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Box 5, Folder 6, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_006.pdf
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  • Title: Box 5, Folder 6, Complete Folder
  • Text: ATLANTA, GEORGIA PHONE 522- 4463 From Malcolm D. Jones, Housing Coordinator r143.215.248.55-4 ,£ l JJ,/",VJ/.::..U 'J..--_.,..__ ~ ~.?~ -£__ i~ _,_, JL,,~.t ~ -!..... ........ FO R M 25 - 15 -- ~ {-- - 73~ L~ . ~?- �NEW= TOWN =~N=TOWN .. .... �This document sets forth the basi c problems to be considered i n preparati on for the development of the New-Town-In-Town program i n the Federal Surplu s l and from the Federal Pen . The Schedules c ontained herein are opti mum and probably are too ti ght to be met by the agencies involved . However , this optimum s cheduling gives · the soundest bas i s for the consideration of differences between t he var iou s means of carrying out t he project. �_;; 1. Decisi ons Ne ces s ary to Develop Ne w- Town-In-Tmm Projects Who will a dmini ster the project ? a. Direct sale by HUD to Developer. b. HUD to City of Atlanta to Developer. ~ c. . HUD to Atlanta Housing Autho rity to Developer. ~ 2. Will di s position be for 221 (D) (3)) 202 only? 3, Who builds prima ry str eets and utilities? L . 4, a, Dev eloper. b. City. c. Atlanta Housing Authority. When are street locations to be pinned down? fl ... �Persons to be invol ved in these decisions? ,. ~~ ~ a. Members of the Planning i,Development Commi tte8 and Board of Aldermen. b. Mayor Ivan Allen c. Mr. John Edmunds d. Mr. M. B. Satterfi eld e. Mr. Edwi n Stern f. Mr. Frank Ethridge g. Mr. Colli er Gladdin h. Mr. Richard Case i. Atl anta Housing Authority Board of Commissioners j. Mr . Cecil Alexand er k. Col. Malcolm Jone s 1. Mr o Dan Sweat m. Mr. Edo Baxt er • , I �l.a. Direct Sale By HUD To Developers , 1. HU!ID states tha t they would expect the City to provide the land use plan) assurances as to public facilitie s, review the_developer s proposals. 2. HUD would need Bureau of Budget apprqval of the method of sale and would present the proposal to sell to the Bureau prior to making the award. Each of these steps would consume a minimum of approximately 30 days or a tota l of 60 days on this stage . 3. Under this method t he :Developer would put in the streets and utilities and this cos t would be r eflected in rent s or s ales prices. ' I 4. No non- cash credits i nvolved. 5. Fed. Pen • .to GSA to HUD i s based on certai n improvements (fen ces , etc.) which onl y HUD can finance . 6. Can HUD a cquir e the 4 non-gov 1 t owned parcel s ? Leave t hem out ? �l.a. Schedule Direct Sale IIDD to Developer Decisions Land Use Map Disposition Plan Relocation Plan 4cqui si tion Plan Project Improvements Plan Financing Plan Submit to the Bureau of the Budget for prior approval ~ Approval Select developer (advertise if necessary) Submit to the Bureau of the Budget for concurrence Concurrence Execute Contract Approval of FHA or Mortgagor of redevelopment Start Engineering Start Cons t r ucti on of Site impr ovements Complete Site Impr ovements sufficient to begin construction of Housing May May May May May May May 1, 1968 J, 1968 21, 1968 21, 1968 21, 1968 21, 1968 21_, 1968 May 21, 1968 June 21, 1968 July 21, 1968 July 21, 1968 Au gust 21, 1968 September 1, 1968 January 1, 1969 January 1, 1969 February 1 , 1969 June 15, 1969 Dur ing the interi m from July 21 to J anu ary 1, it will be necessary to acqui re the 4 pr ivately owne d parcels, r eloc at e the one fa mily and demolish the str ucture . �l.b. Sale from Goverrunent to Cit y to Developer 1. HUD clear with Bureau of Budget for sale direct to City - approximately 30 days. 2. City proceeds with l and use plan, decis ions as to provision for street s a.n.d utilo, determine method of s ale. 3. / of Method sal e as outlined by Asst . City Atty - Tom Choyce : 1. A res olution mus t be pa s s ed by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen s tating that the r eal estat e is no longer usef ul and n ecess ary to the Cit y and ordering the real es tate t o be sol d. Formality but must be done at a r egul ar Ald . meeting after a mee t i ng of P & D Com. 2. The Land Agent mus t cause a pl at of the pr operty to be made by a register ed l and surveyor. ~This mus t be done by any agent . AHA woµl d n eed about 20 days prior to cl os ing ). 3. The Land Agent must cause an appra isa l of t he property to be ma de by t he Atlant a Real Es t at e Board or a r eal estate appraiser who i s a member of t he American I ns t i tute of Re al Est ate Appr ai ser s . The apprai s a l must be pla ced in a s eal ed envel ope and turned over to t he t he Land Agent . L,.. The plat of the property al ong with the l egal de scription must be submi t t e d to t h e Purchasi ng Agent, who mus t a dvert ise for bids t o be submi tted for t he purchase of t he pr operty . 5. All bids mus t be opened and r ead a t t he desi gnated time by the Pur chasing Committ ee . The Purcha sing Commit t ee must t abul ate t he bids and ref er them to an. Al dermanic Committee . 6. The Committee must open the sealed appraisal and take t he appraisal into consideration in determining whether or not any of the bids shall �-2- be recommended for acceptance. This Committee must submit its final recommendation to the Mayor and Board of Aldermen for :f.nra:i determination. 4. City must find a way to purcha se the them out. 4 non-gov 1 t owned parcels or l eave �. 1. b. Schedule HUD to City of Atlanta to Developer Decisions Land Use Map Dispos ition Plan Acquisition Plan (4 pri vately owned par cel s as well as Federal Land ) Reloc ation Plan Project Improvements Plan Financing Plan Planni ng and Development Committee to make reco mmendations t o the Board of Aldermen in joint session with the Finance Committee Aldermani c Approval Order Survey and Des cription Appraisal s Ordered Advertise Recei ve Bids Board of Aldermen Approve Contract • Begin Construction of hous ing ·'k May 1, 1968 May 3, 1968 May 21, 1968 May May May May 21, 21, 21, 21, 1968 1968 1968 1968 May 27, 1968 June 3, 1968 June 3, 196e June 24, 1968 June 24, 1968 Au gus t 24, 1968 September 16, 1968 September 26, 1968 J anuary 26, 1969 ENGINEER ING AND SITE IMPROVIl'IENTS Engineering Let Site Improve ments Contract Complete S.I. suffici ent to begin Cons truction of hous ing Ju ne 3, 1968 1~~--lEJuly 21, 1968 December 6, 1968 September 16, 1968-:B~ Nove mber 1, 1968 · March 15, 19691*' This date would delay the start of cons truction from J anuary 26, 1969, to March 15, 1969. ~--lE- -:BH*' Engineeri ng start after selec tion of Toveloper. Engineering start before s election of .Tuveloper. �l.c. HUD to AHA to Developer l. Atlanta Housing Authority would use the normal urban renewal procedure through on and 'expe dited " basis. The schedule i s estimated on optimum time intervals as are the other schedules. 2. If the project puts in the basic streets and utilities, they would be constructed at project cost which could be more than offset by Noncash Grant-in-Aid Credits. J. -The t wo major credits are for two schools: one at $1,000,000 - 100% eligible and one at $2,000,000 - 10 to 50%eligible. 4. Some comparatively small credits would be eligible from park, bridge, ramp and other items probably in the range of $50-100,000. �1. c • Sc;ne dule Thomasville Amendr~ent R-- 22 HUD To AHA To Devel oper Thi s schedule i s prepar ed ba s ed on the fo llouing as sumptions : L All deci sio ns nec essary for th e submission of t he appl ication ( particul arl y the ones appli.ed to the method of disposition and sequence installation of site i mprovements) are made prior to May 1, 1968 . 2. That the submission is to be macl e to the June 3, 1968 Aldermanic · Commit tee . 3. That HUD holds good on their commitment t o r eview and approve the applic ation in 30 days . I. Part I - Part I I Aopl ica tion - -· - ~ -.... l. - Decj_sions Land Use Map Proj ect Area Dat a Report Disposition PJ.an Relocati on Report Acquisj_tion Plan Urban Renewal Plan Proj ect I mprovements Plan All other s ections of t he application Financing Pl an Submit to Alderciicm:i.c Financ e Commit tee Pub1.ic Hearing Aldennanic Approval Compl ete Submi sc:i on II. May 1, 1968 May 3, May 20, May 20, May 21, May 21, May 21 , May 21, May 21, May 2)-1, May 27, May 31, J une 3, June 7, ' j i Execution Activi t i es Approval Executed Lo an and Gra nt Cont r act a. Disoos~ti on Acti viti e s _..,._,-=· n.i'-7-..=I , .._._ •MCW:.-....- Adverti s e Receive Bids Identi fy Developer Sign Contract Begin Const ructj_o'r1 of hous ing·:H*" b. July 8, 1968-~July 15, ~*" .. July 29 ., 1968 Sept . 23, Oct. 21 , Oc t. 31; Januar y 27, 1969 April 2b, 1969 }fay 27, Acsiuis:itio r:~RelQ c at :i.on-Dsmolitiori Begin l\.cqui s ition Begin Relocation Complet e Ac~uis ition Complete R2lo c 2tion Complete D~n0 J_j_tion July 29, 1968 Aug . 26, Sept. ~Cl, Scp -L . 1966 July 27, Aug. 27, Sept . 27, Feb . 27, 1969 30, I Oct. 11 , ~:-T~me cont ingent on HUD acq9-9.. i-r-~f-Time contingent on Developa.6e, a.n.d 1.ianJ..:ta!r..y dwelling u.n.li-6, a. detell.m,[no..ti.on. made. by ou.tt Ma.yott when. he. en.Ul.ite.d the. ai..d 06 ma.n.y 1.iu.b1.ita.n;t,i,ai. uilzen.-6 06 the. Ciltj to be.gin. h,i,,6 c.a.mpa.,i_gn. a.n.d e.66oltt.6 to tteUe.ve. the de.p.lotta.ble c.on.cUtion.-6 06 ma.n.y 06 Atia.n.ta. '-6 cU,i,ze.Yl.-6. H.-ui tte.c.ogMtion. o,& .the. de.gtta.ded c.on.d,i_;t,i_on. 06 ma.n.y Mea.-6 06 the. Wy a.n.d the. gttoW-i..ng de;te.tt,i_oJr..a;t.,i.on. 06 e.wting dwe..U,ln.g-6 began. wha;t Wa.-6 a.lm0.6t a. "One. Ma.n. WM" a.galn.-6.t .thue u.n.,6otttu.n.a.te c.on.d,i_.t,i_on.-6 06 .the poott . The. ,6a.c.t.6 Welte. ga..theJted a.n.d tteve.a.le.d. The. Ma.yott a.ppe.a.led to in.du.-6:IJttJ to mee..t ;th,i,,6 n.e.ed. Su.6 6-<-uen.t in.c.en.tive. motiva..ted gtte.a:t in.teJte.1.it. HoweveJt, M pJt,i,va..te i n.teJtMt-6 be.ga.n. .to wottk., 1.iu.ttp!U-6.-i..n.gly e.veJttj en ooJt.t Wa.-6 1.i.tym.-i..ed by one ob1.ita.c.le - - pft,{,va..te vu.ted .-i..n.teJtut-6. Se.veJtal. 1.i ma..U pall.C.W We.Jte .6U.C.C.e..6.6ou.il.tj zon.e.d to tte.c.uve. hou.-6.-i..n.g a.n.d we.tte. u.-6 e.d. Su.b-6 e.qu.e.n.t tte.-zo n..-i..ng e.6 6oltt-6 ,i_tto n..-i..c.a..Uy bttou.g h.t oppo1ition. 6ttom e.ve.Jttj qu.all.te.tt 06 the. Wy -- no Jta.c.e. oft tteUgion. exc.lu.ded. Th,i,,6 Wa.-6 .the v o.-i..c.e. o6 t he. pe.o p.le. ! To .th,i,,6 da;te., .th,i,,6 voic.e ha.-6 be.en. he.Md on. ptr.a.c.tic.a..Uy eveJty pe.,ti;ti.on.. Fotttu.n.a..te.ly, .th,i,,6 1.iUe. Wa.-6 a.n. e.xc.eption.. Vo.-i..c.e.d obj ec.tio Yl.-6 a.n.d Jte.-6 e.r1.-tme.n.t.6 pu;t .the. BoaJUi o6 Alde.ttme.n. .-i..n. a. po1.iilion. 06 ttefuc..ta.n.c.e to ac.t on. an.y pe..tilion. 6ott Hou.-6-<-ng pu.ttpo-6 e-6 • T hW Jte-6 po Yl.-6.-i.. b-i.,,U,ty ,i_,6 to -6 ell.Ve the. WW hu o6 the ma.jail.Uy o0 .the people.. 16 th,i,,6 be. il -- the. pe.ople. 06 Afta.n..ta have. -t.wz.n.e.d .thw ba.c.k.-6 on. tho1.ie le1.i1.i 6otttu.n.a.te, and th,i,,6, ,i,n. me.lo, btte.e.d-6 :tJtou.ble. . �The. m and pU!tpo.t.e. 06 the. Fe.dVl.al. How.,ing Ao.t.,v.,:ta.nc.e. Admin,v.,.tJLation have. no:t be.e.n undV1..t,:tood by :the. pe.ople. 06 Atta.n.ta.. HV!.e. ,v., a. p!1.og11.am 06 a.t,.t,,v.,:tanc.e. and be.ne./)U - and we. tUJtn oUJt bac.k.-6 . The. /)iM:t 11.e..t.ult and ac.c.ompwhme.nt 06 .tiu.6 p11.og11.am put.t. a .t.ub.t.:tan;t,i.a...t 11.006 OVV!. :the. he.ad.t. 06 pe.ople. . That the.y Me. wa11.m, dll.y , and po.t..t.ibly c.omfJoll.:ta.ble. ,v., .t.e.c.ondMy. The. 6ill:t 11.e..t.uli and ac.c.ompwhme.n:t ,,u., u/)ting the.m out an e.nv,<_11.onme.nt that hM b11.e.d c.Jume. and moll.al. de.g e.nVtatio n. Ye.;t - we. tUJtn ouJz. bac.12.t. . We. complain 06 a :ta.x bUJtde.n ! on I.t. ;th,v., a :ta.x buJz.de.n - ;to move. pe.ople. out 06 .t..fu.m Me.M - :to e.n/)011.c.e. ;the. How.,ing Code. - ;to i ~ e . a Woll.Mble. P11.og11.am ;to b11.,<_n.g :the..t.e. Me.a.t. up ;to .t.:ta.nda.Jc.d 011. de.mofuh :the.m - ;to 11.e.Ue.ve. OU!t Pouc.e. o{J ;the. e.xpo.t.Wte. :to :the..t.e. Me.M -- ,<_.t, ;th,v., a bUJtde.n? Many have. 1.,;tate.d - M .t.oon. M :the..t.e. .t.lum Me.a.t. Me. vac.ate.d be./)011.e. an.y;thin.g c.an. be. done. - othe.11.f., move. in. oil.om out 06 ;the. Cay be.c.au.t.e. ofJ de.c.Jz.e.a.t.e.d job oppoJz.:tun.Uie..t. in. :the. ll.Ull.al. Me.M and o:theJr. c.iue..t.. Jo ble..t..t. pe.ople. mu.t.;t .t. e.e.12 . NatUJtaUy ;the.y tull.n. ;to A:tla.n:ta. - a Me.c.c.a - a Cay on. fi,<_11.e. - on.e. 06 the. mo.t,;t t~ving me..t!Lo pou ta.n. Me.M in :the. Coun.t!Ly. Ne.v eJr. wil..e. :the.y .t.:top c.om,i,n.g . Th,i,f., m,i_g11.ation. w.lU. c.on:t,i,nue. whe.:theJr. addd,i,on.al. hou.t.in.g ,i_.t, p11.ovide.d oil. no:t - - and i6 no:t p!tovide.d, :the. .t.fum Me.M uiu'..l J.>ptte.ad uf2e. c.an.c.e/l.. What a.Ue.11.n.ative. do we. have.? Shall we. le,:t :th,i,f., in.6fux c.11.e.ate. c.Jz.d,i_c_al. a11.e.M whe.11.e. on.e. ,v., af;11.a.,ul. .t.o wa.£12 - - Me.a.t. whic.h e.ve.n. Pouc.e. c.a.n.no:t c.on:tll.ol? All.e. we. inte.n:t,i,on.aUy c.11.e.ating .t.c.hool.t. 06 c.Jume. and c.011.Mp;U.on.? What ,i_gn.de..t. .t.he. 6u.t.e.? We. have. .t.e.e.n. e.xplo.t,ion..t. in. othVl. c.aie..t.. fa ;th,v., ;the. Amwc.an. way? - 2 - �It ,u., the. 6011..tana,te. and the. able. c,,itize.Vl-6 who mMt he.lp , we. the.y dM;tJioy ;the.m.oe.lve/2 . Ati.a.n.ta c.anno;t and mMt not .twc_n m baQQ ;to ne.Qeive. ;the. pov~y- 6onQe,d .omb 06 ve.nge.anQe. 06 ;tho.oe. who aJz.e. ,UY!pal.e.d upon the. 6;.,.uh and ha;te. on ;the. .ofu.m.6 ! Who among lL6 ha.o ne.v~ had the. na~e/2 06 a ;toile.;t, QOOQe.d on a de.Qe.n.t .o;tov e. , on, a.o in ;the. pcv.d, lAXl6 he.d fu he/2 in a pan and tMown the. wa.t~ out a W,tndow? Ye.;t thi-6 ,u., ;the. line. 06 many to day . Thi-6 .o;tall..t 06 Aftan;ta'.o lMgMt PubuQ HoMing de.ve.lopme.n.t und~ th~ TMnQe.y Sy.ote.m i.o a .oub.o;tan,u,a.,f_ ne.auza;tion and a milM;tone. i n oM Ma yon' .o wall. . Five. Hun~e.d ne.w home/2 ;to hoMe. Twe.n;ty- Five. Hu n~e.d u.tize.Vl-6 06 Aftan.ta . Ra.th~ ;than a Gnound Btl.e.aung , we. .ohould .oay ;thi-6 to ;the. Be.ginning . ,u., a Ve.diQatio n Pnoviding hoMing and moving pe.ople. nnom ;the. .olum all.e.M in;to de.Qe.n.t, .oa6e. and .oa~y .o~ounding.o doe/2 not e.nd - it be.gin.o the. job. So, e.duQa.;:Uo n ha.o be.Qome. an ,UY!pO~n.t paJz..t on ;the, HoMing Pnog~. I n.o;te,ad 06 e.duQWO n, we. c.an be.ti~ ;t~m a ;the. n e.vdauza;tion on inh~e.n.t qu~e/2 06 man.. To ne.v~ ze. ;the. ne.e.d and M ge. ;to live. pnope.nly in a we,ll -bu;.,.u, a,t;t!r_active. home.; ;to ne.vdauze. the. ne.auzwJ.on 06 a Qon;tinual.ly impno ving e.nvinonme.n;t; ;to ne.vimliz e. ;the. dMine. ;to main;tain and uplint ;the. .o;tandand 06 .ouQh e.nvinonme.n;t - to ;thi.o we. ple.dge. oun.oe.lve/2 .o o ;tha;t he. , ;too, Qan go W,t;th dignity and pnide. among ill me.n. - - and hM Qhildne.n a6t~ ~ . In .oome. i vit,;tanQe/2 we. may nail - but we. ~ put thMe. nailune/2 be.hind lL6 M t he. pniQe. We. pay to in.o M e. OM .ooue.;ty non pa.ot~y. - 3 - ��t 1t r:fy s e r lyy l D 11 yoi, ~ • •• r. mar �\ I r r, r, E U, C · , COl OU I I' April 16, 196 I le -• H Jo o. l (, or r3l Pen ite ) g sted th t I tr1 to e;at private o Colli r Gladin eitej and d in th1 1 c ntl/ D S oat a ed oo to ork with Colli r Gladin and l 1y ard Oppe h w in trying to expedite ut lo or the hou n portion of th1e site . c April 10 l t r thi e1 • • li.ck Ca r ., Ho dul d con£ renc with a pro pcctivc d lopor d Oppen aw of the Housing Authority and rtieip ted in the conto of HUD ~ ne • Subsequently ! have tter 1th Collier Gl din and others int rested ill th"s di cu t. P-ro :rty is now in Ganer l ~rvice Titl Topogr phic ha turni d t Public been pr p red nd is in center•lln for the i.:xpres ay nnd 13 working on slo boundary .......,._..,. fin ni tration. he St to iighway D per ent h s 1ng uthorlty. of ban >. Ho e r , tho ... d eonr· s te Highw y D por ent cannot ccur tely y bound r s until after it l olds a nc . ar uou cl tract, acquisition o.f trian -le h t ich is 1r ble tor inclu ion in th o rill proj~ct. 1 own d by pr1v d 1 tere t • It could b _ e u1 ition .................. should not · l y dev, lo 1 lo rtic Thi t nt o.r the l··nd to be dedicated ti htly tiuled d 0 or ately by- the !ousing Authority aoqnired ~lo n chedul ' d.1 cent to the xi ting hould continu and thi portion �IVAN ALLEN, JR, MAYOR ATLANTA, GEORGIA Mr . M. B. Satter f ield, Executive Director Housing Authority of the City of Atlant a 824 Hurt Building At l anta, Georgia 30303 �IV AN A LLEN, .JR . MA YOR ATL AN T A , GEORGIA Mr. Edw in L . Sterne, Chairman Atlanta Housing Authority 824 Hurt Building Atlanta, Georgia �June 11, 1968 Mr. J ames S. R ~bins on, President Urban East H o using Consultants 900 Peachtree Stl"eet Atlanta, Geo rgia 30309 Dear Mr . Robinson : I am v ery ple ased to l earn that you are making pr og res s on the Martin Luther Kin g . J r .• Village to provide housing for 193 Atl anta families. Your plans are i maginative and e xemplify the best th i nking in n10dern housing developn:ient for low and mo J erate income families . Since re ly yo urs . Ivan A ll en, Jr. lviayo r lAJr:fy �URBAN EAST Housin g Consult an ts James S. Robinson, president 900 Peachtree Stree t Atlant a. Georgia 30309 Phone 404 875-0781 June 3, 1968 Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Re: Rawson-Washington Urban Renewal Project Martin Luther King, Jr. , Village Atlanta, Georgia i I Dear Mayor Allen: I am writing at the requ e st of Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr., in reply to your letter of May 31, 1968, regarding the progress of the above captioned project. Please be advised that the Application-Project Mortgage Insurance (FHA Form 2013) with preliminary plans and sp e cifications were submitted to the Atla nta Insuring Offi c e of the Fed era l Housing Ad ministration this morning, June 3, 19 68. The Federal Housing Administration has e x pressed its eagernes s and willingness to e x p e dite th e processing of this case in order to provide th is ne e ded housing at the earliest possible date . A considera ble amount of time and effort has been e x p e nded by the Ebe ne zer Ba ptist Church and its repres e ntative s to insure the deve lopm e nt of a resid e ntia l community which e mbodies the most ad vance d thinking in multifa mily liv i n g. Our deve lopment plan provides for a high ris e buildin g con s isting of twe l v e stories, pre s enting a pa norama vi e w of downtow n Atl a n ta , th e expre ss ways and the spaciou s spl e ndor of the City . This i s the fir s t atte mpt to de velop a high ri se cons tru c tion under Sectio n 2 2l(d) (3) of the Na tiona l Housing Ac t i n th e City of Atlan ta . With the i ncreas ing a waren e s s of th e ne e d for hi gh r:ise residenti a l faciliti es , it is i mpera t i ve tha t low to modera te i ncome fam ilies , especia lly fa milies with out children , are pro vid ed for i n h i gh ri se constructio n in C entra l City. Larg er fam ili e s will fi nd spacio us accommodation s in 2 , 3 or 4- bedroom s i ze u nits with the 3 and 4 bedroom units designed with 1 1/2 baths . All low rise units are town houses and garden type, two -s tory wa l k-up apartments, w i th amp l e �1- • Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. - 2 - play areas and enclosed patios. A pedestrian walkway, free of vehicle traffic, allows for safe access throughout the development. A community shopping center consisting of approximately 7,000 square feet form an integral part of this development concept which will provide the daily essentials for residents and the general community. In addition, an office building complex of approximately 3200 square feet, is incorporated in this community center, providing space for professional offices and convenient type stores and shops. A day nursery designed to accommodate preschool-age children of working mothers has been given special study and the result of this intensive investigation regarding the special needs of these children are reflected in our day-care center. A coin-operated laundry facility is also provided. Our development plan utilizes open spaces and green belts in order to provide a character of individuality and sense of pride and appreciation. The total 19 3 unit complex will be served by central air conditioning and heating. We feel that Martin Luther King, Jr. , Village will be an exciting and important addition to the City of Atlanta and a major step forward in the development of residential communities in urban areas. ,.,~~ .,< Your continued interest and coopera tion is greatly apprecialed. l /ery truG ~ 1 )'r 2 ( . cc: Martin Luth e r King, Sr. Mr. Cary S. Hooks Mr. Cecil Al exa nder Mr. Albert Thompson - '{ ) ':-, ~ I / '_.I. 1/-,: urs, - \'~ ,· ·/ /; ,,, ~c _ , .,. v- es S. Robinson I - - �·"· HOUSING RESOURCES CO ITTEE ROOM 1204 , CITY HALL June 11 , 1968 Mr . Cecil A. Al exander, Chairman Housing Resources Committee E ORANDUM TO: Pursuant to your suggestion ~ several days ago I talked to Jim Parham about E. O. A. providing administrative support to Lee Burges' newly organized Housing Development Corporation nd informed him of our previous contact with Bi ll Allison regarding this matter . At that time 1 . Parham did not ppear to be f miliar ith it, bµt said he would talk with Bill Allison and look at the file on the subject which as pro ided to Bill Allison by H 11 are . Following the Housing Resources Committee Meeting June 6 , Hr . Parham discussed the atter with me and provided me with the att ched copy of "A Proposal to Form the Atlanta Housing Development Corporation . r . P rh m stated thnt be is very spmpathotic ith the idea of E . O. A. prov iding ad inistrative support for the Housing Development Corporation; th the ill need, ho ever , the folioing indicated materi l in ord r to present nd justify this atter to his Board , •hich he feels will be inclined to act favorably upon it : copy of the Logal document of Incorporation of the Housing Development Corporation . (A) A (B) A statement of the Corporations functions , scope of operation , and principal activities, a ctually established (not the "proposal" for for tion of the Corpor tion, as cont ined in th att ch d.) (C) A list of th Corporation's Bo rd of Directors ( r. Parha stated that it ould bee 1 r for E. O. A¥ to support the Housing D velop ent Corpor tion dministratively. if tho Bo rd of Directors contains r pres nt tion from th poor). �Memorandum Page 2 June 11 , 1968 (D) A statement as to how the Housing Development Corporation will benefit the poor . (E) Budget (including breakdo n by principal items) . NOTE : At the time of our conversation r . Parh m insisted that I give him some concept as to what the total amount of the budget would probably be , I told him that I did not know , as I felt this would have to be orked out with the Director, selection of hicb I understand is now being considered , but that I anticipate that it would be in the neighborhood of $25 , 000 per year , principal items of hich would be the salaries of the Director and Secretary, office supplies and postage . r . Parham said thnt as soon as the above information is presented to him, he will submit a formal proposal to his Board for inclusion of this item in E . O. A.' s further activities. I feel that e should provide him as quickly as possible with information he has requested . Malcolm D. Jones Housing Coordinator J,fl)J/mac Encl : Copy "A Proposal to Form The Atlanta Housing Development Corporation . CC:V'Mr. Dan E. Sweat , Jr. �June 7, 1968 Housing Resources Committee City of A tlanta Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Attelltion: Mr . Malcolm D . Jones Gentlemen : Re : G~lbert Gardens Turnkey:- Mayor Allen ' s Letter We are in rec~pt of the Mayor ' s letter of May 31 , 1968 'U rging us to proceed as quickly as pos sible with the Gilbert Garden Turnkey Project. He requested t hat we keep you advised 0£ our progress and any problems which tend to delay this development . To the best of our knowledge, the estimates have been received and approved, and they confirm our revised contract price of $4,028,775 .00. We would be ready to sign 'the contract on Monday , June 17, 1968 and proceed with the project immediately thereafter. If in checking the statu of thi project you should find that any inf'<:>rmation is required , plea e advise the writer. dditional We are most aru.tious to take advantage of the balance of the desirable oununer con truction season, and look forward to an award this month . V erry truly your , mer cc: Ralph P. Pase, Jr. D n E . Sweat, Jr. , Director of Governmental Liai on M. B. Satterfield, E x ecutive Dir ctor, Atlanta. Hou ing Authority �CEREX ATLANTA CORPORATION June 10, 1968 I I I I l !I ! Mr. Howard Openshaw Director of Redevelopment Atlanta Housing Authority 824 Hurt Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Openshaw: This is with reference to your letter of June 4, 1968 outlining several objections to our plans for the development of Parcels E-la and B-2. As I understand it, these objections represent the position both of your office and that of the City Planning Commission. I should like to take exception, first, to the second paragraph of your letter, which states in part that, "While certain elements of the original plan have been retained .... other features on which the development competition award was made have been eliminated, reducing the original extraordinary site plan proposal to the average run-of-the-mill development." That statement is unjustified as to the facts, and, if it is an expression of aesthetic judgement, not one with which we agree or respect. I I I Second, I should like to point out that your action in advising the Federal Housing Administration that our plans were not acceptable has resulted in their refusal t6 issue ready-to-go commitments. This may mean the loss, to . us and . to the City of Atlanta, of the 22l(d)(3) reservations for this project and, if 22l(d)(3) money is, as we are advised, exhausted, it may be some time before new reservations are obtained if we lose these. A far more advisable course for you to have followed (in terms of safeguarding the 22l(d)(3) reservations for this project) would have been to permit FHA to issue their commitments and in the period preceeding initial mortgage closing, work with us to achieve that which you feel is necessary. Your control of our going and our coming is so complete in every respect that with or without the commitment we cannot proceed into construction until you SUITE 2352 • NATIONAL BANK OF GEORGIA BUILDING • ATLANTA GEORGIA 30303 • TEL: 404/688-1415 -. ,'··. ~ i �• ! CEREX ATLANTA CORPORATION Mr. Howard Openshaw June 10, 1968 I .I .i ,I Page - 2 - .I I ·I I are completely satisfied with our work. You chose, however, to pursue a course which places the project's development in . jeopardy .... a needless and disheartening risk and delay. i J Third, I should like to point out that we are no less interested than are you or any other City Agency concerned with this project, · in producing as superior a development as possible.