Search (111 results)

Applied Filters (Reset)

  • Tags = Box 3 Folder 17

Filters

Result Types

Item Types

Tags

Featured

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 52

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_052.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 52
  • Text: CIRCULATION 422-5370 aT es Sal: Ailanta’s Newspaper Of Distinction 40 Fi Paying Visit to Nortl An international bus filled with 40 Ameri- can Field Service students from 25 countries will arrive at Peachtree Presbyterian Church _ today, Jilly 3, at 1 p.m. Its passengers have spent a year as members of families and as stu- dents of local high schools in communities across the United States. Activities planned for the teenage visitors include old-fashioned Fourth of July picnics, the | annual parade, and sightseeing. On Saturday, because they wish to learn about our urban and social problems, they will be taken on a tour of a poverty area, a communi-. RN AMY his in nares een edhentintininaimitiinieniemesesinateamcen* ty center and an urban renewal area. The tour will begin at 2 p.m. at the KOA center, 486 Deca- tur St. Shopping Center, “== ’ Bus Number 48 is one of 74 touring buses enroute to Washington D.C.,-where over 3,040 AFS students will have a final meeting before returning to their own countries. The end-of- year bus trip exposes the students to more of the United States than they would otherwise see from their home communities. Over 25,000 families in over 650 communities host bus trip Students. Handling all the arrangements for the So eta a mst aie ATLANTA, GEORGIA, THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1969 bus stop in Atlanta is Mrs. Harry L. Holloman of Sandy Springs. The American Field Service conducts Inter- national Scholarship Progrants for students 16 ta 18 years of age from many nations, A non- ° profit organization with no religious or political affiliations, it seeks to foster understanding of the differences and similarities which exist among peoples of the world. To accomplish this aim there are two Ameri- ' ean Field Service Programs: One, Students to the U.S., in 1968-69 has brought more than . 3000 students from 61 countries to live, study and join in community life in the United States. The other, Americans Abroad, in the current year has sent over 1400 students to 48 coun- . tries overseas for an equivalent experience. ‘from 75 countries have participated in the AFS | In the past 21 years, over 47,000 students eran AFS has 40 overseas offices and volunteer Chapters throughout the U.S.
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 51

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_051.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 51
  • Text: THE ATLANTA INQUIRER RLY 12, 1869 EOA Plays Big Rele life Presents A Brighter Side To 1-Year-Old Sharon For nearly I3. years, Sha- , -ron Dennis” parents, bro- , thers, sisters ami friends _ thought she was retarded. ~~ She did not attemd school. She could not talk. And she could not understand what was said to her. Today however. she goes to school, and plays at the Suiu-Mec EOA Center beca- use of the work afMrs, Ber- nice Miller, an EQA Neigh- borhood Service Aide. She found that Sharem was not mentally retarded but almost deaf, The 15-year-old black youngster from the Mechan- fcsville area of Atlanta liv- ed with almost 20 family “members in a painfully cro- wded 31/2 room house on Georgia Avenue. Her family, like countless impoverished bkack fami- lies, earns less than $2000 ayear, — covered Sharon but she learned that her mother had anearnestdesire to enroll the child in some school, She did not however, know the proper procedure. The aide recom- mended her mother send Sharon to anearby EOA Cen- ter until plans could be com- pleted. The mother agreed, But Mrs. Miller’s work with EOA required that she - temporarily leave Sharon and Mrs. Harritt Darnell, a Home Service Technician at the Summerhill-Mechanics- ville Center, kept in touch with the child by frequent vi- sits to her home and by gi- ving helpful suggestions to her mother. When Mrs. Miller visited .- the k home, she not only dis- ~ In 1968, Mrs. Miller re- entered Sharon's life and _discovered that she still had: “Snot been enrolled in any school, Immediately, she contacted the Bryant School for a psychological test, the Butler Health Center for a physical examination and Milton Avenue School for possible acceptance, All went favorably, The school putSharon inan age-grouping since there is no grading system and im- mediately Sharon became in- volved in physical skills, grooming and oral expres- sion, Hopefully she will ul- timately write understand- ably. Her progress since 1968 has been commendable, Sharon still lives at the -crowded Georgia Avenue ad-
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 41

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_041.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 41
  • Text: # i fi > oh a a fi & a Aaa cy ys i VRE ES a vied Implementation of a sum- mer feeding program. which will provide mini-meals to an estimated 70,009 Atlanta « children before the summer is over, began Monday. M. Agnes Jones Eleinentary School, located on Fair Street in southwest Atlanta. is one of 12 Atlanta schools selected to serve as a food preparation and distribution point. The between-meal supple- ments which will be trucked Fhe Le eo ry oad oe | se WA Ay eel iS ma FN OP twice a day to parks and play- lots, will consist of such items as milk, sandwiches, fruits, breads and juice. A number of West End supervised playlots and recreation centers are among the 100 to partici- pate in the program. Among those already being served in West ind are Oak- land City East, Howell Park. West End Park, and Commu- ° nity of Hope. More will be added as the program gets into full swing. che: a - Atlants is one of the tirst cities in the nation to take advantage of the new feeding program made available by the US Department of Agri- ‘culture’s ‘Special Food Ser- vice Program for Children.” Atlanta’s program is reported. to be the largest in the nation. Although USDA provides most of the funds and food for this program, its actual oper- ation is the result of coopera- tion and hard work by offi- cials of the city, the Atlanta Board of Edueation, theAt- lanta Parks and Recreation Department and _Economic «Opportunity. Atlanta, “The “said” Mike Ray. “who is with EOA and is coordinating the ~stiimer feeding program. Ray said that * ‘although the program is ready to go, we are low on supplies of card- board boxes and sandwich bags.’’ He said he hopes local industries will contribute boxes and -sandwich bags. “That way, all of the USDA finds could be spent on food for these needy children,” he said. The Campbell Foundation of Atlanta has already con- tributed $10,000 to the summer project to help pay for personnel needed to pre- oA Meg —— A Ce K
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 28

