in s l ums with freedom. He went on to say that the c a se at po i n t is that thi s is the type of thing urban renewal and public hous ing is producing in Atlanta and it must be stopped. As to the question of Rockda l e, he stated that two years ago a group of Negroes began ini tia l efforts t o organize this community and devel op support of area resident s for a plan f or Rockda l e; subsequently, a community organization was formed and working with the Atlanta Housing Authority, assembled a proposed plan for Rockdale according to their rules and regula t io ns. He stated that propo s als by three other developers were also submitted, t wo of which were later disqualified because they did not abide by the rules o f bidding; however, two weeks later, following a meeting of the Housing Authori t y's �0 Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee May 12, 1967 Page 3 Board of Commissioners and passage of a resolution by them, these same two plans were reinstated, notwithstanding their previous disqualifications, and that this is the basis of their complaint. After this, Mr. Williamson stated it is his understanding from sources that he can secure information from that the Housing Authority narrowed the consideration to two top plans - the Douglas-Arlen and Rosen proposals - and he was told by staff membersof the Authority that both of them were about equal, but when he receives information that somehow plans can be reinstated that do not meet the bid proposals of the Authority, then the Douglas-Arlen group knows they are at a disadvantage; that it is the same old routine of urban renewal - Negroes aren't allowed to participate because the Douglas-Arlen group has Negro participation, even though Rockdale is a Negro community and will serve Negroes. He stated all they are asking is that the plans be judged on merit and where the Douglas-Arlen plan is as meritorious as any of the others, and Rockdale being a Negro community, it should be given to Negroes; that if Negroes can't participate in urban renewal at all levels, then the City Fathers should leave them in the slums, rather than uproot them and take their property; that the time has come when he felt this needed to be said publicly. In reply to questioning by Chairman Cook, Mr. Williamson named the Rosen and Chruckrow proposals as being the two which were disqualified and then reinstated. He then called on Senator Johnson to speak. Mr. Johnson stated he felt this matter was of enough importance and seriousness tha t he had interrupted a speaking engagement in California to return to Atlanta today for this meeting; that because of his absence from the city he had no t had an opportunity to prepare for the meeting as he should have. He then st at ed "I bel ieve with all my heart and soul that we have been discriminated against be c ause we are Negroes and that if we were not black, we would have been awarded the Rockdale Project". He then explained that he drew the charter of the Rockdale community organization and they began working on a plan for the area long before the bidding was opened; that they were successful in securing a sponsor, builder and archit ect and eventually a plan was submitted t o the Housing Authority according to the bid pr oposals. He stated furt her that after so doing and while waiting on a de cision , and believing in the operation of democracy, they were info rmed that po litic al influence was being used to get the Rosen plan approved; tha t he immediately began to investigate and pose questions, among o thers, as to why the two proposa ls which were disqualified were reinstated; that the foremost thought in the Negroes ' mind s at this time was "you folks happen to be of the wrong hue and you are not going to get it"; that they were told by the Housing Authority, as stated by Alderman Williamson, both proposals were good and a ssuming this is so, then he felt it incumbent on the City Fathers t o " bend over backwards" t o award the development to a Negro group, compos ed of Negro architec t s, lawyers, real estate brokers and builders, who are loc al ly based and have a vested interest in the heart of a Negro community and will represent Negro people who were moved from the area and will probably move back whe n housing is available. He also noted that Rockdale is in the heart of his senatorial district and Alderman Williamson's third ward. Senator Johnson stated further that it greatly disturbs them that on the one hand they have been told by members of this connnittee that no decision has been made and �- ---· . . ··- - - -- - - - - - - -- - -- - ~ Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee May 12, 1967 Page 4 on the other hand he gets a call in California saying the Rosen plan had already been sent to FHA by the Ho using Authority and he submitted this is a serious matter. He further commented that after talking with member s of FHA and persons alrea dy engaged in 221 programs, it is his understanding that even if their pla n was submitted to FHA, it would be altered before bein g returned; that you never get plans back from FHA exactly like they are submitted. He cit ed as an example the Allen Temp le Project. He went on t o say they had also been told Negroes had nev e r built anything this big; t hat the ti me wasn't right and there was a question of the ability of the Union Baptist Church to administei the project since they had no previous experience. Senator John s on stated their position here in the 196O's, whether it is i mmediately managing or selling, is to do ri ght; that most of the reasons cited agains t their proposal are not meritorious arguments since the project would be Federally regulated anyway. He again ci ted Allen Temple as an example. He the n concluded by ·stating t hat all they are seeking is "a fair shake of the dice and don't deny us because we are black"; that they feel there is rank discrimination somewhere in the Rockdale project and they are asking this committee to right it. Mr. Cook asked Mr. Johnson who told him they would not get this project because they were Neg roes. Mr . Johnson rep lied "Mr. Cook you know that I cannot reveal my source of information anymore than you could, but as surely as there is a God in Heaven I, and we, have been t old we would not get this project because we are black". Mr. Johnson did say that hi s source of information had the contacts to know whereof he speaks. At . this time, Chairman Cook and Mr. Gladin excused themselves from the meeting t o keep a previous appointment in the Mayor's office. They did no t return during the remainder of the meeting, although they had hoped to. Mr. Griggs presided as Chairman during the rest of the me eting. Reverend Sam Williams then addressed the committee briefly on three points: (1) that so much time has to be spent by Negro es keeping vigil to see that even token justice is done; (2) the c ruelty of denying Negroes because of historic disabilities imposed upon them whi ch they themselves did not p l a ce upon their shoulders; and (3) the fact that Negroes should be al lowed to share in the financial rewards flowing from urban renewal. Reverend Williams also s tated he was personally familiar with the Eagan Homes situation because a member of his congregation lived there and he agreed these things must be corrected. Reverend Grier, representing Operation Breadbasket and a group of ministers, and Reverend Dorsey of Operation Breadbasket , both endorsed the remarks of Alderman Williamson, Senator Johnson and Reverend Williams . Mr. Griggs assured Messrs. Williamson and Johnson that it is of great concern to membersof this committee that the charge of racial discrimination in Rockdale ha s been made. Mr. Cotsakis then stated he had to leave the meeting on a previous commitment, but before departing he stated for the record that in all the meetings of the �0 Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee May 12, 1967 Page 5 Policy Commi ttee he had par t icip ated in he had never heard the word Negro mentioned, nor had he received any indication of racial discrimination as far as any particular proj ect is concerned. Senator Johnson commented "you don't have to say the word to do the act". Mr . Persells then responded to the charge s as follows: As to no participation on the part of Negroes in planning, he s tated there was a cons iderable period of time whe n there wa s little, if any, par ti cipation in urban renewal planning by whites or Negroe s; that the planning and action that went on took place at the off icia l level and the participati on of the cornmunity at large was extremely limited; that only within the last two to fo ur years were people outsid e o f o ff icials really brought into planning in urban renewal to the extent of actual participation. The first effort at involving parti cipation on the part of persons living in the project area t ook place in the West End Project through a Ci tizen s Advisory Corranittee, whic still functions. The second effort t ook pla ce when the Buttermilk Bo ttoms North Avenue Project (which was combi ned wi th Bedford-Pine) was initiated ; the c itizens residing in the project area fo rmed an organization ca lled "URESCUE" whi ch, from that day f o rward, actively and fully participated in every planning decision affecting the area; that this organizat ion has had a profound effect on the urban renewal plan f or this area and he expected it to continue to do so. Mr . , Persells commented further t h at at some point you have to d evelop a basis f or discussion; in the case of Rockdale the people were moved, the land cleared and then came the question o f utilizati on of the l and; that it was determined many years ago that Rockdale would be used f or schools, playgrounds and residences, with an incidental po ssibility o f furnis hing a service shopping area for the 1500 families that would live in the are a . The allocation of 1500 units was based on a limitation on sewers, documented by the Sewer Departme nt. Mr. Persel l s stated further the initial concept was f or single family r esidences, however, this was never possible, t opographically or financia l ly. Mr . Perse lls said further that for a long time prior t o this there wa s, in Atlan ta, a gr ow ing consciousness of t he importance of good urban desi gn , one reason being there ha d been several i llust r a tions of awards made on a flat do ll ar s ystem whe re t he redevelopmen t s had not been too good, so i t wa s ult i mate ly determi ned tha t in multi-fami l y developments it would be de s irable to make the offe ri ng s at a f i xed land pri ce and awa rd t he b i d base d on compet i tive design c rit e r i a ; t hat a pri me reason f or this change in policy was to avoid the type o f pr ob lem mentioned by Mr . Wi lliamson whe re Wheat Street Baptist Church overbid on the land . He s tated t hi s was a very unfo rtunate situation but could no t have be en avoid ed at that t i me wi th the existing laws . I n adopting the fixed land price s y s tem, Mr. Perse ll s s tated an elaborate procedure was e s tabl i shed to insure that awards wo uld be on the basis of design criteri a a nd not po litical or o ther f acto r s . This procedure involved staff reviews and recommendations, ora l presentat ions by developers and recommendations from e xperts in th e fi eld of planning, architecture and housing. �Minu te s Urban Renewa l Policy Commit tee May 12, 19 67 Page 6 Th is procedu re wa s f ollowed i n the case of Rockda l e . The se r ecommenda t i on s were then presented t o t he Urban Renewal Poli cy Commi tte e who s pen t in e xc e ss o f f ive hours ev a l uating the f our proposa l s . The pr opos a ls we r e t hen pre sented t o t he Board o f Commi ssioners o f the Ho using Autho r i t y a nd t h ey discussed t hem v ery c arefu l l y, howev er , no de c i sion ha s been made by t hem. At thi s point , Mr . Per s ell s com.~ ented t hat no on e had a tt emp t ed to infl uence him in thi s matte r o r con t ac ted him ab out it exc ept Mr. Wi ll iamson an d Mr . J ohnson; that whe n the y visited his o ffi c e he a dvis ed them a t t hat t ime that he wa s a s ta ff member , no t a de c i s i on o r po li cy make r , and he woul d be remi s s in hi s duty if the s t a ff had i nfl uence on policy t o the exten t t hat it was . an overr id ing fa c t o r , ra t her t han a r e commendat ion, and such was no t the ca se wit h Rockdale . Mr . Per s e l ls commented on the s tatement that Ne groes do not hold re sp onsible j obs i n urb an renewal , or t hey hold l ow type j ob s. He s t a t ed this is s imply no t an a c curate s tatement ; that there are a number o f Negro peop le involved in urban renewal a t h i gh and l ow l eve ls and their jobs are open f o r inspection ; that there are v acan t j ob s wh i ch are yet to be fi lled and when quali fie d Neg r o peo p l e ca n be f ound , who a re will i ng t o a cc ept t he job at the salary it c arri es , he would per so na l ly re commend them f o r empl oyme nt. As to the allegation , by imp l i cat i on o r dire c t statement, tha t there ha d bee n no previous la nd purchases invo lving Negroe s and t he que s tion o f t he Ne gro colle ges pa ying more f o r uban re new al land t ha n anyone el s e, Mr. Per se l ls s a id t ha t p r i o r to Ro ckdale, awa rds were stric t l y on t he ba s i s o f the h ighest bidde r, wi t h some c on siderat i on g i ven t o des ign f acto rs, and he could r ec all onl y two ins ta nces when awa r ds we r e made o ther than t o the high b idder and these ha d c lear-cu t re ason s which h ad no thing to do with the qu e s tio n o f ra c e ; that t he re hav e be e n seve ra l ins tanc e s whe r e Neg r oes hav e been s ucc es s f u l bidder s , f or e xamp le, Ci t iz ens Tr us t Company; f urther, at the t ime the Unive r si ty Cent er Urb an Renewal Proj e c t was being planned, it ap pe are d that it wo uld be impo ss ib l e t o f inanc e a proj e c t of t he size des i r e d by t he co l l e ges and so the col le ge s , i n o r der t o make t he project fe a s i ble and se cure t he land, ag reed to pay $40 , 000 an a cre; t ha t h e had neve r heard them comp la in ab out this ; that Whe a t Str eet Ga rde n s , again, wa s a n unfortuna t e se t o f circumstances, but t hey related t o the t i me and s ituation as i t was t hen; t ha t bas ed on his exp e r ience, t he Negro co llege s would have pai d more f o r t he l and wi thout the be nef it of the urb an renewal project. Mr . Pe rsells did no t comment on the pub l i c hou s i ng , except t o s ay the things mentioned in regard t o Eaga n Horne s ar e not who lly accurat e and do no t fairly repre sent the si t uation a s i t i s. He then made brief concluding commen ts on s everal othe r po ints rais ed by Messr s. Williams on and J ohnson. He s t a ted th er e had b een an ass umption made that the two proposals me ntioned (Douglas-Ar len and Ro s en) were equal , but he could assure everyo ne tha t whe n a decision is reached, it will be bec au s e the two were not equal. They had a l so assumed that the Rosen pr opos al doe s not involve Negro pa r t icipa t io n , but Mr . Per sells stated t hey might well include local Negro participat ion , j u s t as Douglas-Ar len does; t h at t h e Ro sen group has agree d to "spin o f f" po rt ions of the t ota l development, in the same manne r a s �- 0 -~-- -- - - - - - Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee May 12, 1967 Page 7 the Douglas- Arlen group anticipated spinning off the whole of the projec t , to a non-pro f it organiza t ion , however, Rosen was explicit in his desire to retain control of the development. As to t he capability of the Union Baptist Church t o c arry out a project of t h is magnitude, Mr. Persells state d that t o let thi s be t he gove rning factor in the de cision would be wrong; tha t t he assump tion has to be ma de .that such an organization would employ pro f essionally skilled peop l e who could assist them in ma nagement activities. As t o the Rose n propo sal be ing submitted to FHA , Mr. Persells stated it was submitted to FHA f or a preliminary review to determine i f it was acceptable to FHA without having t o make major ch anges; i f i t had been r eturned, another proposal would have been s ubmi tted to them; furth e r, it is not accurate to say that pla ns will not be deve l ope d a s submitted to FHA becaus e they will change them; that i f this were t r ue, compe ti tions would not be he ld; t hat while minor changes might be sugge s ted becau s e of topographic cond itions or other reasons, it doe s not mean the basic concept or layout of the developme nt would be altered. As to Negroes sharing in the financial rewards of urban renewal, Mr. Persel l s stated the bu lk of the f inancial rewards which would accrue to Negroes or whites would be in the development stage; after the structures are built, it lies with the continuing ma nagement. Mr. Persells conc l uded by saying t hat he hoped they could continue to opera te without rega rd to race , creed or color and involve the community as a who l e in planning a c t iviti es oriented to urban renewa l projects; that we shou l d no t condemn ourselves by past mistake s, but pro fi t f rom them and move f orward. There we r e then ques t i ons a nd ans wers . Mr . Glenn st a ted he was the n ewe st member o f t h e Bo a rd of Commiss ione rs and in the meeti ngs he had attended race had never been me ntioned and to h is knowledge no dec ision had been made on Rockdale. He pointedly asked "has a dec i s i on been ma de and was r a ce an issue?" Mr. Griggs stated the Po l icy Committee had ma de a recommenda t i on to t he At lanta Housing Authority a nd rac e was not a n is sue; tha t no decis i on has been made yet by the Authori ty. Mr . Pierc e s t ated he would like it clarified about the charge of reinsta t ing disqualif ied plan s. Mr . Persells explained that at no t i me were any o f the f ou r pr opo sals set aside; that in thei r initia l r eview o f the propos al s, which is to determi ne if they are in proper order t o be accepted, t hey did discover minor t echni calities in the Rosen and Chruckrow p ropo sa l s . The Rosen proposal did not submit a bid bond , nor a total dev elopment cost, although suffic ient information was available to arrive at this figure . The Chruckrow proposal failed to meet the exact specifications with respect to their drawings, however, after consultations with the Authority ' s legal counsel, it was felt these were merely minor irregularities and not sufficient reasons f o r rejecting the propo sals since the s e irregularities did not affect any of the design criteria ; consequently, the Board of Commissioners, �0 Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee May 12, 1967 Page 8 under the provisions of t he o ffering, waived the se irregularities, but up to this point there was no cons id eration given t o the proposals on the basis o f merit and they were under cons tant review and still are. As a result of this situation Mr . Persells stated it wa s determined that the wording in the offering was too ambiguous and subsequently an addendum to the offering was ma de, setting forth in greater detail the speci fi cations for bidding. Mr . Pierce asked i f any of these exceptions were ever mentioned at the Policy meetings, t o which Mr . Persells answered negative ly, explaining that it was felt this was a re sponsibility of the Board of Commissioners, whose meet ings are a matter of public reco r d. Mr . Wi lliamson con tended that if the Douglas-Arlen group had not "dotted every 'i' and cross ed every 't' t hey would be ou t of the ball game". Mr . Johns on stated it was their understand ing the Policy Corrnnittee wou ld make a re corrnnendation to the Housing Authority , who would be responsible f or making the final decision, but since a re commendation fr om the Policy Corrnnittee is tantamount to approval by the Authority, they felt it was their responsibi li ty t o dis cuss the matter with the Pol i cy Committee and they are here today because they thought no deci sion had been made. Mr. J ohnson stated furth er that he and Mr . Williams on vis ited Mr . Cook in hi s o ffi ce and were told that a decision had been made by t h e Po li cy Corrrrnittee and Mr . Cook suggested they s ee Mr. Persells; that they did visit with Mr . Persel ls who, in turn, suggested they take the matter up with the o ther members of the Policy Committee, resulting in today's meeting . He also mentioned that when Alderman Cotsakis le ft the meeting, he said he would not return to the meeting to vote because thi s Committee had already ma de a recommendation; that if this is the c a s e , then everything said today has been to no avail. He said further that the Ho using Authority permi ts a laxity of rules for some and requires o thers to "toe the mark" and this is where discrimination begins. He submitted that if the Douglas-Arlen group had not submitted a performance bond, they would have been eliminated. Mr. Williamson asked when must the Housing Authority publicize its decision. Mr . Persells stated not later than Monday. There being no further discussion , Mr . Griggs thanked everyone for appearing and the Committee then went into Executive Session. In Executive Session, Mr. Sterne commented that the Policy Connnittee, after studying the four proposals very carefully, and after having the benefit of written recorrnnendations from the experts, did make a recommendation and the final decision rests with the Hou sing Authority; that there is some merit to the statement that generally speaking the Board of Commissioners tends to follow the recommendation of the Policy Corrnnittee; that while he is aware of the Senator's explanation of the insidious way the race issue comes up, he could truthfully say it never entered his mind at any of the briefings or meetings he attended. �..,._ w (/) ~ -· • ... .,.J. - -- -· i'~-- . - - ------ _________ _______________ Minute s Urban Renewal Policy Committee May 12, 1967 ...._ Page 9 LrJ 0 a.. ~ "S'. ~ J a: 0 0 m Mr . Griggs stated he was "dumfounded" when Mr. Wil liamson and Senator Johnson came to his office and made the charges they did; that he was completely unaware o f any racial prejudice connec ted with Rockdale. Mr. Persells stated the bids were opened legally on March 15 and the Housing Authori ty is obligated to reach a decision and notify the successful bidder within 60 days, after which they have 10 days to sign the contract documents. In answer to questioning by Mr. Griggs, Hr. Persells stated the Board of Commissioners will have all four proposals before them at the meeting, with a favo rable recommendation from the Policy Committee on the Rosen proposal. Mr . Pierce recalled that he had to leave the meeting of April 25, 1967, at whi ch the four proposals were discussed, prior to its conclusion and at the time of his departure, advis e d the Chairman that up to t h at point, he favored the Rosen plan, based on the plans he had seen and the recommendations that had been given it by the va rious experts; however, he stated that at that time he was not aware of the exceptions which were made, o r the questio n of the race issue, and he requested that if the Chairman did vote favorable for him, that it be stricken from the record. @ Mr. Sterne, a l so being a member of the Board of Commissioners, sta ted he wanted to make it clear that the waivers which were granted took place pr ior to any hearings and it was afterwards that the detailed presentations were made on all four proposals. After other brief discussion, the Acting Chairman stated that if today's presentations had altered the position of any committee member, he would entert ain a motion to reconsider the matter. Mr. Pierce so moved and simultaneously moved that the Douglas-Arlen pr opo sa l be a pproved. These motions died for the lack of a second. The Acting Cha irman then entertained a motion to reaffirm the previous de cis i on o f the -commi t t ee. Moti on was made a nd seconded by Messrs. Sterne and Flanigen that acc e p t ance o f the Ro sen p r oposal be reaffirmed, s aid motion being adopted by majori ty vote, with Ald e rma n Pierce voting a dversely. Approved: jp Respectfully submitted : �April 28, 1967 A regularly scheduled meeting of the Planning and Development Conunittee of the Board of Aldermen was held on Friday, April 28, 1967 at 2:00 P. M. in Committee Room #1, Second Floor, City Hall. The following members were present: Rodney Cook, Chairman E. Gregory Griggs Charles Leftwich George Cotsakis John M. Flanigen Q. V. Williamson Absent: Jack Summers Also in attendance were: Collier Gladin William F. Kennedy Pierce Mahony Earl Landers Howard Openshaw Les Persells \. The Chairman called the meeting to order and the following business was consiqered: Mr. Gladin explained that the Planning Department, with assistance from other city departments and agencies, have been preparing the annual request for recertification of the Workable Program, which is necessary in order for the city to continue participation in a variety of federal programs; that it is hoped to submit the recertification to the Board of Aldermen for approval on May 15 and to HUD immediately thereafter in order to allow them two additional weeks of review time. He stated further that prior to today's meeting, a draft copy o f each of seven sections were . forwarded to each member for review and he then asked for any questions o r suggested changes in any of t he individual draf t sec ~ions . Mr. Kennedy of the departmental staff briefly commented on each draft and the foll owing is a listing of them and the recommendations of the committee: 1. Codes and Ordinances - Under Item 4, relative to the number of appeals filed during the past twelve months as a result of code enforcement, it was requested that the figure reflecting the number of cases resolved by the committee be changed to accurately show that the commit tee itself had resolved all the cases which had been brought before it, even though some of the cases might be pending before another governing board. 2. Comprehensive Community Plan - No changes. �Minutes Planning and Development Committee April 28, 1967 Page 2 3. Neighborhood Analyses - No changes, 4. Administrative Organization - No changes. 5. Financing - No changes. 6. Hou s ing For Displ aced Famili e s - The committee asked that the total number of families displaced during 1966 (shown as 162) be verified; that it seemed rather low. Mr. Persells stated the Housing Authority could document this figure. 7, Citizen Participation - No changes. The committee then unanimously adopted the following resolution: "A RESOLUTION BY PLANNI NG AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE ' \. WHEREAS, the City of Atlanta is constantly . working to solve the problems of urban blight and decay and, WHEREAS , the City of Atlanta is committed to a positive working relationship with the national government in an attempt to solve urban problems of mutual concern and, WHEREAS, recertification of the City of Atlanta's Workable Pr ogram for Community Improvement i s necessary in order to cont inue to r ece i ve gran ts-in-aid under a va riety of federal aid programs and , WHEREAS , t he ·city of Atlanta ha s made out standing pr ogress in 1966 in meeting its goals f or t o ta l community i mprovemen t . NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Mayor a nd Board o f Aldermen of the City of Atlanta, as f ol l ows: l. That the attached report, A Review of Progress under the Workable Program for Community Improvement, is hereby adopted. 2. That said report be forwarded to the Regional Office of the �r Minutes Planning and Development Committee April 28, 1967 Page 3 United States Department of Housing and Urban Development for their review no later than June 1, 1967." "'("k-k* Mr. Mahony of the departmental staff gave a brief status report on the Land Use Plan, ~tating it is expected to have it in a final draft form by July so as to begin consultations with the committee with a view toward final adoption. Revision of Zoning Ordinance \ Mr. Gladin briefly commented that the staff feels it would be desirable, as a n initial step in updating the entire ordinance, to rev~ew it for certa in kinds of deficiencies which should, in turn, give.a clearer under~ st a nding of where the ordinance is lacking in its basic approach to both development and enforcement; tha t while most of these deficiencies are obvious to the admin{strative sta ff , it was felt it would be desirable to have an outside review of the ordinance from a more objective standpoint, point i ng o.ut both the kinds of deficiencies and the areas where it may substanti a lly differ from other ordinances employing similar concepts . and accord i ngly, the American Society of Pl a nning Officials has been employed to do such · a review. Mr. Gladin stated also that he anticipated b r inging this matter before the committee a round the middle of May for discussion. Survey and Planning App lic a tion for Na sh- Bans Area Mr. Gladin exp la ined tha t an in i ti a l mee ting had been schedul ed with representatives from all the a r ea civi c c lubs, chur che s a nd other groups ; the purpose o f thi s meet ing , a nd ot her s i milar one s t o f ol l ow, will be t o acquaint the s e area repre senta tives with the c ity ' s plans f or their area; to hear their problems and s o l u tions; t o ascertain their fee l i ngs about an urban renewal pro j e c t f or t heir area , and t o s o licit thei r support; in turn, it is hoped the s e repre senta tives will keep thei r r espec tive neighborhood informed of all the s e activities . • Combi ning of Buttermi l k Bottoms - Bedford Pine Projects Mr. Persells brought this matter to the committee's attention, explaining �Minutes Planning and Development Committee April 28, 1967 Page 4 that HUD has stated that since we are simply adding the areas and budgets together, no new resolution is required and the documents can be presented to the Regional Office and unless this committee wishes to restate the position taken by the Urban Renewal Policy Connnittee in approving the combination, no further action is required. ·I The conunittee felt no further action was needed. There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. Approved: I Respectfully submitted: ' \. Col lier Gladin Planning Director jp Joanne Parks Secretary �JJ . 1~ 2 called meeting of the Urban Renewal Policy Committee wos h::~n :~e::::, April 25, 1967, at 4:00 P.M., at the Atlanta Housing Authority, 824 Hurt Bui ldin g. Al I members were present as fol lows: Mr . Mr. Mr. Mr . Mr . Mr. Mr. Rodney M. Cook, Chairman Edwin L. Sterne Hugh Pierce E. Gregory Griggs John M. Flanigen George Cotsakis Fra nk Etheridge Also pre se nt were : L!J .,.., V. <( w Q.. ,.:.j 0 0 f') Mr . Collier B. Gladin, Plan n ing Direc tor, C ity of At lanta Mr . M . B. Satterfield, Executive Direc tor, Atlanta Housing Authority Mr . Howard O penshaw, Ch ief , Planning- Engineering Department, At lanta Housin g Au th o r ity Mr. Hugh Pe terson, King and Spalding, Attorneys Mr. Les Persel Is, Dire c tor of Redevelopm e nt , At lanta Housing Au th o rity Mr. John Hopkins, Atlanta Housing Au tho rity Th e Chairman cal led the meeting to order and th e fo l lowing business was co nsidered : N o te : For th e pur poses of these minu te s and in o rd er to mai ntain clari ty a nd correlat ion of fa c ts, eac h proposa l is w r itten as a s ing le e ntity. How e ve r , al I four pro posals we re jo intl y discusse d, weig h ing th e meri ts of each a ga inst th e o ther. At rhe ou tset o f the meet in g , each com mittee membe r was pre sented with the foll owing materi al : An individua l apprai sal of the fou r Roc kda le proposal s by: Ro bert L. Sommerv i lle; G rac e Ha mi lto n; T. M . A lexa nder and A. B. Padgett , a ll members of the C it ize n' s Ad visory Commi ttee for Urba n Re newal; a re vi ewer 's ra ting shee t of the redevel opme nt pro posa ls , prepared by the At lanta Ho using Au th o rity . Included in th is appra isa l shee t were ratings by the At lan ta Hou sing Auth ority , the Atlan ta Planning Departm en t , the Ameri c an Insti tu te of Plan ners , th e Mayor 's Committee on Housing Resource s and the Ci tizen's Ad v iso ry Commi t tee for Urban Renewa l. These ratings were o n the bas is of fr om 1 to 4 poi nts, 1 being the most de sira bl e for the de velopm en'" a nd 4 the least. Mr. Persel Is stated the Housing Au th ori ty would prefer to tak e the position meeting o f o nl y answering questions and making c larifi cations . t '"hi s It was agreed that the following format w ould be f?llowed: The committee would evaluate �r··. - I ! Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Commi ttee Apr i I 25, 1967 Page 2 the aspec ts of each proposal, pro and con , and by th e proc ess of e limi nati on , based o n the merits of design criteria, narrow the consi derati on to the two top proposa ls o fferi ng the grea test possibi Iity for development for the objectives wh ich Ro c kdale shou Id seek to serve . The proposal by Marv in Warner was discussed at length. During this d iscussion, the comm ittee exa mined closely a rchi te c tural si te plans and pe rspec t iv es presented by the proposer a nd made t.he fol lowing observations and comments - A summarization of these o bservations, Iisted be low , led to the subsequent disqualification of th is proposal from consideration: Flood probl ems and the apparen t placing of some buildings wi th in the fl ood pl ai n . Severe grad ing problems and building co nstruc tion because of th e tremendous variation in grades . Dou btfu I that the si te cou Id be graded to comp ly wi th the site plans presented . The land would have to be tailored to the building arrangeme nt, as opposed to the buil ding to the land. The severe grad ing would destroy all trees. The entire site is covered with buildings, som e to within 25 feet of the property line . A commendab le feature of the plan was the coopera t ive housing approac h (76% co-o p) wh ich wou Id provide for eventual purchase of the uni ts by the resident. The proposal by Chruc krow Construction Company was then conside red , with the following observations and comments - again, a summarization o f these observa tions, I isted below, led to th e disq ualification of th is proposal from considerat ion: Proposal embraces the 11 villa·ge 11 concept , which is desirab le in princ.iple. The vehicu lar street pattern (circular dr ives) was designed in su c h a way that. i ' separated e ach 11 vil lage 11 and actually cu t off pedestrian traffic from one vi I Iage to another . The plans proposed do not fit the topography of the property, and the land would have to be conformed to the bui ldings. The develo pment wou Id be difficult to achieve without costly, extensiv e gn;1ding which wou Id create problems. �Minutes Urban Renewa l Pol icy Committee Apr i I 25, 1967 Page 3 There is reasona ble doubt tha t the si te could even be grade d to con form to the plan because o f so many un kn owns , such as rock deposits , e tc. Only one smal I recreation bui Iding is proposed in the entire developmen t . The developer states that und er 221 (d)(3) developments, swimming pools are not feasible. The archi tectural rend er ings g ive a concept of flatness, with no di ffer ence in grades. A desirabl e fe atu re of the plan was the f lexibili ty of uni ts and varia t ion in des ign . It was the opi ni on of the Policy Committee th a t th e pro posa ls by The Douglas-Arlen G roup and David L. Rose n were the better of the four proposa ls. The se two proposals were co nsidered in terms of advantages and disadvantages and va rious site plans, fl oor elevatio ns , etc. , were examined through ou t the discussion. Douglas- Arlen Pro posal Adva ntages: Proposal embra ces the 11 village 11 or 11 clus ter 11 a rrangement o f buildings . The build ings conform to the site, ra th er than the site being con formed to th e build ings. More community fa ci lities are proposed tha n i~ any of the oth er de vel opmen ts. Appropro to all o f the pro posals , the com munity fa c ilities th a t are o therwise available in th is area were then poin ted out, th e se being a pro posed Ci ty park fa ci lity , ex is ting and proposed elementary sch oo l , the Gun Club Park and the existing health ce nter, which are to serve the proposed 1500 uni ts . It was noted tha t a swimming pool cou ld be pl aced within the Ci ty park fa ci lity if it was not provided elsewhere in the development . Devel opment provides for convenien t access fr om one part of the project t o an other . Ha s local sponsor. �Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee April 25, 1967 Page 4 Provides for church sites as cal led for by th e p lan. It was po inted out that the developer has sta ted he wo uld not be able to f inan ce all the proposed communi ty fo ci Iities , however , the land wou Id be availab le for that purpose if and when f inancing becomes ava ilable - either from the developer or o ther groups . Comp lete separati on of pedestrian and vehicu lar traffic eliminating the danger of c hildren playing near c ars . Central garbage pick-up is pro posed . A des irable feature was the fl e xib ili ty in unit a rrangements - 5% I bed rooms; 5 0 % 2 bedrooms; 35% bedrooms. Site plan fol lows the contour of the land. Entire concept of development mini mizes the grading , keeps the cost down and preserves some of the natural foliage. Disadvantages: Serious question of finan cin g maior portion o f proposed community fac i lities; yet th is is the founda t ion around which the entire proiec t is bu i lt . Over-emphas is on the Community Cen te r concept , espe cially since similar fac il it ie s will be in the nearby park . The large size of the ·swimming pool , the paved area and the build ings a re u nrea l istic. Financing of the communi ty faci lities is not an FHA guaran tee . The vas t amount of paving propose d could c rea te flood and heat reflec ti o n prob lems. Devel o per proposes underpasses (5) a nd overpa sse s (2), wh ich it is fe lt are ge nerally und es irabl e. Exc essi ve wa lking d istance from the park ing areas to the dw e lling units. The conc e pt of buildin g arra ngements ut il izes some unde si rable bu i lding areas and leaves bu ildab le areas va ca nt (Example - sou theast sh o pping area). A qu est ionable feature is the four-story bu i ldings. The grouping of all comm un ity fa c ilities in the v ery center creates a self-contained atmosphere , unre lated to its surround ings, particu larly the existing community facilities - health c e nter and school. · �L - () (' m Minutes Urban Renewal Po l ic y Comm ittee Ap ri I 25 , 1967 The developer proposes to se l I the proiect, in its entirety , to a non- profit sponsor wh o has had no prev ious experience in operating or manag ing parti c ularl y a development of this enormity a nd , hopefu lly , th ey wou ld get some experien ced people to w ork w ith them o n th is. Servi ce side of the bui ld ings a re o r iented to the inter ior c ou rts, making a ccess to service v ehicles (f ire truc ks, etc .) d iff icu It . David L. Rosen Proposa l Advantages: Dwell ing un its are further removed from the rock q uarry than the o ther three proposa ls . ,, I,.~_;.. l t'J Access galler ies to eac h u ni t , permitt ing c_ross ventilation . ~ i ,1 .., _i "t No effort has been made to grade the interior Court concept, leaving the area fa irly natural . Th is wou Id avoid heat reflection problems and red uce cost. ! ,..: (J) <( LiJ Q_ The parking is recessed so th a t it is low er th an the dwelling units. This would eliminate visibility o f parking lots from the dwelling uni ts. (I t was noted thi s was listed as a disadvanta ge by one of the proposers). De velope r is investing maximum money in the units. The perspect iv es presented indicate a cl ear understand ing of the rough grades. Pedestr ian streets are pro posed throughout the pro jec t. The service sides of the buil dings are oriented to the outside, providing better access for serv ice vehicl es; and the I ivi ng rooms of the units face grassed areas and walks, rather than paving. A more complete separation of pedestrian and vehicular traffi c. G rouping of the proposed c hurch, health center and community cente r will prov ide for convenience and joint use of parking areas. Page 5 �Minutes Urban Re newal Policy Commi ttee April 25, 1967 Page 6 Two swimming pools are guaran teed by the devel oper, one for c h il dren and one for adu Its , with smal I recreati on areas arou nd the pools. In every instance the parking is adiacen t to the buildings a nd re cessed so as not to be visib le from the u nits . Devel o per will utilize FCH foun.dation coopera t ive housi ng , a very substantial sponsor who w i ll a ssist in the finan cing a nd w i ll conduct th e advertising and sales program for the development . Des ign o f the uni ts provides bu il t-i n f lexibility, allowing contract ing o r exparding of uni ts wi th the same ou ts ide walls; this will permit developer to compete with th e market, and meet tena nts I needs. Five church sites are proposed . The developer proposes to retain a maior persona l investmen t in the ' projec t and operate it personally. Di sadva ntages: The prov iding -o f 1386 units, rather than 1500, is q uesti o nable since it prov ides that much less housi ng for peo ple . Som e ad justment shoul d be made in the secondary entrance road to the projec t so t hat it woul d not funnel traff ic throu gh the roc k q ua rry e ntrance , and vice -versa . This would ne cessita te ad justment of a few bui ldings . 85 % of the uni ts are 3-story garden a partments located on the contours; ho pefu lly th ey would be adjusted to minimiz e th e !e v e ls and steps to t he units . Re c apitu lo tion o f the recomm e ndations of the var io us organ iz ations and grou ps: City of Atlanta Planning Departme nt - Da v id L. Rosen proposal . Atlanta Housing Au thori.ty - Dav id L. Rosen proposal. Citi z en 's Adv isory Committee fo r Urban Renewa l - Dav id L. Rosen proposal. - 3 to l . American Institu te of .Planners - Dav id L. Rosen proposal. I •; ' . · ·: . , · . ', I• ~ I 'J. ,, ' ' �Page 7 M i nutes Urban Renewal Pol icy Committee Apr i I 25, 1967 Am e r ic an Inst i tu te of Arc hite c ts - No spe c ific ·e commenda t io n , buL favored the Dou glas- -Arlen proposal: · · Mayo r' s Comm ittee on Hou sing Resou rc es - Do uglas- Ar le n proposal . Tfie 'Urban Renewa l Po lic y Comm i ttee, withal! bu t one member present , Ond aft~r evaluafion o f' each o f the p roposals' and wr itten c omments ·su bmitted by the organi zatio ns listed above , u pon. mo t ion by Mr . Flan igen , seco nded by Messrs . Ether idge .·and Cotsakis, unan imously recommended to Lhe Boord of Commissioners of the Housin g Auth o rity o f the Ci ty o f Atf o nta , G eorg ia, the ac c eptanc e of the David L. Rose n proposal; Alderman Pierc e had to leave the mee t ing before its co ne lusion and based on facts presented up to th.e time of his departure sta ted he fav o red the · .Rosen proposal and asked th a t the Chairman so reg ister his vote in Execu ti ~e Session . ·k*-A· ·k * *·J.:·),: * ·k ** *"k There °be ing no fu rther busi~ess, the meeti ng was adjourned.. . ' ' . '*·k*******·k***** Respe c tfo I ly su bmitted , APPROVED: · ,- ·' .. · .r:/_. I I I . - ·- , ·. . ··.: J /. _J_o_a_n_n_e-Pa-rk_s_1_S_ e_c-re_ t_a_r_y_ _- . v' JP /Im ,' �April 21 , 196 7 A reg ular mee ting o f the Urban Re newa l Policy Committee was he ld on Frid ay , April 21, 1967 at 10:00 A. M. in Committee Room # 2, Second Floor, City Hall, The f ollowing membe rs we r e pr es ent: Ro dney Cook , Chairman Edwi n Sterne Gr ego r y Gri gg s Geo rg e Cotsakis Frank Etheridge Absent: Hugh Pi erc e John F lanigen Also p resent were: George Aldridge J im Kl u t t z George Berr y John I zard Hugh Pe ter son Robert Somme rville Howard Open shaw Colli er Gl adin Le s Perse lls Bob Biv ens The Chairman c a ll ed the meet ing to o r der and the following bus iness wa s considered : Mr . Gla din introdu ced t o the Committee and other s pres ent , Mr . J immy Kl utt z , a new additio n to the City' s planning s taff. He stated that Mr . Klu t tz comes to the City hi ghly rec ommended with impressive qu ali fi c a t i ons; that he has several yea r s e xperience in the housing f i eld and will serv e as the City's coo rdinat o r of urba n renewal. In b eha l f of t he Committee, Cha irma n Cook re cognized and welcomed Mr . Kluttz, s tating t hey look f o r ward t o working with him. Submis s ion of Re v ised Applicat io n t o Combi ne the Bu t t ermi l k Bottoms and Bedford Pine Pro ject Area. Mr, Persells exh i bited a comb ined map of the two e xi s ting project areas and stated that at the time this was initi ally discussed with the re newal assi s tance administrati on , the Hou s ing Authority was advised that the neces s ary right-of-way f o r the wi dening of Bedford Place could be dedicated to the City and that the City could proceed , --- �~~ nutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee April 21, 1967 Page 2 with the widening project, however, when Part I of the Buttermilk Bottoms Application was presented for their review and approval, a change of policy at the Federal level was made, necessitating that the City purchase the right-of-way for the street widening, which will require a cash outlay of a quarter of a million dollars. Mr. Persells stated further that inasmuch as the City is not in a position to make this cash outlay, the only solution to the problem s e ems to be to combine the two projects. He then cited the advantages to such a combination: First, the proximity of the projects to each other dictate a tying together of the street alignments; since there is a change in street grades as much as 20 feet at some points, considerable regrading of the street system will be required. Secondly, there is a Federal restriction on relocating people outside o f a project proper, and combination of the two projects would permit the temporary on-site relocation of people from one project to the other. Thirdly, if the projects aren't combined, the City stands to lose approximately $125,000 in credits for the widening of Bedford. Mr. Openshaw explained the existing project boundary line is on the east side of Bedford; the City is i mmedia tely widening on the west side of Bedf ord to 3 lanes ( a ll within the Buttermilk Bottoms project) and this being the boundary line , only 50 percent credit will be , 'eligible, both in the cost of the right-of-way and street improvements, unless the projects are combined so as to include the east side of Bedford, making it an interior street; this would then per mit a 100 percent credit f or t he widening that the City had hoped ~o rece ive . Mr . Pers el ls sta t ed als o the coor di nation , a cqui sition , demol ition and reloca tion wil l be much simpl er a s a sin-. gle pr o jec t , r ather than two. Dur ing ensuing discussion, Mr . Cook expres s ed concern about the a dditiona l del ay in acquisition of propert ies i n t he Bu ttermilk Bottoms projec t since the people in this area have been t old it would begin within t he next six week s. The Commi ttee was a l s o doub t f ul tha t i t woul d involve jus t a six months de lay, and Mr . Cook f urther expr essed parti cular concern about known har ds hip cases al ong Forres t Avenue . Mr . Persells explained that he did not believe there would be t hat much delay i n the pr oj e c ts actually ; that as s oon as the Survey and Planning App l i cati on i s submitted t o combine the proj e c ts, t he Housing Au thority can immedi ately proceed with preparation of Part I of the app l ication and would expect t o have it r e ady by the time the Survey and Pl anning Application is approved; that since about 60% of the Buttermilk Bottoms project has been acquired under the Letter of Consent method the Authority has agreed that it would not make any such additional request after the Federal people h ad called to their attention that you cannot execu te a ~roject under the guise of Letters of Consent. However, in order to facilitate a cquisition of hardship cases, Mr. Persells stated Mr. Davis (City Comptroller) has agreed to make available up to $250,000 to purchase bona f ide hardship cases in the 40% balance of the project; that based on a preli minary survey of the types of hardship cases existing and �Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee April 21, 196 7 Page 3 potential numbers, it is felt this amount will take care of the situation during the additional delay involved in submitting the revised Survey and Planning Application. In addition to this, Mr. Persells stated the Authority also proposes to request an amendment to the last Letter of Consent to include the acquisition of three pieces of property at the corner of Piedmont and Forrest which are among the priority hardship cases; that the advance acquisition of these three tracts will solidify the area and facilitate development of the entrance to the auditorium. In response to questioning by Chairman Cook, Mr. Persells stated that through two bond issues, three and one quarter million dollars in urban renewal funds have been allocated, most of which are committed; that present estimates indicate when all credits in all of the urban renewal areas the City now has are pooled, the City's total cash requirement (the actual cash amount the City will have in the projects)' will be about $900,000. It was mentioned that this figure was dependent upon all of the non-cash credits currently scheduled in the projects being built. Mr. Somme rville felt any delays which are not absolutely necQssary should be avoided. He stated delays of this sort imperil the entire urban renewal process and creates an attitude of bitterness toward the City on the part of people living in these areas. After other discussion, it was the general consensus of the Committee that combining of the two projects would be desirable and beneficial t o the City if the matter of acquisition of hardship cases could be assured, In answer to questioning by Chairman Cook, George Berry of the Comptroller's Office stated he felt additional funds, beyond the $250,000, could be provided, within reason, for bona fide hardship cases. A motion wa s t hen made by Mr. Griggs and seconded by Mr, Et heridge tha t t he Commi ttee approve t he combining of the two projects and accept t he lo an of $250,000 from the City to permit advance acquisition of p r op e r t ies de t e rmined to be hardship cases. Messrs. Sterne and Sommerville rel uctan tl y concurred with the motion. There was then a l engthy di scus s i on relative t o the t h ir t een acre s of property l y ing withi n the University Center Proje c t which the Policy Committee had allocated f o r 221-D-3 housing. (See Mi nutes o f March 4, 1966, Pages 2 & 3). This entire area, inclqding the ten acres awarded . to the colleges, was originall y scheduled for 221-D-3 housing, with the ten acres being excluded for college utilization. Mr, Persells stated the thirteen acres was offered for sale on April 12 and that he would like to discuss a �Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee April 21, 1967 Page 4 0 schedule of dates for presentations by the proposed developers - seven at the present time. He explained that in an amendment to the offering, each proposer has been advised he will be given an opportunity to be heard for thirty minutes, with an additional thirty minutes for questions and answers; that it might be advisable to divide the proposals and hear them on two successive days; that he would like to arrange these meetings so that as many members of the committee as possible could attend. In addition to the oral presentations, Mr. Persells stated he hoped to have available, prior to the hearings, written comments on each proposal, highlighting points of interest. Chairman Cook then stated he was greatly disturbed about the offering price of this property ($74,000) stating he felt it was entirely too low a nd unreasonable; that while a specific write-down figure was never mentioned in the discussion of this property for 221-D-3 housing, . the Committee anticipated the property would be sold at a reduced cost for this type development, but not for $74,000 which amounts to about $5,000 an acre. I \. Mr. Cook stated he felt this type of question was a real policy decision matter and the offering at this price should have been b~ought back to the Corrnnittee, Mr. Openshaw stated the Authority appraised the property on the basis of 221-D-3 housing, which they were instructed to do. Mr . Cook ag reed with this, but reiterated no specific write-down figure was mentioned and the Committee had no idea it would be so low; that he did not want to get into this situation again. Mr. Etheridge stated the Housing Authority's Board of Commi ssioners had approved the offering on the assumption that proper steps had been taken; that he, quite frankly, was surpri sed at the low appraisal. It was pointed out that thi s area has been designated for low-cost housing from t he beginning o f the project and it was recognized that this would result in a below market price. The only action taken by the Committee was t o exclude the ten acres for the Universities, resulting in a substantial increase t o the City. After other discussion, it was felt by eve ryone, however, that renewed emphasis should be placed on communication between the Policy Committee and the Authority in such matters and that in the f utu re , they would be brought back to the Committee. Also, Mr . Persells was asked to continue to study the situation at hand so see what steps could be taken to get a higher appraisal of the land without jeopardizing t he steps already taken. The Committee then expressed delight at a nd after a discussion of various dates was unanimously agreed as follows: The P. M. to hear 4 of the 7 proposals; and remaining three. the submission of multiple proposals for presentations by the developers, it Committee would meet on May 9 at 4:00 on May 10 at 9:00 A. M. to hearing the �r w M. B. Satterfield, Executive Director, Atlanta Housing Authority. Les Persel Is, Director of Redevelopment, Atlanta Housing Authority. Howard Openshaw, Chief, Planning-Engineering Department, Atlanta Housing Authority. . Collier Gladin, Planning Director, City of Atlanta. George Berry, Comptroller's Office. Robert L. Sommerville, Atlanta Transit Company. ~ 0 0 ro Representatives of various City departments were present; also, several representatives of Georgia State College were present, i.e., Dean William Suttles; Andrew Steiner; V. V. Lavroff and Jesse Draper, Member of the Board of Regents. The Chairman cal led the meeting to order and the fol lowing business was considered: Public Hearing on one block amendment to Georgia State Urban Redevelopment Plan, said block being immediately north of the Atlanta Police Station and bounded on the north by Gilmer Street, on the east by Butler Street, on the south by Decatur Street and the west by Piedmont Avenue . @ Mr. Howard Openshaw gave the fol low ing pertinent information relative to th is amendment: The original Urban Redevelopment Plan was adopted by the Board of Alde rmen on March 19, 1962 . Notice of today's public hearing was adve rt ised in Th e Atlanta Constitution on February 3 and February 10 in accordance w ith Federal regu lati ons . The plan c ons ists of a ten pa ge narrat ive and two ma ps , indicating the project boundary , prope rties to be a cq u ired a nd proposed land use. Al I urban redevelopmen t ac t ivi ties have been completed in the ori gina l proje ct area - acquisition, relocation, demo lition, and disposal of land to the Board of Regents. The proposed addition involves a total of 6.6 acres, comprising 13 properties which are proposed �Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee February 17, 1967 Page 2 for acquisition. The properties will be appraised by two competent appraisers and every effort made to acquire the property through negotiation but if necessary, the property will be acqui red through the power of eminent domain. All fifteen existing structures will be demolished. There are no families to be relocated. Relocation assistance will be made available to the existing thirteen businesses in the area. An information statement describing the financial assistance available was distributed to the business concerns on February 10 . The actual moving expense for any one business concern to be paid by the Federal Government cannot exceed $25·, 000; under certain conditions a smal I business displacement payment may also be available. The area to be added is presently zoned M-1 and no change in zoning is proposed, however, certain controls will be placed on the land restricting its use to college and college-related uses; 4.5 net acres will be sold to the Board of Regents for redevelopment in accordance with the Comprehensive Master Campus Plan. The amendment will increase the net project cost $1,147,072. The local share, one-third of the net project cost, will be provided by the Board of Regents. The City of Atlanta will provide an estimated $77,647 for street, sidewalk, sewer and traffic improvements. Dr. Suttles briefly explained how this additional block would fit into Georgia State's Comprehensive Campus Master Plan . And rew Steiner, Georgia State Consultant, briefly explained the composition of the proposed buildings and using perspective maps, gave a visual concept of this proposal as related to the entire Plan. In response to an expression of concern by Mr. Cotsakis that the overal I Plan shou Id be approved prior to the piece- meal addition of a sing.le block, and that some members of the Board of Aldermen were not familiar with the Georgia State Campus Plan, Mr . Cook explain e d that th is was the reason the Pol icy Committee reques ted the Master Campus Plan . He commented further that he fe It Georgia State had progressed far enough to indicate that any additions would follow the guidelines as set forth in the ir Maste r Plan . Cha irman Coo k was requested to alert the Board of Aldermen about the Plan as a ma tter · of communication (at their next meeting of February 20, 1967) and ask them to re vi ew the copy wh ich had been forwarded to them . Mr. G ladin note d tha t there was cons iderable private development a ct iv it ies w ithin the Ce ntra l Bus iness District and that he felt it is in order tha t th is Comm ittee a nd other Alderma nic Committe e s re cogni z e and support the need fo r the de ve lopme nt o f a Central Downtown Plan, designed to coordina te and re late a l I these vari ous activiti es. He cited several examples of both public and private p lanning be ing done on a spot basi s, such as the Nasher property, Portman's Peachtree Center, Georgia Plaza and rapid transit . Mr . Cook then read into the record two communiques. One from Alderman Cecil Turner endorsing the Georgia State Campus Plan, stating he hoped it would be approved and �Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee February 17, 1967 Page 3 sent to the Board of Aldermen on February 20, 1967; a second from the Atlanta Civic Design Commission, stating 11 it is the consensus of opinion of members present at the February 9 meeting that the Atlanta Civic Design Commission strongly endorses, on the Georgia State College Master Plan, the concept of the Plaza system, which includes the separation of vehicles from pedestrian traffic by different levels 11 • No one from the public appeared to be heard, and upon motion by Mr. Griggs, seconded by Mr. Cotsakis and unanimous vote, the one block amendment to the Georgia State Redevelopment Plan was approved. Ebenezer Church - Proposed Expansion. 0 Mr. Openshaw pointed out, on an accompanying map, the existing property of the Church on Auburn Avenue and stated that the property in question Iies adjace nt th e reto to the east; that he understands from the Church members the City Building Inspector has required them to remove a back portion of their building to allow for a fire escape and this eliminates a great deal of their parking; that this request is to purchase an additional 150 feet along Auburn Avenue, extending through to Jackson Place, to be used for church parking. He exhibited a second map illustrating the property on a larger scale. The Committee noted that this property and the adjoining properties extending to the intersection of Auburn Avenue and Boulevard were designated for commercial use and the ensuing discussion centered around the existence of a liquor store situated on the southwest corner of the intersection and whether or not th is owner's rights would be abridged by extending the Church property 150 feet, thereby placing his bu siness in such a proximity to the Church so as to prohibit him from ever selling his business unde r the State statute relative to required distances from Churches for such uses . Alderman Pierce felt the liquor store owner's rights should prevail should he decide to se ll his business since it existed prior to this request. Mr. Cook was of the opinion, and the other committee members generally agreed, that the question of the store owner 's rights is immaterial in considering the merits of a llowing the Church to expand and that the remedy to his problem, if and when it arose, would lie elsewhere, perhaps within the courts. 0 h,,.._____ Mr. Sterne raised a question as to how the commercial development of the remaining properties might be affected by the use of this 150 feet for church purposes. �Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee February 17, 1967 Page 4 Mr. Satterfield stated it was his opinion the remaining 1.63 acres would be just as saleable, if not more so, than if it were a part of the whole parcel. In response to questioning by Chairman Cook, Mr. Openshaw stated the Butler Street Project originated in 1959. A brief discussion then ensued about the type of problems prohibiting consumation of the project. Mr. Openshaw explained there have been no expressions of interest in the remaining properties to date and it has not been previously advertised, but preparations are being made to offer the property for sale. Mr. Persells explained that because there had always been a demand for property in the Butler Street Project, the general policy pursued by the Housing Authority had been to advertise the property after there had been a specific expression of interest in a particular piece of property so there would be competition; that the project had now reached the stage of a few remaining 11 tag ends 11 and the Authority is working on a general proposal to place these on the market. 0 Chairman Cook concurred, stating he would Iike to see a concentrated effort to complete th is project. The Committee then unanimously approved the Church expansion as requested. Rockdale Urban Renewal Project - Fulton County Property. Mr. Openshaw pointed out, on an accompanying map, the property owned by Fu Iton County, lying generally to the east of Grove Park Place, and he stated that he would like some direction from this Committee as to how to acquire the County's interest a.nd a clear title to this property. He explained that another individual is claiming an interest in the lots, therefore clouding the title and prohibiting clear acquisition of it; that Mr. Sheats is wi II ing to give a quit- claim deed for the County's interest at the approved price of $7,300. However , Mr . Persel Is explained the County is not wi 11 ing to take the necessary steps to clear the title because of the cost involved and that the Federal Government will not participate as it would be an ineligible cost. After other discussion, the Committee unanimously agreed that the Housing Authority should take this matter up with the County Commissioners with a minimum of delay and that Chairman Cook would furnish the Housing Authority with a supporting letter in behalf of the Policy Committee, urging the Commissioners to undertake to resolve this problem as soon as possible. ' "'---------- . �Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee February 17, 1967 Page 5 With further reference to the Rockdale Project, there was a brief discussion as to FHA policy relative to allocation of units within the Area. The Housing Authority maintained their previous position on the matter - that the initial allocation of 150 units for the first project was impractical (see minutes of November 18, 1966, Page 4) but Mr. Satterfield, in response to questioning by the Committee, stated that he had not received any indication on the part of an proposer that they were withdrawing from the competition because of the restrictions being imposed by FHA, but they have voiced some objections. Mr. Persells stated he understood the Mayor's Housing Resources Committee is go ing to urge FHA to increase the allocation of units and he felt it would not be amiss for this Committee to direct a letter to FHA suggesting that every consideration be given to a larger allocation of units. It was the unanimous decision of the Committee that Chairman Cook would direct such letter to FHA • 0 . Rawson-Washington Urban Renewal Project - Industrial land adjacent to public housing. Mr . Ope nshaw pointed out on a map of th e project area Parcel N - 3, owned by Swift and Company and the adjoining small parcel (B-4) being offered for sale by the Housing Authority. Parce l N-3 is presently occupied by a small office building for Swift and a hydrogen gas ta nk; parce I B- 4 is vacant . Both tracts are z oned M- 2 and I ie adjacent to proposed public housing . Mr. Openshaw explained that a bid ($6,300) has be en submitted on Parcel B- 4 and the proposal is for a motorcycle repair shop by Atlanta Motorcycle Sal es; that he would li ke a n expression of th e Committee' s fee lings about th is proposa l . He commented further he a lso discussed with Sw ift the ir plans for the ir property but was advised that he woul d have to write the company in Ch icago . Mr. Sterne commented tha t the Haus ing Authori ty's Board of Commissi oners was strongly opposed to it, fee ling it would not be desirable to place such a use in the midst of public housing where it is presumed there wi ll be a concentration of children. 0 Messrs. Satterfield and Persells stated that it may well be the Housing Authority would want to acquire both tracts and include them in the project in the future, but in the �Minutes Urban Renewal Pol icy Committee February 17, 1967 Page 6 interim, they did not feel the use of the property for a motorcycle repair shop would be conducive to the surrounding neighborhood. The Committee unanimously denied the bid and requested that the Housing Authority determine from Swift (by writing the Chicago headquarters) their future proposal for Parcel N-3. The Committee then considered the following unfinished business: Citizens Trust Property, Parcel A-5, Butler Street Project. Mr. Openshaw was requested to report at the next meeting whether or not a building permit had been obtained by Citizens Trust. Status of request for up-to-date appraisal from Walt Sullivan on cost of moving public housing building from Hilliard Street. 