· Our competition submission was not a pipe dream nor did we approach it on the basis of winning a beauty contest thinking to make it work later, as is often the case. I would imagine that we will be with this project long after most of the City officials concerned with it now have left the scene and its success, both as an investment and in the achievement of our social objectives, depends entirely upon its desirability to potential tenants. It was recognized publicly, by you and by us during the course of the competition, that detailed planning, architecture and fiscal analysis would require certain changes, but that the major concepts presented would be preserved. We have ! acted in . good faith in pursuing our work and those changes which I have been made, in practically every single, instance of concern to you, have related to four major factors: ' A. The severe cost restrictions governing the 22l(d)(3) program which have become even more severe over this past year by virtue of the money market and tremendous increases in construction costs. B. Detailed cost analysis of certain of our original development proposals (such as rental town housing in Parcel E-la and elements of site development) have proved to be economically infeasible in terms of their effect upon rentals. C. The need to provide the full number of units originally proposed when certain areas, upon detailed site planning, proved to be economically infeasible for development or, proved to contain conditions of which we were not advised (such as County ownership of certain lands within the proje c t area) • I I ' ' i .. ..... --- ....... . __ .... . -· - ~-::--: �CEREX ATLANTA CORPORATION Mr. Howard Openshaw June 10, 1968 I .i Page - 3 - I D. The rentals and carrying charges which the housing market with which we are concerned can absorb. Lastly, _ I should like to point out that most of those elements of our work which you now question ·; have been known to your office and to the City Planning Commission for several months. It is baffling, to say the least, that at this late and critical date you choose to present your comments. Now, as to the substance of your letter, I shouH like to make the following brief observations which will be enforced by oral argument and graphic material presented at our meeting on June 11, 1968. I • I · J I As to your item (a), we do not agree that the geometric arrangement of buildings does not provide interesting and varied pedestrian spaces. The changes we have made in Parcel E-la with regard to buildings placement are not major. If you are making an aesthetic judgement, we agree that the original concept is better, but not that our revision does it great violence. Additionally, some study of our building placement would have indicated the extreme topographic conditions which account for many of our shifts in building _.location, conditions we originally felt able to resolve, but in the face of economics, could not. In this regard, I sh9uld point out that retaining walls were the first to go when the dollar situation became extreme and this fact mandated a shift in building, parking and driveway location . .I I! f I !I !: • I I J !I I As to your item (b), rental townhouses in Parcel E-la were ' eliminated solely for reasons of economy and FHA guidance here _: was quite convincing. They proved too costly to build and could not be absorbed by the rental market with which we are concerned . Eliminating townhouses eliminated the structured and disciplined flow of pedestrian traffic, but that function can be provided by strong and adequately designed pedestr i an pathways . - .. ., ·r : . ~ ·! �CEREX ATLANTA CORPORATION Mr. Howard Openshaw June 10, 1968 Page - 4 i I II The original competition drawing did in fact show townhouses step up or down the grades. It was later recommended by your office and concurred in by us, that the B-2 site be converted to all co-op townhouses which more fully and economically served the market for townhouse occupancy. In addition, FHA requirements regarding percentage of grade around the E-la townhouses parking ·lots which served these steep townhouse had severe cost implications. Also, the cost of producing such a steep townhouse proved to be so high as to approach or exceed the maximum rentals under the 22l(d)(3) program as follows: • I i ·. i I I I i ,. I I I i: Tr:ee of Unit 2BR 3BR 2BR basement 3BR basement 4BR basement I Monthly Rent On E-1 Site $ 98 112 105 119 126 Monthly Charge On B-2 (co-o:e site) $ 81 98 96 109 119 • Note: Includes all ~tilities As to your item (c), we agree that the community plaza . was a major and highly desirable element of our original proposal. We eliminated it and distributed the functions elsewhere throughout the project in that a part of Parcel E-lb and all of E-lc cannot now be developed for housing due to certain facts not brought to our attention during the competition. We, therefore, sought to recapture some of the lost units by placing them on the community plaza site. However, we are quite willing to eliminate that housing and to reinstate the original community plaza proposal, but you must recognize that this will mean a net loss of approximately 40 dwelling units. I' !I I  ! Additionally, it should be noted here that the new centrally located community recreation area was not only approved by the Planning Commission and the full Board of Aldermen in our Community Unit Plan submission, but was also approved by the Atlanta Housing Authority. Similarily, the \ . ~r\ --- , �CEREX ATLANTA CORPORATION Mr. Howard Openshaw June 10, 1968 I I . J Page - 5 I ! i l new church site location plan was forwarded to both the Housing Authority and Collier Gladdin's office on April 22, 1968 and no objection was raised at that time. As to your item (d), changes in relationship of peripheral drives and parking areas to the housing units they serve, were made necessary by detailed studies which could not have been performed during the competition and by other changes such as building location and elimination of retaining walls. However, not by any stretch of the imagination can we understand the charge that the basic concept and relationship of driveways and parking to housing units served, has been violated. As to the statement that a massive "sea of asphalt" parking area, remote from housing units is created, we point out that this is not the fact except perhaps in one instance. Even though the number of parking spaces has been increased to serve a larger number of housing units the parking solution in our proposal is superior to the original in many instances and in fact results in eliminating seas-of-parking. The statment that ,· parking areas are remote from housing units is absolutely unfounded. Except in two instances they are all in the same relationship as originally proposed and improved in many instances -- at FHA insistence. I ' As to your item (e), the concept of uninterrupted pedestrian streets is maintained. As a matter of fact, it is improved in both -Parcels E-la and B-2. Site plans showing the use of this particular street has been in jour possession since March. As a matter of fact, its utilization resulted as much from your suggestion that it be used and dedicated to the City so that approximately $30,000 in site improvement credits would accrue to the City, as it did from our desire to eliminate the cost of constructing additional roadway. 'I 'l , · ' '. ', As to your item (f), the pedestrian and vehicular traffic between Parcels B-2 and E- la will provide for controlled street crossing as originally proposed. I \ ... .. . . -·--.----\ ..... .,. .! . I ! ·- . • . •" .. ,.-. I ' . �~ . CEREX ATLANTA CORPORATION Mr. Howard Openshaw June 10, 1968 Page - 6 I, I As to your i _tem (g) , we have rethought the placement of church sites within building clusters in view of our meetings with church groups which established that the churches will attract members both from within and without the project area. · ·To place churches within the clustered areas would be to introduce large amounts of parking which we consider undesirable. As to your item (h), ·the geometric arrangement of Parcel B-2 not only does relate to topography, it is governed by topography. We do propose a cluster arrangement of buildings with much of the site open and existing ttees preserved. The statement that the entire site is covered with buildings and parking areas is completely unsupported by the facts and rather contentious. Coverage is approximately 20% for all buildings, roads and parking areas. The original plan proposed 331 dwelling units and 450 parking spaces. The present one proposes 250 dwelling units and 375 parking spaces -on the same acreage. I Very truly yours l.,;11~,A.,Nt}l,I143.215.248.55 I I DLR/sbs I ' cc : Mr . Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr . ~ Mr. Mr . \ Lester H. Persells Ralph johnston Collier Gladdin Rodney Cook Hamilton Douglas, Jr . Cecil Alexander Larry Chkoreff Stanley Berman �U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT NOTICE RENEWAL AND HOUSING ASSISTANCE 5/22/68 JQ: ALL RENEWAL AND HOUSING ASSISTANCE PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS SUBJECT: HUD Policy for Provision of Information to the Public We are transmitting for your information a reprint from the Federal Register 32 FR 9660-62, dated July 4, 1967, presenting HUD's public information policy pertaining to those documents, records, regulations, manuals, etc. contained in the HUD Central and Regional Offices. The policy of the Department of Housing and Urban Development is to make full and responsible disclosure of its identifiable records and information consistent with such competing public interests as national security, personal privacy, and obligations of confidentiality as are recognized by the Public Infonnation Act. The "Public Information Act, 11 also lmown as "Freedom of Information Act, 11 5 U.S. 522, as amended by P.L. 90-23, upon which this policy is based, became effective July 4, 1967. Attachment NOTE: This "NOTICE" i s part of the new HUD Unified Issuances Sys tem. It will be u sed on occasion t o advise y ou on matters o.f general interest conceYning HUD assi sted programo HUD-Wash., D. C. �DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Reprinted from Federal Register-32 F .R. 9660-62 July 4, 1967 Title 24-HOUSING AND HOUSING CREDIT Subtitle A-Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development PART 15-PUBLIC INFORMATION In Subtitle A a new Part 15 is added as follows: Subpart A-Pi,rpose and Policy Sec. 15.1 15.2 15.3 Definitions. Purpose. Statement of Policy. Subpart S---Production and Disclosure of Records 15.11 Publication in the FEDERAL REGISTER. 15.12 Materials not published ln the FEDERAL REGISTER. 15.13 Identifia ble records produced upon request. 15.14 Sche dule of fees. 15.21 Subpart C-Exemplions E xemptions authorized by 5 U.S.C. 552. Subpart D-Where Records May Be Inspected and Information Obtained 15.31 Information centers. 15.32 Informa tion officers. 15.33 Material ln Department Central Information Center. Subpart E-Procedure for Requesting Access to Records 15.41 Requests for records. Subpart !---Disclosure of Records and Refusal To Disclose 15.51 16.52 Authority to release records or copies. Authority to deny requests for records. Subpart G--Administrative Review of Denials of Requests for Records 15.61 Administrative review. AUTHORITY: The provisions of this Part 16 are issued under 5 U.S.C. 552 and sec. 7(d), 79 Stat. 670; 42 U.S.C. 3535(d). Subpart A-Purpose and Policy § 15.l Definitions. As used in this Part-- . (a) "Act" means section 552 of Title 5, United States Code, as amended by Public Law 90-23, 81 Stat. 54, June 5, 1967. Public Law 90-23 repealed and superseded "Pubttc- Law 89---487; 80 Stat. 250, July 4, 1966, sometimes referred to as the "Freedom of Information Act" or "Public Information Act." (b) Department" means the Department of Housing and Urban Development which consists of the Office of the Secretary and the several organizational units. (c) "Secretary" means the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. (d) "Organizational unit" means any one of the several offices, staffs, divisions, or administrations of the Department, including the F'-ederal Housing Adminis- tration (FHA) and the Federal National Mortgage Association (FNMA) . Organizational unit also includes Department Regional Offices and local FHA and FNMA offices. (e) "Person" means "person" as defined in 5 U.S.C. 551(2) to include corpora,tions and organizations as well as individuals. (f) "Information center" means any place, reading room, desk, or other area or facility established and maintained by the Department where the public may request and obtain information and records concerning the Department's operations and business. § 15.2 § 15.12 Materials not. published in Fecleral Register. Purpose. This part contains the rules and regulations of the Department implementing 5 U.S.C. 552. It informs the public about where and how the Department's records and information may be obtained from its organizational units in Washington , D.C., and its regional and other local offices throughout the country. § 15.3 Except to the extent that a person has actual and timely notice of the terms thereof, no person shall in any manner be required to resort to or be adversely affected by any matter required to be published in the FEDER/IL REGISTER and not so published. For purposes of this § 15.11 , matter which is r easonably available to the class of persons affected thereby shall be deemed published in the FEDERAL REGISTER when incorporated by reference therein with the approval of the Director of the Office of the Federal Register, as provided in 32 F.R. 7899, June 1, 1967, 1 CFR Part 20. Statement of policy. The Department's policy is one of full and responsible disclosure of Its identifiable records and information consistent with such competing public interests concerning the national security, personal privacy, and obligations of confidentiality as are recognized by 5 U.S .C. 552. Every effort will be made to -furnish service with reasonable promptness to the public with respect to the obtaining of records and information. Subpart B-Production and Disclosure of Records § 15.11 Publication in the Federal Reg- ister. Subject to the exemptions in § 15.21, the Department shall separately state and currently publish in the FEDERAL REGISTER for the guidance of the public: (a) Descriptions of its central and field organization and the established places at which, the employees from whom, and the methods whereby, the public may obtain information, make submittals or requests, or obtain decisions;(b) Statements of the general course and method by which its functions are channeled and determined, including the nature and requirements of all formal and infonnal procedures available; e J:wllQfed. (bJ Charges will be made in accordance with the schedule of fees set forth in § 15.14 for any records search which involves more than one man-hour of work, and for duplicating, reproducing, certifying, or authenticating~opies �of documents furni~ed. (c) When a request is made for an identifiable record of the Department which has been stored in the Na tiona l Archives or other record centers of the General Services Administration, such record will be requested by the Department if it otherwise would be a vaila ble under this part. (d) Every effort will be made to make a record in use by the staff of the Department available when requested, and such availability will be deferred only to the extent necessary to avoid serious interference wit h the business of the Department. (e) Copies of a requested record need not be furnished if the record is published in the FEDERAL REGISTER or is availa ble for purchase from the Superintendent of Documents of the Government Printing Office. Such records may, however, be examined in one of the Department's information centers. § 15.14 Schedule of fees. For the services listed below performed in the location and disclosure or furnishing of copies of records under 5 U.S.C. 552, and pursuant to the policy established by Congress in 5 U.S.C. <1964 Ed.) 140, Act of August 31, 1951, the following charges will apply : (a) Records search: ( 1) First m a n-hour on any single request : no fee. (2) E ach additional man-hour or fraction ther eof: $5. (b ) Copies of documents: (1) X erox or equiva lent, page s ize up to 8 ½ inches by 14 inches, per p a ge : $0.25. (2) Photostat, page size up to 8 ½ inches by 14 inches, per page : $1. (c ) If charge is less than $1.00 per order : no fee. (d ) Maximum number of copies furnished of any record : 10. (e) Certifica tion of true copies, each : $ 1. (f ) Attestation under the seal of the Department or of FNMA, as the case may be, each : $2. (g) P ayment of fees under this § 15.20 shall be made in cash, or by U.S. money order , or by certified bank check payable to the Treasurer of the United States except that, in case of the F ederal Housing Administ ration and the Federal National Mortgage Associa tion , drafra should be ma de payable to those organizational units. Postaire stamps will not be accepted. Subpart C-Exe mptions § 15.21 Exemptions u.s.c. 552. authorized by 5 A requested record shall not be withheld from inspection or copying unless it bot h (1) comes within one of the classes of records exempted by 5 U.S.C. 552, and (2) there Is need in the public interest to withhold It. In determining the scope of the classes of records described in paragraph (a) of this section, the Attorney General's Memorandum on the Public Information Act, June 1967, will be used as a guide. (a) The classes of records authorized to be exempt ed from disclosure by 5 U.S.C. 552 are those which concern matters that are : 0 ) Specifically required by Executive order to be kept secret in the interest of the national defense or foreign policy; (2) Related solely to the internal personnel rules and practices of the Department; (3) Specifically exempted from disclosure by statute; (4) Trade secrets and commercial or financial information obtained from a person and privileged or confidential; (5) Interagency or intra-agency memorandums or letters which would not be available by law to a party other than an agency in litigation with the Department; (6) Personnel and medical files and similar files the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy; (7) Investigatory files .compiled for law enforcement purposes except to the extent available by law to a party other than an agency ; (8) Contained in or related to examination, operating, or condition reports prepared by, on behalf of, or for the use of the Department in connection with its responsibility for the, regulation or supervision of financial institutions; or (9) Geological and geophysical information and data, including maps, concerning wells. Subpart D-Where Records May Be Inspected and Obtained § 15.31 Information centers. (a) The Depar tment maintains a Centra l Information Center in Washington, D.C., at the following location: D ep artment of Housing and Urban Development, 1626 K Street NW. (Room 102 ) , Washington, D .C. 20410. (b) The Department also maintains an informa tion center(1) In each of its Regional Offices as follows : R egion 1- 346 Br oa d way, New York. N.Y . 10013. R egion II- Widener Building, 1339 Chestnut Street , Philadelphia, Pa. 19107. Region III-Peachtr ee-Seventh Building , At l a nta, G a. 30323. R egion IV--360 Nor th Michigan Avenue, Chicago, DI. 60601. R egion V-Fed e ra l Office Bu!lding. _819 T aylor S t reet, Fort Wor t h, Tex. 76102. Region VI--450 G olden G a t e Avenu e, P ost Office Box 36003, San Francisco, C al!f . 94 102; Northwest Operations Office, First Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 98104. R egion VII- Ponce De Leon a nd Bol!va, Post Office Box 3869, GPO, San Juan, P .R. 00936. (2) In each FNMA Agency Office as follows : 2 11 South Broad Street, Ph!ladelph!a, Pa. 19107. 34 Peachtree Street NE., Atlanta, Ga. 30303. 1112 Commonwealth Edison B uilding, 72 West Ad ams S treet, Chicago, Ill. 60603 . 411 North Akard S treet, Dallas, T ex. 76201. 3840 Wilshire Boul evard, Los Angeles. Calif. 