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_028.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 28
  • Text: 8 THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION, Friday, June 27, 1969 Continued from Page I time, but we were never divorced. I would like to know if I can draw his Social Security. I am 53, have no means of support and am not able to work. — Mrs. A. R. . Ifyou are disabled, you can probably draw Social Security, provided that you meet the other requirements. The fact that you were separated from your husband will not affect your case: Check with your local Social Security office. Can a Fulton County dog catcher came onto private prep- erty to remove a dog?—L. G. F. Not if he doesn’t have the permission of the owner of the _ property. a : Tf interested in the Rent-a-Kid program. I have a lot of work to be done around my house, and I'd like to get some youngsters to do it. Can you tell how I can get in touch with this pregram?—M. C., East Point. To employ one of these youngsters, you may call the Rent- a-Kid office at 577-5522. They are between the ages of 14 and 16 : and perform the traditional summertime clean-up, fix up jobs. They also do baby sitting. The baby sitters get 75 cents an hour in the daytime and $i an hour at night. The fixup, clean-up youngsters earn $1.35 an hour. The program is sponsored hy £04. ee _ How does Georgia rank in land area among the Soufhieast- ern states?—Q.M. , Smyrna. - Georgia is the largest state east of the Mississippi River, with a total land area of 58,876 square miles. es
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 50

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_050.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 50
  • Text: ATLANTA DAILY WORLD * SUNDAY JULY 13, 1969 Head-Starters Visit: Six Flags Over Georgia For 85 children at the Bowen Homes Day Care Cent- er, 1 of 10 Full-Year Head Start Centers funded by Ec- onomic. Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. and a component of The Gate City Day Nursery As- sociation--A DREAM came true on July 1, For many weeks these children had dreamed of a trip to SIX FLAGS OVER GEORGIA, Thanks to hundreds of won- derful people throughout the State of Georgia who sent S & HGreen Stamps, checks and dollar bills and other good wishes, f These children, who might not have had this opportunity at any time in the immediate future, had a real ‘‘HOLI- DAY,"* and ohe ofthe Best parts about it all-their par- ents were able to share the experience. From the time the group boarded 2 Atlanta Transit Chartered buses until the return trip to the Center, these children and their par- ents ¢xperienced one of the happiest days of their lives, Thanks to all who respond- ed to the Appeal, People do care about those they do not know. The Community really came through and Head Start will label it - ‘In-Kind Con- tributions’’ - but the parents and children call it FUN, EX CITEMENT, HAPPINESS ana say THANKS A MILLION to the hundreds of people who are responsible for this “"ALL EXPENSE PAID TRIP to SIX FLAGS OVER GEOR- GIA ate
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 3
  • Text: CITY OF ATLANTA CITY HALL ATLANTS, GA. 30303 Tel, 522-4463 Area Cod May 26, 1969 e rea Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison MEMORANDUM To: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. From: Dan Sweat 5h Subject: Attached letter from New York Urban Coalition on Summer NYC Jobs I had a call from Washington a few days ago asking how many NYC slots we would like for this summer. We had anticipated 250. I suggested that we would be able to effectively use 675 which was the final total we reached last summer, Since that time, we have received word that 675 slots have been approved. The U. S. Department of Labor has been fair with us in my Opinion in giving us these slots. I don't really feel like we should have to help fight New York's battle. The problem is that New York is in a class all by itself and the number of jobs they need staggers the imagination, You will notice they are talking about upwards to 100,000 jobs. They have 55,000 approved. Unless you just want to support a general demand for more slots, as we have done in the past, I would recommend no action. DS :fy Jb You Sra ble Ca
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 15

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_015.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 15
  • Text: \ THE VOICE-June 29, 1969-Page 11 a Themes And Variations By Xernona Claytor ----- Two highly ‘capable’ ‘Negro male Atlantans were promoted to top positions last week, William Allison, former deputy director.o of EOA (Equal Opportunity Atlanta), was promoted to Director to succeed Jim Parham who resigned to assume a new. post, “‘Bill’s” competence is commensurate with the requirements of the job--- Kelvil Wall has been named a vice-President of the Coca- Cola Company and becomes the first man “‘of color”’ to occupy sucha seat, Mr, Wall possesses qualities which match the occasion, When black men receive their de- served and earned positions, each of us shares thepride of such recognition for it is a comfort to know that racism doesn’t “‘always’’ prevail, This columnist congratulates these two men who obviously Bove both natural and ac~ , quired abilities!! =
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 49