0 The latest appraisal from Mr. Sul I ivan, obtained by George Berry of the Comptroller• s Office, was in the amount of $62,000. The Policy Committee felt this was entirely out of the question and agreed that the Housing Authority would pursue the idea of placing pub Iic housing on the property. Motel proposal, Parcel D-9, Rawson-Washington Project. Mr. Persells stated the proponents are continuing to pursue this matter; that they requested and was granted an extension of time by paying an additional earnest fee in excess of $50,000, which will not be refunded should the project not materialize. Block 27, West End Boys• Club, Inc. Requests plan change to designate parcels I thru 8 11 To Be Acquired", and re - classify Block 27 for institutional use. (A- I zoning district). Deferred from January 13, 1967 me eting . The Committee unan imously approved this plan change , subject to verification by Keri Byers, Chai rman of the C itiz ens Advisory Committee for West End . Status of study of traffic probl ems around a u ditorium c omplex~ 0 '------ Mr. Gladin stated the City has acquired land on Forrest Avenue and is ready to begin the street widening. �\ Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee February 17, 1967 Page 7 The remaining unfinished business of the Committee was postponed until the next regular meeting with a request that the Housing Authority be prepared to submit status reports on all items. There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. Approved: <2W(irman 0 jp 0 _________ ,.,.,._ Respectfully submitted, f ~oanne Parks, Secretary �January 13, 1967 A meeting of the Urban Renewal Policy Committee was held on Friday, January 13, 1967 at 10:00 A.M. in Committee Room #2, Second Floor, City Hall. The following members were present: Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Rodney M. Cook, Chairman Edwin L. Sterne George Cotsakis John Flanigen Hugh Pierce Absent: Mr. Frank Etheridge Mr . E. Gregory Griggs Also present were : ,/".', - @ ~ i , M r • M • B • S a t t e r f i e. I d , E x e c u t i v e D i r e c t o r , · Atlanta Housing Authority . Mr. Les Persells, Directo r of Redevelopment, Atlanta Housing Authority . Mr. Howard Op e nshaw , Atlanta Housing Authority Mr. Colli e r Gladin , Planning Enginee r , Ci t y of Atlanta . Mr. Elme r Moon, Assistant Building Official . Mr. Geo r ge Berry, Comptroller ' s Office . w (/) <{ w Q.. Se v era l m e mbe r s of the City Planning Staff w e re pr ese nt ; also , se v er al representat i ves of other City departments we r e 1n atten d a nce . ~ ~ J ~ 0 0 co Chairman Co ok i n tr odu ce d Dean Will i am Su t tl es of Ge o rgia State C ol lege wh o , in t u rn, intr odu ced se v era l oth er rep r esentatives of Georgia State w h o w ere pre s e n t, i.e., M r. V. V. Lavroff, Comptroller; M r. J am i so n, Ar c h itect i n c h ar g e of physical plants and Andrew Steiner, Georgia S tate Consu l tant. Mr. Steiner distrib u ted copies of Georgia State College's M aster Campus P l an, prepare d by Robert an d Company Associates, and gave a brief resume of t h e Report, with major emphasis on implementation. He commented the purpose of the Plan is to provide a guide to the physical development of Georgia State �Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee January 13, 1967 Page 2 College in an urban environment. To satisfy four specific questions raised by the Policy Committee on April 22, 1966, Messrs. Lavroff and Steiner submitted the following: (I) Certified original of minutes, including a resolution therein, of the Board of Regents meeting in which they accepted the Georgia State Master Campus Plan (original attached hereto and made a part of these minutes by reference); (2) Copy of letter from the Fulton-DeKalb Hospital Authority, under signature of Edgar J. Forio, Chairman, dated November 28, 1966, agreeing with the general philosophy of the Master Plan and expressing Grady Hospital's willingness to consider mutually advantageous development of the total area (letter attached hereto and made a part of these minutes by reference); (3) Eliminated all proposed classroom facilities north of Edgewood a n d ( 4 ) I n c o r p o r a t e d t h e b I o c k p r e s e n t I y o c c. u p i e d b y t h e P o I i c e Station into the Master Plan for possible future expansion. Mr. Gladin explained the Housing Authority has prepared an a me n d m e n t to th e Ge o r g i a S ta t e U r b a n R e d e v e I o pm e n t Ar e a i ncorporating the block bounded by Gilmer Street, Butler Street, Decatur Street and Piedmont Avenue (containing 4.6 acres of land) and approval of this additional block by the Policy Committee is necessary i n order to facilitate final clearance of this amendment . At this point , Chairman Cook excused himself from the meeting , stating he was due at the Legislature . Mr. Persells then offered the following comments and suggestions, stating they were not related to the approval of the project amendment , but to the Master Plan as a whole : (I) Since the individual buildings in the total complex are bein g designed by various arch it ects , he suggested that some c on tr ols should be written into the Maste r Plan to i n s u r e a n d e f f e c t u a t e m a x i m u m c oo r d i n a t i o n a n d c o r r e I a t i o n of bui ld i ngs , pedestrian malls, etc . (2) Scheduling of parki ng should be given further consideration since it appears off-hand that it is programmed late 1n the plan, rather than as early as it will actually be needed. .[ I �~ ~-- ----·-..._ _____ ·~---- - ----- Minutes Urban ~enewal Policy Committee January 13, 1967 Page 3 (3) Suggested that copies of the Master Plan be transmitted to the various city departments, city u t ilities, private utilities and the Rapid Transit Authority, with a request for their written comments and/or recommendations so that in the future implementation of Plan recommendations, Georgia State would have the benefit of their findings . (4) Suggested that within the Plan there should be a clarifying statement as to the uses contemplated west of Ivy ar:id why it is important that the Campus extend into this area. (5) Because of the proximity of the prope r ty across Edgewood to the Central Business District and its potential tax producing capabilities, there should be a clarifying statement as to why it is important that the housing contemplated north of Edgewood be directly across the street from the Campus, as opposed to say a few blocks away convenient to public transportation. (6) Noted there was no indication in the Plan as to how the s t u d e n t s w o u I d m o v e f r o m t h e g r o u .n d I e v e I t o a n o t h e r I e v e I (escalato r s , elevators , etc.) Mr . Lavroff s tated this will be a part of the de t ailed design planning . ( 7) Noted that on Page 20 of the Master Plan, there is a s tat e men t" •. . • . storm arid sanitary sew er s ar e comb i n e d i n th is area . . . •• " and sta t ed that since F e de r a l f u nds ar e i nvolved the r e i s a necessity · fo r separating t he s t o rm a nd sa n ita r y sewers , t herefore , th e Housing Autho rity w o ul d li k e s ome r ecommendat i ons on t he pa r t o f the C oll ege as we l l as t h e Ci t y wi th r espe c t to ut i l i ties i n t h e ar e a. In reference to Ite m (3) , M r . Stei n er sta te d t h ey d o p r opose t o mail c o pies o f t h e P l an to a l l memb ers o f t h e Board o f Alde r men a nd w ill be happy to co m p l y w i t h M r . Per s e l ls suggest i o n . Mo ti o n was t h en ma d e b y M r . Sterne , seconded by M r . Pi e rc e and carri ed unanimous l y as fo l lows : ( I) J Th e C om m ittee to o k the G eo r g ia Sta te M a s t e r Campus Plan und e r a d vi se m en t. �Minutes U r b a n R·e n e w a I P o I i c y C o m m i t t e e · · January 13, 1967 Page 4 (2) Approved the additional block (bounded by Gilmer Street, Butler Street, Decatur Street and Piedmont Avenue) as an amendment to the Georg'ia State Urban Redevelopment Area; in so doing, it was the Committee's understanding from Mr. Persells that this approval would, in no way, represent an approval of the Master Plan, per se, and would not commit any member to any future urban renewal projects in this area. (3) Set a public hearing (as required by law) on the one block amendment to be held at the next regular meeting of the Policy Committee on February 17, 1967. Mr. Openshaw presented for action the following requ e sted plan changes in the · West End Urban Renewal Area: I. Pa r cel 1.... 15, John C. Theisen 751 Park Street, S. W. Requests plan change to 11 Not T o Be Acquired" to p ermi t continued operation of supermarket. Agrees to sell contiguous parcel 1-4 to Housing Authority . (M-1 zoning district) . Rec omm e ndation of West End Local Citizens Commission appointed a sub-committee to study this request and determine if the present op era tion could be upgrad e d . The Policy Committ ee withh 1 1d any action , .pending a r e p o r t f r o·m t h i s s u b - c o m m i t t e e . 2. Parcel 11 - 39, H. 541 Lee Street L. DeF o or, et a l Requests p l an change to 11 Not To Be Acqu ire d" t o remove existing two-story frame residence in poor condition to a ll ow expansion of Gu l f Station on adjoining Parcel 11 - 1. (M-1 to C-2 zoning district). Recommendation of West End Local Citizens Commission Rejection. �[ ---143.215.248.55---c.;-.-.:-: ._ -."JC.=-. ., -=-~-= = = ==--- -----· ·- ----·4·- ~ . - -- -· -...._. . ____ ,..______ _ ___ _ _ _ Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee January 13, 1967 2. Page 5 (Continued from Page 4) Mr. Openshaw stated this would be · the only piece of prope.rty in a two b Io ck are a (between Lee Street and Se a rs) that w o u Id not be acquired. Mr. Persells thought it pertinent to state that originally the Plan contemplated acquisition of this property, however, the G u I f S t a t i o n w a s e r e c t e d -u n d e r a Bu i I d i n g P e r m i t i s s u e d a f t e r the Plan had been developed, but before it was approved, therefore, i t could no t be prevented - this relates to t h e land owner and not the lessor. Mr. Sommerville felt any action at this time would be premature and not in the best interest of the West End Plan . Motion was then mad e , seconded and duly c arried, that this request be rejected. · I\ \...J 3. Block 27 ~.:~.!-143.215.248.55 Boy s 1 _ C I u b , Inc • Re qu es ts plan chang e to designat e Parc e ls I thru 8 11 To Be Acqui r ed 11 , and r eclassify Block 27 f or institutional use (Boy s C I u b) . Re comme n dation of Wes t End Local Citi z ens Co m mi s sion App r ov a l , a lthough not unanimous . F ollo w ing a brief d i scussion , this r equ e s t w a s defe rr ed fo r f u rt h er s tudy . 4. Parce l 5 7 -2 , F ulton Coun ty 1368 Luci l e A v e nu e Req u ests p l an c h an g e to p e rmit this parc e l to be developed by a major oil compa n y . ( R-6 zo n in g district). Mr. Openshaw stated this property is scheduled for re siden tial rehabilitation. Upon motion by Mr. Cotsakis, seconded by Mr. Sterne and unanimous vote this request was rejected. Mr. Gladin stated it �Minutes . Urban Renewal Policy Committee January 13, 1967 Page 6 might be in order to offer to the County the idea of a higher density residential use of this property but he was not prepared to make any specific recommendations at this time. 5. Paree I 44-24 Mrs ._Berry_Blackwood Requests permit to operate day nursery in R-6 zoning district. Recommendation of West End Local Citizens Commission Approval. Motion was made, seconded and duly carried that this request be approved. 6. Westview Drive City owned remnants City proposes to sell remnants for apartment development. Requires plan change from R-6 to A-I zoning district. Recommendation of West End Local Citizens Commission r ejection . Because of the uncertainty of exactly what the City owned along Westview Drive and other factors, this matter was de f e r red fo r furthe r study and Mr . Openshaw was requested to have a map a t the next meeting ind i cating city - owned remnants along We s tview . ********** M r . Pe r s e l l s e xpla i ned that w i thin t he Bedfo r d -Pine Ar e a, the Eco n omic Opp o rt un i ty Atl a n ta Org a ni za t i on des ire s t o temporarily uti l ize a vaca n t r e s ident ia l s truc t u re at 365 L i n den Avenue in c o njunction wi th the ir n e i g h b o r hood s erv i ce s ce n ter program . Specifically, they wa n t t o u s e it f o r pre-sc hoo l age and mentally retarded children u nde r a day-care t y p e of program. Mr . Persells stated the matter had not come before the Local Citizens Commission but he felt they would approve it. In r es ponse to a question, Mr. Satterfield stated that EOA•s urgency is they presently have a tutorial �Minutes Urban Renewal Policy Committee January 13, 1967 Page 7 program underway in this area and they don't want to break this continued activity. The question of temporary use was discussed by the Committee, and with the understanding that use of the premises would be temporary, the matter was . approved. As a matter of information, Mr. Gladin e x plained that the official guide lines for preparation of a Demonstration Cities Application for Planning Funds has been received from HUD and that the City anticipated completion and submission to Washington by March I; that this will result in a considerable step-up of activities in t h e P I a n n i n g D e p a r t m e n t a n d i t m i g h1t b e c o m e d e s i r a b I e a n d n e c e s s a r y to call additional meetings of the Policy Committee to keep abreast of the situation. There being no further business to discus s, the meeting was adjourned. **** * **** App r ov e d : Ro dney Chairman jp Respectfully submit t ed , r . ,-. Coo K !l'kl l I / / (/ /1" ' , . LJ,(1 , /~ ;_, / ~ L _ i...L/_ - - ,-L 143.215.248.55-. _1/ ---J oan n e P ar Ks S e cr e tary ' /, �THE FULTON-DEl
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 20, Folder topic: Aldermanic Committees | Urban Renewal Policy | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 20, Folder 27, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_027.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 20, Folder 27, Complete Folder
  • Text: - -oFFICE OF CITY · CLERK -~ITY HALL ATLANTA, GEORGIA p- A RESOLUTION BY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE WHEREAS, pursuant to a resolution adopted by the Board of Aldermen on March 6, 1967, the City of Atlanta has submitted an application to the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development for a Model Cities planning grant under Title I of the Demonstration Cities and M~tropol itan Development Act of 1966 and, WHEREAS, the announcement of those cities which have been chosen to receive such grants was made November 16, 1967 and, WHEREAS, Atlanta is among those cities chosen and, WHEREAS, it is important that the planning phase of this program be started immediate Iy since th is phase is Iim i ted to a one year period and, WHEREAS, in its application the City proposed that the authority and responsibility for administering the planning phase of this program be vested in an Executive Board composed of the Mayor of Atlanta; two members of the Board of Aldermen; the President of the Atlanta School Board; the Chairman of the Fulton County Commission; one member to be appointed by the Governor; and three members to represent the private sector of the community; one from the general public, one from among the City's Negro leadership and one from the Model Neighborhood Area residents. NOW; THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen that the Model Neighborhood Executive Board is hereby created for the purpose of admin istering the planning phase of such program which is conducted under Title I of the Demonstration Ci tie~ and Metropolitan Development Act of ~966, commonly known as the Model Cities Program, and for which federal financial assistance is received. THAT the Model Neighborhood Executive Board shall be composed of the Mayor of the City of Atlanta, who shall serve as Chairman; two members of the .._c·c.;:-=-:-:=.::·===-=-:...::-=--=--=-=-====-=- -·----.,------~- ·- - - -- ··- -- --- - -- �,- -2 .. Board of Alde rmen, to be selected by the membership of that body~ one of which sh al I be from among those members representing the first and fourth wards; the President of the Atlanta School Board; the Chairman of the Fulton County Commission; one member to be appointed by the Governor; and three members to represent the private sector of the community, one to be appointed by the Mayor from the . general public, one to be appointed by the Mayor from among the City•s Negro leadership, and one to be selected by and from the membership of a committee to be formed representing the citizens of the Model Neighborhood Area (Model Neighborhood Area Council). THAT the Model Neighborhood Executive Board shall have the authority and responsibility for administering the planning phase of the City's Model Neighbo rhood Program, including the approval of plans and work programs developed by the project staff and the reconciling of conflicting plans, goals, programs, priorities and time schedules of the various participating agencies; and shall have the responsibility for recommending to the Board of Aldermen the allocation of grant funds received for this program from the Federal Government. THAT the Mayor is requested to make such appointments as he 1s authorized to make under the above provisions and is further requested to contact the Fu Iton County Commission, the Atlanta Board of Education and the Governor of Georgia, and to request that they make appoin tments to the Model Neighborhood Executive Board in conformance with the above provisions. ADOPTED BY BOARD OF ALDEPJ-IEN NOVEHB'ER 20, 1967 APPROVED NOVEMBER 20, 1967 -- -- ·-- -··-- -····----- - -- ---- - - - - ---- - - - �r . ~t(/) July 21, 1967 A regu /a;ly scheduled meeting of the Planning and Development Committee of the Board of Aldermen was held 9n Friday, July 21, 1967 at 2:00 P. M. in Committee Room #2, Second Floor, City Hall. The following Members were present: Rodney Cook, Chairman E. Gregory Griggs John Flanigen George Cotsakis Q. V. Williamson Absent: Charles Leftwich Jack Summers Also Present: Collier Gladin, Planning Director Sam Masseli, Vice-Mayor Tom Shuttleworth, Departmental Staff Robert Lyle, Associate City Attorney The Chairman called the meeting to order and the following business was considered: 1. 0 Public Hearing - Annexation Petition. Chairman Cook explained this annexation involved 47 lots lying to the north of Jett Road, contiguous to the city limits of Atlanta; that the petition for annexation by the residents of the area has qualified for public hearing under the criteria established by law. Mr. Gladin briefly explained that 27.62 acres were involved, totaling 47 lots. Of these 47 lots, 44 are occupied and 3 are vacant. He then stated under the requirements of Section 6 of the Annexation Ordinance, the City is required to make plans for the extension of services to the area proposed to be annexed and shall, prior to the public hearing provided for in Section 3 of said Ordinance, prepare a report setting forth such plans to provide services to such area . Mr. Gladin then submitted said report, stating that the Department's of Fire, Police, Construction, Water and Sanitation have indicated, by letters included in the report, that adequa te services can be provided to the annexed area. He stated that the Department of Planning recommends approval of this petition. show of hands indicated about 10 people were present in favor of the annexation and about 6 in opposition . A The Chairman stated the Committee would hear from those in favor and then the opponents. First, Mr. John Sikes of Bryn Mawr Circle appeared and tendered a signed list of persons wishing to withdraw their names from the petition they previously signed for annexation to the City of Atlanta. He also submitted a separate petition of opposition for the record. The proponents asked that the names on �n Minutes Planning and Development Committee July 21, 1967 Page 2 this petition be read aloud, which th e Chairman did, as follows: Barbara S. Newland; Marshall C. Newland; Constance W. Balnis; Henry J. Balnis; W. B. Ray, III; Mrs. W. B. Ray; James M. Robinson; Frank J. Breunig, Jr., and Jane R. Breunig. The Chairman then asked Mr. Glad in to che ck this list against t he original petition to determine if it would still qualify. However, the staff was unable to determine this during the meeting because of the complexity of such calculations. The following persons then spoke in favor of the annexation: 0 MR. C. A. LORENZEN, 4624 JETTRIDGE DRIVE. - I have been a resident of Atlanta for two years and have resided on J ett rid ge all that time. We have bee~ very inter e st ed in becoming a part of the City of Atlanta since moving he r e . My wife submitted a petition in 1965 but at tha t time the annexation issue was coming up and in view of this it was thought advisable that the petition be withheld. I feel there are tremendous advantages for the people in Fulton County and the people living adjacent to Atlanta to being a part of the City. I think Atlanta is a very progressive City. I think that in order for Atlanta to grow that the community surrounding the cities has tribe a part of it. Those of us in Fulton who work in Atlanta have got to help the City grow. We earn our salary here and I think that we are a part of Atlanta, therefore, it is absolutely essential that petitions similar to this be adopted. MR. GEORGE FREER, 4625 BROOKHOLLOW ROAD. - I am a new resident of Atlanta, but I am very interested in this a r e a becoming a part of t he City because we are par t o f the City. We lpartake of the services and the name of the City and we are hopeful of partaking of the government of the City of Atlanta. Thos e of us in the proposed area do not have adequate f ire protection. I believe those of us who have children are very interested in comi ng in the Atlanta School System. We can se e nothing but good, as far as the s e rvices of the government of the City of Atla nta, that would come of us becoming a part. Whe n i t comes time to dispose of our property , it is much more in our favor that this property be within the city limits. I want to go on record as supporting it wholeheartedly. MR. DICK HODGES , 4615 BROOKHOLLOW ROAD, supported the annexation for the basic reasons as previously stated. MR. GENE STELTEN, TWIN SPRINGS ROAD, - From an accompanying map on display, Mr . Stelten pointed out that this area is basically divided into three divisions Mil lbrook and two others, which have been developed a s subdivisions longer than Mi llbrook. He s tated that the s e ntiment f o r annexation in the Millbrook subdivision is about 83% o f the homeowners and 81% of the ele c tors, so they are ovenvhelmingly in favor of it. To the south (Jettridge Fo rest Subdivision) prior to the submittal of the withdrawal petition, the people were 47% in f avor of annexation by homeowners and 40% by electors, so the sentiment here is strong for annexation. In the third subdivision (3 lots on Bryn Mawr Circle cul-de-sac) the sentiment for annexation was less than 50%. The names on that petition fall within this group. If this will make a difference in your deliberation, I wanted to point out this factor. _.J �6-- !'l w fJ} ~ Minutes Planning and Development Committee July 21, 1967 Page 3 <'( w a.. cl:5 '"'-" .C:- J ~ 0 0 en There were then random questions and answers from the audience. Q - I have a senior going to Sandy Springs. Will she be able to finish the last year at Sandy Springs"? Mr. Gladin replied affirmatively. "Is there any change anticipated in the sewer arrangement in the whole area; will any additional sewers be needed?" Mr. Gladin stated there are no anticipated new sewers. Q - "Will our homes be reappraised for tax purposes and what experience do you have as far as appraisals goes?" Chairman Cook replied the homes will not be reappraised since there now exists a joint City-County Board which functions for both governments. As to past experience, Mr. Cook cited the case of the Sa ndy Springs Annexation, as . an example, stating there would have been a moderate increase in ad valorem taxes if annexed to the city, however, this would have been largely offset by lower charges in other areas, such as water, fire, sanitation, etc. and he felt this would be typical with the ~ase at h~nd. Q - "In talking with the people, the fears expressed had to do with installation of new service facilities and higher taxes. Can you give us some assurances about this since this is our main fear?" _) 12': ~ !~~ ~ w j ~ ~ J ~ 0 0 CQ In response to this question, Mr . Cook read aloud the letters f from the Water Department, the Construction Department and the Police Department. These letters are on file in the proper Docket. Q - "If this is approved will our children be transferred to other schools in September?" Mr. Cook stated they can be transferred this September, but graduating seniors can elect to remain in the school they _are presently in until graduation. Q - "If this is approved, when would this area become a part of the City 1" Mr. Gladin stated if it is approved by this Committ ee today, it wou ld go to the fo llowing meeting ' of the f ull Board of Aldermen for f ormal action, and woul d become effective on signatu re of the Mayor, which would be sho rtly there- after. Q - "When would the tax es become effective ?" Mr. Cook stated the City of Atlanta taxes would become applicable January 1, 1968 but the City services would become effective immediately. JOHN SIKES, 4575 BRYN MAWR CIRCLE , spoke in opposition. There are three homes on my street seeking to come in. The first basis of my objection is a number of people in the neighborhood appeared t o want to c ome into the City because they feel it wil l affect their house values. They have tried to sell �Minutes Planning and Development Committee Ju l y 21, 1967 ~' ~ ij < -,: j Page 4 and lost buyers because they are not in the city. They feel this is a situation where they can help their property val ues so they can move away and increase our taxes . They are not looking to pay the extra taxes . My sec ond objection is the Dykes High School. If you put one more child in Dykes, the walls will burst out. I understand it will be a couple of years before more spac e would be available. Mo st of the people in the lower end o f Jettridge where the opposition i s coming from have had children in the county school and we like the county schools. Most of the people tal king about going into the City s choo ls are the more re cent residents further out and they have not had the good experience with the County schoo ls we have. We resent being "saddled" with ext ra taxes to set up a number of people beyond us to see this as a added value inducement. ,L w (;') <( w o_ ~ ~ > 0:. 0 0 ) Q) ALICE STROMQUIST , 4540 JETTRIDGE DRIVE, spoke in opposition, stating she had hoped to wait until all of Sa ndy Springs could be brought in . MR . JOHN BURNETT , 4545 JETTRIDGE DRIVE. The proponents mentioned inadequate fire protection~ There is a fire station down at We st Conway and Northside Drive which services this area. I don ' t know what e l se could be done by the way of additional fire protection. We pay an extra mill t ax to use that fire station. I could drive to t his station in about a minute. In response to the question of increased taxes, Mr. Cook stated to Mr . Sikes the staff would be glad to provide him with the differenc e in tax figures on an individual basis if he would like, and he believed the people would be surprised at how little the difference will be, taking into account the reduced cost of services from the increase. Regarding fire rates, Mr. Cook stated, if you come inside the City taxes would be r e duced by one mill, which you are now paying for fire protection, and your fire protection will be increas ed with a likely reduction in f ire ra t e s. J OHN BEAMER , 4525 J ETTRIDGE DRIVE. I don't want to be a nnexed primarily because o f the school situation, until Dykes has additional fa cilit ies . Mr . Cook stated the staff nor the committee had heard any oppos ition until today and all efforts until now has been to get the children in the city schools by September. If you wish to keep your children where they are and try to work it out with the School Depar tment, we will che ck on the schoo l situation . The new Dyke s High School has been f unded; so has the new elementary school on Mt . Pa r a n. Both we r e f unded in 1965. The land has been bought and the money is a vail able . The contract should b e l e t in the Spr ing and cons t ruction st a r ted. It will be about an 18 month building program. From the a udience - "we are not against coming into the City. t he timing is bad." We jus t t hink A young lady, who did no t ide ntify herse l f , sta t e d tha t a schoo l teacher , who has taught in bo th the City a nd County s chools there is a va s t difference in the t wo systems, t he City being t he better one. I w (/) ~ w a... .:::...- ~ �Minutes Planning and Development Committee July 21, 1967 Page 5 Q-"Will the new Dykes High School be consolidated ?" Mr. Cook stated he could a s sure everyone there will not be a consolidated school. I think the schools are loc ated with the possibility of annexation in 1mind in relationship to the population. Q later? 11 11 Will there be the possibility of any annexation around th~ new School Mr. Cook stated they could petition for annexation if they elected to. Mr . Sikes stated that since everybody below this line (pointing to · the map) wants to stay out to take this area which is the last and newest of the three subdivision .and l eave the area as it is. Mr . Cook stated the Committee would look into this in Executive Session. Mr~ Cook asked the audience if most o f the ir objections have to do with the schools, to which those in opposition replied yes. Mr . Cook asked them if the school p r ob l ems could be worked out, would this help. 0 Mr . Sikes stated this is actually an over-simplification since some of the . people who withdrew their names do not have c hildren , but this would be desirable. The matter was then referred to Exe cuti ve Session. In Executive Session, f ollowing a discussion period, the Committ ee unanimously agreed t o approve the Or d i nance , sub ject to it qualifying under the 60% elector's requirement and the 60% land a rea requi rement, and f urther, t hat the Planning Department staff wo uld che ck with th e Board o f Education to see if t he children in the area could continue at county school s in c ases where their parents do not wish them to be transfe rred t o city schoo ls. Tre e Or dinance - Public Hearing . Mr . Cook brie f ly expl ai ned the p urpose and intent of the Tree Ordinance, and then called on Mr. Gl adin, Planning Director, who bri ef ly revi ewed the 27 sections of the Ordi nance , emphas izing it covers two major areas , one o f pro tection, t h e other of p l anting and maintenance. Mr. Cook then recognized and expressed appreciation f o~ the large audience in attendance f o r the hearing and opened the meeting t o questions and answers. __j - Q - "Is this restricted t o just scenic routes and main thorough f ares, or .will it be in all neighborhoods"? �Minutes Planning and Development Committee July 21, 196~ Page 6 Mr. Gl a din stated it is res tr icted to the St reet Tree Plant i ng Zone along Major Thoroughfares and Scenic Drives, as defined in the Ordinance, with the Exeception of Section 10, which relates to the stripping of property over the entire City. From the audience - There are other places in the City that should also be protected. Q - "What is the definition of a major and minor street"? Mr. Cook stat ed that a listing of these streets is available; that they are streets, such as Pe achtree, Ponce de Leon, etc. Mr. Gl a din further exp l a ined they are radials f rom the Central Business District that link the expressway to the Central Business District and outlying areas. Mr . Cook stated they are based largely on traffic and width size. Q - "Is there a section alre ady related to ex isting residences or is it applicable to property if there is a house there or not?" 0 Mr. Cook stated it is relat ed to a ny residentially zoned property in so far as the Tree Protective Zone is concerned. The f ollowing p ersons the n spoke in support of t he Tree Ordinance: Mr . Be n Jones, Vice-P r esident of t he Spri ng lake Civic As sociat i on ; Mr s. Wa l l ac e And e rson, in beh a l f o f t he League o f Wome n Vot e rs (A St ate me nt was p r esented f or the r eco rd) ; Mr s . C. R. Brumb l y , Member and Offi c er o f the Fu l ton Co unty Federat io n o f Ga r den Club s; Euge ne Lowry, Ar chi t ect; Ma r y Nikas , 85 Avery Drive , N. E.; Ann Mo ore, Cha i rman o f the Downt own Beauti f ica tion Commit tee o f the Chamber of Commerc e ; Jo e Ha rre l l , J r ., Co ll ier Hi ll s Civic As soc iat ion; Me lba Ciferly , Geo r gi a Co nse rvancy; Joc e l y n Hi ll, Geo rg i a Bo t an t ic al Soci ety; Ed Da ugherty , La ndsc ape Archi te c t and Ha rry Ba ldwi n , At l anta Ci vic Des i gn Commission. Ge ral d Thurman, Att orney , represent ing t h e Geor g i a Power Comp any , pro te s ted c ertain portions o f the Tree Or di na nc e s ay ing i t wou l d i nt erfe r e wi t h Georgia Power' s r ou t ine t opping o f tree s t o prote c t l i nes; that t hey fa vo r t he Ordinan c e itself, but wou l d r e que s t an amendme nt whic h wo u ld ke ep it fr om i nterfer i ng with the company' s wo rk. Mr. Cook explai ned tha t the late s t re vi sed d raft o f t he Ordinanc e r emoved the t ree pl anting and ma i ntena nce standards se c ti ons, which wo uld eliminate mos t of Georgia Power' s obje c tions. C. D. Le bey, Jr . , President o f the At l a nt a Real Estat e Board, said hi s o rganiz a tio n a g r eed wi t h the inte nt o f the Or dinance, but fel t tha t a s pre se ntly drawn it would v es t too much po~er in o ne ma n, namely, t he " City Arbo ri s t". In a nswer t o ques t ioning by Chai rman Cook , he s ugges t ed a better approach would be t hrough s tre ngthe ni ng the Zo ning Ord inances . �Minutes Planning and Development Committee July 21, 1967 Page 7 A representative of the Tel ephone Company, who did not submit his name, supported the position of the Georgia Power Company. Warren Coleman, immediate past President of the Men's Garden Club of Atlanta, spoke in support of the Tree Ordinance, as did Wadley Duckworth, resident of North Atlanta; and Edith Henderson, Architect and Member of the Atlanta Civic Design Commission. Mr. Sam Massell, Vice-Mayor, asked Mrs. Henderson if she felt as an architect that sidewalks must follow a straight line; that the Ordinance now prohibits trees within five (5) feet of the sidewalk and that he was opposed to this and would like her opinion. Mrs. Henderson replied that she did not fee l tha t sidewalks should be in a stra ight line; that the last place a tree should be is between the sidewalk and the street. That she felt it would be desirable for the trees to be planted on property off the sidewalk and arch over the street. Mrs. Rascal Vernard, Garden Club of Georgia, and John Mixon of the Georgia Foresty Commission, spoke in support of the Ordinance. The matter was then referred to Executive Session. 0 In Executive Session, the Committee discussed the proposed ordinance which had been re-drafted to delete the tree pl a nt ing program in addition to s eve ral oth er change s as proposed by the staff (s ee draft "C") section by sec t ion suggesting t hat several a dditional changes be made. The maj or change as re commended by Mr . Lyl e of the Ci ty Attorney's Of fice was that the Tree Protective Zone apply to all city streets rather than just major stre ets since he fe lt that under the police powers of the City this would be considered less descrimi natory by the Court s. The Committee gav e tentative approval to the ordinance s ubj e ct to the sugges ted changes b eing made by the staff with the a id o f the City Attor ney 's Offi ce, with the re-drafted o rdinanc e being brought back t o the Committee for their final approval. Mr. Gladin presented each Committee member with a preliminary staff report on the amount of vacant l and in the Ci ty of Atlanta by zoning districts. This information was compiled for and furnished to the Hou s ing Resources Committee. The report recommended a joint meeting o f these two Committees to examine the City's housing policy. There being no further business , the meeting wa s adjourned. C ~':-k �Minutes Planning and Development Committee July 21, 1967 Approved: Page 8 Respectfully submitted: /) / Collier Gladin Planning Director mc/jp 0 - (J ';J_/. / J .?