90005. (3) In each FHA Local Insuring Office at its respective local address as listed in local telephone directories. § 15.32 Information officers. There shall be a.n information officer in each of the information centers described in§ 15.31 who.sha.11 be responsible for m aking information and records available to the public in accordance with this part. The information officer in the Department Central Information Center shall be designated by the Director, Division of Public Affairs. The information officer in each Regional Office and field office shall be designated by the Regional Administrator or the Director of the office, as the case may be, with the concurrence of the Director, Division of Public Affairs. § 15.33 Material in Department Central Information Center. (a) The Central Information Center shall contain or have ready access to the following as a minimum: (1) FEDERAL REGISTER, Code of Federal Regulations, and regu_Iations of the Department contained therein; <2) Precedent final opinions and orders in the adjudication of cases; (3) Administrative staff manuals which affect the public; (4) Program manuals which affect the public and forms; (5) Interpretations relied upon as precedents; (6) A current index of the foregoing materials issued, adopted, promulgated after July 4, 1967. Cb) Each Regional Office information center, each FHA Local Insuring Office, and each FNMA Agency ·Office shall contain or shall have ready access to such of the above records as pertain to the activities of that office. (c) Fa<:ilities shall be available to each information center for the copying of properly requested and available records. Subpart E-Procedures for Requesting Access to Records § 15.41 Requests for records. (a) Requests for identifiable records should be made at the established information centers. (b) A request should specify the requested record by brief description, containing the name, number or date as applicable, in enough detail that the record ca n be identified and located. A reasonable time should be allowed for records to be loca ted, copied, and m ailed or otherwise delivered. (c) Th e request should be accompanied by the fee or an offer to pay the fee when determined. (d) Copies of ava ilable records shall be produced as promptly as possible. Copying service shall be llmlted to not more than 10 copies, of any single .p age. Records wh ich are published or availa ble f or sale n eed not be supplied. Subpart F-Disclosure of Records and Refusal To Disclose § IS.SI Authority to release records or copies. The head of each organizational unit or the designee of each of t hese officers, wit h respect to records pertaining to programs or activities for which each has primary responsibilit y, is authorized to release any Department record or copy t hereof when disclosure ls clearly appropriate under this part. Such authorized persons may release records for which another officer has_primary respoiisibWty �only with the consent of the other officer or his designee. § 15.52 Authority to deny requests for records. thereafter may not be made available except with the express authorization of the Secretary or his designee. Subpart G-Administrative Review of Denials of Requests for Records The officers and their designees described in the preceding § 15.51 may deny § 15.61 Administrative review. a request for a record. Any denial shall be promptly made in writing and con(a) Review shall be available only tain .a simple statement of reasons for from a written denial of a request for the denial. Prior to a denial, the officer a record issued under § 15.52, and only or designee shall clear the matter with if a written request for review is filed the Office of General Counsel or the office within 30 days after issuance of the writof the appropriate Regional Counsel or, ten denial. The filing of a request for rein the case of an officer or designee in view may be accomplished by mailing to any FNMA office, with the Office of the the Secretary of Housing and Urban DeGeneral Counsel, FNMA, or the app_ro- velopment, 1626 K Street NW. (Room priate FNMA Agency Counsel. Denial 600), Washington, D.C. 20410, a copy of shall terminate the authority of the par- the request if in writing, a copy of the ticular officer or designee to release or written denial issued under § 15.52, and disclose the requested record, which a statement of the circumstances, reasons, or arguments advanced in support of disclosure of the original request for the record. Review will be made promptly by the Secretary or his designee on the basis of the written record described in this § 15.61. (b) The decision after review will be in writing, will be promptly communicated to the person requesting review, and will constitute final action of the Department on the request, subject to judicial review as provided in 5 U.S.C. 552(a) (3). Effective date. This regulation is effective as of July 4, 1967. ROBERT C. WEAVER, Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. �Jun 7, 1968 ~MORANDUM To: Mr . J. C . John on Director of Model Citi Pur u t to our di&cu. io:n y, st rd y , thi is to dvl e you that in r port which I. in now pr p ring to Mr D n E . Sw t, Jr ., Dir ctor o..t Gov rnm ntal Li i o , pert lnin . to Ex run ntal Hou in Surv y , I m p!l'opo ing (1 ) th t approxbnat ly a four block r (about 10 c.re.e) c nt r d en0 r ally on the int r ection of Conn lly Plaee d Crumley Str et, S . E. or (2 ) slmU ~ eiz r cent r d o.n the ill' reectiori of R - d Stre t d Love Str t, S. . b d ign t d for ex riment housing d t t r que t b tniti t d promptly to HUD for uthority to cquir tuch tr ct for thb pu.rpot · a oon · po ei'bl , und r pp opd t proc dur a. Both of thee tract• v b n di;scu• ed with Mr . Sw r . Jim right ot your offic . M lcolrn D. Jon Housin Coordln tor MDJ':(y t d �HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE May 15, 1968 ' ·.I SUMMARY 'i STATUS OF ACCELERATED LOW-INOMCE HOUSING PROGRAM . . (Commenced Nov. 15, 1966) Total dwelling units ·permitted in Atlanta: 1963 - 9,129 1966 - 2,382 5 yr. Program, 1967-71 1964 - ~,829 1967 - 4,630 1965 - 2,656 1968 - 1,810 (thur Apr .) % estab. for f Goal (Same % first 2 yr. used for 5 yr. period) ' Sta tus 100% 16,800 No. Units May 15 Jan 15 1,312 2,031 · Completed (new Const.) (57%) (9,576) P.H. & TK. May· 15 Jan 15 (82) (13%) (2,184) FHA 221 May 15 Jan 15 (510) (400) (30%) (5,040) Pvt. Devlp. (Conv.) Ma y 15 Jan 15 (1,439) (912) ~ Elderly & N. H . May 15 Jan 15 ' 5,108 3,701 · (910) (790) (1,188) (565) In Planning 7 2 151 6 2 582 (2 2 91 4 ) (2 2 220) (3 2 651) (3 2 868) (140) ( 4 8) ( 44 6) {44 6) Total in Sight 14,290 11,595 O, 906) (3,010) (5,349) (4,833) (4,589) (3,306) (446) (446) Increase-Deficit -2,510 -5,205 (-5,670) (-6,566) (+ 3, 165) (2,649) (-451)(-1,734) (446) (446) 2,?94 4,481 Did Not Materia lize I (0) Und er Construction Be ing considered (all categories) I (3,010) (2,346) See Note A. Figures in this column are basic and represent the entire program. ( ) Indicates breakdown by programs, of figures included in basic column. In additi on, 658 units have been leased for P.Ho and leasing of 372 additional units for P.H. is being negotiated. Als o 13,983 units have been reported ~y the Housing Code Division as repaired (rehabilitated). However, those figures include un i ~ found in compliance on ori g ina l inspection. It is estimate d that 75% of this figure, or 10,487 sub-st andard units have been brought into compliance thr ough actual r eha bilitation. 218 units have been rehabilitated by the H.A. in the West End U.R. Project. These do not increase the number of housing units _ available, but do increase the supply of standard units. 1 Includes only units financed under Federal assisted low and med ium income housing programs; and units constructed under convent ional financing as follows: Multi-family units costing not more than $10 ,000, exclusive of land Respectfully submitted, ti Duples uni ts · " " " · " $12 ,000, " "ti ti Single family units " " " " $15,000 , " }k-k d-J-~-"i-~ Enc ls: 1 . Summary of Public Housing in Atlanta 2. Notes Malc olm D. Joo/5 . Housing Coord~nator 3. Inventory of Low and Medium Cost Housing in Atlanta (with office copies only) Note: �HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE May 15, 1968 SUMMARY OF PUBLIC HOUSING IN ATLANTA 8 874 • Existing Units in operation - filled. • 1140 Units in Development stage, as follows: Units under construction off McDaniel St., in Rawson-Washington completion in '68) (248) Spring '68 (82 of these units completed 5-15-68) (402) Fall '68 (650) Units under construction in Perry Homes Extension - South of Procter Creek. (78) 3 Bedroom Bids opened March 7, 1967. Permit issued May '67. Const. (46) 4 Bedroom (16) 5 Bedroom on schedule for completion by Nov. '68; 48% completed 5-15-68. (350) Units planned for Thomasville U. R. Project (40) 1 Bedroom (16 elderly) Bids opened May 15, 1968. 12 months, at least, required for (120) 2 Bedroom construction. Will try to have part delivered before final. (80) 3 Bedroom (80) 4 Bedroom (30) 5 Bedroom 4200 (1372) Units reserved (Allocations made by HUD to date; Hollywood Rd., 202; Gilbert Rd., 220: Bankhead Hwy., 500; and Honor Farm #1, 450) (500 units of this reservation are approved for allocation to the leasing program, to be replaced later) I (500) i Units allocated for leasing program; can only be utilized for Public Housing as ~hey become vaca n t. Allocation requested for 230 additional units to the leasing program. 300 5640 14 , 514 • R. Project (scheduled for (140) 1i I. u. (8 locations) (658) Units under lease (372) Negotiations under way for leasing 372 additional units. • • Total Potential Figures in ( ) in this column are included in figure above; not in ( ). { i I Encl. 1 .I �HOUSING RESOURCES COMM ITTEE May 15, 1 968 NOTES A. ll, 022 units proposed did not materialize, of which 8,056 were shown in the previous report of Jan. 1 5, 1968 a nd 2,966 a d di tional units are listed in this report, as Lost. (The majority .of these losses were due to disapprovals of sites and propo~ed r ezoni n g. ) 0 f B. P roposed locations for low-cost housing .are coordinated through the Planning Dept., for adequacy of Community . Facili t ies, ex i s t i ng or pros p osed. Proposals are also reviewed periodically with the School Dept. for adequacy of school facili t ies. C. An engineering firm from Savannah, McNa mara & Associates, Consulting Engineers, has recently made present ations in Atl ant a o f a t' p atent applied for" low-cost housing method of construction with flexible design, whic h is claimed can be construc t ed qu ickl y o n sit e, employing mostly untrained labor and at a savings of 10%-15% under conventional construction. This fir m establ is hed connections with a reputable construction firm in Atlanta and a l ocal architect. This team is anxious to acqu ire a 1 0 ac r e tra c t in the Mo d el Cities area to construct an experimental Housing project. · D. The Travelers Insurance Company has agreed to finance 70 or more new single family low-cost houses in the Th omasvil l e Ur ba n Rene wal p roject a rea under the FHA 221 D (2) insured mortgage program. Equitable has made $1,000,000 available to Atl ant a Mor tgage Brok e r ~g Co. for financing low-cost homes at favorable rates. E. I n v i e w o f difficulties encountered in zoning and getting other approvals on sites proposed for large multi- fam ily d e velopme nts , it is app arent t h at the Low-income Housing Program will have to lean heavily on Developers and Builders prov i di ng a s ubs ta nti al p or ti on of the requirements on small scattered sites, with or without Federal assistance. 1 ! I I I ·I F. No pro p os a l had yet been made for construction of uni t s (even efficiency or 1 bedroom) to rent or sell for a s l ow as $ 50 per mo nth, althoug h the London Towne Houses, a 221 d (3) co-op development now under construction, is pushing t his close t with its o ne bed room u n it advertised to sell for· $59 per month. The City's greatest need is in the $30-$50 per month re nt a l -purc h ase r a nge . G. Ric hard L. Fullerton Associates has proposed a fibre glass "manufactured" patented process, 3 bed r oom and bath house . ( 900 s q . ft. & c ar p o rt ) with w-to-w carpeting and air conditioning, which he claims can sell for $9,000-$9,500, including l and es t i mat e d to cos t $ 1,500. H. National Homes Corp. of Lafayette, Inc. placed on the market Fab. 1, 1967 a 800--900 S. F. (O.S. dimensions) 3 b e dr ooms , p refabric ate preass e mbled p a nel, single family house plus a 96 S.F. (IoSo dimensions) stora ge building manufac t u r ed b y Arrow Me tal Products Corp. , t o sell under FHA 221 d (2). Price includes plumbing , electrical, heating units, stove & refrigerat or. Ho uses c an be comple t e ly a ssembled in 8 5 man h our s; 72 of t hese ( wit h conventiona l plumbing) are being erected (pr e-sold) i n t he Thomasville Urba n Renewal Area . Approx . 8 0 0 sq. f t. h ouse is priced at $ 11,200; 900 sq. ft. house is p riced at $ 1 1 ,600. Adrian Homes Cor. has prop osed a p refab to r e tail f or a bout $ 7,500 plus land, foundation , closing and possible tapping fees. Other p refa b d is tr i but o rs and c onve nt i o n al builders h ave int eresting potential houses to of f er but, because of fear of local Codes di ff icult i es, are not producing single i fam ily houses in Atlant a to sell in the $ 10,000-$ 12,500 range for which there is a strong demand and marke t . Pe rhaps the grea tes t 1 di f f iculty is a v ailab il i ty of suitably priced land within the City Limits. Economics for this p r ic e r a nge sales h ousing req uire land wh ich will no t c ost t h e developer mor e than $ 1500 . per unit. (A 5,000 sq. ft. lot is cons i dered a mple for this type house.) I. Ralph L. Dick ey o f Atlant a h a s proposed ~a non-prof i t revolvint fund enterprise to acq uire substandard hous ing ; renovate it and r e s el l prima rily t h rough .priv ate e n t e r pr ise. CACUR recent ly f ormed a 1 non- profit corporation to reha bil itate e xis int 1 units u n~er 221 (h) • . I Mo r r i s Brown College is a not her such sponsor . Nor th West Communi ty Forum ha s a lso fi led app lications for ~ 4 projects und er 2 2 1 (h) ~ J. Informa tion is welcomed as t o c orre ct ions, add itions or delet ions of ma ter ial conta ined i n this report. {Ca l l 522-4463 Ext . 4 3 0 . ) �I HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE I !' PROJECT INDEX To accompany Low-income Housing Inventory Report of May 15, 1968 Item No. No. Units New - Existing Designation Location Program· Allen Temple Single Family Duplexes & Smal~ Apts. Apts. Leased for · P.H. Rehab. H.C. Div. Rehab. by H.A. Rehab. by Pvt. Ent. Apts. Apts. Apts. Apts. London Towne Houses Public Housing Gordon Rd. ~ear Harwell Scattered Scattered Scattered 8 Sites Throughout City West End U. R. Project Scattered 2661 Beeler Dr., S.W. 1930 Flat Shoals Rd., SW 1991 DeLowe Drive., SW 200 Alden Ave., NW 3242 Custrman Cir., SW McDaniel St., SW 221 d(3) Conv. & 221 d(2) Conv. Conv. Leasing. for P.H. H.C. Enf. U.R. Conv. Rehab. Conv. Conv. Conv. Conv. 221 d(3) co-op P ·.H. Pa omp leted C-1 C-2 C-3 C-4 C-5 C-6 C-7 C-8 C-9 C-10 C-11 C-12 C-13 C-14 Totals 373 380 100 534 658 10,487 218 30 28 32 96 400 6 82 2 ,TI3I' 11,393 Jnder Construction UC-1 UC-2 UC-3 UC-4 UC-5 UC-6 UC-7 UC-8 UC-9 UC-10 UC-11 UC-12 UC-13 UC-14 UC-15 UC-16 126 96 78 108 140 568 306 247 76 62 30 134 80 250 150 11 Park West No. 1&2 College Plaza London Towne Houses Gartrell Ct. Perry Homes Ext. McDaniel St. Single Family Duplexes & Small Apts. Apts. Apts. Apts. Apts. Apts. Apts. Apts. Single Family 3751 Gordon at Bolton i017 Westview Dr. at . Jones Pl. 3242 Cushman Cir., SW . 38~88 Younge St., SE 1730 Kerry Dr. , ,NW R-W UR Project Scattered Scattered 1145 Constitution Rd., SE 140 Mt. Zion Rd., SE 419 Chamberlain St., SE 1101 Collier Rd., N.W. 1895 Plaza Lane, SW 1185 Collier Rd., NW 1991 Delowe Dr., SW Thomasville U.R. Project \ I 221 d(3)L.D . 221 d(3) 221 d(3) Co-op 221 d(3) LD P.H. P. H . Conv. & 22i d(2) Conv. Co nv . Conv. 221 d(3) LD Conv, Conv. Conv. Conv. 221 d :( 2) .i �i. HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE PROJECT INDEX (Continued) Item No. -- No. Units New - Existing Designation Location Program - Jn der Construction (Continued) UC-17 UC-18 UC-19 UC-20 UC-21 UC-22 UC-23 UC-2 4 UC-25 UC-26 UC-27 UC-28 UC-29 UC-30 UC-31 UC-32 UC-33 UC-3 4 UC-35 UC-36 To ta l 58 76 76 192 138 108 80 92 48 192 . 45 64 400 92 72 202 208 20.8 2 41 54 5,10'8 Apts. Apts. Apts. Apts. Apts. Apts. Apts. · Apts. Apts. Wheat St. Gardens 2 & 3 Apts. Apts. Apts. Apts. Apts. Hollywood Rd. Project Friendship Center Allen Temple 3 Apts. Apts. 1910 Bixby St., SE 1501 Beauregard Ave., SE 1935 Allison Ct., SW 914 Collier .Rd., NW 2722 Gordon Rd. , NW 2950 Springdale Rd., ~W 2390 Palmour Dr., . NE 1090 Hollywood Rd., · NW 2113 Defore Ferry Rd., liW. Butler St. U.R. Project 3379 Stone Rd. SW 1073 Hollywood Rd., SW 3901 Campbellton Rd. SW . . 2400 Campbell t ,on Rd. SW 50 . Mt. Zion Rd. SW 1580 Hollywood Rd. NW 99 Northside Dr. SW 31·75 Gordon Rd . SW 475 East Paces Fy. Rd. NE 3136 Gordon Rd. SW Conv. ~or lease as PH Conv. Conv. Conv. Conv. Conv. Conv. Conv. Conv. 221 d(3) & RS , Conv. Conv. Conv • Conv. Conv. Turnkey 221 d(3) 221 d(3) ·conv. Conv. I n Plann i n g IP- 1 IP- 2 IP-3 IP-4 IP- 5 IP-6 IP-7 IP-8 IP-9 IP-10 IP-11 IP-12 IP-13 52 116 1,384 3 50 262 220 5 00 1 52 20 250 500 41 588 Park West 3 London Towne Houses Cerex Atlanta Corp. Apts & Elderly Russel Property Gilbert Rd. Bankhead Hwy Site Ebenezer Baptist Church Single Family Ashbury Hills Home Fairburn Rd. Site Single family lots . Central Methodist Church Gordon Rd. at Bolton 32 4 2 Cushman Cir~ SW Rockdale U.R. Project Thomasville U~R. Project Off Etheridge Dr. NW At Flynn Rd. SE Bankhead Hwy; ,. -at . Maynard Rd. Between Capitol Homes & I-20 Thomasville Gammon Theological Sem. Site Fairburn Rd. N. of Holy Family Thomasville U.R. area E. of Fairbur~, N. of Sewell 221 d(3) 221 d(3) Co-op 221 d(3) co~op,221 d(3),BMIR ,M I R P.H. 221 d(3) Turnkey Turnkey 221 d(3) .221 d (3) Hill-Burton Act , 232; 202 221 d(3) Co- op 221 d(2) 221 d(3) & Elderly �HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE PROJECT INDEX (Continued) j· .i j It em No . No. Units New - Existing Designation Location Program Betmar Apts. Apts. Br,owntown Rd. Site Butler St. YMCA Site Leopold Project Apts & Elderly. Apts. Apts. Honor Farm 1 Apts. Apts. 1765 Pryor Rd. SE N. of Gordon, W. of Adamsville Dr. N. side Browntown Rd. NW W. side Hollywood Rd. W. of Jonesboro Rd.,S~ .of McWilliams Bedford-Pine U.R. Project 3750 Gordon Rd. SW . E. of Brownlee Rd., SW, N. of Scott Off McDonough Blvd~ West Lake Manor East Lake Golf Course 2 Leasipg for P.H. Conv . . Turnkey 221 d(3) Turnkey P.H. Conv. Conv. PH;Turnkey & 221d(3),(2) 221 d(3) L.D. Turnkey Single Family Lots Joe Anderson Project Joe Anderson Project S. side Westview Dr. SW Seminole Ct. Apts. Cenker & Kingloff Project Railroad Ave. Duvall tract Wellswood Apt. area Ga. Teacher's Develop. Inc. Lee P. Fore property Keith Project David Berry Proposal Multi-family Apts. Cath. Archdoicese Property Thomasville UR area 221 d(2) Glun Club Rd. NW 221 d(3) Alvin Dr: NW 221 d(3) West End UR area 221 d(3) LD Near N. Highland & N. Ave. Turnkey Rehab. Harwell Rd. at Oakcliff 221 d(3) Railroad Ave. NE 221 (h) or d(3) E. of Jonesboro Rd. SE Turnkey S. of Englewood Ave. SE Turnkey Harwell Rd., S. of Bankhead Hwy. 221 d(3) · E. of Empire Dr.,sw,s. of Oak Dr. 221 d(3) Co-op W. - side of Gilbert Rd. at Co. line Conv. W side of Fairburn Rd.near ··Bak~rs .:Fy ; Conv. East of Kimberly Rd.-Fulton Co. Turnkey L.L. 68 14th Dist.-F.C. Conv. Off DeKalb Ave. at Hampton Ter . Turnkey l I n Planning (Continued) 1 IP- 14 IP- 1 5 IP-16 IP-17 IP-18 IP-19 IP-20 IP-2 1 IP-22 IP-23 I P-2 4 Total 352 48 450 180 180 364 52 40 600 32 800 7 , 151 ~Being Considered BC- 1 26 100. BC-2 BC-3 150 BC- 4 50 BC-5 80 BC - 6 65 BC -7 500 BC-8 2 40 BC-9 225 BC- 10 2 50 BC-11 16 BC-12 20 BC- 13 600 BC -1 4 72 BC -15 200 BC -16 2,594 Total 36 l Did Not Materialize DNM DNM-2 8,056 150 175 DNM-3 50 DNM-1 Shown on p r evious report of January 15, 1968. W. side Jackson Pkwy; at Procter Cr . 2 21 d(3) Co- op A. L . Roberts Pr ope r ty H.A . early submit t al E . side Jonesboro Rd;N . of Circum. Tu r nke y or 221 d(3) Blyd. Dr . SE,Howard - Hallman- Saunder s El d e rl y Turne r Monumenta l Chu r ch • I .l �HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE PROJECT INDEX (Continued) Item No. No. Units New Existing - Designation Locatioa Program )id Not Materialize (Continued) DNM-4 DNM-5 DNM-6 DNM-7 DNM-8 DNM-9 DNM-10 DNM-11 DNM-12 Total 260 200 364 280 100 175 360 500 352 11~022 221 d(3) Wm. L. Warnoker Proposal W. of S. Expressway; S. of AWI>RR Conv. Charlie Taylor Proposal W. of Bolton Rd; S. of Sandy clr. Luther Fraser Property Adj. to CC Esates;off Boulder Pk. Dr.221 d(3) Turnkey Ralpy Willis,J.R. Hall proposalCuster Ave. E. of Chosewood Pk. Carl ton Marlow Proposal W. of Jackson Pk\VY ;D .E. Glenrock Dr. · 221 d(3) Trailer Park Site Bankhead Hwy. at Osburn Rd. Turnkey Golfview Apts. Cleveland Ave. Ext. 221 d(3) LD Part of Golfview Project At Cleveland Ave. · Ext. Turnkey Wm. A. Mitchell tract Between Collier Dr., NW & I-20 221 d (3)" �June 3 , 1968 ME ORANDU FOR RECORD Several weeks go rs. Charles W. Heeden of Lithonia (telephone 482-6149) called me concerning her property at 512•14 Decatur St., S. E. This property was under Housing Code proceedings sever 1 y ars go , together itb other properties in the s me block on either side of tb Heeden prop rty. As efforts the top St ., S . cost of a result of th Housing Code procedures and y person 1 at that tie to enfo ce the Code, the Heeden ' s removed floor (residential) of the building at 512-14 Dec tur E. and re odeled the ground floor for business at a approximately 12,000 . I infor ed Mrs . Headen that I no long r directly involv din Code Enforce ent and referred her to r . J mes A. Smith, Chief of the Housing Code Division. This date, Mrs. He den call d e ag in and read to e rec nt Court Order (copy att ched) p rt ining to the properties adjacent to b rs ind informed e that her Insur nc Comp ny ha cancelled her insur nco on the prop rty at 512-14 Dec tur St . nd th t she cannot get insurance itb ny other oo p ny b caus of the fire haz rd caused by th adj e nt properti s. rs . R den pecifically requested that l brin this to th tt ntion of th M yor; that b c plied 1th th reque t to i prov the property at 512-14 Dec tur St. owner of th dj c nt prop rti (which r in wor than b r ) b v done nothin and th t she 1s now th victi of circu t nces by da ge being o used by tb djac nt prop rtie. This t.s a ca e of long standing. Housin Cod viol tions on the prop rti s w r r port d nd eorr ctiv otion initl led in 1961, '63 nd '64. The tt ched court Ord r p rt in to th �- Page 2 June 3. 1968 emorandum For Record follo ·ing properties : emorial Drive , 615 emorial Drive , 510 Decatur Street , 516 Decatur Street , 530 Decatur Street , 609 S . E. S . E. S. E. S. E. S. E. This case is making a mockery of the Housing Code_and "In Rem" Orelin nee of the City of Atlanta . I as personally involved in enforcement procedures against these properties, as Director of Urban Re ewal , during the period of 1961-64 . Subsequently, as Supervisor of Inspection Services in the Building Department, I discussed this case at length personally with Judge Whitman of the Fulton County Su ior Court and with r . Robert H. Cleveland, receiver for the executors of the Estate of rs . E. c. Johnson, deceased . I recommend that these properties be personally inspected by any one involved with this c se and that the best legal talent available be utilized in an 11 out effort to resolve this case in behalf of the City . Malcolm D. Jones Housing Coordinator Encl: Copy of Court Order dated ay 23, 1968. �,~ 1 - . --' ~ - .., - ---- ·--. ·.. .. .. I I I MRS •. DOROTHY · JOHNSON SHELL, Individually and as Executrix of the Estate of Mrs. E. C. Johnson, Deceased . CASE NO. A-10557 . Plaintiff •• . . • vs. .• MRS. JULIA JOHNSON MEADOWS (now O'KELLEY) and ERNEST C. JOHNSON, JR., Individually and as Executors of the Estate of: Mrs. E. C. Johnson, Deceased FULTON SUPERIOR COURT .• Defend?,nts 0 RD ER It appearing to the Court that no immediate danger of damage will result, if ~he properties sought to be demolished by the City of Atlanta are left standing; IT IS CONSIDERED, ORDERED AND DECREED that the City of Atlanta is hereby temporarily enjoined and restrained from demolishing the houses set forth in its motion, and .• in the order passed by the City ordering demolition. This Order shall be of force and effect until the further order of this Court. This /l. J/J..day of May, 1968. ! !. 'I. \ ... · -- �··, > ~.-. _5 .. \, - ~-- ;-·; Y:__)J _:::• .~ r-~:-<: rr... -r , -(i-'j"" i / "-. ._,!.,t- ~-.... . ..~ _L-.1~ ~!': - . · . . .I_ ~...: .. ~ .. .. ,:·· ·.f._.... 1 Apri'J.. 1 , 1968 ·~·,. ,-'-..·,. , \ ... CITY HALL ATL.A.!'•.'T A , GA. 30303 Tel. 522 -446 3 Area Cod e ~04 IVAN ALL EN, JR., MAYOR CEC IL A. ALE XAN DER, Ch airma n Housi ng Resou rc es Committ ee MALCO LM D. JON ES Housin g Coordinator The Honorable Ivan Allen , Jr ., Hayor Ci t ;y of At l a..n.t a 30303 Hayor Al len : Pursuant to y ou:~ di re ctive :>f Earch 19, 1968 pertaini n g to a ct i on to b e .L D, bl • l 1.ent,a-;:,i ' ' • -:m 0 1 1:,ne ' u , ;::; , ano., d l i c -".~ei:.ci e s i n i r:i_p._er. Rto t . Cor,1rni ss ~_on ~te':)or t , i:-;i ~l~ - s p e ci al er:iphasis on Ci'1 ~pte~s 10 a nd 17, t l1e . por ti on on II tJ ou s in_:; 11 , s p eci2.ical l :· a s sign ed to tl:c nousing :?.es011rc e s Crnx ni t tee i s h er eu i th s ubr}itt ed , fo r file 1-ii th th e 1°:a~·or ' s Off ice a.n.d t h e Advisor y Cormni ttee on Civi l Lisorcl.er s . ' b y vl ,-, • t y ;...ep 11 t 't«en ar e,s cn l,s J A • • • ~ 1 c, Attention i s call ed to my i rc.tial l e t ter rep o1· t of Earch 22, 196~ copy a t t a ch ed (Encl . l) , A more detail ed rep or t HOrke d up by t he Sous i n 6 Coorc::.i:riator 2.nd revi eHe d by t hi s Cor,'T'i t t e e 1 s Con sultant , and uith whi ch I gener2.ll y con. cur i s atta ched ( Encl.2) . Sincerel y , Encls: Co::,y of l et t er cat ed r-:arch 22 , 1 968 Rep ort dev2l o~Jed oy riousi ng Coor di:r..a t or �Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal . 1Jurch 22 » 19 68 COPY The Honora ble Iv~n Allen, Jr., Haybr City .of Atlanta Atla nt a , Georgia Dear Iva n: In e .:mnectic•n with tr. e i ::ip lf,rr,e nt ation o f the hous i ng pl,ase of the Riot Report, r:e st:;2;;:;est tl;c fol1011ing: l. A persona l l e:t ter from y ou to aJ.l developcr-s i;,1ho h2ve not hrot e n gr our,d uPg i r,g tb c,rn to get r.ioving . Color:e l Jon es c a n supr ly you with t Le n c:.,:;(;s . COPY 2. Ca ll en t he Al~ci~ ~ nic Loa r d to r evi se t h e City Euildi ~i Code to c o nf or,:1 ;:ith t 'hc Fc:.tio,12.l ? uil din2 CoJ D, t r1 w : 1. r,abl l.'1g less e x pe n s i ve co1~:-;tructi c n. 3. As k th e Atla nt a Eo us i n?, .