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_049.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 49
  • Text: Health Fair | In Vine City “A stitch in time saves nine” is the word around the Vine City Foundation Medi- cal Clinic wher a Health Fair will be held July15from 12 noon to 9 p.m, The clinic is located at 558 Magnolia Street, N.W. The clinic is being spon- sored by Mrs. Griffin of EOA and Mrs, Helen Howard of the Vine City Foundation and both advise, ‘*Don’t check out; get a checkup, Pleasedo your -— thing.’’ Free refreshments to everyone, For information, call 523- 8112,
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 85

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_085.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 85
  • Text: FCr PELRASE UCN DELIVE FY TO TEE FEDRUARY 19, 1969 CCNGRES! CF Tin SMITEL OTATF. OFFICE OF THE WHITE HOUSE FRESS SECRETARY THE WHITE HOUSE TO THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES: Economic Cpportunity Act The blight of poverty requires priority attention. It engages our hearts and challenges our intelligence, It cannot and will not be treated lightly or indifferently, or without the most searching examination of how best to marshal the resources available to the Federal Government for combatting it. At my direction, the Urban Affairs Council has been conducting an intensive study of the nation's anti-poverty programs, of the way the anti- poverty effort is organized and administered, and of ways in which it might be made more effective. That study is continuing. However, I can now announce a number of steps I intend to take, as well as spelling out some of the considerations that will guide my future recommendations. The Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 is now scheduled to expire on June 30, 1$7¢, The present authorization for appropriations for the Office of Economic Cpportunity runs only until June 30, 1969. I will ask Congress that this authorization for appropriations be extended for another year. Frior to the end of the Fiscal Year, I will send Congress a com- prehensive proposal for the future of the poverty program, including recommendations for revising and extending the Act itself beyond its scheduled 1970 expiration, How the work begun by CEO can best be carried forward is a subject on which many views deserve to be heard -- both from within Congress, and among those many others who are interested or affected, including especially the poor themselves. Fy sending my proposals well before the Act's 1970 expiration, I intend to provide time for full debate and discussion, In the maze of anti-poverty efforts, precedents are weak and knowledge uncertain, These past years of increasing Federal involvement have begun to make clear how vast is the range of what we do not yet know, and how fragile are projections based on partial understanding. But we have learned some lessons about what works and what does not, The changes I Propose will be based on those lessons and those discoveries, and rooted in a determination to press ahead with anti-poverty efforts even though individual experiments have ended in disappointment. From the experience of OFO, we have learned the value of having in the Federal Government an agency whose special concern is the poor. We have learned the need for flexibility, responsiveness, and continuing innovation. We have learned the need for management effectiveness, Even those most thoroughly committed to the goals of the anti-poverty effort recognize now that much that has been tried has not worked. The CEO has teen a valuetis,fount of ideas and enthusiasm, but it has suffered from a confusion of roles, <2 = OEO's greatest value is as an initiating agency -- devising new proyrams to help the poor, and serviny as an "incubator" for these programs during their initial, experimental phases. One of my aims is to free OEO itself to perform these functions more effectively, by providing for a greater concentration of its energies on its innovative role. Last year, Congress directed that special studies be made by the Executive Eranch of whether Head Start and the Job Corps should continue to ke administered directiy by OEO, or whether responsibility should be otherwise assigned, Section 309 of the Vocational Education Amendments of 1968 provides: "The Fresident shall make a special study of whether the responsibility for administering the Head Start program established under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 should continue to be vested in the Director of the Cffice of Economic Cpportunity, should be transferred to another agency of the Government, or should be delegaied to another such agency pursuant to the provisions of section 602(d) of the aforementioned Econornic Opportunity Act of 1964, and shail submit the findings of this study to the Congress not later than March 1, 1969," Ihave today submitted this study to tne Congress. Meanwhile, under the Executive authority provided by the Economic Opportunity Act, Ihave ~directed that preparations be made for the delegation of Head Start to the Department of Health, Education and Welfare. Whether it should be actually transferred is a question I will take up in my later, comprehensive message, along with my proposals for a permanent status and organizational structure for CEO, Fending a final decision by the Secretary of HEW on where within the department responsibility for Head Start would be lodged, it will be located directly within the Office of the Secretary. In order to provide for orderly preparation, and to ensure that there is no interruption of programs, I have directed that this delegation be made effective July 1, 1969. By then the summer programs for 1969 will all have been funded, and a new cycle will be beginning. I see this delegation as an important element in a new national commitment to the crucial early years of life, Head Start is still experimental, Its effects are simply not known -- save of course where medical care and similar services are involved. The results of a major national evaluation of the program will be available this Spring, It must be said, however, that preliminary reports on this study confirm what many have feared: the long term effect of Head Start appears to be extremely weak. This must not discourage us. To the contrary it only demonstrates the immense contribution the Head Start program has made simply by having raised to prominence on the national agenda the fact -- known for some time, but never widely recognized -- that the children of the poor mostly arrive at school age seriously deficient in the ability to profit from formal education, and already significantly behind their contemporaries. It also has been made abundantly clear that our schools as they now exist are unable to overcome this deficiency. In this context, the Head Start Follow-Through Frogram already 4 delegated to HEW by OFO, assumes an even greater importance, MORE hs In recent years, enormous advances have been made in the understanding of human development. We have learned that intelligence is not fixed at birth, but is largely formed ty the environmental influences of the carly formative years. It develops rapidly at first, and then more slowly; as much of that development takes place in the first four years as in the next thirteen. YV'e have learned further that environment has its grestest impact on the development of intelligence when ihat development is proceeding most rapidly -- that is, in those earliest years. This means that many of the problems of poverty are traceable directly to early childhood experience -- and that if we are to make genuine, long- range progress, we must focus our efforts much more than heretofore on those few years which may determine how far, throughout his