/ / / '. - ·_,.,, Joanne Parks Secretary �June 21, 1967 C..,;· .:: ....... c:.: J 0 CQ A regul ,··y scheduled meeting of the Pl a n n ing and Deve lopment Comm ittee o f the Boa rd of Aldermen was held on Friday , June 21 , 1967 at 2: 00 P. M . 1n Com mitte e Room #2 , Second Fl oor , C ity Hall. T e following Members were prese nt: Rod ne y Cook, Chairm an E. Gregory G riggs Jo hn Flanigen J a c k Sum mers Q . V. Williamson C harles Le ftw ic h Absent: G eorge Cotsak · s he Cha irman cal led th e meeting to order and the fol lowing business wa s co nside e d: @- I. lnit ia rev iew of the upda ted La nd Use Plan . I , . . ·,. ~_,I ' -,( - h is p la n was on displa y for viewing . Als o on di sp lay were supporting mcps o f va r· ous studies whic h furnished da ta for th e u pdated Land Use Plan . P"er c e Mahon y of the depa -rmental staff , in presenting the u pdated Pla n to tne Comm ittee , gave a ba c kground talk on th e history of plann ing efforts in At anra , using 1958 as a reference poi nt . Br ie f ly summar ized , he stated tha t th en .J; an -a began to get in to comprehensive p lanni ng , as a resu It of urba n renewa l a .d an .ual re c ertificati on re9uir eme nts of th e Workable Program; in 1963 the Housing Code Comp li an ce P·ogram was initi ated; in 1964 and 1 65 the C ity e ngaged in th e Commun ity Improvemen t Program; al so in 1 65 a s a result of the 1962 Highw ay Ac t and the Atlanta Are a Trcm spo rtat ion Study, an ag reement was made amo ng the C ity , State , Atlanta Reg ion Met opoli tan Pla nn in g Commission and th e fv e cou nty juri sdi c tion s to in i t ia te a stud y _,k now n as P-37. This is a Federally a ssiste d orogram for making po pul ati o n an d economic projections (for the AAT S) throu gh out the me ropolitan area for 1983, includi ng At lanl·a, of what the housi ng ne e ds a re end the number of jobs by three di fferen t c ate gories - commercial, indus t r ia l nd servi c e. Mr . Mahon y th en st a ted th a t al I of these studies and activities have fu ·n ished aata for and have bee n incorpo ra te d into the upd ated Land Use Plen, pro iec ted i"o the yea r ' 983. He bri efly ta lked on pa st la nd use trends and what w e e nvision the fut u,e. Tw o importan t po in ts empha sized by Mr . Maho ny du r in g hi s presentati o n wast e lee k of invol vem ent and a cceptan c e o f th e 1958 Plan a nd w hy, and the need or their (c·ty o fri cials) in vo lv ement e d u nderstand ing of thi s o ne a nd why it should .:,e come :heir p '.::. .-, . As a pa rt o f '-h e u pdated La nd Use Pl an , some e mph as is has been placed u;)C,n inc . eased spac e for industr ia l devel o pm en t and Mr . Mah on y st a ted th e pla nning sta~r is p·epared to recomm e nd that an " Ind us t rial Develo pm en t Program" be insituted �M " 1u tes Planning and Deve lopmen'" Committee une 21, 1967 Page 2 by th e C ity to se c u. industrial sites a nd de velop them to fil l a gap that is not now being met . Also, the u pd te d Plan emphasized th e need for higher resident ia l den sity' be c ause o f limited mounts of spa c e , in effe ct, a pol ic y of prom oting high rise apartme nt bu i ldi ngs . Suc h a poli c y would make mo re la nd availa ble for si ngl e family use. There was i·he, some dis c ussion as to th e status the Plan w ou Id have if adop ted . Mr. Cook stc te II le ' s do n 1 i" ad o pt th is Pla n and th en no t pay any a ttenti o n to it; let's be serious a bout it and make it work 11 • Mr. G ia in stated the Pla n is designed to prevent c ha otic and disorg a n ized deve lopment of the C i·;y; t i" it sh ou ld be used a s a guide , a nd he emphas ized the word guide, in d"stribu i g ant" c ipated growth of the C ity , however , he st ressed th a t every ac t io n take n by a lderman·c committees sh ou ld be in co nsiderati on of and in con iunction with this Land Use Plan . Mr. M ,ony expla ined that afte r adop ti o n of an overal I Land Use Plan, th e planning staff would p oce e to develop detailed plans o n a nei gh borh ood- by - ne ighbo rhood basis . After o th er discussion , ·twas u nanimously a greed that the staff wo ul d make arra ngements fo every member o , th e Board of Ald ermen to rev iew th is Lan d Use Plan, ind iv idual ly o r smal I g ro ups , ar.d mak e any suggestions and re comme ndations the y desired to prior to ar,y offi c ·al a c ti on by the Planning and Development Committee . 2. C l P Status Repor t. George Aldridge reported that al I C l P reports are c ompleted, and/ or a re under comple~·on; that fo ll ow in g re c ent sessio ns o-fthis Committee wi th the co nsul tants, Ca ndeub , Fleiss ig & Associate s, th ey have been advised , by lette r, to su bmit all fin al reports , w ith su ppor t ing do cu mentat ion, as soo n ·as possible, for review by th e staff and th is Committee cs to contrac i· conformity , u tility and soundness o f recommendati o ns and whether the cor.sul r::i ts will have to do add iti o nal work, pr io r to adopt io n of the Final C IP Repor t . Mr. A ld rid ; e stated further it has been estimated an additi o nal three months will be need ed to c lose out the program and HUD offi cial s have approved this extension; that it does not re pr-2sent any in crease in the cost of the pro gram. He also said that al I a cc epted do c uments w· I hGve to be submitted to HUD for approval , after which final co ntra c t payments wou ld be rr.ade; fol lowing th is w ou Id be the federal a udit a nd co nsummation o f the program. As t 0 act ion by th is Committee today, Mr. Aldridge requested adoption of a Resolution co ncu rr ing in the three months• extension. /l/1r. zftw ic h moved that a Res olu tion to th is effe ct be ad opted and prepared for su bmissi on to C o J r.ci o r. Mo .day , July 3; thi s motion was seconded by Mr. Flanigen a nd carried u anim m,sly. �Minutes Planning and Development Committee June 21, 1967 Page 3 3. Set date for pub I ic hearing to consider petition for annexation. Tom Shuttleworth of the departmental staff presented each committee member with background material on this proposed annexation, explaining it involved 47 lots located north of Jett Road. He pinpointed this on a map, and then certified to the committee that the petition for annexation qualified for a public hearing under the provisions for annexation as set forth by the Legislature and city ordinance and requested a date for said hearing. The Committee unanimously voted to hold said public hearing on Friday, July 21, 1967 at 2:00 P. M. 4. Draft revision to Tree Ordinance. 0 Mr. Mahony presented each Committee member with a copy of the latest revisions to the Tree Ordinance. Chairman Cook commented it is substantially changed from the previous draft and Mr. Harkness of the departmental staff has worked closely with the Home Builders Association on the matter and has obtained their support, in principle . After a cursory examination, it was unanimously agreed that the revisions would require further study, but that the Ordinance could be placed on first reading before Council on Monday, July 3 and referred back to the Planning and Developme nt Committee for further study and formal action. It was suggested that if any committee member had any changes they wished to make in the Ordinance to pleas~ give them to the staff prior to the Monday Council meeting. It was also agreed that in the interim, a pub Iic hearing on the Tree Ordinance wou Id be held by the Planning and Development Committee. ' '* . ,· . There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 3:45 P. M. Approve d: Collier Gladin, Planning Dire ctor jp Respectfull y submi tted, �7 Lu r.n ~ w June 2, 1967 · a.. q;:S ":E ) 0::: 0 0 m !. A special meeting of the Planning and -Development ColllI!littee was held on Friday, June 2, 1967 at 2:00 P. M. in -Committee Room #1, Second Floor, City Hall. The following members were present: Rodney Cook, Chairman E. Gregory Griggs John M. Flanigen Q. V. Williamson Jack Summers Absent: .,,. ,·· .... Charlie Leftwich George Cotsakis Also in attendance were: Collier Gladin William F. Kennedy George Aldridge Izadore Candeub John Brown @ , Also at the meeting were various representatives of the press. The Chairman called the meeting to order and the following business was considered: Mr. Cook stated that the purpose of this meeting is to continue the discussion of the Community Improvement Program, which is to be completed shortly. He then presented Mr. Candeub who stated that the following points, which were raised at the last meeting, would be discussed in detail: 1. 2. 3. Details of individual program sectors. Priority system methodology. Background material on development of land use allocations. He then presented John Brown. Mr. Brown first presented a chart entitled "Residential Construction by 1983". The chart showed the total number of existing housing units in the City, based on a 1965 CIP field survey; total inventory was also shown by standard and substandard units and the number of new units to be constructed by 1983 was indicated. The projected housing inventory for 1983 is 217,370 units - 121,470 white occupied units and 95,900 non-white occupied units. Mr. Flanigen asked Mr. Brown how the housing projections had been derived and did the consultants have a high and low projection of total city population for 1983. Mr. Brown explained that this background information was included fn previous ':co_nomic ·reports. He then presented a second �Minutes Planning and Development Committee June 2, 1967 Page 2 chart entitled "Residential Land Needed by 1983" and stated that his firm has assumed one of the objectives of the City of Atlanta is to continue to provide a large amount of land for detached single family dwellings. He pointed out that one of the alternative program actions that might be followed by the City is to decrease the amount of land that is being used for medium density apartments and to increase the number of high density apartment developments. He stated further that if present low and medium density development trends continue there will not be enough land in the City to accpmmodate the projected number of housing units. He stated this was, of course, a policy decision to be made by the City of Atlanta. Mr. Aldridge asked if these figures assumed any annexation by the City within the time period, to which Mr. Brown stated they did not; that their allocation is based on present land area, which is either vacant or to be redeveloped, within the present corporate limits. Mr. Flanigen asked if it is logical to base the projection on the assumption that no additional area will be annexed to the City. Mr. Brown stated this was the only basis on which they could work; that it is impossible to speculate on future bounds of the City. Mr. Flanigen commented that if the city limits stay the same, instead of getting high density development, people will move out of the city and the population will not grow as much as Candeub has projected. Mr. Brown stated if you propose to cont a in the population growth that is projected a nd also carry out the program that is projected, this ratio, or something similar to it, must be accommodated in the city. Mr. F l anigen said the only way to do this would be to have tenements, which Atlanta doesn't want. Mr. Brown stated this is a policy dec ision for the committee' s consideration; that they have done their program on the assumption that growth will be contained . Mr. Cook asked if there was any basis for the ratio of 40% low density; 40% high density and 20% medium density. Mr. Brown stated there are two bases, one of which is the amount of land available, including vacant land and land to be redeveloped. The total projected units for 1983 were fitted into that land. The other base was the economic study that showed certain types of units to be needed by 1983. He stated these were very rough approximations but indicate a fairly large need for high density units, based on the type of families that will be living in Atlanta - families without children, an aging population and other family characteristics which might require high density units. �Minutes Planning and Development Committee June 2, 1967 Page 3 Mr. Candeub stated they projected Atlanta as a complete regional center, and in connection with that kind of growth in the future, that there would be a substantial increase in the white collar population, the executive category, and a large number of young people coming in, indicating a very definite, strong apartment market; that this is where Atlanta will likely have its major growth in job types in the next decade or more. Mr. Brown exmphasized their projections are not binding; it is just one way of accommodating the city's growth. A small continency of undesignated land (2,700 acres) is available which provides flexibility for growth in any of the three density categories. Mr. Flanigen asked about the population figure per acre for 1983, compared with the data on the map. Mr. Brown stated they had not computed this figure. Mr. Flanigen stated he felt this was the problem; a projection has been made but has not been tied in with the end of the time period; that he did not see Atlanta getting the projected density because it would mean slums, which Atlanta doesn't want. •. Mr. Brown agreed this was a good point of view to bring out and would require a policy decision on the part of the City. Mr. Candeub then made the following comments. t We have made market pro jections of growth and we have been getting a feed-back on a reloc a tion analysis in terms of housing needs. The c i ty had certain land within its boundaries. Certainly we can say these needs can only be met by going beyond its boundaries by going into a policy of aggressive annexation. On th e other hand, let me say that Atlanta will also have a responsibility in meeting its relocation needs in the face of continued growth a nd that i t ha s the resources and a policy to meet the housing needs by ut i li zat i on of i ts r e sources. You have a number of elements to keep in balance. The f a c t or of growth and where it will occur in terms of market consi derat i ons; the fact or of r elocation in terms o f cont inued programs ; a quest i on o f s ize of f amil i es and need in te r ms of what kind of housing can, wi l l and s hou ld be bui lt. The ques t ion of sing le family housing or mult i family, high ris e i s a que st ion t hat has t o be looked a t differently that has been done in the past . I n th e past, the high ri s e was built as a tenement struct ur e t o hous e i mmigrant worke r s who came to the large cities. It was bui l t as a l ow rental form o f trans i e nt housing which was initially, or rapidly , became a slum. This pa tt e rn i s most typical of the northeast and o t her parts o f the central are a of the U. S. What we are talking about today is really entirely diffe rent because the typical high rise is built for a different population and buiit on a different order. It is built for people that can afford to pay a good rent; a low �Minutes Planning and Development Committee June 2, 1967 I 1. Page 4 land coverag e with a high level of fac i lities is incorporated, with a dequ a te setbacks so that one building is not blocking another in terms of li ght, etc. Certainly Atlanta has the power to erect the type res idence s it wants. We are not talking about the old type tenement st r ucture. The new national figures from the census in terms of the effects of the post-wa r birth rate indicate that we are now getting into a period where you will have a lot of new family formations and you will have people seeking apartments because they don't want the burden of free standing housing. We feel the best manner in which Atlanta can maintain its character, and we want Atlanta to have more single family homes, and in order to get more single family homes in face of the total demands, instead of utilizing the land area for g arden apartments exclusively, we are suggesting we want to hold more land for single family homes and the only way to do this is to squeeze down on the garden apartment developments and increase the higher densities under strong controls. Otherwise, you will have little land you are able to hold for single family housing. The housing picture is a changing market picture in terms of population, income and the demand of the kinds of people that Atlanta is drawing. Mr. Gladin asked how to incourage this type of development activity; "what is the route to follow?" Mr . Candeub replied "not to permit a tenement type development". The way to do this, he suggested, might be to go to a design control on high r i se, which they recommended in the Design Report; perhaps establish a minimum size on the lot. Mr . Gladi n then asked "how do you solve the economics of high r i se deve lopme nt?" Mr. Ca ndeub stated they are not trying to do all this at one time ; de nsi ty patterns will have to be revised to allow high rise. You may have to get int o zona l determinations, establ i shing a max imum density i n ce r tain areas. The city has the powe r to draw t he line whe re it want s t o draw it . You might have a hi gh dens i t y i n t he c e nt er a nd a lesse r dens ity on the peripheral areas . The cycle is beginni ng to cha nge because th e population figures are changing . It mi ght t ake time t o pr ove out our proj ections, but they will be. Mr. Cook stated "you mean by 1983 we will have a need for 31, 000 high rise units when today we have 1, 000 which it took five years to fill and some are still vacant". Mr. Brown answered affirmatively, stating the smallest amount of land was left for high rise (69 0 acres). This land will accommodate a large number of housing units, which is another way to look at it. Mr. Cook asked "will the city absorb this and will it be feasible by 1983 and if we do will it be slum development, or should we go on a real strong push for annexation. We would like your recommendations? It is �Minutes Planning and Development Committee June 2, 1967 Page 5 not a question of dividing the acreage on a breakdown of percentages. It is how you think it should be. There is the question of the contingency of 2,700 acres," Mr. Candeub stated if high rise developments become slum tenements, then the City doesn't want any high rise, to which Mr. Cook agreed. Mr. Ca ndeub in turn stated if you accept this as a premise, then we will eliminate all high rise; that he is saying across the country we are getting into higher densities in urban areas and the idea is to provide it in a large building complex. Mr. Cook stated he was not accepting that high rise, per se, is slums but he would like to know the basis of the percentages; that he did question the need for more high rise when we can't fill our present high rise developments. Mr. Candeub st a ted he was not saying it is good or bad. If you control it it ca n be good. If you don't control it, it can be bad. This lies within the power of control. The re is a ce rtain number of units that will have to go into apartments when you project the t otal popula t i on to 1983. We are saying you do have a choice of what density you wa nt it in. This determination will dictate what is left for single family housing. I have a preference f or high rise. I have discussed this probl em wi th many builders who tell me you cannot build quality into a garden apar tme nt , whereas you c a n in high ri se because you have a di fferent leve l of stand ards a nd maintenance. Agai n, th1s is a policy qu estion . We are trying to put it into f ocus. Our obj ectives here is to create op timum sp ace f or single family homes . Within the city's tota l envelope o f need s, we have tried to maximize the amount of land available fo r single family homes. We have also tried to be realistic and leave some l and not categorized because we reali ze some land will not be developed, but for the most part we are saying the city will have to make the decis i on as to whe ther or not it will all be low rise, or will it b e balanced with some high rise. Mr. Gl adin said "you have desc ribe d the reasons why we should start seeking high rise. How do we -start a program of encouraging high rise and how can this committee move in that direction?" Mr. Ca ndeub stated that Atlanta has better builders than most other areas he has seen and he suggested one way is to meet with the builders and discuss problems with them. Mr. Flanigen stated you have to consider the difference in rentals of high rise and garden apartments. Mr. Mahony cited one case in which a ·high rise was competitive with garden apartments. �f t,;-_ _ _ __,.,...,... . ..- -,- -- -- - -- - - - - - - - -- - - - -- -~-- Minutes Planning and Development Committee June 2, 1967 Page 6 Mr. Howland pointed out that the building was a considerable distance from the downtown area. Mr. Cook asked Mr. Candeub "do you think Atlanta can handle 31,000 high rise units by 1983?" Mr. Candeub replied "we see a market for it". Mr. Brown stated that in order to continue land for single family, you will have to change from low density to high density with 20% left over for garden apartments. There was a general discussion of each of the eight improvement sector maps, with considerable emphasis on the Buckhead sector. It was generally agreed that the treatment recommended for this sector was not reflective of the high quality housing existing in the area. Mr. Brown pointed out that factors other than housing conditions were considered in the designation of treatment areas. As an example, he cited traffic and street conditions. Following this discussion, Mr. Brown then explained the priority system methodology. He stated one of the most important features of the CIP program is what should be done first and the only way to determine this was through the development of a priority ·rating system, which he explained as follows: There were five major elements in the rating system, i.e., (1) social implications - areas in which programs for improvement are presently needed to supplement social action agency programs; (2) resource areas - where better utilization of land might relieve pressure for land resources; (3) relation to public programs - the total program should be financed through the building of public facilities which are presently needed by the city, however, when you have a public program for which you do not get any sort of federa l credit, you have a changing economy (example, auditorium complex) and this gives a further sense of urgency for treatment; (4) planning objectives - a tool for carrying out the city's comprehensive plan through the CIP; and (5) areas characterized by change - some areas, regardless of whether they met any of the other criteria, were in need of immediate attention. Mr. Brown then discussed Ansley Park as an example of the priority rating system, stating the neighborhood was measured against each of the five elements and scored from O through 2 points based on each of the five elements. The Chairman thanked Mr. Candeub and Mr. Brown for their presentations, and it was unanimously agreed that the Committee would meet again on Friday, June 9 at 2:00 P. M, to discuss the fiscal and administrative portions of the Community Improvement Program. "'*** There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. �Minutes Planning and Development Committee June 2, 1967 Page 7 Respectfully submitted: Approved: 0143.215.248.55 16:50, 29 December 2017 (EST) Collier Gladin Planning Director me ··,· ,_ �I... I. ~ ..... ;-..l - .-......__... . " ' '-·· . . -- .. _"' OFFICE OF CLERK Of BOARD OF ALDERMEN CITY OF ATLANTA , GEORGIA P~OCEDURE FOR \.PP~ICATION FOR AN1'ffi)~.TION BY PETITION TO THE CITY OF ATLAl~TA OF UNINCOiu>ORATED AREAS CONTIGUOUS TO THE CORPORATE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF ATL. 1 ':A . I 1 H ,, Ii,,. ii 1 " 'I BE IT ORDAINED by the Mayor and Board"of Aldermen of the iiL ,( City of Atlanta as f ollows : ! I •'I Ji SECTION 1. !f i An application for annexat ion to t h e City of ! !!, ) At - anta by petition of unincorp orated are a s contiguous to the Ii !i City Limits of t he City o f Atlanta shall be filed with t he Mayor I l !r Ii j j[ and Board of Aldermen on or before f\ 'i Ji· 1fa y Il 1 of the year dur i ng . whic h said annexati on shall be cons idere.d . l Sue·. applications ! I l I I /J shall contain the written and signed app lic a tion of not less than 1: l H )! Sixty percent (60%) of the electors resident i n the a r ea proposed n '! i for ar.nexation and of t he owners of r.ot l es s than s i xty perc ent . I i( (60%) of the land area, by a creage, i ncluded in such application. 1 ( l; Ji Each such .application shall contain a c omplete legal description lf ,-- ------- Ii. Ji and s hall have attache d thereto a co,npl e te survey by a cor.roe t e nt !! surveyor of the land propose d to be annexed . There also shall be !j ,,;: j! su~1itted with each app lic ation a~ opinion in writing b y a me~ber i Ii li of t he____S. t ate__B_ar of Georg ia s ta-::ing that each appl ic 2.nt ·who h as d ., "··--·--- l1' ) signed said application as an owner a s provided in t his ordi nance. ~f l is th2 r e cord title holder o - the fee ·simple title of the property 11 \!,, c laimed to be owne d by s uch npplic a1 t or is the legal rep~2senta - ,, II !t,, tive of the record title hol 'er of the said pr opercy c l ~i~ed to be !l !I ,! owne~. ii ll ,,/' 0..-:2. Lands to be annexed a t a yon~ time shal l be treated as body , regardless of the n 1r.1 b 'r of O'ivncrs , and all p.2.:cs s'1.2ll I l I I I I I - l --!-- �l _._. ' i !: ' . .. ' ., '• ,I ,; It' 1 i\ l! 11 i!l I1 be considered as adjoining .cie limits of the City of Atlanta when 1i .I any one part of the entire ~ody ab uts such limits. For the purpos~ I li 11 . . . · ' application ,!l 111 or- d eternn.ning t h e percentage o f e 1 ectors signing sucn >1 I [;, t the De partment of Pla nning sha ll obtain a list of electors r ~ sid- ! ,l .! ing in such area from the reg istrars of the county or counties i! 1t ii in which the area lies. !1 ,'t Said list shall be as comp i led by the H I board o f registrars and provided to the City of Atlanta in H· jl ac cordance with Section 34 - 636 o f the Georgia Election Code, and 11 the City of Atlanta shall bear t h e e x pense of the preparation of /I !,I such lists in the manner prescribed by such section . For the 1/ purpose of determining owne rship of the property included within /1 Iil sue h - · · . 1 e h o ld e r ot~ t h e ree ~ simp . 1 e tit . 1 e, application t h e recor d tit J/ or his legal representative shall be considered the ,,.. r 1 rowne r" of ' such property~ ii;j SECTION 2. li The Department o f Planning shall f urnish to if the Planning and Development Committee the infonnation ne cess ary iJ ll to determine whether such app lication complies with the require - )) 11 ments o f this Ordinance . 1 If it determines that such appl ication '. doe s not comply with this Ordinanc , t e Pl anning a,d Development I j I Comm ittee li'1 sha ll notify, in writing, the per sons presenting such happ lication .. ~ 1 wherein the applic at ion is def icient. If it is 111 determine d tha t such application does comply with this Ordinanc e , I. !! I/ 'I the Committee shall proceed to s e t for public hearing said applica 7 I:i/ tion I! H rt se t I! . i n ac cordanc e SECTION 3. · l1. wit . . . 3 l1ereo:i.. c Section Th e Planning and Dev e lopmen t Commit t e e shall a pub lic hearing during he month of July . . f or an a?p 1 ication 1 ' ·I ll which has been determined to meet rl I; Ordinance . Such h earing shall be !I ! t ! I I l 1 - 2 - i i I the requ irements o f this if held by said Com:1i~t2e no ~ less f �,. __ . .. ___.-· I I /j than iif t20.n (15) nor rnor ! t he Committee makes a determin~Lion that such petition i s valid. !I Notice _f t h ~n for t y- f ive (45) da ys fr om the time of the time and place of ::;uch hearin g shall be given , in writing , to the person~·pre~enting t he appli c at i;n and shall be II adverti sed once a ,;..;,eek f.or t:wo cons ecutive week s I ! • l i mmediatel,y I JI preceding such hearing in a newsp aper of general circulation in !• ii the City of Atlanta and in t he area propos e d for annexat ion. 1 At such publ ic hearing all p e rsons resident or owning property in the Ii j, l ~ City o f Atlanta, or in the area proposed for annexation, may be /1 il li h2ard on the qu~stion of annexation of such a~ea by the City of !, it n H Atl anta; provided, however, that any property owner may withdraw " I !I li by !I 1:,1 1 I at \ the time ann exation procedures are initiated, coincides ,vi.th the ...------------- \!dcity I l j of the area proposed for annexation and of the ci t iz en s of the - ~::----·- 1 the City of Atlanta of the area proposed in the application j I and Development Corn:n i ttee, determines th a t the annex2.tion Any a_ ea sep.2rate.d from the city limits boun da~y l a street or street rig ~t - of-way , a creek or river, the ri~ht - of ~ othe r p ~bli c s ervi ce corpora tion, l a nds own · wa,}' ./ ...--0-f --a-ra-i lro.ad , _ or l! i by ,1 t he city; lands owned by a c ounty, or l a nds m, ~ Iof Georgia shall be a rrc ontig uous l area"· within the ~eaning of this ·--- - ,, .) by tl e St .:.1 t e - �,. ti ii .I i !, Ordinance when such area coincides with either the city limits or I l j such l and or both on at le~~t one - eighth of such area's aggregate t! /f external boundary. ,,t! t he Provided the re shall be no annexation across boundary lines of . any political subdivision under the pro- lj visions of this Ordinance. I l SECTION 6. 1!,r !l The City of Atlanta shall make plans for the extension of services to the area proposed to be annexed and shall., j \ l 1 p rior to the public hearing provided for in Section 3 of this ,. Ordinance, prepare a report setting forth such plans to provide services to such area. The report shall include: A. · A map or maps of the municipality and adjacent territory to show the following information: 1. t l ' } V r! f II City. i !f !1 .ir The present and proposed boundaries of , the ...... .. ~ [ 2 • .. The present major trunk water mains and -~· ! sewer interc eptors and outfal ls as required 1 l by this sectiono The above information and such information as listed below shall ij be prepar~~ by the city departm~nt responsible !. for such ser~ice ,1 and such i n f ormation and/ or maps sha ll be forwarded to the Dep art - !ment o~ _P.lanning··-·no . l ater than seven •' 1 II (7) days prior to t h e date ·. / I I i on which the area proposed for annexat ion has been scheduled for · I l.l jf pub lie hearing . '-j B. I A statement shall be prepared setting forth the l I p l ans !I major F of the Ci ty for e x tending to the ar e a to b e anne xed each I I s e rvic e p e rformed within the City a t ,the time o f annexa tion . / d Specif ically, !J !I,, I~ I\ !I I' t 1 s uch plans s hal l : 1. Prov ide for extending pol ic e protection , fire protection, garbage colle c tion and i I l �7, '~, II ,. I .. ,, . . . . . - • - - • · "' 6 • --,.: ... ·~ • . . . • _.;:.,..; ,., a .. • • _' 1• 1 ···· I I . I ! II iiii -~-~~--- s t r eet ma intenance services to -the area to ·-·-----··--- '! l I be . ariqexed on the date of annexation on l' !, · ' subst an tially· the same b as is and in the same 1/( I ii r -- -- --·····~------· manner as such services are provided within l l !. the rest of the City prior to annexation. I If a wate r distribution system is not avail- ! i able in the area to be annexed, the plans shall call for reasonably effective fire protec·tion services until such time as water lines are made available in such area under Il existing City policies for the extension of ll ! water lines . I Provide for the extension of major trunk ! I water mains and sewer outfall lines into I j 2. 11 !t I l I the area to be annexed within twelve (12) I' Il I months of the effective date of annexation I so t hat II when such li· it l' !l I property owners in the area tobe annexed I 11, ll will be able to secure public water and ( , n p sewer service according to the policies in l 1l l l• ---· !! I" ~~ j I! F ,! iifl SECTION 7. effect in the City and sewer lines to l individual lots or subdivisions. lI I i;..Th.en such appl ication is acted upon by t he Mayor an d Board of Aldermen. and the l and is, by ordinan ce, l annexed . j/ to the City, a complete survey by a competent surveyor, not .) lj necess ar ily a county surveyor , shall be filed a s a part of the f; ordinance annexing the territory and a copy certi f ie d to by the L I ! I !· ,I I ' I l l ' If I I - 5 - i I i i , il I _ l_~ �....... ---·-· ,.··--.-.. '1 't -·...·-~-· -- -- -· _..,.. __ ..,, _ ____ .. ....--- 1: I~ if ...-· ·· ··· ····· - - rr ~ . ii {· · !l Ji I ,/ _...--..::::::-- - if City Clerk shiil:T-b·e- filed with the Secretary of State of t he State l, of Georg ia and municipal. · ad\ valorem taxes shall not app ly to i/ property _w ithin it 1 I 1 1 . the annexed terr i to r y until Janua ry l ·of the - - -following year. 'When so ar:1exed, such lands shall con sti t ute a part of the lands within the corporate l imits of t he City as completely and fully as if the limits had been marked and defined ) by sp e cial act of the Gene r al Assembly. l SECTION 8. .! Nothing within this Ordinance shall prohibit !! !! the City .of Atlan~a from requiring the residents of the new annexed l I l area to use City owned utilities when they are availab l e. SECTION 9. ( As provided in Ga. Laws 1966, pp. 409, 413, l ! within thirty (30) days of the effective date of the Ordinance I! l { ! I !) annex ing such land to the City of Atlanta, any resident elector l I!