~u~ho!'ity to t 2.ke 1, 00 0 o f tr:e unit s no;1 to be:: c e v e lo:,i:d ;:,y t r,c tur rfr.ey pr oc es s and r e v~rt to the old r.i~tllod of bu:i l d inr, thcz. u s 5_;,:T, t!-,e Aut ho·c i t:y . It is in t:~e a !'-~.J. of pul1lic hous ir.z un its e ,ot ·..-e nrc b ehind your sc:1-2dule . i'cvic:,,r t he n u, r:1;:i:::t er l 2r.d u ~e :ile.n t o ·inc lude sone Bor e a nd ~.tr-.:: t n(3' ic a r e as for hous i r.s , 1'l icn c a ll on t he ;.lden~an ic Board to a Jr • f:r. t-:a lcolm D. Jones COPY COPY COPY v ./ �i I HOUSnIG RT~SOU~-WES COJ,ITHTTEE Report Requ ire d by Nayor ' s Directive of Har ch on .11 U-.S. Riot Commission Hepor t 19, 1968 HOUSING The entire rep ort is quite comprehensive and uell done . The Committee deserves crecli t for so thoroughly analyzing and cJ.evelop~ng such a -corr.prehen-· s ive report on s uch an involve d and expl osive matter. , In gene ral t he r ep"o rt lJc1.s signal ed out and effe ctivel y treat e d many of the major i ssues i nvolved. Little fault. can be fou..11cl 1-1i th its pr~ncipal findine s and r e conmendations. Hoi.-rever , t he rep ort bas ically pla c es ~11 r e s ponsibility for the riots on the Ahi te Conmu.ni ty and f ails to place any responsibilit y on the participm1ts in the Riots for the wanton de struc tion a nd other crimes which they cor,~rni ttecl . Thi s omission i.s unfortunate ~s i t ·coul d r esult in a fe eling among futur e p~t ential riote ~s tha t such pro ceclure i s cor,doned . not be This possibi lity should. overlooked Ha ti or.all y 2..'1d locally in c;i.ttcrapting to dea l with this eA-plosive situati on and prevent future riots . The r eport r ecomm~nds ancl ca lls for drastic a ctions on t he part of Federal, State , and Local :?;O'rer·nnents a s -~ell as '. Jhite Co,,muni tie s for s pe cific actions to correct Tu'1satisfactor :r conditions a s a deterrent in preventing f1.:ture riots. It fails however to call for or place upon the dissi dent oc·cupants of s l um areas any c ons tructi ve eff orts which t hey t:-1er,1selve s should t ake to improve thei r conditions . Of t he spe cial r e comnendations contained in Chap ter 10 of t he repor t , it appear s tha t corre ctive measu:r·e s for all of them are a dequ a t el y dealt with in ·- the Eayor 's -1-farch 1 9 Dir e ctive , with the possibl e exception of " }0cpanclcd Legal Service t o the ?oor" . Additional corr ective r esponsibilit_y in this fi eld might b e assign ed to the loca l Bar Ass oci a t ions . The n eed for c orrectin~ or improvir:g u..11s atis.factory condi tions in t he slur,1s of our cities , one of t!le foremos t of uhich is housini , is ,vell docunented 2-.nd .,, in generaJ. t he rernecliec pro~)o sed and r e cor,,11encla.tions mac1e are so1.1.t,d 2J1d ap~)ear a c1equate , if carried out on the l ocal l evel. Hi th r espe ct to - C'nw.,ter 17 1-rhi ch deal s spe cifi cally :,;i th proooss d c orr-: ctiv e meas ur e s , ~: some b e si c considerations i n the hous i1,e fi eld appe2.r to have b een o verl ooke d or at l e~ s t the y are not spe cifj call :;r brou:;ht out i n the re-)ort . Drief cor:11'lcnt on some of t hese , as t hey affect the l ocal h ous i r.~ si t uation jn Atl;:cnta , fo1lom:: . �2 Three basi c f actor s are cur r en t l y der:1ora.l i ,-,in~ f ut ure progr ess in lo cal l ow- i nc ome housing constr uction i n At l anta : Firs t, is the l ocal oppos i t i on t o mul t.:L- fami l y housi ng, part i cul arly Publi c Housing . Pr ogress mus t be made in f a cilitating rezoning of ne ces s ary sites to meet Atl ant a ' s l on-income housi ng needs , if adequate progr ess is t o be continued i n t hi s i mportant field . · Se cond, the existine Feder al poli cy of di scouraging approval on sites f or . . . Publi c Hous ing in r a d al .J_y identif iabl e areas i s hi nd~rinc progre s s of t he pr ogram and pr eventing the constructi on of many uni t s t hat are badl ;;r ne eded for t he lowest i ncome fami l ies . Third, the l egal prohibition agai ns t 221 d ( 3) Federal l ~r assisted proj ect s being built in governmental entities ( such as nei ghbori ng counti es which do not have appr ove d 1:·Jor kabl e Progr arns ) is def.e ating the purp ose of the Lou- income . hardsJi j_p for prov:Ldir.e such housi n~ on communities Housing Progr a.m and is pl a cing unc."ue which do have 'iJor kabl e Progr ams . . The current polic~.· automat icall y ex clude s t hos e ' ar eas whi ch have the mos t avai l abl e land and where t he housing is most needed (near neHl y l ocat ed industrial establis hments wher e t he occupants could be pr ofitabl y emplo? ed). This Comrai t t ee r e comm.ends t hat spe cial effort be made to over come ea ch of ·the above indi cat ed obs t a cles. The r ecom:me:r:dat ion cont ained in the report that Pu'b:l_ic Housing be more fl exi bl e in both desi E;TI and t ]I)es of units (including t o1mhous es , du~~exes and even si ngl e . bution on small er scatter ed sites , is ver y worthy f amil y hous es ) as well as distri . ~ of encoura;;ement , in orcler t o ge t a·. ,ay f r om t he i nstitutional ima~e of Public Housing_~ I n fa ct it :-rould be ver y hel pful i f t he Housi n:; Aut hor i ty would el i mi nate 1 all of i ts signs at the entr ances t o pr oj e ct s adver tizi:r:g t o t he publ i c i n effect t hat II t his __is a l ow r ent Feder all :, subsidized housing pr oj ect 11 • Emphc>.sis i ri the r eport on application of the Hou~i ng Code i n substandard and depr e ss ed areas i s verf appropriate , ho1-1ever ·t he feature t hat could be most effe ct i ve , and which hc>.s been mos t ne 6l e ct ed i n Atl anta , i s not ment ioned; t hat is tenant r esponsibility . This shoul d and must be stres 9ed continous ly, i n orc.l.er t o get more effe ct i ve r esult s fro m the Housine Code . All iWA Neighborhood Centers should promote class es i n hous ek e epi ng and property maint enance by oc cupant s of rent al housing . I nstruction in t hi s fi el d shoul d be _i, ns tit uted , perhaps at ni ght , to whic h clas ses t he Housing Court could ~ s entence minor of fe nders to a ttend a pr escri bed number of s ess i ons , in lieu of monet ary f i nes or j ail s ent en ces f or code vi ol at i ons , in a s i mi l ar manner to th e procedure no~, bei n:; prac t i ced i n Tr affi c Court of s ent encing mi nor of fe nder s to attend sessions in 'I'raffi.c School. �i ~------- The cl eanup of premi s e s , effect i ng co:ri:-1ercial a nd indu strial, a s well cJ.s .r e sidential proper t i es , i s a nother i mporta nt factor in i mproving the Ghe t tos . The condj_t ion of premis e s should go hand in hand ui th Housing Code en forcement, · 1-1he t her it is dire ct e d by the Sa nitary Depar t ment or t he Eousinz Code Inspe ctors. It i s quite f utile to i mprove the living condi tions of a dwelling unit and n ot r equire the i mmediate premi s e s and surr oundi ng ar eas to b e cle ane d up and kept cle an_, .'e spe cially in the ghett os. Siml arl y , it is usel~ss to i mprove a residential property a nd l eave the c0171P1ercial or i ndustrial prop-e;;ies· in the same vicinity in a disgraceful and disreputabl e condition • .Atlant a needs b a dl y a Cominercial and Industrial Code, just a s it has a Housing Code. Some of t he more pro:;ressive cities have such cede s today , legislation r e cent l y a dout 's . ed which authoriz e d Atlanta , 11 The enabling In :?.em 11 Ordin2-n ce prov· ding for moving direct l::r a gainst dilapidated residential proper ti e s inste ad of, in he traditiona l manner, against the o,-mers, for violation of the Housing Code , al1o authoriz es such action a gainst· poorl y 111aintained commercial and industrial es lablis hnien ts as ;;ell. All th2.t is needed is a local i rripl er.1enting Ordinan ce . In order to provi de and encourage much d.esirs d home o, mership a.>rtong loH-i:pcome familie s , a s pe cial sins l e family zoning district should be ad8pted ,-,hich would p er mit con str u c t i on of .sin~le farr.ily home s of 720 s quare f eet or l ar;er on lots having a ma;dmum · i..rea of S' , OOO square feet, wi t h a r.iin:L-nurn frontga::;e of SO 1 • This would provide ample area for lm-r- income sin3l e f ar:lil :r hous e s an d would provide increa se i n t he d e:nsity by 50:, and redu ce t~e cos t of lots l:iJ 33 1/3; f r or.1 tha t now authoriz ed by t he current a pplicable ~-5 sin5l e family r esidenti2.l zoning district . It is r e cormnended that some n e~-r l o,r-income devel o:::ime nt be iniate d as s oon as poss i ble t rais sum,iler in t he 1•'. odel Ci ties area , by s el e ctin g a t l east one lirni t ed area ( per haps four ci t y blocks ) in the h eart of t he r.:os t dilapidat e d portion of the area and obtaining authority from the Federal governr:: . nt to acquire the 12nd t hrough 0 an adva nce a cquis i t i on process , similar to the rnanr.er in whi ch 18.nd. for t he Auditorium and .Civic Center -i--as a c~uired, and turr.i n~ it over to the Hous in·; Au thority, or t hrou ~h expedi t e d sale to private enterpris e to -dev elop. It i s a l s o r e conmende d tha t iI'ia ti on of develop::1.e nt of a t l eas t a o or tion of t h e }..;eder 2l ? rison s ite be e:,::pedi ted f or s tarting cons truc t ion this S'J.rrcr1er of l owi nco?'1e housing by pr.irate enterpri se . �CITY OF .ATLANT.A CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 May 31, 1968 IVAN ALLEN , JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT; JR., Director of Governmental Liaison Mr. M. B. Satterfield Executive Director Atlanta Housing Authority 824 Hurt Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Satt: Of the several categories of low-income housing to meet the City's five year goal, Public Housing, including Turnkey development, is the category in which we are currently most behind. Locating suitable sites for this type development is extr eme ly difficult and experienc e to date indicates that we cannot afford to leave most of this problem up to the hopeful developers. In order to speed up construction of the Public Housing units which we have reserved, I would like for the Housing Authority to assume responsibility for development, by the Housing Authority itself (old method), of 1, 000 units of our current reservations, in addition to the Public Housing units currently planned for the existing Thomasville Urban Renewal project, the Bedford - Pine Urban Renewal project and Honor Farm No . 1 site. We will endeavor to assist you in every way feasible 1n obtaining suitable sites for these additional units. Sincerely yours, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor cc: Mr. Edwin L. Sterne �May 31, 1968 Mr . M . B . Satterfield Exe cutive Dire ctor Atlanta H ousing Authority 824 Hurt Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Satt: Of the sevei-al categories of low-income housing to meet the Citys five yeal" goal, Public Housing , including Turnkey development, is the category in which we are currently m o st behind. Locatmg suitabl sites for this typ development is extremely · difficult nd expei,ience to d te indicate that w cannot ffol'd to leave most of thi problem up to the hopeful developer • In order to speed up con trued.on· of the Public Housing unit which we h · ve l" el'ved; I would lik for the Housing Authority to assume responsibility fol' d velopment, by the Hou ing Authority its lf (old m thod), of 1, 000 units of our cu.rrent r rv tions , i.n ddltlon to the Public Hou ing unit cu1"rently planned foJ' the .xi ting Thom ville Urb n Ren wal project, th B edford-P in Urban Renew l project n d H onor F rm No. l sit . W will endeavor to s i t you in ev ry w y f dbl obt lning suit-bl it tor th • ddltlon 1 uo.lt • S inc: r l y y ou.I' , I c: Mr. Edwi n L. Ste _ Iv All n , Jr. May or in �CITY OF .ATLANT.A CITY HALL May 31, 1968 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS , Administrative Assistant MRS. AN N M. MOSES , Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Governm ental Liaison MEMORANDUM To: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. From: DanSweat o/ Attached is a copy of the cover letter sent to you by Cecil Alexander in response to your request for implementing the riot re port. I am also attaching letters which would follow up items 1, 3, and 6. I recommend you sign these letters. DS:fy �The New York City Education al Construction Fund was crea ted to carry out .a new program of urban deYclopmcn t, the ronstru ction of elementary and secondary public schools in combined-occupancy buildings. The Fund is a public benefit corporation, a S_tatc-authori ze\l, self-supp:::·_tins-.J.~1-~i~~ tio!1 most commonly called an auth ~!_)t_y, establi sh ed to finance th e con struction of public . --- schools for the City of :l'\ew York. It is govern ed by __nin e un salari_e~ --~ ~~':_':_S, five of whom are members of the Board of EclucaJion. The program is intend ed to achicYe three objectives: 1. Maxim11m 11sc of land . Construction sites arc becoming increasingly scarce in the City. Those that remain must b e used with m aximum effectiven c:~s. To en able n ew schools to be built jr{ conjunction with oth er faciliti es, the l::c1u ca tion al Constru ction Fund has b een given as its principal purpose "the timely ;!nd responsive provision of such combined-occupancy structures in accorda11 ce wit], th e foreseeable need s of the City of N ew York ... " (Sta tement or legi sla tive fi :1,li ngs and purposes, Anicl e 10, Educati o n Law) 2. Fin o.nci11g rJ11f sid e thr Ci ty's capital budge t The need for a m ass ive school constru ction p rogram h as d evelo ped at the I same time as many other dem a nds for capital improvements. The Fund is a new source of fin an cing ou'ts idc the City's capital budge t for a substa nti al school construction progra m . Its operations will increase the ra te at which n ew schools can be built. In addltion, th e Fund " ·ill provide th e public school sys~cm with additional schools that could no.t be built und er the City's debt li~~i·t.. 3. Reinforced econ om ic and social vitality Combined-occupancy st ructures will provide n ew sch ools in several kinds of settings. ln S::QIT!!!!g£i~l areas, speciali zed high school progra ms, s~ich as th e co-op progra m o1Icrin g experience trainin g toge th er with skills training, could train the highl y-skill ed gradu a tes required by th e busin ess commu n ity. In residenti al areas; sch oo ls and hou sing in th e sa me stru cttircs sh c uld fos ter a ffi~f~-;;]·JCS~'C n~ighborh oo cl life. S;lll-C a re;~ .::. su ch as tho-;e -; Ch ('duJecJ for extensive red evelopm ent - might ,1·cll lend th emselves co an y con1bination of facilities su ch as child ca re a nd H ea d Sta rt ce nt er3, c,Jm me rcial fa ci liti es, m odcr~tcincor11·e h ousing a nd ~- sch <_?ol. ---·--- - �May 31, 1968 MEMORANDUM To: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. F :rom: Dan Sweat Attached is a copy of the cover letter sent to you by Cecil Alexander in response to your request fol" implementing the riot re po:rt. I am lso attaching lettei-s which would follow up items 1, 3, and 6. I i- comm.end you sign these 1 tters. DS :fy �May 31, 1968 Mr . M . B . Satte1'field Executive Director Atlanta Housing Au.thority 824 Hurt Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Satt: Of the several c t gories of low - income housing to meet the City' s five year oal,, Public Housing , including Turnkey development, l th c tegory in which we ar currently most behind. Locating suitabl sites for this type development is xtremely difficult and exp rienc: to date indicate th t we caQ.not afford to leave most of thi problem up to the hop ful developer • In 011der to peed up con tli'uction of th Public Hou ing unit which w h ve r aetved, 1 would like for th Housing Authority to \Ull r spon ibility fot d v lopm: nt, by the Hou lng Authority it li (old method), of l, 000 unit of our current r e t-v tlons, in addition to the Public: Hou ill unit curr ntly plann d for the . xbting Thom vlll Urban R newa.l project, the Bedford-Pi e Urb Ren w 1 project and Honor Farm No. 1 site. W will endeavor to a sist you in ev _ry y fe lbl obtaining euitabl sit • for thes dditional unit•. Sincer ly yours, Ivan Allen, Jr,. M yo~ c~: Mr. Edwin L. Ut • in �May 31, 1:968 Mr . Lee Burg Betail Credit Company P .. 0 . Box 4081 Atlanta, Georgia 30314 Dear Lee : Cecil Alexander ha informed me of the exc Uent work you h v been doing as Ch irman of the Finance and Non-Profit Funds Panel of our Housing Re ources Committee in est bU.shing a Non ... Profit Housing Development Corporation to as i t d lopment of lowincome housin in A tlant • 1 under t nd that thi is pretty well lined up no , including an initial op rating fund. I wi h to congratul te you on thi worthy ccompli hm.ent and to ugg st that form l announcement of the corpor tion• purpose d ctual xistenc b made to the public ooz,, nd th t the eorpo,-ation become · ctively eng ged in el ting low-income hou ing, ne d velop nt nd rep ir 0£ xl ting d lling , 0011 po lbl . I wish to per onally thank you and your Committe I.or your effo in th1 fl ld nd to 1 h you succ in th cor-pof tion' end or•. Sincerely you • Ivan All n, J-r.. M yol' <:c: Mr. C cil �ay 31 , 1968 rtin L~ King ; Sr. Dr . Ebenezer Baptist Church 413 Auburn Avenue , N. E. Atlanta , Oeor ia Der Dr . King : It ha rec ntly c me to has not yet broken project , y attention that your or nization round on your 152 unit R won- oshington A you kno this 1s n important element of Atl nta ' ov r 11 low--inoo e housing program nd is very much needed in eting he City's goals for housing o .- lo and moderate incom famili s . l 1 b to enoour g pos ible in getting co and urge you to move truction i por ant dev lop ent and it pos ible . r pidly ctually tart don this very ultim t co pl tion s oon s . hieh t nd to d lay this developtn nt and resolv , ple s o 11 on our Bou in sit you . l wi toe rly your or ucc in o rrying tbi d v lop bop to th utual b nefit of both City of Atlant • Siner ly, Iv n All n, Jr. yor I r/ J/aac nt �ay 31 , 1968 r .- David Rosen David Rosen A oci t s , Inc . 2352 Natio~ 1 B nk of Georgia Buildin Atlant , Georgia 30303 D r r. Rosen, Ith a r cently c me to my att ntion that your organi tion b snot y t broken round n your 1384 unit Rockdale Ul'bao ene- l project. you kno thi is n i port nt ele eut of Atl ut ' overall lo -income housing program and 1 v ry much nG ed in meeting l'he City's go ls for housing oul" l nd oder - te incom f mili I wish to ncour ge and ur you to mov r . pidly as po ible in gettin construction ctu lly st rted on thi v ry 1 portant d v lop ent nd its ulti ate co pl tion soon s possibl • If proble hicb you r R ouro C which t nd to d, l y thi i t you·. t rrying thi d v _lop nt utu 1 b n fit o both · nt • ish you th b st of ucce rly co pl tion., and l b your org ttt. tion nd th City of to dev lop nt nd c 11 on our Housing olv, pl as 1"no r _ly, I n All n, Jr~ )'OX' lVJr/KDJ/ c �ay 31, 1968 -Mr. icb Alston , 1220 C & Atl nta, Dear el Trotterr Attorney iller and Gaines S National Bank Building Geor ia 30303 r . Trotter: It ha recently came to my att ntion that the group ith - hich you are working h snot y t broken ground on your 180 unit Hollywo04 Road project . A$ you now thi is n i portent lemeut -o f Atlanta's overall lo -inoo e housing program nd i v ry much ne d din meeting the City's go 1 inoo e f mili s. tor bousinc our lo nd od r t I 1sb to noour nd urg you to ov s r in gett.ing construction ctu lly t rt d very import nt d v lopment and it ulti te compl o-on po stbl. possibl ri which t nd to d 1 y this d v lop nt unable to r olv ,. pl se c 11 on our Bou 1n to 1 t you. l t 1 to rly your o»g nd th tb1 d v lo 1 b n Siner ly.,. lv tt All n, · r. II r JVJr/JID~/ c nt it ot both �May 31 ~ 1968 rvin Warner T rvin Warner Corp . 107 5 , aeadi oad Cincinn ti , Ohio ~r . D ar has r. aruer . It ha recently ca o y attention that you o· yet broken gro nd o yours · O unit F irbur organization Rod proj ct . As you know this is an important lem nt of Atl nta ' all low- inco e housing progra and is very mueh ne ded in h City's o ls for bou·ing or low and od rat inc e f I w'sb nooura~ and urg you to mov rapidly po sible in g t ing con truction actually start don thi impor ant dev lopm n· nd its ulti ate co pletion soon o sible . 1~ proble aris · ich t nd o d lay th· d v lopmen hich you r un bl to re o v , pl as c 11 on our Iousin Resources Committe to a 1st you . ery s nd you h b st of succ ss in carrying thi d v lop nt I arly compl tion , and I hop to th mutu 1 ben fit of both your or anization and the City of Atl nt . to Sino rely • Ivan All n, Jr . yor �y 31,168 A. s . Die er o ae ~ D r Re • Die C ntr 1 t ·oct t Church 1507 ozl J Pl c , S . Atl nt., Geor i tly c to 1 tt ation t grou don your 558 UQ1t It ha on : not ir ur 11 1:h ill ry • n inc r 1 , I a • yor 1 1 • Jr .. �May 31 , 1968 Mr . atthew D. Bystry , snag r itin - Turner construction Company 2970 Peachtree Road , N.l . Atl nt , Georgia Dar 30305 r . By try : Let me congratulat you and your o pany on being the first to break ground on Turnk y Lo - inc om Housing proj ct in Atl nta . Th ground breaking cere ony on . ay 9 . on your Holly ood Road project bas been distinct sti ulu to our Low•income Housing progr m nd hop to se others t rt d oon . bro I notio,, how v r , tb t your org ni _ation has not y t n round on your 220 unit Gilb rt Road proj et. pidly s on thi very oon nd urge you to ov construction aotu lly nt nd it ult1 t oo ncourag 1 nd Hou 0 l to 1 h you the b rly co pl tion your org ni ation t of · ucc no l hop nd th d v lop nt 11 on our inc rrying thi d v lop _ nt to th utual b n fit of both City of Atl nt • inc r lf, Ivan ll n, Jr. yor lVJr/tl.DJ/: c �.. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -~~---•,.! Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal Hay ao, 1te1 COPY ns-. Job I. Le , S. ea-lnteadeat Atlota Pla!>Uc School.a MP. .1 111 C. Vai wri bt • hnldeat Atlat• Doud of Education QmJ.oaed i• catlonal · ha COPY 1'MOUl"CU c lttff• . b lt• Lapl P Atioq tile Tee 11~• ln1 ca1 Connltuta fu itbe • • Tork 1• te &clYiaoS't who i• a pe,N OMJ. fl'iu4 ad uuoiate · ot aJM. If you --~ UN to 41N1IU this I INN ba will ..-twit y • COPY llMa• ,1... tbl• U111P01acb ,our Col!ld.'t't. . v11l he1.p I COPY •1. . . . . 'to ceur11ntct hoo1a Ul'l4u • i.e.. VNa&. . .t •lmltaeouly with COJl8'trQclt of be UII• atr.. Al'CMr- o. ltll. !i.Ql145'1ND of that pe•J. • uke4 to cona t w1t tvo &1.'t t• h1bletlft l'OQtea ~ Mk• thU •1hh.. T wllet1 J.a aUU be aMJl'O&Clll t'O tlM. pabl• •ppe to ft ••lleGt po9&U>.UttS..a 1a llowtSng Sena •• U u ·G t.law flelu. ken NekJi in e14erat.toa. • ..., tbat i'~ OUt • Jo - • lMu w.ltll bJ.11. �f. . i 1 ·• ,.. i i ! i i l [ l ! 1 1 ·I I 1, j J. -j 1 \ i t • • i' l -i . ! I .t j i . ,j j -~ ·, J .-i I . f ! \ ,· ) I 1 ~ ·i ! j l 1 l ·j . ·1 i 1 ~ . l ·] ! ~ i1 _! ·) INFO l{_IV!rftTIO r~11.L I3TJ I ,LETII'~~ MAY 2 4 1953 j l -I ] FINCH. /\LG'.,"J<2rn, Q;\R~4:S, ROTHSCHiLD & Pf';~ClnL ATL,-\;~ i·A, G~iJ:-?2iA �·.= - - . =·~-·=-1 ..J ·- !~ t . -· i~~! -; ~ €. ~~c, =. ~~ r ~.; ::,-:_ i~ i7 rr Brown G uenther B a ttaA lfo Galv in, Architcds P.S. 126 AND HlGHBRIDGE HOUSE - This facility, the first in the Fund's program, combines an elemen tary school for 1,4 11 children with 400 apartments for micldlc-incorne families in the Bronx. �-1 I The Fune! is the ·first agcn~y of its kind 111 the country authorizecl to fin ance public schools in combinecl-occu1:iancy structures. Although its purpose is new, it is a traditio nal form of governm ~nt institution establishecl to fin a nce public and quasi-public facilities. •· The rapid increase in the number of public benefi t corporations in urban ized sta tes like New York. during the past twenty years has parall eled the n eecl for increased capital construction ::;.t costs exceecling liniitations ·on public debt. Simila rly, New York City.'s fi scal lim itations, toge ther with its need for school constru ction, generatecl th e crea tion of_the Educational Construction Fund. The concept was clevelopecl by Lloyd K. Garrison while h e was President of the Boarc.!_ of Education. H e saw the public benefit corporation as an appropriate vehicle to serve both the City a nd th e school system. " ' ith a gra nt from the Tacon ic Foundation to underwrite- research and bill dra fting, he initiated th e action that subsequentl y " ·on the endorsement· of Governor R ockefeller a nd . J\fayor Lindsay and th e support of the L egislature during the 1966 session. The Fune! is h eadecl by the President of th<.: Board of Edu cation wl10 is designa ted by hJ\v :ts Chairman. Four additio nal m embers of th e Boarcl of Educaticn, appointed by the Presidcn, , serve th e Fund during their terms o[ office on the Boa rd. Fonr tru stees, appoin ted by the i\fayo r, serve term s se t in itia ll y at two, three, four or five yea rs. T h eir su ccessors will all ~erve for fi ve years. The present trustees bring to the d irecti on of the Fund's development and fin ance operillions a combi ned background in a ll areas essenti al to th e success of this n ew venture -education, housing, labor, commerce an d finance. 