later life, the child can reach. Recent scientific developments have shown that this process of early childhood development poses more difficult problems than had earlier been recognized -- but they also promise a real possibility of major breakthroughs e0on in our understanding of this process. Ey plecing Head Start in the Department of HEW, it will be possible to strengthen it by association with a wide range of other early development programs within the department, and also with the research programs of the National Institutes of Health, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Much of our knowledge is now, But we are not on that ground absolved from the responsibility to respond to it. So crucial is the matter of early growth that we must make a national commitment to providing all American children an opportunity for healthful and stimulating development during the first five years of life. In delegating Head Start to the Department of HEW, I pledge myself to that commitment. The Vocational Education Amendments of 1968 directed the Commissioner of Education to study the Job Corps in relation to state vocational education programs. I have directed the Secretaries of Labor and of Health, Education, and Welfare, and the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Manpower, to work with the Acting Commissioner of Education in preparing sucha report for submission to Congress at the earliest opportunity. One of the priority aims of the new Administration is the development by the Department of Labor of a comprehensive manpower program, designed to make centrally available to the unemployed and the under- employed a full range of Federal job training and placement services. Toward this end, it is essential that the many Federal manpower programs be integrated and coordinated, Therefore, as a first step toward better program management, the Job Corps will be delegated to the Department of Labor. For the Department, this will add another important manpower service component. For the Job Corpsmen, it will make available additional training and service opportunities. From the standpoint of program management, it makes it possible to coordinate the Job Corps with other manpower services, especially vocational education, at the point of delivery. The Department of Labor already is deeply involved in the recruitment, counseling and placement of Job Corpsmen. It refers 80 percent of all male and 45 percent of all female enrollees; it provides job market information, and helps locate Job Corpsmen in the areas of greatest opportunity, MORE -4- This delegation will also be made effective on July 1, 1969; and the Departinents of Interior and Agriculture will coniinue to, have operating responsibility for the Job Corps centers concerned primarily with conservation. I have directed that preparations be made for the transfer of two other programs from GEC to the Department of Eealth, Education, and Welfare; Comprehensive Health Centers, which provide health service to the residents of poor neighborhoods, and Foster Grandparents program. In my judgment, these can be better administered at present, or in the near future, within the structure of the Department, In making these changes, 1 recognize that innovation costs money ~~ and that if CEO is to continueits effectiveness as an innovating agency, adequate funds must be made available on a continuing basis. Moreover, it is my intent that Community Action Agencies can continue to be involved in the operation of programs such as Head Start’at the local level, even though an agency other than CEO has received such programs, by delegation at the national level. It also is my intent that the vital Community Action Frograms will be pressed forward, and that in the area of economic development CEO will have an important role to play, in cooperation with other agencies, in fostering community-based business development. One of the principal aims of the Administration's continuing study of the anti-poverty effort will be to improve its management effectiveness. When poverty-fund monies are stolen, those hurt most are the poor -~- whom the monies were meant to help. When programs are inefficiently administered, those hurt most again are the poor. The public generally, and the poor especially, have a right to demand effective and efficient management, I intend to provide it. I expect that important economies will result from the delegation of the Job Corps to the Department of Labor, and we shall continue to strive for grater efficiency, and especially for greater effectiveness in Head Start. A Concentrated Management Improvement Program initiated in OEO will be intensified, Under this program selected Community Action Agencies will be required to take steps to devise improvements in such areas as organizational structure, financial and accounting systems, personnel training and work scheduling, Standards will be applied under the "management improvement program'to evaluate the operations of Community Action Agencies, We intend to monitor these programs actively in order to ensure that they are achieving high-level effectiveness and that they are being administered on an orderly basis. In the past, problems have often arisen over the relationship of State, county and local governments to programs administered by OEO. This has particularly been the case where the State and local officials have wanted to assume greater responsibility for the implementation of the programs but for various reasons have been prevented from doing so. I have assigned special responsibility for working out these problems to the newly-created Office of Intergovernmental Relations, under the supervision of the Vice Fresident. I have directed the Urban Affairs Council to keep the anti-poverty effort under constant review and evaluation, seeking new ways in which the various departments can help and better ways in which their efforts can be coordinated. My comprehensive recommendations for the future of the poverty program will be made after the Urban Affairs Council's own initial study is completed, and after I have reviewed the Comptroller General's study of OEO ordered by Congress in 1967 and due for sulsmission next month, ° a 5 a Meanwhile, I would stress this final thought: If we are to make the tmiost of experimental programs, we must frankly recognize thcir experimental nature and frankly acknowledge whatever shortcomings they develop. To do so is not to belittle the experiment, but to advance its essential purpose: that of finding new ways, better ways, of making progress in areas still inadequately understood. We often can learn more from a program that fails to achieve its purpose than from one that succeeds, If we apply those lessons, then even the "failure" will have made a significant contribution to our larger purposes, I urge all those involved in these experimental programs to bear this in mind--- and to remember that one of the primary goals of this Administration is to expand our knowledge of how best to make real progress against those social ills that have so stubbornly defied solution. We do not pretend to have all the answers. We are determined to find as many as we can. The men and women who will be valued most in this administration will be those who understand that not every experiment succeeds, who do not cover up failures but rather lay apen problems,frankly and construc- tively, so that next time we will know how to do better. In this spirit, I am confident that we can place our anti-poverty efforts on a secure footing -- and that as we continue to gain in understanding of how to master the difficulties, we can move forward at an accelerating pace, RICHARD NIXON THE WHITE HOUSE, February 18, 1969, Hae
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 91