·i of ! I·'l h {j the area so annexed or of the City of Atlanta, or any property l l owner of such area or of the City of Atlanta may bring a petition ! l!for I declaratory judgment in the Superior Court of Fulton County ) to determine the validity of the application and the C:ity 1 s l l action 11 thereon. SECTION 10. All Ordinan c es an d parts of Ordinances in fl conflict herewith are hereby r epealed . i ADOPTED AS AMENDED BY THE . BOARD OF ALDE RMEN 11 Se ptember 19, 1966 !i APPROVED ) l Sept ember 20, 1966 H II I I I,),'1 It j ---···-·- . �1.17 ,, GEO RGI A LAWS 1%G SESS IO>.' ' 1:'i \_ J to provid e for th e ca n cell a tion of exec uti on s ; to r ep eal Cod e section 24-3327, r elating to th e exec uti on and fil in g of an ack'nowlecl i rn ent of t he p ay me nt of a ju dg rn e; nt; to provid e th e proc:e; dur e con n ect ed th erewith; t o r epeal conflicting la v:s ; a nd for oth er purpos es. B e it en acte d b y t h<.: Genern l A ss em bl y of Geo r g i,.L: S ect ion 1. Code Ch apter 39- G, r ela tin g t ai:·e collect ion ancl s tre:d lll ,tinlc nanc e servi ces to th e area to !Jc ann exed on lh e cl:ttc of ,rnn cxation on s ul>stantially ll1e sa me li;1 ~is and in th e s am e nrn11n cr a s s uch s er vice::.; arc prn vid (:( l w ithin th e r est (l[ t.li e rnunid p:di( y" ' �, I GEOIZGJA LAWS 196G SESSJO:\' prior to annexation. If a water di s tribution system is not available in the are a to be annexed, the pl a ns mu s t call for reasonably effective fire protection services until s uch time as water lin es are macle ava il a ble in such area und er exi s tinz municipal policies for the extcnsic.,n c.,f water lini:!.:.;. ~- ' 413 ) (2) Prov ide foi· exten s ion of majc.,r trunk water mnins and sewer outfall lin es into the area to be annr::xd v: ithin twelve months cif th e effective d a te of annexation so th at when such lines are con structed property owners in th e c.rea to be annex ed will b e abl e to secure public water and sev:er service, according- to th e policies in effect in such municipality for extending water and sewe r lin es to indi v idu al lo ts or subdivi s ions . Section 7. When su ch application is act ed upon by th e muni cipal auth oriti es ancl th e l?.ncl is, hy ordin a nce , annex::-d to the munic:ipality, a complete s un·ey by a compet en t s urveyor, n ot necessaril y a county su rYey or, ·s h a ll be fil ed as a part of th e ordina nce a nn exing the t errit ory and a copy certifi ed t o b y th e clerk or s imi lar offi cia l of the municipality shall b e filed \\'ith the S ecretary of St ate of th e S tate of Georg ia and muni cipal acl vfdorem t a x es sh ~,11 not Hpply to property within th e annexed t erritory un t il J a n ua ry 1 of th e follo\\'ing year. Wh en so annexed, such land;; shall constitute a pa rt of the Ja nel" within th e corporate li mit;; c,f the muni cipa li ty as completely ancl full y as if th e li mits h ad been mark ed and dcfin ecl by specia l Act of th e Gcn ern l Assembly. "Incorporat ed muni cipality" ns usect in thi s Act shn ll m t' n,1 an i11 coq1oratecl municip:1 lity whi ch ha s a popubtion of ~() 0 I I IL Pbt. t:i::>: C- S , C'tC. f" ( 'i r I n cv :·1 ... :- .. : t-,= 11: L!H j,;,- ;~1:i '.i:y. or more p er so ns ncc0 rdi11 g to th e l 9GO Feclern l D ccc·nni,,l cens us or any future su ch cen s us. i , ._ _1 Secti on 8. Nothin g- within thi s A ct sh:111 p rn hiliit t he municip:1lity fr om r c,1uiri11 g- tJ a, r es id ents of th e n e\\' ann exed art':1 t o use cit)· O\\·ncd utilitic ;: "·h en th ey ,1n' ,1 \·,1il able. S ection 9. Within thirty (:>Cl ) cl ays of th e effrdi\"C cbtc of the ordinan ce ,lllll t'xi ng such Lrnd t o th e m 1111ic ip:1li ty , . UtilitiL' $. l h- c br :-, t, ,:-y j ll 1! }.: ! :l L'I! ~ . �414 GENERAL i\CTS A t\'D RESOLUTIONS, VOL. I any res ident el ector of the area s o annexed or of the municipality, or any property own er of such arc:. or of the municipality, may brin g a p etition for clcclarntory judgment in the superio1· cou rt of the county of the legal situs of the annexing municipality to de termine the validity, in accordance with thi s Act, of the appli cation and the municipal_i t y's action thereon. Wh en ever such a petition is filed with the muni cipa l gove rning body sha ll fil e wi t h the court th e record of their official actions in regard to such application and a certified copy of the annexing ordinance. The judgment of the court on any such petition may decla re th e annexation ordina nce null a nd void upon a finding that the appli cation, and th e rnunici1'la lity's action th ereon, are not in s ubs tanti al compli a n ce with thi s Act. Upon a finding th_at procedura l defects or d efects in the plan for service to the ·ann exed area exist, the court sl-iall, where poss ible, fra m e a judg m e nt t o p erfect s u ch d efect and uphold the ordina n ce. Actions p rovid ed fo r in this s ection sh all b e in a ccordan ce with th e D ecla r a t ory Judg ment Acl, and a ny ag g ri eved party may obbtin a review of a fin al judg ment under thi s section as by law in other cases provided. S ection l 0. All laws and part s of laws in confli ct h e1·ewith arc h er eb y r ep ealed. Approved March 10, 19GG. MEIVTOJU A L TO COMM E MO ll AT E \VA LTE R F'. GEOR GE. No: 1GO (Sc:natc R es oluti on No. GG) . A Hcsolution. Authnri zill i•; a s tHl11 c, lrn s t or o1h(:I' m cnrn r i;t! of Wall er Franlf C e{ll')-';ia ; ;11Hl for ot h e r )lttrpose:,. ~ r l f �March 3, 1 96 7 0 ! • ,! • ' .. ·,1 r egularly sc eduled m e c ing of the Planning and Devel opment Co~.i t tee o i the Board of l dermen ·was held on · _iday, 1arch 3, 196 7 , at 2: 00 P . M. i Committee Roon 11=1 , Secon · Floo r, Ci ty Ha ll. '• •......! T' e foll oP i g mer.ibe·s wer presen t : Rod ey Coo c, Chai r man E. Gregory Grigg s Cha le s Leftwi ch c.:5 Geo ge Cotsakis J a e~ S mi--ne _s Jo hn M. lan i gen Ab s e n t : Q. V. Wil l ia s on Also i n a t te,danc e we . e : Col lier Glad in Les Perse lls William R. Wof fo rd George Al d ri ge Dan Sweat Rober t Biv e s The Chairman c alled t he meeting t o o r der and ·the f ollowing bus i ne s s was considered : 0 Hr . Gladin presented each co,:nittee memb r with a copy of an enabling reso _ution approving a request for financial assistance for the City of Atlanta to plan and develop a comprehensive City Demonstrat i on Program and a lengthy discussion ensued . ..... tn lo ! u c_ -· 0 n-. Hr . Gladin briefly explained that since the last meeting of this cormnittee, staff members of the Planning Department, as well as staffs from other city departments and various publi~ and private agencies, have been working almost full time to put together the Demonstration City application; that the ini ial dra:t was compiled about two weeks ago and around 100 copies were distributed to these various staff members; that it was subsequently critiqued and rewritten, not merely to cha,ge it, but for continuity and to strengthen it and cover the areas which were missed, in that each individual section was written by a group of people or individuals. Regarding the budget phase of the program, Mr . Gladin explained this had not been finalized, but staff members of the Comptroller's Office is working on the ma tter in conjunction with the Finance Committee and the final figu es should be ready by March 6. He specifically noted that the en~bling Resolution did not mention any specific cost figures, but the tentative estim&tions fo the total budget is around $600,000 - approximately $475,000 Federal funds and $120,000 City funds. He explained that the city's local contribution did not represent a cash outlay, but present employee's salaries, including those of participating agencies, will be credited against the city's share. �I io Minutes PlannL,g - Dcve lopment Committee t-!ar ch 3, 1967 I During the cou .. c of other discussion about the nany facets oft e lv~odcl :_,.j"cighbo r; ood P_ograri1, .e com:.itt e (and Chairman Cook in particular) again r~ised the p_a ctical ob'ection as to staff availability to impleDe t the progi:-a:n and expressed rel 1 cta nce ·co ente .. into t he Model City program when othe r i~por~ant and vital p _o grams of the city (such as the Land Use Pla., updating of the Co p _ehens ive Plc:.n and Zoning Ordinance, etc . ) were bei. g "relegate to t e s>.. elf" and that the presen planning staff was being overworl·ed and "spread too in" . 0 Mr. Gladin stated that the planning staff was instructed to put this appli cdtion together and his is w .at they h ave attempted to do ; tat this application will provide the city wi h the financial capability to accomp l ish a particular job; that the majcirity of he planning workload will be borne by ~he project staff, consi sting of per,anent project personnel to be recruited by the ci ty and supporting personne l on loan from other city departments , from other publi c agencies , and in one case from a private agency . Hes ated further he was aware of the ot her city programs and agre d they were v ital and impo tant, however, a problem at the moment is t· e filling of job vacancies i n the Planning Department whi ch were requested and created in the '67 Budget (5 profess ional planning slots now open); that the Planning Department is u~dertaking a major recruiting campaign to fill these jobs but this will take time; that when these vacancies are occupied, it will provide a balanced staff and he felt the department would be able to meet its co1J1Y.1itments in other programs . He emphas ized that the majority of the work the City Planning S aff woul d be doing in connection with the "Nadel City progra would normally be done anyway . In response to specific questioning by Chairman Cook as to when the Land Use Plan would be ready, Mr. Gladin stated he felt the July 1 deadline could be met; he stressed however he did not mean it would be approved by this time, but it woul be in a form that this com:ni ttee could a c t on it and submit it to the Federal Government to substant i ate that the City has met its requirements set forth in the recertification of Atlanta's Workab le Program . In a n swer to further questioning by the con:..'1littec, Hr. Gladin stated that if subnission of this application for financial assistance is approved and submitted to HUD, it will be around June before HUD will submit an answe .. and in the neantime, the staff will have completed recertification of the Workable Program. 0 Nr. Cook stated he agreed the Demonstration Cities prograra was important a nd that he supported it, but he wanted some assurance that the basi c, r egular day-to-day planning is accomplished; that if t h e answer is a ddi~ional staff, then he would support it. Mr . Gladin reiteraced that he felt if the existing staff vacancies could be filled, the departffient could meet its corn:nitnents. Bill Bassett, Program Coordinator, then gave a breakdown of the proposed �r Li:1Utes Pia:min3 6, D velopme.n t Com. -· tte e r-~a _ch 3 , 196 7 Page 3 org.::rii zation of the Dcr:tonst· ation Citi es Program . (Fo·· comp le ~e det2ils, see Pa_ t I, page 13, Adminis rative fa chinery , of A Mod el Nci ~hborhood for Atlanta) . Upon rr.otion by ~1r. Leftw ich, seconded by Mr . Griggs an t '1e follo·,.,ing Reso lution was a anted : II unanimous vot e , RESOLUTION Y PLA.N"NING & DEVELOPMENT CO,frIITTEL APPROVING REQUEST FQ. FINA ' CIAL ASSISTA1"CE TO PLAN AND DEVELOP A CONPRE~ENS I VE CITY DtHONSTRATION PROGRAM . WHEREAS, the City of At l anta desires to undertake a comprehens ·ve program to rebuild or rev·talize large slum and blighted area s and genera lly i mp r ove living conditions for the peop l e who live in 0 such areas; a . d WHE. EAS, t he Secretary of Housing a nd Urb a n Development is authorized to make gra. ts to, and contract with, City Demonstration Agencies to pay 80 percent of the costs of planning and developing such city demonstration programs : NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED , by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta, as follows: Approval is hereby granted (1) for the submission of a reque st for financial assistance for the planning and development of a comp rehensive city demonstration program; (2) for the provision of any information or documentation concerning the p _eparation and content of such program as may be required by the Department 0 of Housing and Urban Development; and (3) for the �-, ·, 0 Hinutes Planning~ Dev lo~ m t Co!il!.i t · e Ma rc 1 3, 1967 Page I., representation by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. as t . e aut, o ized re, resentai::ive err.po·.;rered to ac on behalf oft e City of At lanta, ulton County, Georgia in connection vith all matters pe taining to the request for finan c ial assista .ce . " 0 u ~r . Gladin sta cd t.at 1e had invited th Building Committee to attend this 1.eeting so that both COIT.mi tee I s could jo intly discuss one problem aspect of the 1967 Housing Code Corapliance Prog r2m - this being the Planning Department 1 s basi c disagreement w"th Pa ·ag raph II. A. 4 and a related Paragraph IV. E . 2 . , whic. pen its ~e abi lita t ion of sub standa rd resident"al structur es in indus~ ially zoned area s. He stated that the Planning Department real i zes substandard houses in industrially zoned areas are a problem, but do not feel this is an acceptable answe r; t hat the present wording of the paragraphs objected to would only postpone solution of ·he problem . M_. Gladin explained that a cco rding to t he Zoning Ordinance, construction of new residences is not permitt ed in the M- 1 and cl-2 Industrial dis ricts and existing residences are classi£ied non-con~orming uses; that to rehabilitate many of t1ese substandard residences would require structural alterations which would be in violation of the non-conforming provisions of the Zoning Ordinance and he is opposed to he City supporting a policy of r ehabilitation i n these areas which is in conflict with a city ordinance. He elabor tcd further that if a st1.- ict interpretz. ion is made of the provisions of the po licy as now written, which stat e s "provided he conmlies in fuil with all codes end ordinance", (and he felt its· ould be e~forced with no dcvi2tion whatsoever) , then in the mejority of the cases tle prop rty owner woul not be allowed to rehabilitate ·at all ; that the Planning Department would like these sections changed to require elimination of structures that have deteriorated over 50 percent and not allow a developer the alternative of repairing it u.dcr these circumstances; furthe , the Department proposes thnt t'.1e non-conforming use provisions of the Zoning Ordinance should be clarified and strengthened as soon as possible to permit a better resolution of the entire problem. Mr. Gl&din then gave a brief slide presentation of the types of structures which have deteriorated beyond repair. �/ }!in tes Planning & Developmen Yarch 3, 1967 0 Co:nr:i ~tee Page S Mr . Hofford sta· ed that is posi ion is that the Policy and Procedure Guid , as now ~rittcn, is as near right as it can be made and 1- should be epp-oved. v i I .' ...._: ~ c. of the ensui .g discussion cc~tered around prop erties int e general vici ity of Markh- and laynes Street wh re there were considerable dilapidated structures in industrially zo,ed a· eas . ~r . Flanige was of the opinion tha ~ he Ordinance should be c,anged to allow p2ople to r eh~bilitate r es:dential s t ructures in industrial areas, sati ng that is study of o her zoning o _dinanc es in the country reveal cy permit this in most cases . Hr . Fofford st.:!ted a serious nroblem involved in code enforcemen in this instance is a s hortage of ousing and whe r e t o put people who a displa ced from these industrial areas . '.:") r, r . G~iggs expressed concern about razing structures and leaving vacant land; e asked M . Wofford if he had a y personal knowledge of a deman for this type of industrial land. Mr. Woffo rd stated he idn ' t . Mr . Gladin stated in these types of areas you have the problem of assembling land; further, that he idea is to make strong residential areas and strong industrial £.reas; that in order to develop a Land Use Plan, you must hav a strong Zoning Orciinance with a strong non-confo·ming section and maximum enforcement in order to implement this Plan . Mr . Gladin stated further that if the particular vicinity i question is a good residential area , t ,en the zoning should be changed to reflec and encourage residential developmen , but if it is a good industrial area, then residential construction and rehabilitction should be prohibited; that no industry will locate in the midst of slum co ditions - they have to be attracted to clea , nice-looking areas; that he personally felt there was certain industries in this area whic1 would poss::.bly expand if a house or wo were torn dmm and land mode available; that he felt this was a good po ential industrial area and its development as such should be made stron 0 , but to co1tinue repairing these dilapidated houses 1vill nerely prolong the situation. ,_ 0 Hr. Wofford stated that the areas in uhich he has had the most vigorous co,~laints about dilapidated and substandard housing have been within these industrial areas. Bob Bivens, Executive Director of Central Atlanta Progress, Inc. stated that the developrrent of the air rights property in the vicinity of the Techwood and Hunter Viaducts area is arriving and will have a profound affect on this area and in his opinion, it would be a mista~e to prolong this low type of residential housing. �Him:tcs P _ann i g & Devclo ment Commi t tee M~r c 1 3, 1967 Page 6 Mr . Cook stated that he objected to blanke t au hority for rehabilitation, oi1d would favor strict code enfo,.cemc ,-;: in not allowing rehabilit at ion in the ~ark1a a nd Hayne3 Stree~s a_ea, however, south of Hunter Street and L the o · lyi ng .:Jreas, he would like for the Planning and 3uild i ng Depa r tm nts to loo: furthe _ at hese areas and have some meeting of the ~i~ds; that in his opin io n, t ese a eas c ould be considered in a differen light . Nr . 7 lanigen _obje c ted top o·. ibitin:; n~habilitat ion . Tnc _e wa s then a bri f discussion about the t ime l i mitat io n in t he Zon i ng Ord inance on non - confor mi ng u s es a, [J oints of weaknes s e s and how t hey co~ld be strengthened . There was also ab ief dis cussion about code enfo rc ement, and Chairman Cook, wi~h the cornmittee's concu:..rence, reque sted that the Planning Department provide the Building Inspector with a prin t - ou t o f information from t e CIP da a file; this will enable the Building In spect or to ma e determina·ions c oncerning the lo cation of non- c onformi ng u ses throughout the City and the development of a strategy for the i r r emoval . Notion was then made by Mr. Cotsakis, seconded by Mr. Griggs and carr i ed by majority vote that he following wording be deleted f r om Paragraph II A.4 . - 11 Should the owner elect to reh ab ilitate a struc ture he will be permitted to do so provided he co . p lies in full with all codes and ordinances; also, by simul aneous motions and a c tio n , t he same wo r ding was deleted from a related Paragraph IV E.2 . Mr . Flanigen voted adversely to bo th actions. The re being no further business, the meeting was adjourned . Approved: Rodn~ Cook Chairman jp Respectfully submitted: jl Joanne Parks Secretary �- - ------- ---- --·- --.... ··--··· -~.-· -·· - "-- ---· ----- ·-·-- - --,_::-,-: _ --- ~ - 1 January 27, 1967 A regularly scheduled meeting of the Planning and Development Committee of the Board of Aldermen was held in Committee Room #1, Second Floor, City Hall, Friday, January 27, 1967 at 2:00 P. M. The following members were present: @ .~ e:. r I m zs w Rodney Cook, Chairman E. Gregory Griggs Charles Leftwich George Cotsakis Jack Summers Q. V. Williamson John M. Flanigen Also in attendance were : iJ) <( w Q_ &j ?::) c~ 0 -· 0 ro Robert Sommerville Earl Landers Collier Gladin George Aldridge Malcolm Jones Pierce Mahony Dan Sweat Bob Bivens Ray Nixon Darwin Womack William Howland M. B. Satterfield Elmer Moon George Berry Howard Openshaw Les Persells The Chairman called the meeting to o r de r and the followin g business was considered: ® ~ _,,I i ? w (/) <{ w a.. ix:s Regarding t he minutes of the De cember 14, 1966 meeting ( see page 3) Alderman Flanigen reques t ed (by l etter o f J a nuar y 6 , 1967) that the f o l lowing clarification be added regarding the di s cuss ion o f the $450 , 000 allocated for the study of add iti onal housing units: He raised the question of who was to guarantee this loan from the Federal Government and Mr. Satterfield advised that when, as, and if a project was approved this amount would be added t o the cost of that project, but he was rather evasive on what would happen if no project was approved, but inferred that it would not be charged to the City; in seconding the motion to adopt the Resolution, Mr. Flanigen made it clear that this would not be charged to the City. Mr. Gladin gave a brief 35 mm slide presentation on the Demonstration Cities Program and what Atlanta has done thus far to take advantage of it. �Minutes Planning & Development Committee January 27, 1967 /. Page 2 He stated it has been under consideration for the past six to eight months and represents a logical extension of the Community Improvement Program - the Demonstration City project being one of the first phases of implementation. He also explained that the City had received the official guide lines from the Federal Government and is now proceeding with the preparation of an application for planning funds and it is anticipated it will be completed and submitted to Washington by March l; that if these planning funds are granted, it would then entail some nine to twelve months to complete a final application for implementation funds and would eventually require five years to complete the program. There was a brief discussion about funds and it was pointed out that ther e had be en no actual appropriation beyond the initial allocation o f twelve million dollars for planning grants for fiscal '67. '· ./ Mr . Gladin said that this program places major emphasis on citizen participation and as a result, two neighborhood meetings have been scheduled f or the purpose of presenting this program to the residents of the proj ect are as; tha t Mayo r Allen will be conducting thes e presentations, explaining the program to the people and seeking their support. Fur ther, he stated that Mr. Johnny Robinson, under a Sterne Foundation Grant, is working out of Dan Sweat's office and has the responsibility of publicizing the program . This is in addition to cons i derable press and t e levis i on cove r age. Mr . Gladin commented thi s progr am will a lso p lace more emphasis on socia l rehabilitation than ha s eve r been done before a nd major effo r ts made to rehou se t he people as they a r e d i spl aced by staging t he developments (on a block-by- block basis i f necessary) so as to avoid wholesa le relocation , a s has been exper ienced in the past. Mr. Sonnnervi lle stated he s upported the s ubmis sion of t he a pplication, bu t he questioned the abi lity of the c ity planning staff , which he stated is too slight as it is, t o submit an application within a six weeks period that would meet the Federal guide lines - particu larly "innovation", on which so much emphasi s is being pl a ced . He also made t he ob servation that this program has been oversold na t i ona lly and he fea red it was in danger of being oversold l oca lly; that he questioned great l y some of the statistics shown on the slides and the choice of some wo rding being used in connection with the program, particularly that Atlanta "expects" to be a model city. He stated we have no basis on which to "expect" Atlanta will be one. He reiterated his support of the application submission but again warned that it was very dangerous f or the City to oversell what it was capable of producing in so short a time. l .,J Mr. Gladin explained that the preparation of this planning application is not restricted to just the city planning staff, but involves many agencies whose staffs have been working on the matter for a year and the results at this point do not merely represent a six weeks effort, but actually about a year and a half to two years. He also explained that it is not contemplated there will be an additional large staff to implement this particular project, �Minutes Planning & Development Committee January 27, 1967 I;,- Page 3 but rather a smaller coordinating staff (5 to 6 people) working directly out of the Mayor's office under a program coordinator who will be responsible for coordination of all activities of the responsible agencies involved, The Committee agreed with the principle but raised the practical objection as to staff availability. Mr. Gladin e xplained that in developing the application, proposals will be made for administering the program but at this point all of these questions have not been answered. Mr. Sweat r e- emphasized that it is only being requested at this point to file an application for planning funds; that a massive amount of research material has resulted from the CIP study and Atlanta has more information from which to put together an application than any other city, except perhaps those who have a completed CIP study. He suggested that a copy of the complete program guide lines should be furnish ed to the Committee members as soon as possible. J .. .J . Mr. Cook concluded by requesting that Mr. Gladin inform the neighborhood residents that this program is still in the preliminary stages and that funds were not yet available for executi on. Colonel Mal colm Jones gave the f ollowing r eport in be ha l f of the Housing Resour c es Commi ttee : The respons e to t he Mayor's Housing Conference o f November 15 , 1966, calling for 16,800 additional low a nd med i um cost standard housing units in Atla nta during t he nex t five years (9,800 by De cember , 1968 ) has f ar exceeded the expect ations o f the Housing Resour ces Committee. It has been announced by Mr . Cec i l Al exander , Chairman, that 51 separate proj ects have been propo sed or are i n execu tion, or completed; 9,311 units are completed , under construction , and / or proposed since the Mayor's Conference. A breakdown of thi s t o tal was then given in three categories as f ol l ows: 3, 963 units - probable; 1,540 units - being considered; and 800 uni t s - doubtful . The 9, 311 t o tal includes 1,206 public housing units, 66 of which are being leased. In addition, 1,424 existing units are proposed for rehabilitation and of the 9,311 total, 1,652 units are estimated to be available during 1 67 and 4,075 available during '68 so that there is now a total of 5,727 units in sight for the next two· years. Colonel Jones then stated that in addition to the Chairman and Co-Chairman initially appointed to the Housing Resources Committee, Mayor Allen is now appointing additional prominent community leaders to the Committee to serve on nine different panels - Legal, Construction & Design, Financing, Non-Profit Funds, Public Housing, Land Acquisition and Rehabilitation , Social Problems, Business Participation, and Public Information; that an organizational meeting of the entire Committee is scheduled to be held February 9 and details will be announced later • Colonel Jones concluded by informing the Committee that Mr. William W. ··---- �1··. ' .......... Minutes Planning & Development Committee January 27, 1967 Page 4 Gates, . retired former Chief Underwriter for FHA in Atlanta, has accepted an appointment as Special Advisor to the Housing Resources Committee and will be available in the committee office in the City Hall each Thursday to advise and assist builders and developers interested in FHA programs; further, their Committee is trying to keep an inventory of the different projects and proposals coming up and would appreciate receiving any information on such matters. (Copy of Report attached). Mr. Cook asked how many of the 5,727 units would be public housing, to which Colonel Jones replied 2,406. Mr. Sommerville asked how many units in Rockdale were included in the three categories, to which Colonel Jones stated roughly 250. Mr. Satterfield gave a brief resume of the time schedules on various projects with statistics (Thomasville, McDaniel, Rockdale, etc.) and Mr. Cook subsequently requested of Mr. Satterfield a chronological listing of these projects with time schedules and that each member of the Planning & Development Committee be furnished with a copy. (_; Mr. Gladin then gave each Committee member a Fact Sheet of the Nash-Washington Urban Renewal Area, along with a letter from Mayor Allen, requesting that the Pla nning & Development Committee r econsider its previous r e j e ction o f a nd approve the submission of a Survey a nd Planning Applica t i on f o r the Na s h-Wa shington Area in view of the progress t hat ha s been made in providing housing and the future outlook. (Mayor Allen's letter contained supporting sta t i s tics , as outlined by Colonel Jones' housing report). At this po int , Mr. Gladin pointed out the need to select a name for the pro jec t. Referring to the Fac t Sheet, Pierce Mahony of t he departmental staff briefed the Committee on t he Survey a nd Pla nni ng Ap pl i ca tion, covering the fo l lowing ma j or points - Des c r iption, Goal s , Proposed Reuses and Improvements; Methods and Pro cedures , Financ i ng , Op tion on Sewe r s , a nd Possibl e Sources of Money. He then stated the recommendations of the planning staff, a s outlined in a memorandum to Chairman Cook, dated January 27, 1966. (See copy attached) . _,I There was a lengthy discussion of the Nash-Washington Project, including the controversial location of the new junior high school and the major problem of relocation. It was the tenor of the conversation that the Committee members were very frustrated and disillusioned over time schedules that are continually not met because of any number of delay s; that they were tired of dealing with the people on promises and unless some better assurances could be given the Committee (than had been done in the past) that housing �[' . . ~ .~' Minutes Planning & Development Committee January 27, 1967 Page 5 would be available to the people in this area, then they would be -reluctant to approve the Survey and Planning Application. It was generally felt that there was, however, a favorable trend in providing adequate housing and this Committee would certainly not want to reverse or slow down this trend. Mr. Charles Hart, 807 Commodore Drive, speaking as a layman, expressed his disappointment at ~ast efforts in this regard, but stated he too felt the trend was favorable. The Committee then gave tentative approval to the project, with the tentative name - "Nash-Bans Project Area" - pending further discussion of the project with area residents. The Committee stressed that evidence of neighborhood support of the program will have to precede final approval of the planning application request. The Committee discussed a Bill to incorporate certain land adjacent to the City of East Point. This review was made in response to Representative Dick Lane's (of the 126th District) letter of J?nuary 12 to Mayor Allen requesting comment on the proposal. Mr. Bill Bush was present in behalf of the City of Atlanta Water Department. In reviewing maps o f Land Lot's 1 and 37 of the 14th District (consisting of 24 parcels) and noting their relatio nship to the corporate limits o f both Atlanta and East Point, the Commit t ee observed (1) that this area would provide one direction in which the City of Atlanta might expand in the future; (2) one of the City o f Atlanta's maj or water mains (approximately 1600 feet valued at $32,000) supplying water to a large part of South Fulton County is located in Welcome All Road which runs north and south through the area under consideration and must continue to be maintained or be relocated by the City of Atlanta in orde r to provide uninterrupted service to Fulton County. Mr. Leftwich t hen moved that the Committee take a stand against passage of the Annexation Bill. This motion was unanimously approved by the Conunittee and Mr. Gladin was requested that this information be conveyed to the Fulton County Delegation. (See attached sheet for additional action taken on this matter). There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. Approved: jp Respectfully submitted, �,.--.__ /• ' January 30, 1967 Re: @ t: ~~-:.:)i1. d l,,' J 6t~ ,.-;./ w EAST POINT ANNEXATION BILL Subsequent to the January 27 meeting of the Planning & Development Committee, Mr. Landers and Mr. Cook discussed further the Committee's recommendation. Mr. Gladin was asked to draft a letter to the Fulton Delegation setting forth the following conclusion: (See Item 3 of attached letter). Mr. Landers then contacted each of the Committee members, with the exception of Alderman Leftwich, who was out of town, to review this draft letter which needed to be forwarded to the delegation prior to their scheduled meeting on February 3, 1967. This letter was approved by each of th~ Committee members, with the exception of Mr, Leftwich. iJ) <( w CL ~ Collier Gladin Planning Director ~:::) ~ CY- 0 0 m jp Complete copy of letter attached. �. CITY I-IALL ATLA1""TA, GA, 30303 Tel. 522 -4463 Aroa Code 404 Df~I'/\Iff~I E NT OF PLA:\r-,'.I:\G COI.LIEH B. GLADI:-,/, Director February 1, 196 7 · Ho ;,o n, b l e Ch<1 rl ie Carnes, Cha i:c;;1an Fulto n Co unt y Hou s e Dele ga tion 1 }~un:: -2 r Str e et, W. Atlan ta , Georgia s·. Dc ~r Rep re s entative Ca rnes: The Pla nnin g and De velo c)mc n t Com.11i ttce o f the Boord of .1\ldcr;;-:c n, a t it s Jan ua ry 27 me eting , d i s c u ss e d a Bill Xo incorpor a t e cer t a i n land c1 d ja c cnt to t he City of E a st Po i nt . Thi s revi ew was rnad 2 in ~e s ?on s e t o Repres entativ e La ne ' s (of · t h e 126th District) l e t t er of January 1 2 t o :Mayor Allen r equ e s tin :; comme nt on this p ro po sal . ? • i\ ft e r ~cvi ew ing map s of L.::ind Lo t 1 and 37 o f the lLft h vi st r ic t, wh ich c ons i s ts of 2L, pn rcels o f l and a nd no t i n~ th e ir relation si1i ? t o the co rp o r a t e li mits of both Atla n ta an d Eas t Point, I was aske d to rel ay to yo u th e follo wing three ma jo r obse r vations of the Pl a n ni ng and Dev e l opme nt Committee: 1. Ihat the area of unin co rpora t ed Fu lt on Co u nt y u nde r ~onsidt t j tio n WJS eont f guous to At l anta ~h
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 27, Folder topic: Aldermanic Committees | Planning and Development | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 29