2 �l The ·Fund is expected to proYid e a substantial portion of the City's school .construction program from now on. . Combined-occupa ncy stru ctures I.milt und er thi s program ,rill ~e o\\·ned j3__i_1!_tlY. - --by .the Fune! and the deYclop er. Th e Fund will finance ancl own the land ancl . - - ---- ---- ---------- -- - ·-· the school. The d eYcl op er " ·ill fin ance and mrn th e faciliti es aboYe the school. The two portions of the combinecl-occupancy building will be d es ig ned and constructed as a singl e proj ect. The Fund's acti viti es generally start with a site designated by th e Board of Education for a ne\\· school. Th ey inclucle dcYeloping appropri a te con cepts for combined me of these sites, promoting deYeloper interest in undertaking construction, ancl coordinating with th e Board of Education durin g the desig n and cons~ruction of the school. Local School Boards will b e consul tccl, and all combined-occupancy structures will be appro\'ed b)' th e Board of Education as well as by th e Funcl, thu s assuring th a t the program directly serves the school system. The Fund hopes to a tt ra ct as spo nsors qu alifi ed person s and orga niza tion s interested in participa tin g m th e program , including community and other non-profit g roups. School sites already mrn ecl or b eing acquired by the City will be publicly adverti sed by the Fund if suitable for th e developm ent of combin ed-o ccupancy structures. Proposal s for th ese sites will b e invited from potenti a l sponsors and devel op ers. In addition to info'rm a ti o n describing th e site, th e Board of Education's r equirem ents for each sch ool will be made availabl e for the preparation of a proposal. Evalu a ti o n of the p ro p os al s will b e b ased on several criteri a, including th e comp a tibility of th e non-sch oo l use, th r in come t 0 h e derived th erefro m, and th e finan cial ability and experi ence of th e appli ca nts. P !."_op_os_a_l~ _fro_~ _J~O ten tial dc,·elop ers " ·ho eith er own or h ave a lega l interes t - - -- -in a site m ay b e 'consid ered o n a n ego ti a ted b as is. Th ese p ro posa ls would h ave to- m ee t th-;;-s -ii111e--st;-~c1 ~·;:.cls- of fc ii.s ibility -;l~;cf de,-cloper qualifi ca tio ns as th ose received throu gh publi c im·ita ti on. In additi o n, th e Fund m ay consid er, in r are in sta nces, n ego ti a ted p ro posals fro m developers who ha\' e in curred consid era ble cos ts in. developin g imagina ti ve des ig n or no vel m e co ncepts for a 3 �,. comoin ecl-ocrnp:111ey building. In accep tin g either type of proposal, the Fund will be governccl by th e public interest. Eventually, om1ership of the site and the school portion of the combinedoccupancy structure reverts to the qity. Air ri ghts to the non-school portion will be leased or sold to the developer. . The developer will h ave full responsibility for th e construction of th e school as well as th e non-school_ portion of th e building. Although the three ma3or subcontrac tors (plumbing; heating, ventilating an cl a ir conditioning; electric work) will be selec ted by p ubli c bidding, as required by law, instead of by the inform al negot iation usual in priv':.t~ ,rnrk, th e winning bidders will be made responsible to th e genera l contractor or d eveloper. The major ach·antage of a single construction contract has thu s been preserved by establishing a, singl e responsibility for the timely and satisfactory comple tion of th e w'ork. 4 �--- The . F1..: ncl will sell tax-exem pt boncls an d bone! anticipation notes to finance ' -- --- -·----- --------------- -····- -- site and construction costs of school s built under its program. Th e developer ·-- -·------ ~----- - ------- . ------ ------ - -----------~ ,#. ---- -~-. will independentl y ((r:i__a1:~ __l~i~_p_o_1~~i_on of~ ~ co1'.1~j_£1~~l-occupa ncy structure,__ using eith er convention al or government so'.:!-ccs of ~ortgagc•.:_~~1:.':X·~ The Fund's bonds are expec ted to be hi ghly m a rk etabl e at a fav orable rate becau se of an unu sual security feature I~ additi o n to a capital reserve fund cover _debt service for any succeeding year on all outsta nding bonds, as is customary for public ben efit corporatio ns, th e law authorizes a first li en on to State aid to New York City for th e support of th e public school system. A call on State aid would be mad e only in th e improbable event th at the capi tal reserve fund shoul d at some time be insuflicicn t to meet debt service and the · City did not rcpl enisl1 it to the amount requi red. H owever, th e provis:on assures at all tim es th e so lvency _o f the Fund and th e security of its bonds. D ebt service on the Fund's notes and bonds will be paid from income. There w ill b e three sources: I. Paymen ts for th e sale or lease of air rights The Fund will rece iYc fro m t!1e devel oper an annu al payment, based on fair m arke t value, for th e sale or lease of ~he ai r rights over the s::hool. 2. Pay m ents in lieu of taxes Instead of paying real estate taxes to th e City, th e developer will m ak e equivalent payments to th e Fund for a p eri od_ of time not less th an th e p eriod of th e serial bonds issued to fin ance site a nd construction costs of th e school. 3. R en(a ls for th e sch oo ls This paym ent is expected to be nominal for th e majori ty of schools bui lt 111 combined-occupancy stru ct ures. vVhcnever th e income from th e di sposition o f air rights an cl payincnts equi valent to real es tate taxes are sufficien t to coyer d eb t service an d the Fund·s admin istra tive costs, th ere will be no need for additional incom e. School renta ls will be req uired onl y for th ose structu res tha t cannot mate suffi cient p aym ents to cover debt servi ce, such as tax-exempt public faci li ti es and certa in kinds of non-profit housing. · The bonds to be issu ed by the Fund arc lim ited to 40-ycar maturities, and the notes to 5-ycar m a tu riti es. Th ey a re lega l investm ents for all organi za ti o ns authorized to buy th e Sta te's bond s or other obliga tions, such as public bodies, trust and msura n c;e compan ie., , b a nks and fiduciari es. 5 �.l..- ... i· The major ponion of the program. is expected to provide new schools at liule or no cost to the City. i\Jost residential and commercial structures are SI a year. Some . will even yield a surplus, which can be used for the construction of additional expected to yield enough income to p ermit_ a school rental of schools or turn ::"cl over to the City. Some combined-occupa ncy structures ,rill probably be built to meet the City's social needs clc'spite their inab ility to produce enoi.1gh income to pay all 0£ the debt service - those providing rnodcrat;-rent housing, for example. In these instances, school rentals will be no high er than the annual cost of a comparable new school. The Fund h as been designed for considerable fl exibility in its operations. Because a wide variety 0£ commel-cial, public, social and residential uses can be accommod a ted in combined-occupancy buildings, many sections of the City offer appropria te si tes. Combined use is adaptable to small structures thc1.t can blend into existing, cohesive communities. Jt is also applicable on a la rge scale to major redevelopm ent areas, including urban renewal and l\Iodel Cities projects. It can b ecome on e of tne City's imponant plann ing tools during the n ext d ecade to create econom ic, social :rnd pl:ys:ca l renewd while carrying out its prime pu rpose of creating additional sch ools. 6 �Alfred A. Giardino Chairm an Aaron Brmrn Fergus Reid, III Lloyd K. Garrison Philip A. Roth Morris Iushewitz Clarence Senior Jason R. Nathan Howard Stein Daniel z. Nelson Exe cu live Director Grace Bliss Assistant Director Sol A. Liebman G eneral Coullscl Andrea \\Tilson Consultan t on E1hlcation .. ' YECM N~tt:Al COMZUi\.TI\MYS 1, Nixon l\Iuclge Rose Guthrie Alexander &: l'l'I itchcll Bond Cou nsel Finan cial Advisor Erns.t & Ernst John H . i\fuller / Auditors R eal Esta te A c/·uiso'- 7_ Eastman Dillon, Unio n Securit ies&: Co. �EDW IPl M. , . . S 'r ER NE EXE C U TI V E C HA I RMA N B . SATTERFIELD D I RECTO R AN O S ECRE TA R Y LESTER H . PERSELLS GEORGE S . CRAFT ASSO C IA T E EXE C UT .I V E D !R E CT O R V I CE CH A IR MA N CA RL T O N GARRETT DIRECTOR J. B. OF FIN A NCE GILBERT H . BOGGS SLA Y TON DIR E CTOR OF HO U S ING FR ANK G. ETHERIDGE HO W ARD OPENSH A W JA C K F . GLENN D IRECT OR 824 HURT BUIL D I N G ATLANTA, GEORG IA 36303 O f' RE DE V EL O P M E NT GEORGE R . SANDER TECHNIC A L D IRECTOR JACKSON 3-6074 May 22, 1968 Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. c/o Mayor's Office City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Sweat: Another FIRST for Atlanta! Thursday, May 30, 1968 at 10:00 a.m. the Atlanta Housing Authority will be host at ground-breaking ceremonies for the first 11 New Town-In Town 11 program in the country. To reach the site in the Thomasville Urban Renewal Area, please turn south off McDonough Boulevard op Henry Thomas Drive. Direction signs from that point will be posted. It is our hope that you can be present on this important occasion to meet and hear Dr. Robert C. Weaver, Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development. With Mr. Edward H. Baxter, Regional Administrator, DHUD, presiding, Dr. Weaver will be presented by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr . Others participating will include John T. Edmunds, Assistant Regional Administrator, DHUD ; Warden Gordon Blackwell, Uo s. Federal Penitentiary; Cary Hooks , Director , Georgia Federal Housing Administr ation; and Wilbur H. Sanders , Regional Administrator, General Services Administration. One hundred and t wenty acres have been made available to the Authority by the Federal Government to use in developing a new model community in Atlanta. This new neighborhood , superior in s chools, parks and ot her community facilities, i s expected to show the way for cities in the nation to utilize federal sur plus lands to meet cr itical urban needs . This ground- breaking is symbolic of the type of leadershi p Atl anta i s furni shing the nation. ~:_, Edwin L. St erne Chairman ELS:gk �.. i . May 17, 1968 -.. . ,·. ' f Mr. Eznr D. Ehrenkrantz ! President Building Systems Development, Ince 120 Bro~d:-:=iy San Francisco, Cc?lifornia 94111 Dear Hr. E;~enkra nt.z: ·- t We nppreciate your l et.tor of Nay 10, 1968, on the npplicntion· of Building Systeras to thn dove1opr:-:ent of b::.uslng in l:o(fol Ci ti0 s J.reaz. He, l:01;ever, are not imrolvcd in this t :i110 devolop::1ent, and would hrive little tc, offer to your p.r-oera!"l. However, we h<'l vc tc:?ken the libe1·ty to i'o:r.,r.::rcl your letter to t1-m clcvelopQrs and con1:.ultm1ts 1-;ho h&.ve presentsd systca appro oche s to us. I am 5Ure they wlll be in cont act "i,'1.th you. If' W9 c an ba of further assi$tanco, plea se feel free to cr.11 us. Very trul y ;yours, Jffme s H. Hm~lr;y , J1·. Chief, cc : Hc!k:;1.'.jrc! t1. Ar-s-~d.B'ces Joha O. l ~c:~z.nm~.:i B. Ens t Taylor St re~t S.:,vc3nn:::h, Gc·o~·c.ia Ri chrir·c1 L a FulJ.erton & A~:::<>ci at es Ri chwrd L. Fullerton B.1x 716h Atl £:ntJ, G.::oro;la J OJ09 Prof.,T .::1·.1 Services Branch �' / / . ..dlJILD&mG SYSTEnns DEVElOPMEl'JT, Ir.JC. 120 Broadway ,,/ May 10, 1968 --- A tlanta Housing Authority - -- H u r t· Building Atlanta, Georgia · Gentlemen: Building Systems Development, Inc. has been awarded Prime Contract No. H97 l by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to develop the "In-City Experimental Housing Research and Development .Program" for 25 model cities . . This program is. designed as an experimental project to develop new methods of pi"oviding low cost housing. The program itself is divided into two phases -- the first taking five weeks during which time the experimental program must be developed with respect to specific cities with recommendations submitted to HUD by June 15, 1968. The second phase calls for implementation of the experimental program with construction commencing on individual . _ . _ _ ___proje_c;~s q ~ aLch J .,__19.69~pp:r:.oaches .whi.ch-are .developed in these experimental projects will provide new building products, components, systems or total buildings which will meet the needs of the city residents · at a low cost. It ·is obvious that successful approaches have an opportun ity of be i ng implemented widely in model cities and throughout the country. In fact, the program is directly related to Presid ent Johnson' s objective of 6,000, 000 new or rehabilitated federally as siste d h ousing units for lower income farnilies. The approach to this project is t o analyze the various cities to determine their needs and their ability t o h ost different social and technical experin~e ntal approaches to housing. Simultaneously; we are looking to industry for new dev elopments in terms of produ c ts or procedures which will meet the needs of people fo r low cost hous·ing quickely. We are, therefore, soliciting comp anies such as yours throughout the country to determine whether or not there are appropri3.te building systems , materials and construction ideilS which you would like to have us consid er for use in the individual e x periments. If you wish to be considered in this regard we would welcome receiving notice imm ediate ly \ Telephone 415 434 3833 94111 �. / - 2 - and desire full information on the product ideas and infoi:mation you ~ave in mind. We would be pleased to have the opportunity to evaluate this information and assess the way in which various ideas of different companies can be combined to P1eet the objective. ---All .information you submit to us .will be considered to have been submitted in respon.s e to this inquiry, will be ·submitted by us to the United .States Government as infor~ation developed by us as a ;-esult of the research and studies conducted under the above-mentioned Prime - Gontra·ct No. H97 l, . and will be subject to and ·governed by the provisions of Article V "Publication" and Article VI II Patents" of the Prime Contract. Copies of Articles V and VI are enclosed. Your submission of information to us will constitute your agreement with us to this effect. During this period that we are preparing the Phase I report, preliminary to submitting this report to HUD for the Phase 2 contract, we desire V that any work that we do to incorporate your material into an experimental .--:-p rogram be considered confidential by you until the submission is made to HUD. - - ~l"-f_ you have information relating to other manufacturers with whom your products are comp atible, we would also appr e ciate receiving this information. We specifi c ally desire complete inforrpation within a week, including drawings, test data if any, photographs, and experience on any precedents whe re i n the products you are suggesting w ere used. We are interested in w h ether you have had experience wi t h or will require code or zoning var i ances in order to use your p a rticular ideas, and whether it is anticipated that there may be any problems with regard to jurisdictional d is put es among installing building trades unions . Included as Attachment 2 is a list of the 25 model cities which we are considering and a n y specific experience in these citi es wo'uld be of. considerable interest . The e x perimental p r ogram calls fo r the construction of perhaps 10 to 200 d w elling units in e a, ch city with the possibility of building substanti ally more if it -..vill benefit the e x perim e nt . We would be interested t o receive information on th e co s t of your compone n ts in the nearest mod e l city to y our plant for 10, 20, 50, l 00 1 200, 500 or l, 000 d we lling uni t s. The actu a l proj e cts w ifl be financed through e x isting fed e ral pro g rams . ·som e m o nies w ill b e a v ail a bl e for e x p e ri men t a l cos ts . These w ill b e alloc ate d on a cost benef i t basis. �/ / "' - 3 / We also need information regarding the number of units which you estimate would be required using your material, product or system to approach the point of optimum efficiency . The. information on your products, systems or dwelling .units should also -:-d ei.-C::r1be methods a11d tinie for installation and general procedures that may be required at the building site. Your interest in terms of distribution of products should be indicated whether it be on a national basis or not . If there are specific cities in which you have had e x p e rienc e work ing in the past and in which you would like to work speci~icalJ.y the forthcoming experimental program, please indicate which one.s they are. I on We urge your earliest reply to this inquiry. Please address it to: Building Systems Dev e lopment, Inc. - "Post Office Box 817 Oakland, California 94604 - --T-ei:·eplrnne: ··-41 5-27t~ 2211 Attention: Jos e ph P . , Fleming v ·e ry truly yours, BUILDING SYSTE MS DEVELOP M E NT, INC . \ \ I �.. · ··- · ·- · -- ·- . - -- · _.... . ./ r / / AttcJcr.w;nt C to RFP H-..22-68 / v. PUBLICATION .. A. Definition. For the purpose of this Clause, "publication" includes any ci.oct11aent containint:; inforn!3 tion intended for puhlic co:1st:mption or the act of, o:c any act which m3.y resuit in, disclosing inforrr.3 tion to the public. B. General. The results of the re s ca1·ch and studies conducted ur.der this contl·act are to be n:adc av.:iilable to the public throu2;h dedication, assignment to the GoYernm::mt ,. o::c such other .means as the Secreta:cy of Housi;1g and Urban Dcvelo1Jment sha ll dete1·mine, as requi:ced under Title III of the Housing Act of 19!~8, as arc.ended (12 U.S.C. 1701e). C. Reports i-1.1.rnish-::d the Cove1·m.:2nt. All int e rrr.edfate and. fi:lal r e.9orts of the ::ce Ee a-cch and studi e s conducted hc:::ceunde r sha ll ir.dica te or, the · cover or other initial page th8t the resea:cch and studies fcnc1ing th:~ basis for the 1·eport s;-rerc conducted pursuant to a conti·sct with the Office of the Secretary, Depart~..:2nt of Housing and Ur b irn Dc relopm·2 nt. Such reports a rc officia l Gov<2rn.:-,ent p r operty and may not be publish(,d ·or r eprodu c e d (in toto, in verbGtir.i. e xcerpt, or in form a ppro:d.r.t:i-t -ing either of these ) as a n unoff icia l pa p Gr ·o r a i·ticle. Unless :-;t:ch repor t s are pla c ed in the· publi c dorr:a in by Goverm~e nt puolicGtion, ~-r.citt e n permission to publish or r e produce them in whole or in pa:r·t in a nonGovernmenta l _publica tion s hall lle obta:l.ned from the Contracting Offic e r. D. Public c:1 t ion b y Go;iernrc.ent. The Of fic e of the Sec re t ary: D-=9n1: tr:1t2nt of Housing and U1·ca n De ve l opment , sha ll ha v e full right to pu bl i s h :'lll inf ori::a tion , d.a t a , nnd findi ng s de ve l oped as a r e su lt o r' t h e 1·e :;;c::o :::ch and studi es c onducted he t cunder . Such publication will, at the opt ion of the Cont r" c to1· (excep t in t he c,1 se o f quote d e xc e1·pt _:, f r o:-~ t he Contract or ' s r eport), c redit the Contra c to r and i t s p r i nc ip3 l p~ r s ~n ne l i nvolved b y fo rewo1·d o r i n i tinl f ootnot e to t he pub lica tion in fo r:1 s ub sta ntia lly as follows: . The r ~s c arch a nd s tudie s forming the b as i s fo r thj s r ~port were conduet c d t h r ongh cont l'a ct '.·rith ( H::irne o f Contrc1 ctc r ) by (N::m.e o r na rr:e s of :9rlncip::il p er~wnnc l ) . Exc ept as othe r~:ise indi0.,, t cd , the D-29.1 r t r(tC: nt o f Hou sin.-:; an::l Ur'r. .-; n Dev 0l o.9mt:~ nt acc -=p t s r e s ponsib il5.ty f or t he: c c:~c lus ton s ht.':rei n s t ::1te d . . . .. - .. , �·-· - - .. . - · . .. - __.,__ . - . . .., , ,.; ... _. - Attachment C to ' RFP H- 22-68 .t E. Sensitive Inform3 tion. The Contractor slwll not publish or otherwise disclose, ei:ccpt to .the Government and c:
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 6, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 5, Folder 7, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 7, Complete Folder
  • Text: , .. 7 ' . \' , .. 1 ~ • •• .., ") ~. . • ., May 6, 1968 --- . ·- l ~ --~ .. : Honorable H. Ralph Taylor Assistant Secretai·y _. _ ~ __:>•;_, .... -i .__ .£ .' _. _....:.;~--- ,. , ___ . ' .-·. t.,: --. _ .:, Department of H ousing and Urban Development __ ., -~~ ~.:.-. ;n -1:..:.:. _.'.'.l, ;;;-:.,-r" . 'o/.ashington, _. D. C . . 2041 0 .....• Dear Secretary T aylor: ~ .• ~ .. . . ~ .... .. : ,, .;' . J , ' ::: ·.· t Your letter of April 22 informing us of the proposed low-cost housing experiment by HUD in pe 1·haps 20 cities having Model Clties g r ants is m.o st intrig uing. We definitely want you to include Atlanta on your list as one of the cities w illing to coope rate in the deve lopment of innovative techniques , pa:rticularly in our extensive M o del Cities area, in interest of generating increased levels and reducing constr uction costs of dwelling units for low-inco m .e families. On May 2 our Housing Resources Committee adopted a Resolution 1·ecommending early sel ection and deve lopment for low-income housing, as s oon as possible, of approximately a. ten acre po1·tion of the w or st residential section of ou1· Model Cities .., area, through "advance l and acquisition" procedure. / We have also been approached by an Engineer , reputable local Contractor and Architect team which is anxious to obtain a site in our Model Cities area for construction of several hundred units of high density (4 0 units per acre ) low-income housing, using a "patent applied for 11 concept of precast concrete general pur pos e angle slabs that can be cast on-site and installed with a minhnum of equipm.ent and using p rimarily untrained local labor. The principal in this team, Mr. John :McNamara, Engineer of Savannah, Georgia, I understand h a s a l ready contacted a couple o! your people in Washington ab out hi s concept - Mr . Po1·ter Driscoll, �- • Secretary Taylor Page T"vo May 6, 1968 .. Director, Architectural Division, FHA in HUD, and Mr. Deman,· Assistant Commissioner for Technical Standards in HUD. We hope that you will keep us advised of the progress of this housing experiment and assure you of our desire to participate and willingness to cooperate in this venture. Sincerely yours, •• -~. ~ ~ ·, ~ 1· . .... .... .. ·'.. ..-1 .- .: y ~:; ~ ·.· _.. :.~ ·.' "t f l ~ . .. .;t r. 0 i. ' ; . . · ..: ... . ·· 1:j ~ . :; :. lvan Allen. Jr. Mayor .. ·. ' ") .. i.; , , ~· IAJr:fy .... _.. ..,.· ~ •,' ...... __. , ' ..... ,. . ·. , ) -\ . ~ . ...:,; I '·. ..; ,,, ' : . -~ .' . .. • • \ .. ,._ :. J fl ,, . .:· . ,; ' ,, ..... ,..,_ ,. .. .. ;.... I • ! '· ·:'. '. .- . •• ', .... ~ ... .-. , .· _ I \I - .. • ) ::,• ..- -., ,, , : -, .;, .-~ ... I .1. r," :'.:. ... : .-.: I .. • ., , • ,•,I';. r ... . . . ·- .• -: ~ ·. _,; ..... f • ~ ... , • ' ~.