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_091.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 91
  • Text: Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. O A\ 101 Marietta Street Bldg. e Atlanta, Georgia 30303 e 525-6854 T. M. Parham Executive Administrator March 7, 1969 Mr. David C. Cowley, Director Human Relations Commission Ann Arbor, Michigan Dear Mr. Cowley: his is isn reply to your letter of February 24, for information roge.dince child care plans for low-income and working mothers. Yhe Community Action Agency, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. was faced with this dilemma at the very beginning of the pro- gram since Atlanta has a large number of po ewe working mothers who ave heads of households. We began by going to voluntary agencies, churches, civic organi-- zations, etc., which were based in low-income areas and asking. these organizations to consider organizing Cay care centers for low-income families. We are now contracting with ten (10) autonomous ageneies which are under contract to run eleven (11) centers caring for 715 children between the aces of six months zo nine years. Ninety percent ‘90%) of the ch:.ldren are be- tween the ages of 3-6 yours. ‘ Originally, we were running as straight day care agencies and charged a fee per family based on family income. About fifteen “percent (15%) of our income was derived from fees. ‘Twenty per- cent (20%) came from the community in the form of voluntary ser- vices or in-kind contributions. , The rest of our income came from Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) funds. It is to be noted that we may rent at only one facility, the rest of our housing is donated. We are using facilities in five churches, three housing projects, two remodeled houses and one warehouse. The cost per child is from $75 to $90 per month. Mr. David C. Cowley Page 2 March 7, 1969 ‘ About two and one-half or three years ago, we were incorporated into full-year, eleven hour, head start. The major changes were in the improved ratio of adult to child and extended medical services. As of April 1968, OEO had us discontinue charging fees. ; Our present structure consist of a coordinating headquarters staff including a director, assistant director, program coordi- nator, volunteer coordinator, and program evaluator. There is an overall Policy Advisory Committee consisting of parents, parent representatives, interested professionals and members of the local community. Each Child Development Center is sepa- rately incorporated as an autonomous agency with its own board and staff. Within the guidelines as set forth in the Head Start Manual, each board sets its own program of -instruction, personnel policies, parent organization, etc. Each must raise its twenty percent (20%) community contribution, We have had central recruitment and training of volunteers. We handle purchasing and finance centrally through the Community Action Agency. Also each program is reviewed centrally for quality contro? and improvement of operation. We have availed ourselves extensively of stafi’ training opportunities afforded us through OFO. We also have regular in-service training. We were faced with many serious problems from the outset, many of which are still not resolved. Because our local boards ‘were made up largely of the poor with little or no community experience, many errors in judgment were made in handling funds, staff selection, and social services. Time and experience has helped somewhat but we still have a long way to go. Another area of concern is the lack of qualified staff. Our state offers no certification for pre-school teachers and there is very little training through the local colleges, although the Atlanta Board of Education has inaugurated an extensive program of evening classes for people in day care on a non-credit, low fee basis. Perhaps our greatest handicap is insufficient funds Mr. David C. Cowley Pagé 3 March. 7, 1969 to attract top quality staff and to extend our services. The estimate is that 10,000 low-income children need day care and we are providing for only 715. I hope our experience has been useful to you. I wish you well in your enterprise. Yours truly, (Mrs:) Gloria S. Gross Consultant in Child Development GSG/jm ec: Mr. T. M. Parham Mr. Dan Sweat
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 77