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_029.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 29
  • Text: MRs. WILLIAM S. TAYLOR P, O. BOX 426 ISLE OF PALMS, S. C. August 8, 1963 Mayer Ivan Allen, City Hall, Atlanta, Georgiae Dear Mayer Allen;- I saw you en TV when you appeared be- fere a cengressional conmittee to testify on the President's Civil Rights bill. Here at my summer home with several South Carolina friends,we were all SHOCKED and AMAZED with yeur suppert ef the BILL.Must say, I was GREATLY EMBARASSED when my friends said,"WHAT is t the MATTER with ATLANTA'S MAYOR? I enclese a clipping frem eur Atlanta nerthside weekly,The Metrepelitan Heraldwhich alse further expresses my sentimentse Hepe that yeu will STUDY the bill and see hew it will affect IVAN ALLEN COe as well as ether businessese Yours fer GOOD EA Sait a in Atlanta, Myrs ead ney
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 36

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_036.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 36
  • Text: RUSHIN - PEARSON, INC. Manufacturers Representatives 377 TECHWOOD Dr., N.W. ATLANTA 13, Georcra Personal Mayor Ivan Allen City Hall Atlanta 3, Ga. -
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 50

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_050.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 50
  • Text: tl t —_—_— — ———_ — pe —= _ gi, Me
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 5
  • Text: | | | ap a ot
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 31