--. ', t > : : �... - - DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT . WASHINGTON, D. C. 20410 . ! OFFICE OF THE ASSISTAN_T SECRETARY FOR DEMONSTRATIONS AND INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS IN REPLY REFER TO: APR 2 2 1968 I . . Honorable Iva_~ Allen, Jr. ¥.ayor of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear ·Mayor Allen: I want to take this opportunity to i~orm you of what I believe is a lllost exciting experiment in building new housing for low- and moderateincome families within the Inner-City. Within the ne:x-t several weeks, a prime contractor, most likely a joint venture of several firms, will be selected. by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. T'nis prime contractor will be expected to supervise and manage a variety of low-cost housing experiments in perhaps as many as 20 cities, most of which now have Mod.el Cities grants. These experiments -will be carried out only in cities which are -willing to cooperate in the development of innovative techniques aimed at generating a higher level of housing construction for low-income families. !l1he prime contractor will seek out, study and evaluate new design, construction and management techniques and systems, as well as materials and components to be used in the e.A-periments. Based on analysis and. after consultation with city officials and such interested private groups as l~bor unions, neighborhood organizations, builders, architects, sponsors and educators, the contractor wlll determine the kind_of housing to be built in a specific neighborhood. T'ne goal of the overall experiment is to obtain more housing value for each dollar spent in the development of good city housing for low-income families, and to identify the obstacles to building such housing. Where such housing is to be built within a designated model neighborhood, the experiment "1ill be carried out in the context of the Model Cities planning and program implementation process. In any case, it seems essential that the groups mentioned above be consulted if this bold experiment is to work. Following the selection of the prime contractor, HUD 'Will work wl th him to select cities which seem ,to have the capacity and willingness to carr y out an e:x-perimental project for low-income housing. The Departinent will be committing not only substantial research funds in this effort, but also t ens of millions of dollars o~ . program f'unds from several program soUTces. �- 7 • 2 With the :full cooperation of all who become involved in this experiment to better the nation's housing, and to make government more responsive to the most pressing housing needs, I believe that this can be a most . significant step toward meeting the goal of a decent home in a suitable living environment f'or every· American family. / Sincerely yours, .. • 1 . . ' ' ·. . -'_· . .' . ,, . ..: . . \ I I ~ ' fa /4~(!dA,/4cl'AJ; f/-N . ., .? .. H. Ralph Taylor Assistant Secretary �C OQlt 120 , Cl HALL y 10 , 19 r 11: • t10D 1 to t d d 0 ta n1n C iu 70 t • r• C t C nte 0 • t r .t. • • ~ C ' 0 co 8 t ot. A at f 1 f d t .d •" ee •rat c, 11 , J. 1 ' • l , w•Jn i it el• ,. �May 9., 1968 Mr. M . B . Sa.ttei-field Executiv Dir ctor Atl nt Housing Authority 824 Hurt Building Atlanta, Georgi· 30303 De r S tt: 1 note th t th R solution adopted by the Boa:rd of Aldermen on May 6 pertaining to th Honor Farm No. 1 site authori~e that it b taken into the Thomasville Urban Ren wa1 Proj ct "to be dev loped primarily fol' hou lng £011 !am.Ute of low d 11 mod r te incoine . U.nd r thb criteria, it could cone iv bly b d v loped und J' the v riout · specta o1 the 2Zl d (3) program and housing for th eld rly only. Enclo d l eopy ol a Be olution dopt d by the Hou ing B so-urc • Commltte on May 2, caUtn tor d v lopm nt of a. sub tant l portion ot th dditional la d to b tak n into the p't'oj ct for u1owest incom ho lna. 11 I r onally · uppon thil vie and l'•q et t in calUn £or proposals from. elopers for the rea that the Hou ing Authodty . pc.cliy a. •ub bultial portion of th land to be d veto d for h u.ehlg for lowest come tamilie•. Slnc I' ly. Ivan Allon. Jr. Mayor lAJr:fy cloa •• �RICHARD L. FULLERTON AND ASSOCIATES Con.1ultant.1 /or .Jtulti-/amily .Jlou.1ing Telephone 4 36 - 6 134 P o st Office Box 716 4 Atlanta , · Ge org ia 3030 9 Th TELEPHONE 422-4479 145 NO RT H MAGNOLIA AVENUE P . O . BOX 2068 M y 9 , 1 68 ORLANDO, FLORIDA 32802 Honor ble Iv n Allen, Jr . .M yor of A tlant 0 or ta Dear Mayor Allen: In b half of Mr . K hn and 11 who ar wor kin ' ith u ~ in the e atabli m nt of com• ,>r cilen &lv e br~ kthroJ~ in con  :.i truction co6t , I wbh to JCpr e$ our lnce re t ppr ec tloa fo r the ti me nd 'r;n r y you ave us tht• ft wrnoon. I r l h.e your v ry c r o•d d rJChedule nd th e:.rit.l.:. · µro portion. o f yo1.1r d ily rtw pon ib llltle • you kno~ . the f~deral peo ple , well au cone rn ed citl~ n · , are a lmo i:.;t dttsi-1erat l)' rur.touL to e a ? rlc ~ br kthrO!.l ' h mad , · o U, t tb · poor p~ople c n have d l nity of owne r ·l i p v.lthout il b ln tot l ~ ub idy condition . To b:.ill public hou in . for 17, CiOO p r unit l nu t tl e n Vf r. Th tJ an r can only be found in th at ~hlch madv /\m rica r at ln the !lr t place (r11gal ppr ch to Uf •s many op;.,ortunltl~ ' for t w rd '.tp. tad au c r n t d lre to ;,rove th pot ntl l of our con. tr11ctlon tech.ni u in. c urban ::: ettln • \,f~ -.,r vlous 1 tte r wa compr eben. ive tn th t reg r d . I m v ry ur that the f cic ral p opl (beyond th r e l on l HUD office) 91ould b,.. ~ntbu alaaUc in their cooperation, and \t i• a conviction w ith m ' t h t Atlanta would aln mu h from the fact of bdn th• pl c ·he r thi honelit and ood Am rlcan thing tran ptr d . Th tlme c ri ltJ ls upon u as lt l upon ever yone. o that we cannot atfora to let thi · umm r p & whlle only proc d-ir l f!atre; are car d for . \\ w re not too l t in our orl inal:, pr entatlon. V. e cam ltl a v ral w ago 1th a very 6 rl u · ..,ropo ition nd are ,; ttll aB sine ... r r t hen . e hav ain, p.lease accept my · ratlt\l.de tor your · raclou . ho pit llty and 11,y pled conUouln upport ln th d&)'li which fac U i> a.U. ~~ lcbard L. Pull rton L "'•Jl cc: Y sa.;r • a im. 1louu • Scllartfenh r r, r, Douala ,, urk•. Jone • Rap • and Ga mon .JS•eat, AL••• d o! �-l i l I ATLANTA, GEORGIA PHONE 522- 446 3 • From Malcolm D. Jone s, Housing Coordinator To: May 9, 1968 Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. I. In order to insure that a substantial portion of the Honor Farm No. 1 site be developed for housing for the lowest income families, I recommend that the attache d l e tter be signed and sent to the Housing Authority. Encl: Proposed letter . FORM 2 5 -1 5 \ ' �C ITY OF .ATLANT.A CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 May 9, 1968 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison Mr. M. B. Satterfield Executive Director At_lanta Housing Authority 824 Hurt Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Satt: I note that the Resolution adopted by the Board of Aldermen on May 6 p e rtaining to the Honor Farm No. 1 site authorizes that it be taken into the Thomasville Urban Renewal Project 11 to be developed primarily for housing for families of low and moderate income. 11 Under this criteria, it could conceiva bly b e d e v e loped under the various aspects of the 221 d (3) program and housing for the elderly only. Enclosed is a copy of a Resolution adopted by the Housing Resources Committee .,-on May 2, calling for d eve lopment of · a substantial portion of the additional land to be t aken into the project for 11 lowest income housing. 11 I personally support this view and request that in calling for proposals from developers for the area that the Housing Authority specify a s ub stantia l portion of the l and to be developed for hous_ing for lowes t income.families. Sincerely 1 Ivan Allen, J r. Mayor IAJr:fy Enclosure . �EXTRACT P a g e 16 HOUSING FOR LOW- INCOME FAM ILIES U. S . DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPME NT WASHINGTON , D . C . 2041 0 Hous ing As sis t ance Adm i n ist ra tion pt for a leasing Erogr am 1 the locality must have a ·orkable Pro r for Community Improvement approved by the Secretary of HUD and currently in eff ct. A Wor kable Progr am includes seven lemente of accepted principles of good community development. These interact to deal i t h th probl em of s l ums and bligb.t and help to establish neighborhoods suitable for an adequate family life. (HUD publication scribing or kable Program r quirements are av ilable . ) In the leasing program, the local governing body must approve . use of the progz:am in th loca1ity. In other progr s., e ch project must be approved by the governing body, which mus t also enter into a cooper tion agre nt with th LHA . The ree ent cover s such tters as tax exa ption., payment in 11 u oft es, and provision of the usual municipal oervic .. * * �MINUTES HOUSING RESOURCES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AND LOW-INCOME HOUSING COORDINATING GROUP MEETING May 2, 1968 · The regular montly meeting of the Housing Coordinating Group and Housing Resources Committee Executive Group was held in Committee Room 2, City Hall, May 2, 1968, at 10:00 a.m. Copies of the invitational notices, agenda, record of those attending and reference documents are attached to the file copy of these minutes. Chairman Cecil h. Alexander presided. Mr. Alexander opened the meeting by asking Mr. Archer Smith to give the Committee a report on school construction. Mr. Smith presented the following two proposals: (1) Approach the State School Building Authority about them leasing school buildings and then sub-leasing them to the City. The State could lease the premises from the developer for 30/40 years and turn them over to the City of Atlanta on a sub-lease basis. It would take a political decision by the State to re-vamp procedures to allow this. One advantage to this proposal would be that it would apply to all school systems if they so desire. (This was considered perhaps the simplest course of action.) (2) Have a local constitutional amendment passed allowing the City School Board to enter into leases on a long term basis. This local amendment would be the more solid way and the local amendment would be easier to pass. Mr. Alexander asked if the School Board had been approached to see which course of action they would prefer? Mr. Smith stated that they had not, officially, but the School Board would probably go along with either method. Mr. Jones suggested that the Committee authorize the Legal Panel to contact the School Board and see which they would prefer and then pursue that course. P. motion was made, seconded and adopted that the Legal Panel be so authorized. Mr. John Chapman appeared before the Committee to discuss a proposal for building low-income housing. He said housing for the lowest income families would probably need to be financed by the Federal government; that housing for medium income families could be financed through private corporations. He was suggesting dwelling units with rent range ~of $70-$80-$90 for 1, 2 or 3 bedrooms respectively. He proposed forming a limited profit corporation, the members of which would each put up a certain amount of front money, with the intent of building developments which would produce 4-5% profit, instead of the customery 1415% profit. He proposed using private conventional financing �2 entirely, with no connection with Federal assisted programs. He advised he would try to contact several private corporations about putting up money at a reasonable rate of interest and that if he got enough response from private corporations that this could be done, he would inform the Committee of the reaction he re~eived from this idea. Mr. Alexander commented on and referred to an article by Vincent T. Burke, in the Los fl nge.les Times, March 18, 1968, relating how certain Negro families in Washington had been assisted by a tiny non-profit "Home Buyers" group in obtaining home ownership without any assistance from Federal programs or organizations. (Copy of the article is attached to the file copy of these minutes.) Mr. Persells reported to the Committee on the Honor Farm No. 1 Site proposed concept. He presented a map showing approximately 120 acres between the Federal Penitentiary and the Thomasville Urba n Renewal Project that the Federal government proposes to turn over to the City for urban improvement, including housing. He explained that the portion of the property to be developed for housing and related commercial could be either turned over directly by HUD to developers, turned over to the ~ity to put out for bids, or go to Atlanta Housing Authority for development through process of Urba n Renewal. /1 meeting of the Alderma nic Planning and Development Committee is to be held to consider what should be done. Mr . Persells also advised that a new park area is to be developed and an Elementary School and a "Middle School" are to be constructed in the area. The question was asked about how housing could be developed in the shortest length of time. Mr . Persells responded we would be unable to start building until a street and sewer system was begun; that is the biggest delay. It was suggested that the land could be sold to a developer and he could put in the stree t syst em simultaneous with the housing d e velopme nt. Two choice s were rec ommended: (1) The City or d e velopers could go in and put in the street and utilities at their expense o f about $270 ,000. 00 . (2) Have streets put in by the Housing Author ity as an Urban Redevelopment expense. Mr. Persells explained that from;.d'financial standpoint and time element, the most favorable sollution would be to have the Housing Authority put in the street and sewer system at Urban Redevelopment expense, because the schools would have to be built any way, and the City would receive credit for the schools which would more than pay for the expense of putting streets and sewers in and that they could be put in while the developers were getting their plans approved by the Federal government. �3 Mr. Persells advised that topographical maps and surveys had already been made. He also reported that there was a small triangle of land the Federal government doesn't own; stated there were some title difficulties and the only sure way and quickest ~a y to get clear title to the property would be condemnation proceedings throu~h the Urban Renewa l process. The Land to be developed for housing and related. co~mercial is to be offered for sale on May 27, 1968, to developers, with proposals c~lled for. Additi onal land, 17 single-family lots, is to be added to the Thomasville Urban Renewal Site for sale, with ground breaking between May 2 0-28. Appr oximately 50 acres of the 120 acre tr a ct o f land wc ~ lci be available for housing. Mr . Archer Snith , ma de a moti on that a formal resolution be drawn up that the Housinc Re sources Committee goes on record as urging t h e support o f the New-Town-In -Town project concept condit i oned up on n s ub s t ant i a l porti on of the project to be developed for lowest-incoc e housing. If this condition is not met, then the Housi ng Res o urces Comn ittee goes on record as opposed to the pr oject a s presently planned. Motion was seconded and unanimously adopted , with instructions that copies go to the Housing Authority, Ma yo r Ivan Allen, J r ., Members of the Board of Aldermen and to Mr . Ba xter, o f HUD. Mr . How land nnnounced that the CACUR non-profit housing development corpora t ion has now selected five units f or rehabilitation u nder 221 (h) and expected to have them under way Viithi n 60 days . Mr. Alexande r then a sked Mr . Jones to explain a proposal he had been working on f o r accelerated low-income housing development in the Model Cities ar ea. Mr . Jones explained the concept a nd stated that a de vel opment team was very anxious to get a tract of about 10 acres f-eir an experimental housing dev elopment to start this summer. He read a letter just received by the Mayor from Mr. H. Ra lph Taylor, Assistant Secre t ary , HUD, propos ing a HUD sponsored experiment a l housing pr o j e ct in Mode l Cities area in selected cities to be carr ied o ut by a prime contractor to be selected by HUD; and inquiring if P. tlanta desired to cooperate? Mr. Jones expl ained tha t t his tied indirectly with the proposal he has been working on; that b ec aus e of multiple ownerships, it is virtunl ly icpossibl e f or private deve lopers to acquire land in the ~odel Cities area for this purpose; that therefore he has studied the ar ea and looked at certain sites, with others·, including a representative of Model Cities, and has _ selected two tentative sit es, having badly dilapidated housing which will in al l probability be de~olished any way, and has marked these on a map for consider a tion of the Model Cities staff. �4 Mr. Jones proposed "advanced land acquisition" to be requested in the Model Cities area on such a site to be sleeted so they would get started on construction of approximately a 10 acre site as soon as possible. A_ motion was made, seconded and adopted that the Housing Resources Committee recommends that a suitable site be selected in the Model Cities are~ for accelerated development of low-income housing (preferably under the experimental housing concept) and that application be made to HUD for ·authority to acquire the . site under the "advance land acquisition" procedures; that copies be provided the Planning and Development Commmittee, Mayor and Board of Al dermen and HUD. Mr. Persells stated that he concurred and that the Housing Authority would go·1n · soon with a request that the entire Model Cities area be placed under a GNRP so that this could be done as part of an Urban Re newal Pr oject within the Model Cities area. He requested support of t he HRC to the Planning and Development Committee, the Mayor and Board of Al dermen and to HUD on that proposal so that the "advance land acquisition" could be legally implemented. The Committee agreed to support the GNRP proposal for this purpose. Mr. Alexander informed the Committ ee of ground-brea ki ng on the first Turnkey Housing project in Atl anta on Hollywood Road, N. W. at 2 :00 p.m. on May 9 , 1968. All wer e i nv i ted; that May o r Ivan Allen , Jr., would offic ially break the ground for the 202-ttnit development. Copies o f the announcement, prepared by the Housing Authority were d istributed. It ½as announced that the report from the Ad Hoc Committee on Low-income Housing Analysis will not be ready and that it would be discussed at a later date. Mr . Alexande r an nounced that a conference wi ll be held May 29th at the Dink le r all day, consisting o f debates and discussions on legal aspects, employment, workshops, etc., on equal opportun it y in housing. Mr . Alexander exp la ined briefly the progres s made on Package Zoning. Question ·was asked if a f o rmal resolution has been adopted by the HRC Executive Committee on the proposed Package Zoning Plan . The Committee was advised that such resolution had already been adopted supporting this plan. Mr. ftlexander also stated it is anticipated that the plan would receive the support of numerous civic and business organizations and radio and television. Mr. Alexander read a Press Release from HUD announcing authorization of trailers (mobile homes) for temporary housing in Urban nedevelopment pr~jects. �5 Mr . Alexander also commented on the necessity for positive action soon for improvement in the NASH-BANS area, through Urban Renewal or otherwise. The meeting adjourned at 12:00 noon. Respectfully submitted, .Py~_,'J-0v4~a--vW/~ Malcolm D. Jone . Housing Coorldina ·or Encls: As s tated (with file copy only) �MINUTES Housing Resources Executive Committee and Low-income Housing Coordinating Group Meeting flpril 11, 1968 · . The regular montly meeting of the Housing Resources Committee and Low-income Housing Coordinating Group was held in Committee Room 2, City Hall, at 10:00 a.m~ Thursday, P-pril 11, 1968. Copies of invitational notices, agenda, list of those invited and attending and reference documents are attached to the file copy of these minutes. The following Panels of the Housing Resources Committee were not represented at the meeting: Legal, Public Housing, Social Problems 3nd Public Information. Chairman f.lexander Presided. In opening the meeting Mr. Alexander referred to the objectives of the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and complimented Dr. Benjamin E . Mays, Co-Chairman of the Housing Resources Committee>on his e u logy address at the funeral of Dr. King. Mr. 1\lexander then expressed the appreciation of the Committee for the support it is receiving in the Chamber of Commerce and called upon Mr . Curtis Driskell of the Chamber's staff who read a Resolution a dopted by the Board of Directors of the Chamber of Commerce l\pril 10, 1968 supporting proposed package zoning approa ch for obt aining sites for low-income housing. Mr . t lex ander then made referenc to a new assignment for the La nd Comm it tee, as indicated on the a genda, and explained i nter p r e tat ion by the Director of Pl a nn i ng on u ti lization o f the Ci ty's re c e n t l y a dop t ed La nd Use Pl a n, a s r elat e s t o Lo w- income housing . He the n called upo n Mr . Jones to comment on the Comm i ttee' s suppor t o n t wo r e ce n t zon i ng petitions . Mr . Jones e xp l a ined that t he Exe cut i v e Comm i tt ee o n March 14, 1968 authorized tr.e Ho usi ng Res o ur c e s Comm i tte e to support rezoning requests in c o nnecti o n appropriately planned development projects which c o nforM to the 1983 Land e Use Map and that consequently recent zoning petitions for a 15 acre tract on Jonesboro Road, S.E. for a Turnkey project and f o r a 99 acre tract (East Lake Golf Course No . 2) for a multiplicity of housing development types under Turnkey and 221 d (3) had both been supported by this Committee in letters to members of the Zoning Committee from Chairman Alexander and stated that Mr. Plexander appeared personally in support of both projects before the Zoning Committee at the Public Hearing! *hat the former site is consistent with ·the Land Use Plan and the latter is consistent with the Planning Director's interpretation of intended �-2use of the Land Use Plan; that both sites already have the essential Community Facilities or evidence that such will be provided simultaneously with the proposed development; and that both sites have been approved by the Housing Authority and have tentative approval of HUD; that action taken by the Zoning Committee was to Deny rezoning of the former site and to Defer action on ~he latter site. Mr. ~lexander proposed a meeting with representatives from the School Board, Planning Department and otbers ~affected such as Planning and Development Committee and Planning Board, Housing ~uthority and Citizenry to consider ways and means for taking zon~ng out of politics. Mr. P. lexander called for special report from the Legal Panel on School Construction by Developers in low-income housing projects. ~s the Legal Pa nel was not represented at the meeting the report was postponed. At this time the Chairman recognized and wel9omed Mr. Cary Hooks, newly appointed Director of FHA for Georgia. Mr. Hooks. responded with assurance of FH~ 's contined cooperation in the low-in income housing program and gave a brief report on 221 d (3) projects in Metropolit a n ft tlanta as follows: J.;352 Units 11 Completed 13 Unde r Construction 972 " 5 Commi tme nts Is s ue d 704 II 1 Appl ~.ca tion in process 300 " .Applic at ion 1,043 " 7 Pre limi na St age He a lso c omme nt ed on pr ogress being made i n t he Appa laci a n Progr am, wh i ch cover s the a rea Carrol ton- Rome-Dalton in Georg i a . Also that progres s is being made on the Rockdale pr oject. Mr . Alexander c ommented on l wo- income housing being developed· in Gai nes vil le a nd suggested tha t we here in f. tlanta should give e ncouragement a nd assist a nce if pos sible to Ga inesville a nd other neighbori ng cities to d e ve lope low -income hous ing , wh i c h wou ld ha ve a tendenc y to eas e the b ur d e n curre ntly be ing placed o n Atlanta. Dr. Sidney L. Da vis, Cha i r man of the Housing f. ppea1s · eoard, was called upon for c ommen t s. He e xplaine d t he urgent need for some sources of assistance in dire hardship cases for bringing dwelling units up to standards required b y the Housing Code; that to date all efforts in this direction have been unsuccessful and that the Housing Code Division has about 500 cases in this category~ �-3- Mr. T. M. JH exander, Sr., member of the Housing J\ppeals Board, confirmed and expanded on Dr. Davis' comments. He pointed out particularly the need for some City controls over µnscrupulous, fly-by-night contractors who are not required by the City or State to meet any performance qualifications and who constantly victimize unfortunate low-income property owners. Mayor Allen responded by stating that he has only recently called upon the Better Business Bureau to be on the outlook for this kind of so called Home Improvement Contractor and to expose the unscrupulous ones. Mayor Allen then made reference to the Civil Rights Act recently approved by Cpngress and to his request to the City Attorney for report on its implication to Atlanta. He suggested that the Housing Resources Committee call upon the Board of Aldermen for: (1) Establishment of a City-wide Relocation Service in Atlanta;and (2) Re-evaluation of Zoning for the entire City, with view to providing, thru zoning, adequate space for necessary housing. He also pointed out tha t this may require some changes in the Land Use Plan. Subsequently, motion was made by Mr . Winn, seconded by Dr. Mays and adopted unanimously that the Housing Resources Committee sup p o r t the program proposed by Ma yor P llen. Mr . n lex a nder a nnounced that implementation of the Housing Re sour ces Comm i t tee's a c t ion wo u ld be r efe rr ed to one o f the Sta nding Pa ne l s o r that a n Ad Hoc Committee would be appoint ed t o carr y it out. Mr. P lexa nder t hen r e ferr e d b a c k t o comme nt made b y Dr . Davis and Mr. T. M. Al e xa nd er , Sr . a nd announced that he wo uld refer t o the Legal Panel t he ma tte r o f : ( 1) Ext e nd ing the cove r age o f g ran t s f o r Cod e En1orc e me nt in Hardship c as e s. (2 ) fd o ption of Code Enf o rcement 8reas, which we should try to get designated in Atlanta. Dr. Mays said there should be a call made for Federal legislation to make funds available to help code enforcement in hardship cases. Dr. Henderson commented on EOA Grants of up $2,000.00, but which he concluded ~re apparently limited to rural areas. �-4Mr. Alexander made a suggestion that Foundations in Atlanta might provide some help and made inquiry if requirements for selection of Code Enforcement areas had been simplified; apparently they have not. Mr. f lexander then announced a special meeting for Wednesday, May 17 of principals concerned with view to determining legal implications and ways of establishing some local Code Enforcement areas whereby needy owners could qualify to receive Federal grants and loans, now authorized for Urban Renewal areas only in Atlanta. Mr. Williams. Howland reported that CACUR has experienced considerable difficulty in locating suitable properties for rehab i litation under Section 221 (h) particularly in respect to the high prices being asked for existing properties in need of major repairs and the schepticism of owners in disposing of their properties to a non-profit corporation with expectation of buying them back again after rehabilitation. Mr. Plexander announced his intention of setting up a series of Panel meetings to reorient members and establish more specific assignments and objectives. Announcement was made of the qousing Development Corporation status, i.e., incorporation has taken place; office set aside for i ts use in the Firs t Nat i onal Ba nk Building; funds have been made a va ilable; admini strative support is to come from CAP initially; now look f or a Director . The meeting adjourned at 11~05 a.m. Encls: Resolution by Chamber of Commerc e Invitatio nal notices and lists of those invited and attending (with file copy only ) �A RESOLUTION The Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Board of Direcfors, through the work of the Chamber's Housing ann Redevelopment Committee~ has supported vigorously from the outset the efforts of the Mayor's Housing Resources Committee to relieve the city's shortage of housing for low income families. As a result of its investigation of this pr~blem, the Housing and Redevelopment Committee delivered to this Board in August, 1967 a report entitled "The Low..:.Rent Housing Gap in Atlanta," which ir.cluded specific information underlining the critical nature of the housing need. This Board was informed by the report that the process ,of rezoning land suitable and feasible for multi-family, low-rent housing appears to be the single most difficult obstacle in the task of' providing, during a five-year . . period, some 16,800 units of the type housing required. The Bo·a rd also was made aware that available vacant land is scarce within the City of Atlanta for any use, and outlying areas have not seen fit to qualify for programs which allow construction of federally-insured housing of the type which would help meet the current need. A resolution by this Board in September, 1967 urged immediate steps by the City of Atlanta Planning Department and the Board of Aldermen to adopt an updated land use plan, from which a new zoning ordinance could be evolved. The resolution further declared: " ... Any new zoning plan adopted by the City of Atlanta should make provision for adequate land for m ulti-family housing and open up land for increased density of housing in all quadrants of the city, in order to serve the best interests of a changing and progressive City of Atlanta. 