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_077.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 77
  • Text: PLEASE POST Position: Education: Experience: Salary Range: Job Description: Other Qualifications: Functional Responsibilities: PLEASE POST ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS PERSONNEL DIVISION ANNOUNCEMENT OF VACANCY January 30, 1969 Director Job Corps Skill Center Bachelors degree required; master's degree preferred. Must meet State Department of Education requirements for certification in Vocational Education, Three years vocational teaching experience. Broad industrial experience desired. B.S. Degree $13,723.80 -— $15,360.60 M.S. Degree $14,542.20 - $16,179.00 EDS. Degree $15,360.60 - $16,997.40 DR. Degree $16,179.00 - $17,815.80 Plans, organizes, and directs the educational program and administrative functions of the Skill Center. Reports to the Executive Director of Vocational-Technical and Adult Education. Must have extensive knowledge of the principles and methods of organiza- tion of course content, the principles and techniques of teaching and General school administration; knowledge of academic subjects and their place and value in a Vocational Education Program. Must have exceptional ability to plan, organize, and direct a school program of vocational instruction; to enlist, organize, and effectively use advisory committees. Must have considerable ability to evaluate instructional techniques, procedures, and equipment; present comments and opinions clearly and concisely; create and maintain cooperative relationships with others; and to anticipate, to analyze, and to prepare plans to meet needs and situations. Must have ability to apply budgetary principles, and to establish effective records and report systems. Plans, develops and administers programs to provide educational opportuni- ties and counseling for students, Cooperates with business, civic, and other organizations to develop curricula to meet needs and interests of students and community. Appoints advisory committee for each major instructional area, Establishes procedures, in cooperation with the Job Corps and Employment Security Agencies, for the recruitment registration, and placement of students, and supervises these activities. Interviews and recommends selection and placement of staff and faculty and other personnel necessary for operation of the Skill Center, Provides in- service training for instructors. Statement of Interest: Interviews: RHS/fm Supervises review and evaluation of course content and schedules, and revision as necessary to meet student and community needs. Prepares periodic budgets and determines allocation of funds within overall authorizations. Directs preparation of pamphlets, posters, news releases, and radio and television scripts to publicize and promote personnel recruitment and educational programs. Supervises collection and analysis of data from questionnaires, inter- views, and group discussions to evaluate curricula, teaching methods, and community participation in Skill Center programs. Establishes procedures for preparation of records and reports; for maintenance, accountability, and equipment, assigned to the Skill Center; and supervises these activities. Plans, develops, and administers physical educational program, recrea- tional program, and student residential program. Plans work of faculty committees and directs school safety program to include fire and emergency drills. Statement of Interest should be mailed to Mrs. Ruth Satterfield, Director of Recruitment and Placement, Personnel Division, 224 Central Avenue, S. W., Atlanta, 30303, no later than Friday, February 14, 1969. Applicants will be notified of date and time of interview.
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 83

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_083.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 83
  • Text: DR. JOHN W. LETSON JOHN F. STANDRIDGE SUPT. OF SCHOOLS Atlanta Public Schools EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR VOGATIONAL-TECHNICAL & ADULT EDUCATION 2930 Forrest Hills Dr. S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30315 MEMORANDUM February 20,1969 TO: Fulton County Delegation Advisory Committee Members Other Interested Parties FROM: John F. Standridge, Executive Director 7 Vocational—-Technical and Adult Education ‘ In order to meet the needs of students as well as the needs of business and industry, it is necessary to provide Vocational Education in various fields where the needs occur. More funds are needed in Vocational Education to help meet these needs. Programs which have ‘been authorized nationwide by the new 1968 Vocational Education Amendments and other Vocational Acts for the Fiscal Year 1970 amounts to $773,661,455. The President in his Budget Proposal for Fiscal Year 1970 requested only $286,377,455 which is $487,284,000 less than the authorization. Some of the programs that will be affected by this cut includes the Work Study Program, which provides needy students with part-time jobs while they are going to school. This program was completely eliminated from an authorization of $35,000,000. The Cooperative Education Programs were cut from $35,000,000 to $14,000,000. Programs for Students with Special Needs were completely eliminated from an authorization of $40,000,000 and Construction of Residential Vocational Schools was eliminated from an authorization of $55,000,000. These are just four of several programs that received cuts. However. these four programs are most significant if we are to eliminate the problems of unemployment and proverty in Atlanta and Fulton County. We are again asking your continued support of Vocational Education and that you enlist the support of Congressman Fletcher Thompson and Senators Richard Russell and Herman Talmadge requesting that they vote for the full appropriation. We understand that Congress will finalize the Budget Proposal shortly after the first of March so time is fleeting. We must have action now! JES: pf Serving the Atlanta and Gulton County School Systems
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 67

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_067.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 67
  • Text: ss te s = ie oa fae Two northside Atlanta teen-agers are spend- ing their summer without pay keeping up with 150 active, noisy children. “It’s hectic, but these kids ar-
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 70

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_070.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 70
  • Text: POVERTY AREAS: - Checkups. On Health Offered Free Think. you might have emphy- sema? Diabetes? High blood. pressure? These and other diseases will be the objects of a city wide “search and destroy”: mission sponsored by public and private health agencies. ’ Called ‘‘Health Fair,” the proj- ect is being conducted in 10 At- lanta neighborhoods throughout the summer. The free-of-charge program is designed primarily for poverty areas or areas served by a service center of Economic Opportunity Atlanta (EOA). “But the search certainly isn’t restricted to these areas, ac- cording to a spokesman for the Fulton County Health Depart- ment, which is participating in the program. The first neighborhood to re- ceive the special medical check-ups was-ihe Central City area. Some 250 persons were checked for high blood pressure, diabetes, tuberculosis, syphilis and chest diseases such as em- physema and bronchitis. ° The health department spokesman said the project, in its first year, is “just getting rolling. He said the project will pick up momentum as more and more persons learn of it. Mrs. Helen Howard, director of the - Vine--City- Foundation, said she expects more than 1,000 to show up for the health tests in the Nash-Washington neighborhood on Tuesday. The health department spckesman said the program was ‘‘a cooperative movement” which depends on the neighbor- hood residents themselves for its success. IF A PERSON is found to have any one of the ailments, ! he is first referred to his own physician fer medical treat- ment. A person who has no fam- ily doctor is referred to health agencies or Grady Memorial Hospital, the health department representative said. Other participating agencies include the Fulton County Medi- cal Society, the Georgia Depart- ment of Public Health, the American Red Cross, the At- lanta Tuberculosis Association, Model Cities, the Atlanta Diabe- tes Association and the City of Atlanta. VA
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 97