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_031.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 31
  • Text: ———
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 41

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_041.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 41
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 59

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_059.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 59
  • Text: case eee \ E S ERN NION ae This is a fast message \ [ [ DL=Day Letter unless its deferred char-"*]— ; NL=Night Letter acter is indicated by the l E LE GRAM SF-1201 (4-60) International proper symbol. Ter: et Telegram W. P. MARSHALL. Presiogn ’ NODA 0 ney The filing time shown in the date line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME at paint of origin. Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME at point of destination 923A EST JUL 27 63 AcoOs A LLT337 DL PD ATLANTA GA 26 454p EST MAYOR IVAN ALLEN CITY HALL ATLA I AM SHOCKED AND DISAPPOINTED TO LEARN-OF YOUR Pte seacer (F THE PUBLIC ACCOMODATIONS BILL. LET ME REEMPHASIZE A POSITION THAT I HAVE MAINTAINED THROUGHOUT THE INTEGRATION PROBLEMe THIS IS A PROBLEM THAT MUST BE HANDLED BY INDIVIDUAL OWNERS. THE SOLUTION OF THESE PROBLEMS SHOULD-BE SOLELY HANDLED BY THE INDIVIDUALS THAT ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE INVESTMENTS AND WORK THAT HAVE BUILT THEIR INDEPENDENT BUSINESSESe PROSTITUTING ANOTHER SEGMENT OF THE FREE ENTERPRISE SYSTEM, IS NOT THE ANSWER TO ANY PROBLEM. I THEREFORE OBJECT VEHEMENTLY TO YOUR, AS A DULY ELECTED ATLANTA OFFCIAL SUPPORTING THE PUBLIC ACCOMODATIONS BILL FEDERAL GOVERNMENT INTERVENTION AND CONSTRICTION OF THE Crass OF SERVICE | ER S | NION rs SYMBOLS ‘ This is a fast message ' \ DL=Day Letter unless its deferred char- NL=Night Letter acter is indicated by the E LEGRAM SF-1201 (4-60) | | --_International proper symbol. Letter Telegram W. P. MARSHALL, Pacsiognt NETS Conn The filing tithe shown in the date line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME ar point of origin. Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME at point of destination (W LLT337/2 FREE ENTERPRISE SYSTEM CAN ONLY RETARD THE GROWTH AND SUCCESS OF OUR CITY STATE AND COUNTRY A T (TED) DAVIS.
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 78

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_078.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 78
  • Text: \ “Sel Scheu C*@G os \ KoOATLANT -Gee == oe . eee \ UC wr Wan \ Mayo VAN Aw TR \ Oty a H 2 \ 8 om AAAore ATLAMTA % (5 =O & \ R 40 Lh Mh MELE LD Lb LE Mt
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 77

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_077.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 77
  • Text: Say 7 Naryou Kies (2 pear Se: QutT IWC AR ov VA CH Tat, Ve Tice You HE LETING Looce A Gary wr Tt THAT Big Doce CNET MovTtt OF Youle You ARE NPNTKY Recaure your Fresy Naneic Wav. WEARS SURE 8UT Tov MAIER VOI..N Mey CLce how You PRov ce YouRoah & TRATTOP Te HE Soutry theres Ts THE WHIT & [KA ce, Vou ACE We Retrem THAV AY eeroty Ms ¢ wen You Ge AGANCY Your OW [Cre Cy vwRCUUKeTerR vw WE wd ree PRR A PARNY Te GeTYVoev wT oF oFFice . oy S Trey ey Fh WihrTe Race “SoU BSize ee
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 83

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_083.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 83
  • Text: WEB. 7-Z¥, /965, OM. thadh.n Ati: We Ace aso er ieee a , ate gel Ue agate aoptn tlk Sues ted © Rrceyr por rater of he | be Don Sia:
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 52

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_052.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 52
  • Text: ee Let nee ares shone J. “Bieta Hak ffrig that tee Looe gp AGE Cabal Ad gece ae — n anes mere el nee sie a PRE Oe C
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 58

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_058.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 58
  • Text: ea) WESTERN UNIO unless its deferred char- aoe TELEGRAM W. P. MARSHALL, Paesioent The filing time shown in the date line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME at point of origin. Time of receipt is 1135A EST JUL 27 63 AA2Zu i A OGAO10 PD ORANGEBURG SOCAR 27 1054A EST MAYOR IVAN ALLEN JR ATLA YOU ARE A prsgRace TO THE SOUTH. BILL CARTWRIGHT. , ® (07). 0) io SYMBOLS y DL=Day Letter NL=Night Letter International Die veers: CAL {Eat point of destinanon
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 94

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_094.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 94
  • Text: W. T. ©. Bates Palmetto Building Orangeburg, South Carolina ohn, Sa? Hk Ar tote is ce art ae Om “ a FhrQ Ad € Ties al pProracel Kor tt Ss / Atrorat Grae, flocs Phir ta poor & e aw (gpescents A fies, She Aor vt te Lervkeh- ; C : ee < MV. tt 4} ee fire Ft ee nd Ave pee < 2 Me - + “tis C AF AReorsiy é _?r {ut} Qa etir aL. an é 2 ¢ / Ja AML Core bere, ed- pee At-ehrr— uv Jaae é Dee 7 gyri
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 95

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_095.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 95
  • Text: oe, Bos EL MULLIS COTTAGE "77" GROVE BOX 474 LITTLE LAKE WEIR OKLAWAHA, FLORIDA Tvan Allen Jre Mayor? ort oe hk hab Dear lir, Allens The NEGRO' of ATLANTA should surely be of Their ? MayOr?,. I had an office in Atlanta ADS 9 8 years, pay lots of taxes in Geor gia now but happy I do not pay any to ATLANTA, ft “N Yours FRESDOM for ALL, Bk Me oe ly Muilis
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 90

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_090.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 90
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 105