11 . Since that time, diligent study has been given by the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce to a proposed "package zoning plan, 11 the purpose of which would be to rezone simultaneously several s ites of l and thr oughout the city for development in public housing. Be it resolved that the Atlanta Chamber of Commer ce Board of Directors reiterates its position in support of dispersing multi-fam ily housing to all quadrants of the city. And be it further resolved that the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors supports the pr inciple of the package zoning proposal as an approach well worth considering toward the efforts to alleviate this serious problem in our community. Adopted by the Board of Directors Atlanta Chamber of Commerce April 10, 1968 �_;; De ci sions · Necessc:1.ry to Develop New-Town-In- Town Proj e cts Who will admi nister t 11e pro ject? 1. a. Di r e c t s ale by fIDD t o Developer . b. -HUD t o City of Atlanta t o Devel oper • c. HUD t o Atlanta Hous i ng Autho ri ty _to De v el op er . .. . 2. Will dispos i tion b e f or 221 (D) ( J ) , 202 onl y ? J. Who builds prima ry streets and uti lities ? 4. a. Devel oper . b. Ci ty . c. At l anta Housing Authority. Wilen are street locati on.s to b e pinne d dov;n? I I �Persons to be i nvol ved in these decisions ? !" .,, ~~ a. ('I tt Members of the Planning 1.Development ComTTLi. tte~ and Board of Ald ermen . Mayor Ivan Allen Mr. John Edmunds Mr. M. B, Satterfield e. Mr. E win Stern f. Mr. Fr\k Ethridge . L--- g. h. i . Mr . Colli er Gl a ddin Mr. Richard Case Atlanta Housing Authority Board of Commissioners ..,....-J. . Mr , Ceci1 A1exander Col . Malcolm J ones v"l. v-- m. Mro Dan Sweat Mre Eda Baxter I �l. a . Dir ect Sal e By HUD To Devel opers 1. HUID states tha t they would expect t he City to pr ovide t he l and use plan ) assur ances a s t o public f a cil i t i e s , r eview t he developer s pr opos als, 2. HUD would need Bureau of Budget approval of the method of s ale and would present the proposal to s ell to t he Bureau prior to making t he award. Ea ch of t hese steps would cons ume a minimum of approximatel y 30 days or a total of 60 days on t hi s s t a ge . 3. Under this method the Tuveloper would put i n the streets and uti liti es and this cos t would be r efle cted in r ents or sal es pr ices. 4. No non- ca sh credit s i nvol ved. 5. Fed . Pen. to GSA to }TIJD i s based on certain ~nprovement s (fence s , etc. ) which only HUD can finance. 6. Can HUD acquire the 4 non-gov 1 t owned parcels ? Leave t hem out? �l,a. Schedule Direct Sale HUD to Developer Decisions Land Us e Map Disposition Plan Relocation Plan Acquisition Plan Project Impr ovements Plan Financing Plan Submit to the Burea u of the Budge t for prior approval ~ Appr oval Sele ct developer (adverti se if necessary) Submit t o the Bureau of the Budget for concurrenc e Concurrence Execute Contract Approval of FHA or Mort gag or of re development Start Engi neeri ng Start Constr ucti on of Si te i mprovement s Complete Si te I mprovements suffici ent t o begin cons t ructi on of Housi ng May May May May May May May 1, 1968 J, 1968 21, 1968 21, 1 968 21, 1968 21, 1 968 21, _1968 May 21, 1968 June 21, 1968 July 21, 1968 July 21, 1968 Au gust 21, 1968 September 1, 1968 J anuary 1, 1969 J anuary 1, 1 969 February 1, 1969 June 15, 1 969 Du d.ng t he i nteri m f rom July 21 t o J anuary 1, it will be necessary t o acqu i re t he 4 pr i vatel y owned parcels , r el ocate t he~ one f amily and demoli s h the str ucture . �l. b. Sale from Government to City t o Developer 1. HU]) cl ear with Bureau of Budget for sale direct to City - approximately 30 days . 2. · City proc eeds with land use plan, decisions as to provision for streets Md u til o, determine method of sale~ J. / of Method s al e as outlined by Asst. City Atty - Tom Choyce : 1. A re s olution must be passed by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen stating t hat the real estate is no l onger useful and necessary to t he City and ordering the real estate to be sold. Forn1ality but must be done at a regular Ald. meeting after a mee t i ng of P & D Com. • 2. I I The Land Agent must cause a plat of the property to be made by a regis t ered land surveyor . ~This mus t be done by any agent. AHA woµ.ld need about 20 day s prior to clos i ng ) o J. The Land Agent must cause an appra isa l of the property to be made by the Atlanta Real Estat e Board or a r eal estat e appraiser who is a member of t he American Ins titut e of Real Est at e Apprai sers. The apprai sal must be pla ced in a s eal ed envelope and turned over to the the Land Agent. 4. The pl at of the property along with t he l egal descript i on mus t be submitte d to t he Purchasing Agen t, who must advertise f or bids to be submitte d for t he purchase of t he proper t y . 5. All bids mus t be opened and read at the desi gnated time by t he Purchasing Committee . The Purchasing Committee must t abul ate t he bids and refer t hem to an Aldermanic Committee. 6. The Connnittee must open the sealed appraisal a..n.d take the appraisal into consideration in determinine whether or not any of the bids shall �-2- b e recommended for acceptance . This Corruni ttee must submit its f inal recommendation to the Mayor and Board of Aldermen for £.x:fud: determination. · li. Ci ty must find a way to purcha se the them out. 4 non-gov' t owned parcels or l eave �1. b. Schedul e HUD to City of Atlant a to Developer Decisions Land Use Map Dispos i t ion Plan Acqui sition Plan (4 pr iva t el y owne d parc el s as well as Federal Land) Rel oca tion Plan Pro j ect I mprovement s Plan Financing Plan Planning and Devel opment Committee to make r ecommendati ons to t he Board of Aldermen in j oi nt s ess ion with t he Finance Commi t tee Alder manic Appr oval Order Survey and Des cr i ption Appra i sals Ord ered Adver ti se Receive Bids Boa rd of Ald ermen Approve Cont rac t • Begin Constru ction of housing ·'<- Ma,y 1, 1968 May 3, 1968 May 21, 1968 May May May May 21, 21, 21, 21, 1968 1-968 1968 1968 May 27, 1968 June 3, 1968 J une 3, 1961:l J une 24, 1968 June 24, 1968 Augus t 24, 1968 September 16, 1968 Septe mber 26, 1968 J anuary 26, 1969 ENGINEERING AND SITE IMPROVEMENTS Ehgi neering Let Si t e Improvements Contract Compl ete S. I. s uff ici ent to begi n Construction of housing -'<-'-t. J une 3, 1968 -::-::-:~ July 21 , 1968 September 16, 1968 "" November 1 , 1968 December 6, 1968 March 15, 1969~~ Thi s dat e woul d delay t he s t art of constructi on f rom J anuary 26, 1969, t o March 15, 1969. ~:-:~ Engineering start after s el ection of Toveloper. ~HH(- Engineering start before selection of .Devel oper . �1. c . HUD to AHA to Developer 1. Atl anta Hou s ing Author ity l'rould us e the normal ur ban renewal procedure t r,rough on and 'expe di t ed 11 b as i s . The sche dule i s estimate d on optimum ti me i n t erval s a s a re t he other sche dules . 2. If the pr o j ect put s i n the b a si c str e ets and uti l ities , t hey woul d be c onstruc ted at pro j ect c ost which c oul d be mor e t han offset by Noncas·h Gr ant-i n-Aid Cr edi ts. J, The t wo maj or credits are for t wo s c-hool s : one a t $1 ,000 , 000 - 1 90% eli gibl e and one at $2 , 000, 000 - 1 0 to 50% eligible. 4, S ome c ompar ati v ely s mall cre dits woul d b e el igible from park, bri dge , ramp and other ite ms probably in t he range of $50-1 00, 000, �1. c · Sr.hedul e Thomasville Amendr~ent. R-22 HUD To AHA To Devel oper This schedule is prc:pared b ased on the f o l l01-,ing assumptions : L All decisions nec8 s sm·y for t11 e submissio n of the a pplic ation ( particu-l arly the ones applied to the me thod of disposition and s e que n ce i nstallation of sit e i mprovements ) are maclc prior to May l, 1968 . 2. That the submission is to be ma de to the eet, Atl ..ta (t l phon 524-,8876);· nd Mi-. M lcolm Jon , Hou ing Cool'din tor, Ollie of th Mayo11." , City of Atlanta. They will b · gl d to i t you in addition contaci or th provision of any eai-ch mater · 1 you mlght wish. Slncei-ely you.wa, Dan Swat DS :fy �·------------------------------------------- Mr . Cecil A . Alexandew, Chairman Housing Resoui-ces Committee Finch. Alexandel",, B rnes, Rothschild 8t Paschal 10th Floosr • Standard Federal BuilHing 44 Broad Street, N . W. Atlal'lta; Georgia 30303 Mr . Arch i' D. Smith, III, Attol'ney Hannon and Thack ton 1944 National Bank of Georgia Building Atl t , Georgl Dl' . Edwin Ha'l'rieon, Pre ident Georgi Instltu: of Technology 225 North Av nue , N. W .. Atla.nt , Georgia 30313 Mr •. Moreland Smlth, Director Urban Pl nning Project South rn Regional Council,, Inc. 5 Forsyth Street. N.. W . Atlant , Georgia 30303 Mr. Robert C. Wa Mo.-ton Road t St t&brid RFD# Alphar it , G otgl Mw. L e Burge, Pr ld nt B t U Ci- dit Comp ·~ P,, 0 . Box 4081 Atlanta. Geor a 30302 Mr. A. B. Pad tt, Tru t Office~ T~u t Company ol G orgi P. 0 . Box 4418 .AUu ,, Geor 030Z Mr. Harollton Do la•,, N donal B · , of Ci ors ~- J WU• , P Hol' •WUecm Com 16 P Atl r St • r1·.,,, ef.d n.t y • W. 30 l Attorney Bulldln �Mr . Edwin L . Sterne, Chairman Atlanta Housing Authodty 639 Trust Company of Georgia Building Atlanta; Georgia 30303 M.r . Clarence D . Coleman Regional Director National Urban League 136 Mattietta Street, N. W . Atlanta , Geo11gla 30303 Mr . Charles F . Palrnez, i President Pabne~; lnc . Palmer Building 41 Marietta Stre t Atlanta, Georg· 30303 Mr. Jim E . Land Chief Enginee~ fo.- Georgia Southern Bell T !ephone and Telegraph Company 805 P ac;htree Str t, N . E . Atlant , Georgia 30308 Dr. Vivian H nd 't on, President Cl l'k College 240 Che tnut Sti- et, S . W., Atlanta, Georg 30314 Mt . Duane B ek, Ex <:utive Director Commu:nlty CouncU o1 the Atlanta Ar a, Inc. 100 Olenu Building Atlant ,, Oeot 30303 D an ~Ul m s. r ckaon School of Socl l Wo k Atl nta Univ ity 223 Ch stnut Str t S. W. Atlant , Geor t 30314 Mr, Willie.m. C. B rtholo Chal1'nlatl and P aid nt AU.n Br P. 0, Box 14064 Atl nta., G o 30312 M:r. Da.1 Cla Di.. tol' of Public A · I' w a .. Tv lSSl Brlarc:1Ut Atl ta, Geor E. y �Mr. Ray M oore News Directo~ WSB .. TV 1601 West Peachtre Str·e et, N . E . Atlanta, Georgia 30309 Col . Malcolm D . Jone Housing Coo:rdinatoiO£!ie e o! the Mayo:i, 1204 City HaU Atlanta, Geol'gia 30303 Mr. W . W . Gat~e Consultant Housing Resources Committee .1Z04 City Hall Atl nta,, Cieorgia 30303 Mi- . Georg W. K nn dy, Chah::man Hou ing -.»,d Red velopm nt Committe Cb.amber of Commerce 1300 Commorce Building Atlant • Georgl 30301 Mr •. Johnny C . JQhneon, Dit ctor Mod 1 Citie Progr m 565 HiU Str et Ad.an , Geor a 3031Z �CITY OF .ATLANTA. CITY HALL April 22, 1968 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Cod e 404 IVAN ALLEN , JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Admini strative Assist ant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secret ary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison MEMORANDUM To: Col. Malcolm Jones From: Dan Sweat ~ Could .you f urnish m e with a list of the k e y citiz e ns a nd people which i s r e quest e d i n this l e tte r fro m Litton Sy s t e ms, Inc. I b e liev e I would want the m to start with you and try to keep this in the area of our Housin g Reso.u rce s Committee . DS :fy �• LITTON SYSTEMS, INC. APPLIED SC IENCE DIVISIO N 7300 PEARL STREET BETHESDA, MARYLAND 20014 (301) 652-6616 April 19, 1968 Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr . Mayor of the City of Atlanta At l anta , Geor gia Subject : Co- opera t i on during per formance of HUD Exper imental Hous ing Resear ch and Development Progr am Dear Mayor Allen: On March 14, 1968 the Depar tment of Housing and Ur ban Deve lopme nt solic ited pr opos a l s f or Concept Des i gn a nd Exec ution of a n " In Ci ty" Experimen tal Hous i ng Re s earch and Deve lopment Program. It i s planned that the e f f ort wi l l be concentrated in a l arge number of Model Cities . By May 1, 1968 it is expected that a Contractor will be selected who will be expected to accomplish an intensive analysis in depth of the Model Cities by June 15, 1968, prior to the actual development of experimental housing programs. In a prior letter to you dated 12-14-67, Litton advised you of its desire to participate in Model Cities efforts. As further expression of interest, Litton Industries has assembled what it considers to be an outstanding team of planners, architects, builders, etc., to perform on this complex system job. The purpose of this letter is to solicit your support in establishing contacts with key citizens in your cityo A letter from you defining principal contacts is deeply appreciated. Very truly yours, ~/.:.a, Public Systems Laboratory Washington Science Center LJN/cep �October 17, 1967 HOUSDJG RESOURCES COMMITTEE g/ Hr . Ce ci l A. Al exander, Chairman Housine Resources Cormni t .ee Finch, Alexander, Dar nes , Rothschild, and Paschal , Ar chi t e cts 10th Floor Standar d Federal Buildi ng 44 Br oad Str eet, N. W. Atlanta, Geor gi a 30303 Dr. Sanfor d S. Atuood, Co- Chai r man Housing Re s our ce s Commi ttee President, Emor y Uni versi ty Atl anta, Georgia 30322 Dr. Benj ami n E. Mays, Co- Chairman Housine Res our ce s Commi t tee Presi dent Emeritus, Morehouse College 3316 Pamli co D-r . S. W. Atl anta , Georgi a 30311 PANELS LEGAL Mr. Charles L. Weltner, Attor ney The First National Bank , Suit e 2943 2 Peachtree Street Atl anta , Georgia 30303 Mr . Donald Hollowell, Regional Dire ctor Equal Empl oyment Opportunity Commission 1776 Peachtree Street, N. W. Atlanta , Georgia 30309 Honorable Luther Alverson, JudGe Fulton County Superior Court 13.6 Pryor Street, s. W. Atl anta, Georgia 30303 v' l·'J-. Archer D. Smith III, Attorney Harmon and Thackston 1944 National Bank of Geore;ia Bl dg . Atlanta, Georgia Hr . Norman L. Underwood, Attorney Sanders, Hester and Holley 1001 Commerce Building Atlanta, Georgia Chairman �Page THO . c orSTrtUCTION AND ~ DESIGl•J Dr. Edwin Harrison, President Geor gia Institute of Technology 225 North Avenue , N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30313 Chairman Hr . Herman J. Russell, Contractor 504 Fair Street, S. W. Atlanta, 3eorgia 30313 v lfr . Moreland Smith, Director Vice-Chai rman Urban Planning Project Southern Regional Council, Inc. 5 Forsy th Street, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Rev. John A. I'f.iddleton, President Horris Bror,m College 673 Hunter Street, i . W. Atlanta, Georgi a 30314 Mr. Henry F. Alexander , Builder 2Ld9 r"'ernleaf Court, N. W. Atlanta, Geor i ia 30318 Mr. J ames Noore , President Atlanta Labor Council 15 Peachtree Street, N. E. Room 208 Atlanta, Ge orgia 30303 V M,. Re-id C. Wtil~ •I L '.-1 /ti'lr.,,,. 1~ R~a. ~ o--i rle.,e- trHW, "- ~ ;:=-..o R, ' I A Iµ->t1 l'eAJ 4- ' ~ FI: 1AHCE AI-JD NON- PROFIT F[EJDS' 1 Dean Harding B. Youne Atlanta University 223 Chestnut Street, S. W. Atlanta, Ge orgia 3031Li .,.-, Mt-·., Lee Burce , ~eS'ide nt E$t ail Credi t Company P. 0. Box 4081 Atlanta, Georgia 30302 t"lr. Butler T. Hender@on lfor@house College 22'; Chestnut Street, s. W. Atlanta, 3eorgia 30314 Chairman �Page Thr ee · FilJAHCE AND NON - P:?.OFIT FUNDS ( continued ) Y1r. Vi lls B. Lane, Jr., President The Citiz ens and South ern National Bank o. Box 4899 30.303 P. Mr. Joseph Earle Birnie, President The .rational Bank of Georgia Peachtree at Five Points Atl anta , Geor gia 30303 Mr. August us H. Sterne, President The Trust Company of Geor gia 36 Edgewoo d Avenue, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 V1r . Gordon Jones, President The Fulton Hational Bank P. O. Box l.IJ8 7 Atl anta, Georgia 30302 V v Mr. A. B. Padge tt, Trust Off icer Trust Company of Georgia P. O. Box 4418 Atlanta, Georgia 30302 Nr. Hamilton Douglas, Jr. , Attorney National Bank of Georgi a Building Atlanta, Georgia Rev. William Hol mes Borders, Pastor 1-Theat Street Baptist Church 1426 Mozley Drive , S. W. Atlanta, Georgia Presi dent v' Mr . J ohn Wilson, President Horne-Wilson Company 163 Peters Street , S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30313 Mr. Albert Love Exe cutive Vice President The McCall Corporation P.O. Box 1000 Doraville, Georgia 30040 Mr. Scott Houston, Jr., Executive Director Wesley ~,foods Apartments P. O. Box 15468 Atlanta, Georgia 30333 Vi ce- Chairman �Pace Four PlJBLIC HOJSHJG ./Mr. Edwin L. Sterne, Chairman Housing .Authority of the City of .Atlanta 639 Trust Company of Geor gia Building Atianta, Ge or~ia JOJOJ Dr . Al bert Manley., President Spel man College 350 Leonard Street, S. W. Atlanta, Ge orgi a 30303 Hr . Leon2.rd Re i nch, President Cox Broa.dcas ting Company 1601 West Peachtree St reet , N. E. Atl:mta, Geor;:;i a V Hr. Clarence D. Coleman, Regional Director Nati onal Urban Lea13ue 136 Mariett a Street, N. W., Suite 242 Atla.nta, Ge orgia 30303 Chairman V Hr . Charles F. Pa~ner, President Palmer , I nc. , PaL~er Building 41 Marietta Street Atlanta, Georgi a 30303 LAI-JD ACQUISITION Hr . 1 lallace L. Lee, President Atlanta Gas Light Company P. O. Box 4569 Atlanta, Georgia 30302 Mr . Clayton R. Yates , President Yates - Milton Stores 228 Auburn Avenue, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 .,,_, Mr. Jim E. Land Chief Engineer for Georgia Southern Bell Telephone & Tel egraph Company 805 Peachtree Street, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia 30308 ,,/ Dr. Vi vian Henderson, President Cl:·..rk College 2LO Chestnut Street, s. W. Atlanta, Georeia 3031/-1. Acting Chairman �LAND .ACQUISIT I O~,J ( continued ) Nr. J . A. Alston, Pres i dent E2:1~1ire 1:1e3.~ Estate Board Alston Realty Co. 195 A Auburn Ave. N. E • 3030.3 .'\..tl anta., GeorE;ia !-i:'. SteH,:1r -l: ~-Ji;:;ht 1-J::_ght, Couch ·..c Hard 15 Pea chtree Bl dg. , Room 822 Atlanta, Geor~ia 30303 SOCIAL PROBY~: iS ./ Hr. :ma.i1e Beck, Executive ill.rector Con,--r11.:..n:. tf Co-:..:.r1c::.l o!: the Atlanta Area., Inc. 1000 C·::'..enn BuEci.ir,G Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Mrs. Sujette Crar~c, Social Dir e ctor Neir;hborhooc;. Se:-vices., E.O.A., Inc. 101 Hci-iettc:. Str "et Atlanta, GGorgia .30303 Dr. Tobe Jcl,nson Professor of Political Science Morehouse Collage 223 Cnestr:ut Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30314 v" Dea.ri "W illian S. Jack son School of Social Hark Atlanta Univers.:..ty 223 Chestnut Street, s. W. Atlanta, Geor~ia 30314 l·lr. Erwin Stevens, Chairman Cit:.zens Central Advisory Comi-nittee, E.O.A. 799 Parsons Street, S. 1:I. Atlantc1., Georgia 3031h r~. Le1-;is CcrJ-::er, Attorney 20115 1-lanchester, N. E. Atlanta, Geo1·gia 30309 Chairma.vi �Page Si..'C BUSI::-ESS ?.GTICIPATIO)J Chai rman Hr. Vir1:;il Mil ton 3626 Tu.'Cedo Road, N. H. 30305 Atlanta, Georzia t-:r. Eduard L. Simon, Au.di tor Vi ce-Chairman Atlanta Life Insurance Company lh8 Auburn Avenue , N. E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Harl ee Branch , President Sou· : n Company 3390 Peac}·1trei:: ad, lfu; neo/ C. ).rthur J erJ-::ins Director, I~d~3tri al ?celations Lockheed Con:?<'u1Y I-!arietta, Gc or~i a 30060 Mr. .,,,,,, o-;;r Er. :toll;:;.:1d Lax;:ell, Pre sident Davison 1 s I;-epartment Store s 100 Pe acht r e e Street, X. TT. Atl anta, Georgia 30303 'f\l m , C. .8 c; Y 1), o/.e.rv, "'1 ct,. ll'fflew\ 'l ~~ , iJ tm-f /l:7' ,~""le.. 1;1-., ~ I -' l.,,)L~C P...•.?,0~<;,~ / t o ( lJ·i.'v.ct·i..; . .1.IJ., 'I A-fl.u.1.c..,cw:t . .i~3J~ lk . Jarr.~s L . T01-msend Tov;nsend a nd Associates 101h !·Icaley BldG . Atl anta, Gcor~ia v' Er . Dale Cl r1!'k Dir e c tor of Public Affairs r,-JAG!,-?V 1551 Bri arcliff Road , N. E. Atlanta, Geor~ia 30306 Chairman ..,_... I~r • .lc.y 1-:oore Te~·rs Director '.TSJ- T'l 1601 ".-!est Peachtr ee St reet, N. E. Atl anta , Geor;;>. 30309 Lr, J:'_,'<: Wo8d HeHs Director, WAOIC 110 ~deeHood Avenue , N. E. At lant a , Georeia 30303 Vice -Cha irman �Page Seven STAFF ROOM 1204., CITY R4.LL -""'Malcolm Do Jones 1 Director V H. Wo Gates, Consultant M-.-.. Sl;.;;,ron er~11fo.,..'1 5 ",.g~e1-'-"""1~r �RICHARD L. FULLERTON AND ASSOCIATES Con1ultant1 /or ..Atulti-/amily JlouAing TELEPHONE 872-6089 April 25, 1968 1222 PEACHTREE ROAD, N. E. P. 0. BOX 7164 ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30309 TELEPHONE 422-4479 145 NORTH MAGNOLIA AVENUE P. 0. BOX 2068 ORLANDO. FLORIDA 32802 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. , Mayor The City of Atlanta Clty Hall Atl nta, Georgia D u r Mayor Allen: For everal weeks I have been in conferences with the very excellent staff of your Hous ing Res ources Committee and of the Hous lng Authority with reference to a m jor innova tion we a re undertaking for the provision of low cost housing in urban a r as . Please accept my sincere expression of gratitude for thelr courtesies and their very as hite attention to the matters brought before them . I am worklng ln behalf of a well ca italized g rou p ·whlcb controls the ~tents by which a major breakthrough ln construction costs can b achieved. To over lmpllfy, it is our intention to not m rely "prefabrlc te" but t o actua lly manufacture housing wilts and deliver them to th e s it a lmost intact . The t,Jatents have to do wlth a method of preforming fibre lass so that the necetJsary s tructural charact rlstlce can be built lnto the bulldlng components on a m as~ production ba s t • The automobll indu ·try is turning out much mor complicated prod'1ct th n the housing induMtry at enormously lower costs. Machine work and mass t1roductlon tecbnlque are th obviou nsw r. Our think.in ls not uniqu t.n thls re ard, but the group I r present doeliS control rlgld patent and unusual billtie in the necessary ft lds s o that -we re ur that w can move forw rd. I am writlng now with reference to th "Honor Farm" land th t is currently under con ider tlon by your ofrlce • Obviously th re ls an ov rwhelmlng need for low co t housing to be bullt ln Atl nta. You ll b v faced this issue squarely and I am conftd nt that adequate solutions to the many ~roblem Ul quickly be found. �April 25 , 1968 Mr . Edward H . Baxter Regional Administrator Departm.ent of Housing and Urban Development 645 Peachtree-Sev nth Building Atlanta, Georgia 30323 Dear Mr. Baxter: With this letter I transmit an explanation of the need to convert open-space p rk l nd in the Thomasville Urb n Renewal Project, GA R-22 , to single family use. Enclosed re original and two copies of the docementation required by P ge 7 of Chapter 5 of th 11 0pen ..