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_097.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 97
  • Text: April 10, 1969 Mrs. Mary Lu Mitchell Community Information Officer Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. 101 Marietta Street, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mary Lu: How about thinking about getting a little publicity in the Atlanta Magazine or through other media on our billboard program as soon as the EOA posters are put up. I am sure a lot of people wonder what they are all about, who's responsible for them, etc. If we could get a little publicity for Turner and Process Posters, it certainly would not be out of order since they have been so good to us. You might think of what we ought to gall these billboards - something like ''mini-boards", ‘people posters'', or "Neighborhood bulletin boards", Thanks for your help in advance. Sincerely yours, Dan Sweat
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 71

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_071.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 71
  • Text: Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. O A 101 Marietta Street Bldg. e Atlanta, Georgia 30303 e T. M. Parham Executive Administrator Boisfeuillet Jones, Chairman, Board of Directors, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. cordially invites you to a special briefing and tour for public officials and news representatives f on Friday, January 10, 1969 at 10:00 a. m. Bast Central EOA Neighborhood Center 486 Decatur Street, S. E. at Boulevard (back: side of shopping center). A bus to the neighborhood center will leave at 9:45 a. m. from 101 Marietta Street (between Spring and Cone) for those who want to leave their cars downtown. An early lunch will be served at the neighborhood center for those who wish to remain after the tour.
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 80

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_080.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 80
  • Text: February 12, 1969 Mr. Louis Hertz Louis Hertz Advertising Agency, Inc. 23:-Third Street, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia Dear Lou: Sorry that we have been unable to communicate in the past several weeks. If possible, we would like to use an EOA message on our signboards for the months of March and April and then shift to summer program advertising early in May. Mary Lu Mitchell has sketched out several ideas to publicize the EOA block club movement. We are open to your suggestions and advice. Sincerely yours, Dan Sweat DS :fy Enclosures
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_009.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 9
  • Text: WNéec, a Aerie 5, 1969 Mr. Charles Davis _ City Comptroller ' City Hall 3 Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Charles: RE: ABC Corps «- Casual Employees As you know, for-the past 18 months or more, the Sanitation Division of the City of Atlanta has been involved in a new project under the Atlanta Concentrated Employment Program called the Atlanta Beautification Corps. In this project, so-called hardcore, unemployed individuals have been utilized in special crews designed to collect trash and debris from side- walks, vacant lots, ployer ounces Parks, etc. in an attempt to keep these areas beautiful. The concept of the program was for the City to attempt to identify those members of the ABC Corps who could perform in regular City functions — and to assist them in finding fulltime employment. Our success has not been too great. To date, we have placed three of the former —- workers in regular City PoReOne at the City Garage. ' Because of cutbacks in Federal funding, the ABC Program is being reduced in the number of employees dmmediately by 25 as of Friday, May 2. Ralph Hulsey and his Sanitation people say that this program has been successful and that the ABC workers have performed a great service to the City of Atlanta. He has indicated he is in favor of continuing these people if possible. : It seems to me that since they have performed admirably in areas where they were badly needed by the City that we Should attempt to maintain the services of these 25 people in the Sanitary Division until at least the end of our summer Ta ata a ee en Mr. Davis Page Two April 5, 1969 F program period. This would give us an opportunity to make a further effort to place those who can meet qualifications in regular job slots, At the same time, during the crucial summer period we would have the advantage of the experience of these people in helping in special neighborhood clean-up projects and other special requirements which the summer pexiod brings. It is my understanding that Mr. Hulsey has requested that these 25 individuals be placed on a casual employee status with the Sanitary Division until August 31. I hope that you will support this recommendation and give us your help in having this done. Sincerely yours, Dan Sweat DS :fy
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 45