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_105.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 105
  • Text: 1. The information printed here is not available from any of the regular channels of information which are controlled by our enemy. 2. Read carefully and judge for yourself about what is wrong with America. 8. UNLESS YOU ACT AT ONCE to top this plot which has been steadily pro- gressing for many years, and especially the last 20 years, and now has its key men in the desired positions of power, ready to pall the strings which will submerge Gentile humanity forever. 4, Every Senator and Congressman is constantly voting on questions concerning the world crisis, yet few have the guts to tell the people what is back of the entire world crisis and to advocate measures to counteract ft. 5. Rather than endure the smear that would come their way, many members of Congress are willing to sell their own fu- ture generations into slavery. Spineless creatures engrossed with the egotism of the Felix Frankfurter Placed Many Reds in Government Most Powerful Man in World. ap, ide ne THE COMING i 3 ng re 7 % DICTATORSHIP ASIATIC MARXIST JEWS CONTROL ENTIRE WORLD AS LAST WORLD WAR COMMENCES. THOUSANDS OF PLOTTERS PLACED IN KEY POSITIONS BY INVISIBLE GOVERNMENT. FEW WERE EVER ELECTED. micht losé advertising. 15. The International Jewish Council met at Basle, Switzerland, in 1879 and drew up the “Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion” as the formula for their plan to cap- ture. control. ofthe world. 16. Jews claim the Protocols are for- geries. A forgery is an unauthorized copy of an original. The Jews never question the authenticity of the original Protocols which were written in Hebrew. The important fact is that the Jews are carrying the plot out to the letter. Russian Revolution was fi- “nanced by Jews, Jacob Schiff, Otto Kahn & Paul Warburg, of Kuhn, Loeb & Company, New York bankers. They advanced 48 mil- lion dollars and trained 276 Jewish revo- lutionaries in New York City on the lower East Side who were shipped to Russia in 1917 to direct the overthrow of the gov- ernment and set up the present Commu- nist government of U. S. S. R. They passed through Germany (with whom we were then at war) by permission of Paul War- Henry Morgenthau Gave Money Plates To Communists CG. Douglas Dillon (Lapowski) Undersecretary of State deliberate act) in 1921 and 1829, they brought onthe depressions. (The Jewish plan—see the Protocols). Protocol XX, 20. “Economie erises have been produced by us for the goyim (Gentile) by no othersmeans»ihan the withdrawal of money from circulation.” This was written jn 1905 and referred te the panic of 1893 which was caused by simply and suddenly withdrawing a large amount of gold from the New York Stock Exchange and sénding it to Montreal. “The Federal Reserve Conspiracy” docu- ments the details of this operation from economic journals and from little-publicized Congressional investigations. The money panics of 1907 (which occurred in a year of general prosperity), 1921 and 1929 were caused in the same way, and the details are similarly documented. 22. THE HOUSE OF ROTHSCHILD, Jewish banking: house, loaned money to both sides in World War I (in line with the Protocols plot). Without such loans there _ “David Lilienthal First Chairman Atomic Energy Compyission T.S.D., UL S. Army je oe al Gen. Herman Feldman Quartermaster General Lithuania have been digested by the Com- munist Jews) — with a few Gentile stooges to front for them. Two and a half million Jews in Russia occupy nearly all govern- ment positions and live in luxury with the finest cars and mink coats while the Gen- tile population lives in slavery and squalor as their slaves. LAZAR KAGANOVICH, Jewish brother-in-law of STALIN was the “FELIX FRANKEFURTER” of the Soviet Union. World War Ill fs to exhaust the nations go that they will agree to a Jewish world government. The Jew-controlled United Nations is to be the world government; the flag of the United Nations is taken from the flag of Israel and Russia. 28. The world’ crisis is made by BERNARD BARUCH, FELIX FRANKFUR- TER, LEHMAN, JAMES PAUL WAR- BURG, LEWIS L. STRAUSS (of Kuhn, Loeb & Co., and who was recently appointed Chairman of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission by EISENHOWER), ROTHS- CHILD estatee MORGENTHAU, EIN- _ Anna M, Rosenberg Arthur F. Burns Loaded Dofense Dept. With Reds, Pres. Eisenhower Economie Advisor for But it’s going to last a good many years.” ANNA knows the plan of the Protocols. She supervised the hiring of more than a million while she was in that job. It will take ten years to unseramble the Red net- work she set up if America does not pass out before. 35. She was backed by BERNARD BARUCH for her position. She is a friend of EISENHOWER. BARUCH is the secre@ President of the United States. EISENHOW- ER is his mouthpiece. EISENHOWER, on BARUCH’S advice, opposes the BRICKER amendment so our Constitution can be set aside and world government set up, and the White Race destroyed. 36. Jew EINSTEIN caused the Atomic _Energy traitor, KLAUS FUCHS, to be re- leased from jail in Canada and brought to the United States, where he acted as the world’s leading atomic energy spy. | EINSTEIN was a strong supporter of trai tors JULIUS and ETHEL ROSENBERG. EINSTEIN in a letter to Jew WILLIAM FRAUENGLASS, New York ‘teacher, ad- lrivng Peress ‘ David Dub! Russian-born World Wide Communist Promoted. Labor Leader Army Captain importance of their positions and thinking they are the all-wise mentors of the nation passing on its vital questions, whereas they are guilty of the grossest hypocrisy of all times in evading the one and all important issue which is the foundation of ail other questions. They are presiding over the dis- bure’s brother, who was the Kaiser’s Chief of Espionage, and permission of the Ger- man Chancellor, Von Bethman-Hollweg (Jew). Trotsky and Lenin were the lead- ers. All attempted assassinations and assas- inations of Czars were carried out by Jews. 18, BERNARD BARUCH gave $50,- 000 te WOODROW WILSON’S campaign, would have been yo War as neither side could afford war. But the Jews wanted war in order to have Gentile destroy Gen- tile, and to bring yn world chaos and to seize power in the interim due to the emergencies created, 23. WILSON pyt the U. S. into the war to bale out the Jewish banking interests ee ee ee ee | Ga Boa. Mie STEIN, and the rest of their Jewish con- apirators. 29. Why do Jews talk of the crisis we have with Russia? They control the govern- ments of Russia, England, France, Isvael, and the WU. S, The crisis is their own making, brought about by them in order to put us in a military straitjacket to them. vised all witnesses to refuse to answer questions before Cengressional committees, 387. Jewish international banker forces that backed EISENHOWER for President also. backed STEVENSON, TRUMAN fol lowed the Jewish instructions. The Jewish international bankers, promoting Commu. Niom Gm asnardanes: with @h. Wad 6. Many members of Congress desire to fead a life of hypocrisy and escape the real fasue, leaving it for others, who, in like manner, leave it for others, and all touch fé not. Thus the internal enemy has a free. and untrammeled field in which he is mov- ing rapidly forward to the climax. .%. Needed is a simultaneous effort of a large group of Senators and Congressmen to expose this plot because there is protec- tion in numbers. The public could thus be aroused, and once aroused, would give them its support, and smear of individuals could not take place when a goodly number act simultaneously. 8. Communism was set up by Jews in 1917. 9. It is the Jewish plot to enslave the Gentiles and to rule over them as kings over slaves. 10. The Jews consider this their as “the chosen people”. destiny DaCKEG Py WARDURYW VL RUN LUCY we Company on the promise that he would obtain passage of and sign PAUL WAR- BURG’S “Federal Reserve Act of 1913”— which he did — which placed the banking reserves of the United States under the control of the Jewish international bank- ers. ROTHSCHILD, KUHN, LOEB, and LEHMAN, etc. 19. The public thinks the Federal Re- serve banks are government owned, but they are privately owned, the geographic dispersal of twelve to represent decentrali- zation just being window-dressing as they all are dependent on the Federal Reserve Bank of New York which is under control of the Wall Street Jewish international bankers. 20. ‘They collect the dividends resulting from the interest payments of the U. S. government on its bonds sold to the Fed- eral Reserve Banks, financed by deposits of Edward M. M. Warburg Max Lowenthal Top Advisor to Head of Truman Kuhn, Loeb Co. Phililp Perlman Former Solicitor Gen. James D. Zellerbach Ambassador to Italy Jews in complete charge of the United States — BERNARD BARUCH as head of War Industries Board, PAUL WARBURG as head of banking interests, and EUGENE MEYER who now owns the leftist paper “Washington Post” and also controls Allied Chemical and Dye, head of the Liberty Loan drive. BARUCH spent 10 billion dollars of allied money, giving his own companies the choicest contracts, on which he also could fix ptices, and. made himself a multi-millionaire by fleecing the people of the United States. 24. BARUCH has spent his life car- Tying out the plot of the “Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion” while represent- ing himself to the public as “Elder States- man” and “Advisor to Presidents”. He pre: tends to be a patriot by advising America what it should do for protection against war crises which he and his gang has foistered on America in their plot. Charles |. Schottland Social Security Chiof miata, = aoe Harry Dexter White Treasury Dept. Spy 30. Why did ‘lruman in 1945, In appulie-= ing a five-man civilian board Atomic Energy Commission, appoint four Jews as members? Chairman DAVID LILIENTHAL, then shown to be a member of two Communist- fronts, yet backed by BARUCH! for the position. Other Jew members, W. W. WAY- MACK, R. F. BACHER, and LEWIS L. STRAUSS. 31. Why does Eisenhower now appoint LEWIS L. STRAUSS, Jewish Kuhn Loeb banker, as chairman of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission? 32. Why did Eisenhower appoint Jewish Austrian-born Prof. ARTHUR F. BURNS his Economie Adviser? (The Protocols say the Jews must occupy the positions of eco- nomic advisers). ~ 33. Why did Eisenhower appoint Jewess FREDA B. HENNOCK Federal Communi- cations Commissioner, and Jew SAMUEL ge Lewis L. Strauss Chairman of Atomic Commission te Sen ae eh James P. Warburg World Government Leader CONLFO! THe WOrld aS OULLNeG Mm ier rece tocols of the Learned Elders of Zion” have complete control of both the Democratic and Republican parties. With their unlimited supply of money, they can buy anything. Protocol III., 11. “With the aid-of gold — which is all in our hands — we shall create universal econumic crises which will bring industry to a stand- still.” Protocol IV., 4. “To give the Gentiles no time to think, their minds must be diverted — thus all nations take no note of their common foe.” . 58. The United States is already captured. {ts government is under the control of its 11 million Jews headed by the BARUCH, FRANKFURTER, LEHMAN, MORGAN- THAU, WARBURG gang. Hyman G. Rickover Chairman Peacetime Atomic Energy Commission Louis Rothschild Chairman of Maritime Board 11. To accomplish this they create wars, revolutions, and depressions in order to seize the power during the resulting chaos. 12. For hundreds of years this has been the Jewish plan on the instructions of their Grand Sanhedrin of Constantinople im its Vengeance Protocol of 1492. 13. To do so, they have cornered the world’s gold supply and have sold the world the fiction that gold is wealth, instead of the land and commodities being recognized as wealth. By their control of gold, they have enslaved all nations to them threugh loans. They hold the world in an economic atraitjacket. 14. By their control of gold, they con- trol the means of propaganda, smearing all newspapers and publications who do not kow-tow to their wishes, and also shutting off all foreign news they do not wish a pation’s people to hear. Every regular mewspaper in the land talks of the world crisis, but not one dares to inform the pub- fic of the Jew plot behind the crisis, They commercial banks throughout the country —YOUR MONEY. The U. S. government pays interest on its own credit and the Jewish international bankers collect it. In 1946 on a national debt of 246 billion, the interest was 1414 million dollars a day. Today, 1954, the National debt is 276 billion dollars. Can you see where the money power lies? By their control of gold the Jewish international bankers get richer while Gentile America gets poorer and poorer. In the “Protocols” they say they will drain the entire product of material and labor off the land into their treasuries. 21. The Congress “abdicated” in 1915 when it passed the Federal Reserve Act. The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve Banks met behind closed doors and has more power than the Congress of the United States. Said Board of Gover- nors is not responsible to the public nor to Congress and has repeatedly shown that it is under the control of the international banker. By raising the rediscount rate (a BARUCH spent $10,000 to bring the Com- munist church burners back from Spain where they burned religious leaders alive after covering them with kerosene. (Time Magazine, Jan. 2, 1939.) 25. World War was forced on Ger- many by the Jewish International bankers who squeezed Germany financially for this purpose. Jew, SAMUEL UNTERMEYER, brought about the boycott of Germany in 1933 for this purpose, 26, World War I was for the pur- pose of the Jews doing to Germany what they did to Russia in World War I, causing revolution and establishing Communism. 27. World War Ill is being arranged by the Jews in order to bring the entire world into Commtnism, which is Jewish super capitalism, with the Jews controlling the government aS they do now in the Sovieb Union and all other Communist countries — Poland; Hungary, Czechoslova- kia, Roumania, Chita (Estonia, Latvia and B. GRONER her assistant? The Protocols say they must control all communications. 34. ANNA M. ROSENBERG, who attend- ed Communist front meetings according to sworn testimony by RALPH DE SOLA, hired 10,000 people for the Manhaiian (Atomic Energy) project, (The New York- er, September 15, 1945). This included the spies JULIUS and ETHEL ROSENBERG, GREENGLASS, SOBEL, GOLD, KLAUS FUCHS and others. SIDNEY FIELDS, writing in the New York Mirror Novem- ber 15, 1950, describes the power ANNA had while in charge of the nation’s man- power: “Tomorrow MRS. ANNA M. ROSENBERG assumes her duties as As- sistant Secretary of Defense in charge of the nation’s manpower. There are about 115 different U. S. government agencies concerned with manpower.” Mr. FIELDS quotes Mrs. ROSENBERG: “Today we are in for a long pull... 1 would not dare esti- mate how long. Nobody would believe me, One hundred and sixty million American Gentiles ruled by 11 million Jews. A nation within a nation. And in the world, billions of Gentiles are ruled by 16 million world Jews. 39. DAVID SENTER, political writer for the Hearst papers, on July 6, 1953, states that the man behind the guns in the EISENHOWER administration is SIDNEY JAMES WEINBERG, Wall Street invest- ment banker of GOLDMAN, SACHS and COMPANY. It is clear that the EISEN- HOWER CABINET was hand-picked by WEINBERG’S man, General LUCIUS CLAY, whom WEINBERG made Chairman of Continental Can. Jews WEINBERG and BARUCH rule EISENHOWER, that is definite. 40 While focusing our attention on the enemy from without, the enemy from within has captured the United States government. The power passed from the people to the state about twenty years (See Other Side) ago. No longer are the three @ivisions of gov: ment, Legislative, Executive, Judicial of equal ntended by was y the founding fathers, form of a Republic is main- g the people into believing they c. They have same on local level 1 natienal level, The Executive is all powerful. Con- ss. By patronage and by fe gets his way. He can buy en admit they have no nical budget figures they ry onee voted, the Executive can pend itatwill with no check up. The Executive n supreme Court Judges and so controls that also. invisible Jewish government has l of the U.S. since F.D.R. took controls WINSTON CHURC- c rance, the Soviet Union, Israel, and Czechoslovakia, Poland, and Rou- Only the eceivin taken to Russia to be tried, without protection of the U.S. Courts and U.S. Constitution, and trial by jury. It makes it a crime to say anything re- flecting upon any race, or group, and this law the Jews want so they can proceed unhampered in their plot, and it will be criminal to accuse them. () Universal Military Training is for the pur- pose of getting the young men of America under control of the Jews for 8 year periods and with the military whiphand over them, they will be forced to study and accept Communist propa- ganda. Those who accept will be given the ad- vancement and allowed to study for the postl- tions of doctors, dentists, lawers, etc., but those who rebel against it will be chosen for floor scrubbers, etc. () The Human Rights Convenant, drawn up by .ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, DEAN ACHISON, and two Russians, gives the government of any member nation of the United Nations the right, if it thinks itself threatened, to curb the freedom of the press, and_impose._martial.law,;-and=to We Were not allowed to win the. war. Protocol 111 says “It is indispensible for our purpose that wars, so far as possible, should not result in territorial gains; War will thus be brought to the economic ground... ~ Our irternational rights will then wipe out national rights, in the prop- er sense of right, and will rule the nations precisely as the civil law of States rules the relations of their sub- jects among themselves,” 54, EISENHOWER advocated the LEHMAN inspired legislation to admit 214,000 adaitionar immigrants (mostly Jews, you will see) to re- place the Gentile Americans destroyed in the Korean war. Eighteen gullible Republican Sena- tors sponsored this legislation which they would have voted against the previous year had TRU- MAN introduced it, but now they consider they have a “Republican” President. Since the end of World War 11, ACHESON ‘let in: five times as ‘imm ts as the law allows and 77 per (f) He refused to win the Korean war. (g) He gave the Communists everything they asked in the truce negotiations, including giv- ing up the strategicisland of Cho and two others. (h) He is against tax reduction, although he had promised it. @ He has refused to clean out the Reds in government positions. @) He Is against McCARTHY and never talks against the enemy from without. Gn line with the Protocols wherein they say they will divert the attention of the people while they do tner work of the plot.) “To give the Gentiles no mme to think, thelr minds must be diverted...tmus all nations will take no note of thelr common foe-4,” «&) He is for the United Nations [which is to be the Jewish World Government]. @ He appointed the pro-communist Harvard President CONANT as High Commissioner of Germany. ( He appointed the BARUCH-WEINBERG Will be shot] This is your last chance. Whe the Jews pull the dictatorship, they will shoot you or put you in concentration camps. You have presided at the passing of the United States and the passing of the white race. You let it happen, Now get together in one mighty effort to stop it. This is reality. You have only one chance left and that is to arrange a simul- taneous outcry by a group of your fellow mem- bers of Congress to indict this conspiracy by the size of which the Capone gang and the Mafia are infants, The Jewish Anti-Defamation League, Its Bnal Brith, the American Jewish wongress, are subversive conspiracies carrymg out the Jew plan. They are a “Gestapo” In every community. The Jewish communities everywhere fully cooperate—none disavow It. They have been taught it for hundreds of years, The Protocols of Zion are being fulfilled. Act now or your posterity will be slaves forever! BENJAMIN FRANELIN predicted this in his Convention Speech in 1784, and you have carried it out and brought it to the point at which the trap is about to snap. Get together at once and a4. ‘The land In Israel is owned by the take over all industry andyall labor, T) cent of them were ders, ss stands supine: chosen BOHLEN as Ambassador to Russia, he undo it or be prepared to take the consequences p Jacob Blaustein Jake Arv Herbert Lehman Albert Einstein Max Rabb _ _ Sidney Hillman Ismar Baruch Or. R, Oppenheimer Sidney J. Weinberg Leon een U.S. Del a Joscantord N. Political Boss of Leader in 30 Communist Citations Secy. to Cabinet Man behind F.D.R, Chief of Civil Service Former Atomic Energy Directs Invisible Truman Financia Chicago Marxist Plot Plant Boss Government Advisor TE POTASH CORP. and the PALE- STINE ECONOMIC CORP. represented in the United States by the National Jewish Fund. Arabs bad occupied part of this land for 1,300 years and part 1,700 years. The Jews came in Tr ‘ther parts of the world and murdered the shed nearly a million into the where 850,000 still exist. WINSTON CHURCHILL sent his war 4 to ROOSEVELT through BER- CH who had his apartment in the toria in New York. i6. ANTHONY EDEN recuperated from aa liness at the Rhode Island home of the daugh- ter of Jew, OTTO KAHN, one of -those. who financed the Russian revolution. Mrs, OTTO EAHN was feted by Bolshevist Russia like an etopress, 47. THE JEW os 45 time mes NARD E Waldorf-As T. AW PLAN 9 cause wars to consume the American Sentile manpower which should be the seed of this nation, replace the consumed American Gen- (ob) ‘To This is the means they intend to use to spring the trap on the United States and take over the government with their dictatorship. They are also pushing to do the same by urging passage of standby mobilization tion, for which BARUCH appeared before Congressional committees and for which he has made public speeches in advocating that the President be given complete authority to mobilize everyone from 17 to 70, in event of attack or threat of attack by Russia, a threat he and his gang will bring about at the desired time, because they control the government of the Soviet Union, as well as of England, France, Israel, and the United States. THE PASSING OF THE WHITE RACE 48. Jews keep themselves segregated and do not intermarry but they want the Gentiles to intermarry with colored races, Why not, then, the Jews? Oh, no, they consider themselves “the chosen people” to rule over all the other races of the world, This plot could not go on if the newspapers ly by while all this goes 0M as though it werea little child and not suppos¢d to know. 55. HENRY MORGANTHAU JR., Secretary, of the Treasury, with RY DEXTER WHITE, Under Secretary and ComMiunist (who committed suicide when exposed) and. HAROLD GLASSER —all Jews in charge of oUr Treasury — gave to the Communists money Plates complete with three plane-loads of secret ink and four plane- loads of secret paper for Printing our money in East to pay two Years salary to Com- munist soldiers. Jewish refugees brought mill- ions of this money to the U.S. to set up in bus!- ness, 56. More Koreas are '® come in the future to consume more Amerian manpower which should be the seed of thiS Nation, We now have our men scattered in 63 ©Untries, according to U.S. News and World ReP°rt Dec, 25, 1953. 5%. More letting dow™ of the Immigration Laws is to come, to let In More Jews to take the Place of the consumed n Gentiles. 58, When the United States 1s worn down cet being a ROOSEVELT-TRUMAN favorite inter- preteé= and advisor, who still contends the Yalta and Teheran decisions were right. (n) He appointed the ROOSEVELT-TRUMAN favorite. General. WALTER BEDELL SMITH as Undersecretary of State, who is one of the five men who knew the Japs were on thelr way to attack us at Pearl Harbor and did not alert our forces there, (o) He sponsored the legislation to admit 214, 000 additional aliens in the next three years and secured its passage, (p) He is against the WALTER-McCARRAN Immigration Law. (q) He is for raising the debt limit of the Unit: ed States. a ‘ ne (©) He is for keeping up the foreign spending to finance socialistic governments in other coun- tries while tearng down the United States, (s) He is against bookburning but wants U.S. citizens taxed to supply Red slanted books to foreign libraries, @® He is for Universal Military Training, and and you and your posterity, will be wiped out or go into slavery forever, There is no time to delay. In case you think we are prejudiced, history for more than 1,000 years indicates that where ever these people have settled, it was necessary to evict them eventually—Babylon, Spain, France, England, and as recent as 1939, Germany, and it will happen in America. —o—— What You Can De TO US. SENATORS and CONGRESSMEN _1, Organize into a group willing ta save America by simultaneous action, 2. Outlaw. Communism. 3. Make treason during peace time a crime punishable by death, 4 Outlaw the Anti-Defamation League, American Jewish Congress and American Jewish Committee. TO STATE: LEGISLATORS IN THE 48 STATES: i meee, ins Isadore Jack Martin Liaison Man White House and Congress Alfred G. Katzin in charge of all U. N.. Personnel tiles with Jewish immigrants from Europe and Asia. ‘c) To consume the money of the American Gentile population by the direct and indirect taxes Necessary to pay the interest to the Jew- ish international bankers on the national debt and to pay national budgets brought about by the cost of the wars and the preparation for wars. id) To enforce non-segregation In order that intermarriage of white and colored races (which s ] colored offspring) will be 5 eSlUts in I echt about and thus cause the passing of the white race, which race the Jews consider their only obstacle to the fulfillment. of, their. proto- cols plot, as they feel their superior intelligence (as they call it) will enable them to easily rile over a world of colored races. fe) To set aside our Constitution by means of Bee Simon E. Sobeloff District Federal Judge Vice Pres. A.J.C. Rabbi Hillel Silver Top Zionist Powerful in Washington of the country would inform the people. Papers daily speak of the world crisis yet not one of the regular commercial dailies has the guts to come out with the truth of the Jew plot. They would lose some Jewish advertising dollars__ so better to have wars and the dissolution of the United States and the passing of the white race than to lose those precious Jewish advertising dollars. The newspapers need to also arrange a simultaneous exposure of the plot. 49, Jews ‘brought on World War 11 and — its aftermath, had us fight it in order to re move the two barriers, Germany and Japan from Russian expansion in order to make the present World crisis. 50. The Jews caused the stooge TRUMAN - ACHESON gang to build up Russia to present. a threat to the United States which they could then use to put the United States in a military Wolfe Ladeljinsky Russian-born Jew, in Foreign Oper. Adm. Maxwell Abbell Committee to Prevent Discrimination law treaty with the United Nations and then se} up World Government te the Whrited Watlons which will be a Jewish world govern- ment (f) In any world’ governmeht we will have 7 per eent of the vote, being 7 per cent of the world’s population, They will outvote us and will ship millions of black and yellow people Into the United States and with non-segrega- tlon laws, the white race will melt away, which is tuc Jew plan, (g) Fair Employment Practices Commission, FEPC, the Genocide treaty, the Human Rights Convenant, and Universal Military Training are all Jewish Communist measures pushed by the Jewish controlled United Nations, (li) Y..P.C. is to force employers to hire Com- munists and colored people with no freedom of eholee, in order to break down white control of Industry, and also to bring about intermarriage of whites and colored by non-segregation in im: dustry, t further the wiping out of the white yace. @) The Genocide treaty could force you to be Meyer Kestnbaum Chairman, Comm. on Intergoy. Relations Gen. Curtis E. LeMay. Vice Chief of Staff U, S. Air Force way. 51, Bhe Jews caused F,.D. ROOSEVELT to give Manchuria and Poland to the Communists and to divide Germany . , . . see the results. FRANKFURTER, directing the State Depart- ment, gave China to the Communists and sent General MARSHALL, their stooge, to spend 13 months breaking down enemies of Communism in China, 52. They caused the Korean war to follow by having the U.S. refuse to arm the South Kore- ans, although knowing Russia armed the North ' Koreans to the teeth, and by withdrawing our troops, and announcing we would not defend Korea. Colonel ALFRED G, KATZIN was U.N. representative to Korea, now in charge of all U.N. personnel, Why worry about Military sec- rets when Jews are in such key positions? od. This causéd the invasion they desired, then they threw our teoops im there wathdut con: | scnt of Congress, in violation of Public Law No. 26¢, but caused adoption of the policy whereby ~ Dr. Leo Pasvolsky Drafied U. N. Charter with Alger Hiss enough and the Russian H-bomb stockpile is built up enough so that Russia can win then the Jews will bring about World War 111 to exhaust the white race so that the remnants left will snbmit to world government in desperation, which will be a “Jewish World Government”, 59. They state they will then forbid the in- termarriage of whites with whites. Whites will be allowed only to marry colored peoples in order to dissolve the white race, =e J. Irwin Shapiro Head of State Dept. of Investigation 60. After they get the United Nations “Human Rights Covenant” passed, which gives all mem- ber governments the right’ to impose martial law if they consider thy threatened, they will have their Russian friends perpetrate an event which they will call, a national threat. enabling the government to put the United States under martial law, and then you will actually have in “David Morse Director General of International Labor Org. ” Morris Wolf Gen. Counsel; Foreign Ls dictatorship strait-jacket, which. is fast on the being ia RC EE which is now al- inthe ower but. has not yet, pull- ed the strings. 61, EISENHOWER is completely subserv- ient to the Jewish Plotters and is carrying for- ward their Protocols Plot steadily. That is why: (a) He wants the United Nations to be able to set aside our Constitution, which will bring the destruction of America, and the setting up of Jewish World Government under the United Nations. (b) He proposed and secured passage of treat- jes making our soldier boys subject to foreign courts, Surely he cares naught about protecting our American boys. : (c) He refused. to blockade Red China, (d) He reiused to cut off aid being given to our so-called ailies, who were trading with Red China, an (e) He retused ty enable CHIANG KAISHEK io invade the mainland, : ¥ Operations Administration Manly Fleischman Defense Prod. Adm. under Truman Nathan Feinsinger Chairman Truman's Wagp Stabilization Board has appointed a committee to study it, which committee he has handpicked of those in favor of it, and appointed JULIUS ADLER, a Jew, a: Chairman. : 62, Eisenhower has moved the Jews into top position in our government, in readiness for the day when they will “snap the trap.” (a) He has appointed Jew LEWIS L. STRAUSS as Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission. STRAUSS is a member of KUHN, LOEB CO., investment bankers, (b) He has appointed Jew ARTHUR F. BURNS his Economic Advisor. (2) He has appointed Jew MEYER ROBERT GUGGENHEIM, Ambassador to Portugal. (dq) He has appointed Jew LOUIS ROTH: SCHILD, Chairman of the Maritime Board. Samuel Klaus Intelligence Division, State Dept. Isidore Lubin Mastermind on German Reparations (e) He appointed Jewess FREDA HENNOCK, Federal Communications, Commissioner, — (f) He has appointed Jew SAMUEL B. GRONER, Assistant Federal Communications Commissioner. (g) He has appointed Jew MAX RABB, his White House Assistant. th) He has appointed Jew L. JACK MARTIN, liaison man between White House and Congress, (i) He has appointed Jew CLARENCE D. DILLON, (LAPOWSKI) Ambassador to France, 63. The Gentiles have been willing to share America with the Jews, but the Jews are not willing to share America with the Gentiles, The Jews want it all , and to make the Gentiles their slaves. 64. The Jews cry Anti-Semitism” whenever accused, but the correct name of Anti-Semitism is “Jew conscious.” If a group is guilty of a crime against others, then they should be decried as a group, just as you would decry the Capone gang, for the saine reason. Membera of Congress. Awaken now or you Murry Snyder Asst. Sec. of Defense Charge Public Relations Stuart Rothman Solicitor, Labor Dept. 1. Form groups of fellow Legislators willing to save America by taking simultaneous action. 2. Outlaw the Anti-Defamation League, American Jewish Congress and American Jewish Committee. 3. They have trained “Military Government Units” and in a trial run in nine cities moved in and imposed Martial Law in the name of the United Nations, This was a dress rehearsal for what is to come. 4. Eisenhower's reorganization of the defense system is the BARUCH Plan, which puts the final authority in one man, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, D. The State National Guard units everywhere have purposely been prevented from getting ammunition and equipment by the Federal Government, This is to prevent them from Tesisting the “take-over” when it comes. ‘Dr. tsadore Rabi Commissioner of Atomic Energy TO EVERYONE The most effective move anyone can Make to help preserve freedom in our beloved country is to read the PROTOCOLS carefully so you will know the plan, then make the Protocols avail: able to others. John Gates (Isriel Ragenstrich) Editor, Daily Worker ONE, (COPY. oS sa) te ee $1.00 mle (COPIES sa as oe ee $5, FIFTEEN COPIES — —. — $1000 Sent postpaid anywhere in the world. Quanity prices on request, We also urge you to read and circulate the Federal Reserve Conspiracy, price same as above. COPIES OF THIS SHEET MAY BE OBTAINED: 23: GOPIBS 2k +) =, =: 0G DOD: GORGES ee ee. Lok $3.00 BOO ‘GOPIBS io oo ee ee, ae LOLOD Order from CHRISTIAN EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATION 530 Chestnut St, Union, New Jersey WRITE FOR LIST OF PATRIOTIC BOOKS,
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 114

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_114.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 114
  • Text: By yesterday in the number of dations. said. However, the mayor said he doesn’t feel the lack of response is so much an unwillingness to integrate as it is an aversion to filling out a questionnaire. “A lot of people don’t like to be bothered with surveys and blank forms,” the mayor said. “I know I don’t.” Replies Tabulated Barnard’s comments yesterday followed a tabulation Thursday night of replies to a request for desegregation mailed late last week and early this week. The request was mailed to es- tablishments offering “public ac- commodations, particularly res- taurants, hotels, motels, theaters and bowling alleys, some of which have already integrated. The request followed a meeting last week between the City Coun- cil and a committee of Ne- jgro leaders. The Negroes were particularly interested in obtain- ing a list of places that would of- fer services to them so that they would not be embarrassed by be- ing refused service. The request for desegregation asked for returns only from per- sons who would comply with the request and not from those who would not. Three Against Returns tabulated Thursday in-|; ‘\eluded 12 from restaurants, in-}) cluding one which said it would ‘|not desegregate, and 16 from ho-|: two of which) tels and mofels, ‘}were against it. Bariard Is 1 pis eet ge nt egra Public Accommodations Questionnaires Checked Mayor James L. Barnard expressed disappointment replies received to the City Council’s call for desegregation of public accommo- “Tt was a little less than I expected. I had hoped more firms would let us know how they stand,’’ Barnard However, Barnard said the sig- nificant figure is not that 11 res- taurant owners said they would open their facilities and only one who did not reply. motels. questionnaire could mean most of those not replying are against integration but the mayor doesn’t think this is so. Already In Even though it had been less than a week when returns were tabulated, Barnard said the bulk of the replies the city is going to receive is already in. When the council met with the Negro committee an agreement was made to meet again in two results. In the absence of more conclu- sive returns, which are not ex- pected, Barnard indicated the council will have to take another approach, probably by meeting with owners of the motels, hotels and restaurants. said no, but the large number Requests were mailed to 175) restaurants and 117 hotels and A strict interpretation of the i weeks (next week) to review the Goi Ré ice < Weep z , appointed Qo nse
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 20, Folder 1, Document 103

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_020_001_103.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 20, Folder 1, Document 103
  • Text: July 27, 1963 Honorable Ivan Allen Jr, Mayor of Atlanta Sir: The enclosed factual information ought to shed some light unon the issues of to-day. Please read’ very carefully before you decide to follow the false prophets. The same elements who misused the peasants in destroying the mighty Russian empire are using the Negro to destroy America, so they can rule the ONE World as masters. EVERY AMERICAN SHOULD KNOW THAT THE NAACP was financed and underwritten from the beginning by the Zionist Rosenwald family and communist Gar- land Fund, Zionist Arthur Spingarn is president of NAACP, Zionist Herbert Lehman is Director of NAACP, he Has~ IO communist - front citations. Zionist Felix Frankfurter was the attorney for NAACP, President Theo. Roosevelt called him comrade of Lenin and Trotsky. W.E.B.DuBois,founder of NAACP, has 72 communist- front citations, Other officers of the NAACP who have belonged to communist fronts are: Dr. Ralph Bunche I2 citations Channing Tobias 50 citations Thurgood Marshall 5 citations Roy Wilkins 8 citations Mex Lerner 435 citations E. Roosevelt I07 citations Bishop G.B. Oxnam 36 citations. There many more... Loyal Americans do not join NAACP, only dupes: or traitors.They will help our enemies: to betray America into the hands of ONE WORLD schemers,. Yours truly For Christ and Country DON'T Disarm Today...» You'll Die Tomorrow! DON'T Be The Tool For U.N. ONE-WORLD RULE!
  • Tags: Box 20, Box 20 Folder 1, Folder topic: Letters expressing dislike for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021