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_045.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 45
  • Text: EOA Forum on School S ag Turns Into Political Rally By JUNIE BROWN Atlanta Journal Educativn Editor An Economic Opportunity At- lanta {EOA) subcommittee meeting, which began as a forum for discussion of educa- tional complaints, ended as a Political rally. Despite EOA’s regulation about poiitica’ neutrality, two persons announced at the meet- ing that they are candidates for the Atlanta Board of Education and a third person advised those present to “begin political action to unseat certain board members.” The occasion was a meeting of the education sub- committee of EOA’s Citizens’ Central Advisory Committee Monday night at West Hunter Street Baptist Church. THE SUBCOMMITTEE meet-_ ing ostensibly was called to dis/ cuss a controversial report and set of recommendations for im- provements of the school sys- tem which the group had drawn up during the four years of its existence. _ j t Dr. John Letson, superintend. | ent of Atlanta schools, raised | the ire of subcommittee nce bers by rejecting an invitation to appear at the meeting and | discuss the report. Instead, three members of Letson’s staff fielded questions from those | present. i Early in the four-hour meet- ing, Mrs. June Cofer announced she will run for the board of ed- ‘ucation from the Ist Ward! against incumbent Ed Cook, and | Dennis Jackson said he wil? Le | a candidate for the 2nd Ward | seat held by Mrs. Anne Wood-' ward, ; The Rev. Mance Jackson, director of the Urban Mission Project in the ‘Lightning’ area of Atlanta sponsored by the In- terdenominational Theological Center, told subcommittee members they are “really too. patient with this bureaucratic | red tape.” “THE BOARD of education has no respect for us as a com- munity,” Jackson said. “We play white. people’s games year-in and year-out, and we get the runaround.” “T would hope we would even- tually get ito the point where we would not write letters and beg them to come. I recommend that the subcommiitee entertain political action to unseat those who won't come to see you,” Jackson said. “You sit in a most powerful position. You are not aware of the power you have. This sub- committee has the power to change the complexion of this whole city,”’ Jackson said. - to be in that job.’ Jackson said. “You beat ‘em te death on rapid transit, and you ean da it again,” Jackson said. JACKSON ALSO called for Dr. Darwin Womack assistant oy ‘ QWeun_ey enough in the planning of} schoo's, Dr. Womack respond- ed: ‘You won't like me for say- ing this, but the difficulty with bringing people into plan- | ning is that they want veto! He's doing paichwork planning. served. | power.’ They are just thinking about “Somebody ought to be rec-| “I think the community has | September, they’re not planning ommending as this man’s job;|the right to have veto power,” for the future of the commu- he’s not responsive to the needs | Jackson said. “And he ought to! | nity.” of the cominunity and ough! not Know that he. has to answer to’ Jackson said: “Every day you ,the people,” Jackson said of can hear ambulances coming down Bankhead Highway to pick up a child who’s been hit “IT’S QUITE obvious that by a car walking to school.” " He blamed the repeated accidents on “poor planning’ by Wom- ack’s office. Mrs. Maggie Moody chairman of the EOA subcommittee on ec- ucation, will take the report and the 13 recommendations before the full board of education Mon- day night at the reguiar monhtly br icfing session, building and construction, to be replaced when he refused to agree with the parents in the audience that enlarging Price High School would be detrimen- | tal. to the Negro neighborhood it: @ In answer to a compaint’ ' Womack. from committee members that! the community is not inv olved |
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 60

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_060.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 60
  • Text: They cared about nearly a hundred little Negro children they didn’t even know. They were stirred by the plight of little «rs who live skimpy lives in a shabby piri of-‘~vn, shut off from outings and expeditions and car- nival good times that are a part of growing up. And they did something about it. They sent over 500 books of green stamps, $5 checks and one dollar bills and $10 checksxend one $50 check so the children of Bower Homes Head Start day care center could go to Six Flags Over Georgia. The green stamp people themselves were moved by the desire of the children tp have a day-long outing at Six Feege sto csep sent 100,000 stamps, amounting to 60 books. “We haven't been able to think of the words to say thank you,” said Mrs. Frances Wyatt, director of the school. ‘We've been so busy opening the mail. It’s been a revelation to me. I didn’t know things like this happened. And Tina Usher Prepares to Devour Ice : Cream at Six Flags Celestina: Silley A Hundred Happy Kids Pride of country and pleasure in one’s countrymen would seem to be a good prescription for a Fourth of July holiday. Our founding fathers must have thought’ when the United States was a-borning that such a young, vital, idealist little country would be filled with citizens who like and enjoy and care about one another. . what from that dream. But for at least six or seven hundred readers of The Constiitution it’s true — and they should have the happiest possible celebration today. Alas, we grew and departed some- the children .. they are!”’ I did see. Bill Wilson, our photographer, and I went out to Six Flags. Don Daniel of the pub- licity staff met us and took us to the gate where the Bowen Homes Head Starters would be coming through. We saw them coming—&5 little dark-skinned youngsters, looking spruce and clean and combed and hair-ribboned and polished. They clung to the hands of mothers and teachers and volunteers, who, thanks to your generosity, were able to come along too. The turnstile gate was a bafflement to most of the children and Don explained it and helped them through it one at the time, murmuring words of encouragement and welcome, Once inside the children stopped and stood stock still, gazing in wonderment at little railroad trains chugging over a trestle, old-timey auto- mobiles driven by children along a big track, an Englishman ringing a bell, a band playing, great tubs of gardenias blooming and filling the air with perfume. They caught a glimpse of air-borne cable carts moving across the sky and the fine, ineffable fragrance of hamburg- ers rose from a nearby sandwich shop. They didn’t push or run about or squeal like most of the three-to-six-year-olds I know. They moved quietly, nudged along by the hands of adults, but their faces were alive with excite- ment and awe. When I left them they were to take a train ride. After that they had a mari- onette show and the musical revue at the Crys- tal Pistol before them. They were going to lunch at one of the score of eating places there —a “boughten” lunch, which was an entirely new experience or most of them. The center , had at first planned to take lunch but the money you all sent convinced them the chil- dren should have a totally glamorous day and I think they had it. And there are stamps left—so many that Mrs. Wyatt thinks the center may use them to buy a television set. All of you who helped ... have seen them, thanks enough - you should see how excited I wish you could too. It would have been
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021