$pace Land Program Guide. 11 l wUl appr ci te you giving urgent considetation to this ction so that we may me t the May 20 target d te for: beginning construction of the fir t unit on the Fed r 1 Pd on urplus prop rty. Sincer ly your , lv n All n, Jr. Mayo, IAJr:fy Enclo ur s �Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. - 2 - April 25, 1968 Bec ause of the in novative cha r a cter of our operation. we are desirous of proving our case in an urban etting as contrasted with the usual s ubdivision effort . To accomplish a cost reduction in a rural area is not ae significant as to accomplish the same savings in the heart of a city like Atl a nta . These are dnys of careful experimentation in everything having to do with human relation -• and we mean to perform a s ignificant social service in the process of making the revolutionary changes tn construction techniques that will mass produce the dwelling units. m s ur _ t h t r aiul tion s r e q u ir e a co m pe titive setting tor the d lsposi -. but, by the same token, the F d eral Government . as ;you know. i s almos t desperately anxlou1:, to s ee I tion of th F g r l p n\t nu t y land , cost savings accomplished that will make it possible for low and middle income people to afford new homes without the onus of ma sive financial ub idy. This we propose to do and for this reason we earnestly requ st the privilege of using the Honor Farm land in the massive experiment for which we are now tooling up. ~e are lookin& at various factory sites for rent inside the Atlanta clty limits and , naturally, are anxious that the land we will u e for the actual subdivision will be ln close proximity. The nature of the manufacturing process will not require a great many already trained people. This works another advantage for the urban setting . 'We will be able to glve un s killed workers the modest training n cessary to manufactur and fabricate the components . As we see it then, our program for us ing the Honor Farm Land will provide three immediate benefits. First. lt will enlarge the housing inventory at very rea .:.· onable cost to the tenant and to "whatever agency is charged with subsidizing the tenant rent or µurchas . Second, it will provide employment for ignificant numb r of eemi-~killed and un skilled people in Atlanta . Third. the experimentation will natur Uy have geogr 1Jhic significance s o that my favorlt city can be known as having continued in its cours e of leadership with r ard to national urban problems. ¼e are already lnto the basic s ite desigi,J, 111 propose single famUy and multi-f mily detached unlt in addition to a modest highrlse for the eld rly and whatever shoppini center would be feasible. We will utlllz our fttreglass materials and techniques in all of the con truction in whatever degree the rticula.r s tructure makes possible. �Mayo r Ivan Allen, Jr . - 3 - April 25, l968 \t\lth such a program, the first question is al ways 1 'wh n? " . The machinery with which we will rnanuft-.cture our -,rototype m odels is a lready asse1nbled md win be sbl p ed to Atlanta as soon as we hove the factory s ite ready. The la r ger machinery will be µurchased and brought into operation as needed . We a re counting our time in weeks and will produce upwa r · E, of five hundred housing units during our t esting. Vie will an~lously a -wait the outcome of Tuesday' s meeting, and wUl consider lt a µr lvllege to ork with your people in the service of the citizens of Atlanta . Richard L. Fullerton RLF*jl cc: ~r. Dan Sweat Dtrector of Government Liaison City of Atlanta Mr. Cecll Al xa.nder, Chairman Hou ing .Res ources Committee C lty of Atlant S nator P ul Douala , Ch rlm n resldent ' Commt.tt e on Urb n P roble ms Wa shington, D. C . Mr. VvUUam O. Burke. Director Indu try Dlvls ion Georgl D epartm nt of Indu try and T r d Mr. Georg T. Scharffenberger, t'r e ldent Clty Inves ttna Company N w York C lty Mr. D vld E . K hn New York C ity �2 il 18, l • or • C Y Ii lo nt, ts for plam.ing but th t the Hous portion (includin rcial ed d to the - nt un r ' rb t lO ,., i lo r• a 1 now con .Al,thorit ' O. o vor. h 'Wal . ded b7 , A to the City d de cbool nd otiv Dep·,r lo l c , tl.r tot th project) b to d th Hl htJ t O A t ei portio d ro HUD or tl . _ lated for th £or cone that ta or direct to ot er portions of the • t th ev tu. l ehould d n t ! pro ibl cti c proc , nou ing. t such propooal could ~o 1.ng Authority,. itHout called for by ithor ting for the title to first O A. ace al o h red by otb rs, that th te pll ed thru. pri aettaad f'iret to the Mo11 irin: .. 1! s ibl • di tly to HUD in yf At li Inter! 1th h ci 11t ority '1nd then oing t.hru t tli'o ot the p:rou ecti ve d! spocil'ic lly a hington request · dv toge tb t skc.d t, it do t-"tho Mayor l d cot ight be dori ved in d v lo , t project , if by ri nt or otr·lets Urban the v loper, 1n o p na t d f or it sin Auth rity ·--I.\,, Yt nt. hOU in ul this saved and antic1pot d off s t by the t or lopers thiD proc dur • tall ion or utiliti a by th!) Hou in Authority thru t ould qu eke t loper dir ct, with-out nd in tact have requested 1.1ch pr f r it thi Vhic th t It Ill.so ppear • 4 w-/~ ~ t ltip opinion, vhich i nd cu.welo1 er would be thru deGign propo~ 1 by elo re . for City or housing portion to th pe i ti iti C t f ot ro w rd o din tot cot o t tho xp nse invol 1 d t o the d, velopor. �3 Aprll 18, to ork u crit ri t .or on th ly lo pro Th th 01 in .hey A to pl 01·d13r h on >: d n a 15 l oy get the velripcr tt ~ lop r for u ptin (c) ...,11e nat ri 1 to do by • ay 1) · ttal of propo al l ction oft e &ucce .f·l b) inal elev. lo~. i continu hi lo . nt of' the l~ sit1fl ... f date of • t O O r or velopmcnt cr1 _ri unit bo f ur ye ( t r r, hed int, A w-1n l\hou t d Jun 1) . rousing Authority, oo . as .o"' ibl r- d inform the oon s po siblo ( ·ith target cost of 1 "ld end ~u11'W1ed (inclu n p ct1 e t r.i,>a d ir d for tho r<'.3 a1nlng ... tcd dovelop .. z·s . uthority to call aa l l) JO b· ugh th in progre~~ for ·11 be . l ~d to pull to- eether l) unifon1 4. 117 lots, tb s ppen~. a pro r- · ne traffic circ· 1- tion ti ~ t achedulv no r que r, d .• • , Oo n h cot been rve th rinht to do hou.l q r t!ity .3 . be dete~ i i1ad t details could be ·orked out ,1th rd h HUD uc o cvn th .n lthin JO days . v loper cou1 · the t 2. t nd in..fom.otion ··iou th 1 e fter . 'f d 1 lomll l. intolli.go. tly. en·hrw can p ckoge the doveloprnont criteria ( hich ho i... to p,1t out to d l riJ -will nt th,. t : o that ell 8 (oth r than the i erudou• to kno ~-lu,t, tl • ladin,, ( ) and ). oti o t th , • cir cuid nee rtio ou furni h d pros. etiv; bo oon a pos iblo (t rgot date nt propo,, l I or s b, itt l in �h pril 18 • 1968 v lo r to b d th t th inf.'o , l~nning: r1 ht tow rk ou.t with the , 1 C 11cce tt ter 7. r in ec ful i liVJ r y to i 15 doys d by letter fro Mnyor Al l n to v lo d for Housin lo r to lop r be r t 9. ed itbin te ( d rel ted co . rcial) ed Jointly y tho City- ut ority. a. or r to b ul bi to th porti n of the tract (other th n the ily lo ) to et to t di loper, traffic ti! ctory to tho City. hin ton D in le nt • 0 · to deli or ti 1$ i p.ir ucc in t o (2) lli d to start ph (b~ k g. ound within aix (6) l ical d V\llop. .ent nths from dat o of ot title to the l end. f ul loper bo required to a start ing (br in to c , lcte devolo ent - ound) to . R sp t fully ubmit ted, ~ I ou Coordinator �HOUSING RESOURCES CO ITTEE April 19, 1968 SUPPLE ENTAL ME ORANDU a o. 1 (r dor l P n Ro Honor f~rm lo me ting y t rdey with Hu ing Authori y repr o nt tiv ite) , the following lint points w 1:-0 b~ught out: 1. Pric of th portion prior d t rtnin tion will r qui~ Hou ing Authority e pl'OC du 2. Urb d volop yor pp valop d c n ur. nd t nt of ct without the Urben t la at dev und r Urb n Rn wol . A n t r could b ft ach quick thtough th• Hou ing Ex cution tag xt o ~ ntly f pp l th t non of Public Hou ing nd hat in l (l that thi portion of th do ). not p clud ting th Tumk y I f i th t pzo p ctiv ncour g d to build thy could initi ly or ub nt und r both Tut:nk•y • It ab en wal, c ntly b nd 221 d {3) h ou by th nt rprie , but h would not pr diet how di~ ct through priv t th l nd hould Uri> n nt th r Mz. Pr ell atat d hot Hr. Ed 4. di fr it not b t -,uld t ke to re ch th dav lop l or by d v lop r Urban Rn Mr. Authority rcial s ton ture of d v lcprnont , i •• , through th lla Ex cution at long dev lop d for hou ing and • r. P r 3. to b th t old to th hould r . Op nah wt $~ occup nt nd th t v lo• dvocated • tit vel p nt i nd Juni~r Hi h Sch n t und r uld not be f cilitie ff t~ ti of th cot of n U n • �It 130 dovelopod , how v r , th t thG Junior High School- Cor would bo e gener l co the th Sine fo~ lo Cl'O inc hou ing School portion , hic:h includ difficulty- nt can g City so, out o ite , perticulorly for Public part ov rall n d of th of • to bed diet d, th tin vie of th act th t th are n ed d, thet th 24 r 24 · ere h ving g tting lo - inco Hou in9 , and th entir propoa d dovclopmont o th nti~o fedex l Pen Sit City t nity Cantor nity facility o rving th t whol the city and not lt it d to th 6. I of th uld be batter b rv d if thi t l nd, would b dev lop hou ing. RECOr ENDATIOfh I ( ) Th t th hou ing nd r lot d co d volop d by private ent rpri R now l proe of the er ob ct , without going through th di Urben " cuzr ntly d ignat d Junior High School nd Co (b) ighborhood C nt r site b (c) rc:iol portion Th t ltipl Turnk y and 221 d proc o d v lop d for lo typ inco~ h hou i~ d v lopm nt b • , withe o th t thy could ov ntu ly b ing. cour q du ing both unit ub old to th occup nt . d, 2 nity d aign d �s:a::t1!3TZ AND BBADFI ELD / ARCI-n:TECTS / INCORPORATED/ A.1. l \. ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30309 Please address • 74 FOURTEENTH STREET, N. E. all - correspondence to: P. 0. • TELEPHONE 892-8722 Box 7988 • Atlanta, AREA CODE 404 • Georgia 30309 April 19th, 1968. Mr. Lester Perse11s, Housing Authority of the City of Atlanta, 824 Hurt Building, . Atlanta, Georgia 30303. Dear Mr. Perse11s: We understand that you will have renewal land for sale in the Thomasville Federal Penitentary area for multi-family housing. Please let us express our interest and intention of submitting a bid for either the 221(d)(3) F.H.A. Program or the Turnkey H.A.A. Piogram. Will you please provide to us a prospectus and the necessary bid documents for all sites that will be available for multi-family housing. Very truly yours, SHEETZ AND BRADFIELD/ARCHITECTS/INCORPORATED/A.I.A. Francis B. Sheetz, Jr., A.I.A. copy to: Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Gilbert Boggs .,.,,Malcolm Jones v Er nest Tharpe James F. Kirkpatrick f bs/gk FRANCIS B. SHEETZ, JR., A. I.A. • RICHARD H. BRADF IELD, A. I.A. • RICHARD B. JENKINS • WILLIAMS. MAYTON, A.I.A. • DAN IEL P. SANTACRO CE, A.I.A. JEROM E J. COSTA �GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ATLANTA . GEORGIA 30332 OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT April 17, 1968 Mr. Cecil Alexander Chairman Housing Resources Committee City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Alexander: I am writing in response to your requ est for an evaluation of the presentation made to the Construction and Design Subcommittee of the Housing Resources Committee by Mr. McNamara on Tuesday, March 26. You will recall tha-'c this was a presentation of a new concept for the fabrication of residential units. This concept involved p:uring on site, by use of vacuum forms, concrete elements of a standardized nature which would become elements of multi-family residential buildings. The standardized elements could be varied from job to job and from unit to unit in such a way as to make them adaptable to the needs of various sites and architectural plans. It is my opinion, as Chainnan of the Construct ion and Design Subcommittee, and that of those with whom I have talked who were present at this slide presentation, that the conc·ept is a good one but that it is at this point in time only a conc ept and not a proven plan. It is my opinion that Mr. McNamar a should find a developer who is willing to develop this idea on an actual building project involving a number of multi-family units . If such a developer can be f ound, this may well be an excellent concept to utilize in the model city program as it does r epresent one innovation i n the field of attempting to provide low income housing . The model city program should be considered because of a n ecessity for r equiring a reasonable sized t ra ct of land in order to build enough units to analyze the validity of Mr . McNamara 1 s proposed technique. It i s, after all, an experimental project and one which is yet to be proven in the field. There are many possible applications of pre-fabricated elements within these units which should be explored, but which may be restricted at this time by va_rious codes. If max_·. :Jm saving is to be attained in this kind of project, the use of prefabricated fixtures and materials ~ust be allowed subject to carefully drawn requirements. �Mr. Cecil Alexander page 2. In summary, it is our belief that this is a good concept but that it is only a concept at this time and that it does require actual· construction of a number of units in order to properly evaluate the technique on any objective basis. Sincerely yours, Edwin D. Harrison President EDH:lhs cc: Colonel Malcolm Jones/ Mr. Moreland Smith Mr. Bob Winn • �5 ;( /l. 1'0 u;-J(i c>c·. Jfr ~- Sc ~::n i!? s ion on :Sow-In·:o:n'2 Hou s i_ng A Nat i onal Adv i s orJ -.::ummi ::. st on on Low-Income Hous int;; ts <::sta bl l s hed to c,r.dert.Akc-; fl. c ornprehe :1s ive s tudy and inve stigate the resou:!":ct.::G BJ 1G. cApabi li ti es Ln t h e publ: c ancl pri. vRt. e se-~t.o~s of ~.he c :: , · i-·11y ·.,~1-c h , w.;y b ,~ u sec. ~.o f1~1 ru1 more complete ly !:.:ie cb,1<"•~tives of Vv: nati 0nGl gt;al of "a d e :~en t h,)rne nnd a Ll u itable livine; e nvironment for ever~· American family". 1 ( ·.rh-2 .:;0mrnls s i o.'. 1 ~s d l r2c t e d t o f:ubm i t Lo th-2 fr·2 sidc n:·. A:1d the .:one;r ~ss a.11 i 11t'=rir:: r c?or~. ·.., ~ ~h r es~cc t t o i ':. s f.indi r:..g:c:: anc r <:?ccrrnc:idat ~on s no t lat.er ~.ha::-i .Jul y 1, 196'.: , ru:d. fl fi r.al rep ort no t ~Ater l hA.n J :.ily 1, 1970. �7 TITLE II - llliN'l'/\ L l!OllSING FOR LOWE!/. UICOHF. li'f,JIILIE::3 A new program of Federal assistance to renLal and coopcrativL: hou s ing for lower income families fa authorized by addin~ a new section 236 to the National .Housing Act. The assis t ance is in the form of periodic payments to the mortragee financing the housing Lo reduce the mort~agor's interest costs on a market r a te FIUt-insured project morte;at;e. The interest reducti.o n payinents uill reclm;e payments on thr.; project mortgage from tlwt rcquireu for principal, inter~st, and mortgage in_surance premium on a markeL rate mortgage t o that required J~ur principal an:::l. interest on a mortgac e bear i ng an interest r a Le of :~ per cent. The interest r educ tion payments will r edu ce renta l s t o .a basic chare;e, and a tenant or c ooper a tiv(.; member wi l l e i.ther p.'.lf the basic ch:,.rge or such greater amount as reprec enLs 25 percent of his income, but not in excess of the charges which would be necessary without any inte res t reduction payments. Income~; ot' tenants will be r eexamined at l eas t every 2 years for the purpose of adjusting rentals. Rental char ges collP. cted by the project owner in excess of the ba sic c har ges are to be returned to the Secretary for deposit in a r evolving fund for the purpose of maki ng other interest reduction payments . Tenants of these projects who pay less than the fair market rental charge for their units will generally have to have inc omes, at t he time of the initial rent-up of the p1·oj ects, not in exc ess of 135 pe rcent of the maximum income limits tha t can be es t ablished in t he area f or initia l occupancy in public housing dwellings . Howe ver, up to 20 percent of the contract funds authoriz e d in appropriation a cts may be made available for projects in which some or all c.,f the unit s w:Ll l be occupied, at the time of the initial r ent-up, by tenants whose incomes exc ee d the above limit but do not ex ceed 90 percent of t he inc ome limi ts for occupancy of section 221 (d) (J 2 be l ow-m.:i.rket i nteres t rat e r enta l housing . In de ter mini ng i nc ome .for the pur pos e of eligibility as we ll as Lhe amount of rent to be pa id a $J OO deduc tion i s per mi U ed for eac h minor person in the family and any income of s uch minor is not counted . ( To qualify for mortga ~e insuranc e unner t he new progr am, a mortcaeor mus t be a nonpr of i t organi za t ion, a c ooperati ve, or a l imi t ed di vi de nd entity of the type s permitt ed under th e FHA se c t ion 221 (d )(J ) r ent a l hous ing progr am . The ::i.or t eage l iJnitati on::; 'trith r esp ect to maxirrn un mor Lga ge amount are the s ame as for mort.gaees ins w·ect W1d<~r t he (d )(J ) proc;r .::un . Interes t reducti on payments can als o be made with res pe ct to State- a i ded rental housinr; pro j ec t ::; appr oved for r ecei ving the benefiLs of tl1l:! program prior to compl e t ion of c ons t ruc t ion or r ehabill t a t i on of t!1c proj ects . ' �8 Contrac L::; l'u1· u.::;:..;j3 Lance pay111enLs an! .:rn Lhori ze (t, cutJjcc L trJ a pproval in appropriation ac L:.;, Lu the :cmonnt. of !C'/S mill i on ann1w. lly prior to ,July 1, 1969. 'l'his 2.mounL i:.; incr8t.. ::i l.' U by i100 mil.Lion oa ,July l, J 9G') , and by $125 million on ,Jul;yr l , J.9}0 . A reas onable portion of this authority is tu be trarn.i.l'e rred to t he Se cretary of Ag riculture .for u::;e in rural areas and small totl'ns. A pro ject, 1' i.nanc(~rl 1.111dc!r the rlL'\·J progr~im c~..r1 i i:1c lude such nondwelling facilities as the Secretary deems aduqua te ::rnd appr·opria te to serve the occupants of the pr ojed, and the surronndi11i:; neighborhoou, as long as the pro,jcct is preJomln.:rntly res-Lcle n !.:io. l and any nonJtwllinr; facilities contribute to the economic fea::;ibility ol' the pr oj e c t. Where a project is designed primarily for occupancy Ly the elderly or handicapped it c;:i,n include rela ted fncilities f(,r their use, :.r..ich a::; dining·, work, recreation, and health facilit.i. es . With appro 11al of the 3 21~re Lary of mm a mortgagor ca,,--i sell the individual dwelling units Lo lowe r incoJr,;:) p1i.rchm3ers and these p t.Lrcha::;8rs .:ire elig ible for assisto.nce payments w1der the provisions of th0 ne:w homeownership program. ( A cooperative or private nonprofit corporation or acsociat.ion can purchase a proj ect from a limited dividend mortgagor and finance the purchase wi th a mortcag8 _insured under the program. · Projects for low and moderate income families financed under the below marked 221 (J) (j) progr3Jn can be transferred, prior Lo fina l endorsement for FH/1. insurance, to the new rental housing interest. reduction program. Projects for the elrl.erly or ha ndicapped approved for direct loans can be refina nced unde r the new intere st re duction pro~ram at any time up to, or a reasonnble time after, proj ec t comple tion. Rent supplr.ment payme nts may be pr ovide d for tenants in projects financed under the new program, but no mor e t han 20 p erc ent of the units in any one proj ec t can r eceive r unt s uppleme nt assistance. Rent snpplcm ; and th 0 int 0 rn ~1 de ve lo p me nt r lan i s c onsic t e nt ~i t h c o~rrehensive pl:mrinp; .::'or th P. are a wh j ch mee ts c rit nria c s tab l ished by th e Se c re t.ary. The Se cret ary is au t h ori ze d i. o es tahlish a r c vol vin r f und t'or !.he w aranty f !'Of'. ram wf-: i. ch will ·r e comp ri sr: d o f (1 ) r e c P.i p t,s :'rom r'c-e s an d charr,e s , (2) othe r r P. ce i p ts, and (3) s L: ch sLi ms , a1 1th ori zed to he appr opriatP d, as ma~· be r equ i re d. �' .L, . The Secretary is al~,o alithoriz r-d t.o rnrikr. s1 1 prlcrTH!nLa.ry r.rant.~, t,r; SLaLc anLi l e-cal rd,ljc bodies anc:I c1.. ·C'nc i c s for 1-:atr·r nnd r, (Jv1r, r facili tics anc! ortin srace assisted l:y f'. ran ts Under the l1 01 1SllW ;ind Urban Development Act o C 1965 or th e Gons olidat.e ci Varrn0rs' f1 nme Administr:.ition Act, and the l!oijsing Act of l <)(,l. The S8crc1..'.lr;r r-,11d determine~ that tr.e surrlementary 1:rants are desir.:i.ble t'or ca.rryin~~ out a new commun"i ty ciP.vc lopment ~-roj f·r. t, and th;1L .1. s1:l",t'trmtL1l n1 ,rr.l 1er of housinf'. i.;11it.s for low and 1::ociPral.P. inr.orr:P. p·rsot!S is to r mar:e availahlr: t.hroi.;;,:h :.h<: r r nj~r.t.. 0~ The suppltir;;r.; nl. :11':1 r.,i·arit cannot. · xr.cr.d 20 rcrcent of t.} ~1' r.u~; t, 01· t.bc t'acil Hy and th -~ Lot:11 Federal 1;rant i~,; limi tC: d to 8::, f •f:rr:cn_t of fncili t.y coi,t. Arprorri.:1tions t'or s1:pple1n1:nt,3.ry r:rants a,8 .11 · thorizrid up to ~,5 million for fiscal year 196) , and up to :: 2~ mi , lion for l'iscal year 19'(0. TITLE (_ 1/ - T_!HBAN RENE>.-! AL Netghb..:irh noc~ Dev~: Jupr:1eni, Pro 0r9.m.~ The Secrcl.2.ry of Elm 1 : _; authurlzed. to provide financi e.l assist.an<-~) for n~lghborhood develop:n2rit programs, ~1 ne,.,r n.pproneh to urorn1 !-=n~ ·, ra] wh ich wlll faciJ l tat c more rapid reha.1:iili tat ion 1:md 1·ec'l:::v·. .:lopm:.!nt of blighl~(:a areas on an 'iffect:v~ sc ale, A neighborh-ood dP.'1elopm1_>!1t program ·.:::on::.: i.sts of urban renewa l project 1mdertakings 8..'1d activl1..i~ s i f! on~ or more ;,µ·ban rene,.;al n.r ·=as that are planned and carried out on th1: lJ9.si.s of a:!1. rn.1i:iJ increments. Financing is based on the amount of l 0ari and grcmt funds needed to carry out -:h e acti vir.i es pla..1w~d dul'.'ing a l ?-mcnt .h p e :!'lod ln ea.ch of the urban re!J~ ',181 are es -:.:on l.~ ai!len in 8. CO!Il::11l'1i ty Is r.,rOGt'3.l'i, Ir funds ar2 avaiJabl~ and a communi tJ" ' f prog:.:-a.m is P..cc0.pt<=1bl2 to the ,3e.:::retar.:,·, a co:urnnnltJ can receive fina;.1cial assistance based on its need for t;ub:.iequent annual incr,~me nt s of thc.: ;,roc;rom. The Redevelcprn~nt Land Acency of t-,h8 DL~t:-ri.ct o f' C·.; l •1 !nh ·;_,: is b iv~ n author lty t o p lan ru1d unde rt ak e ne Lr;hborhoocl develcpm2·,.t progrsms. r~ ~reas 2 in m1t.borizatlon of grants 'rhe authoriz e.t: i on f o r urban r2 t1ewal gr:mts Ls i nr~t·-~a:·'--'d 1Jy ~1.!~ 1JillL:m on July J., 1969. In oddi tlon , the authorizat ion for v.rb en ren~,val grants for proj ects in model c iti es area: Ls lnc r ~ased 1y ~33 0 mi.llion. ( Reh1Ju.i.li.tatton 16rants The limit on the a 100unt of a relv=i1; il"LtEi.t.i u ll c;rA ,:-. tu ~.:i. lo•.,·-i. r:c c.,10~ homeowne r ls ir.c r eas c n from :~1, ~,,J0 tv $ 3, 000 and the g ra:11~ Ls made available f or r ·.=h abi.li t etion of :i:12c.l property tn ':lddi.tion Lo the d·..,re J.ling itself. Rehabilitation ~rant s are authori zed to b e mad e to low-:L ncomP. ho;:ne owners for repa lr s and improveme nts of d\1e llings out s i c1..~ urban r>2rlc ·.-1al end code enforceme nt areas 1. where t h e dwe ] lings are .Lr;i areas certif i ed. by t he l ocal go,.rcrnlng body as contaj 11i.ng a s llb r,t a n LiaJ. numbe r o f s t.ruc t ur~s i n !1eed of r8habilit.at l on , �13 2. if the locality has in effect a workable program for community improvement, and 3. the area is definitely planned for rehabilitation or code enforcement within a reasonable time, and the repairs to be assisted are consistent with the plan for rehabilitation or code enforcement. mm is also authorized to make rehab ill tat ion grants to low-income homeowners whose property has been determined, after an· inspection pursuant to an approved statewide property i nsurance plan, to be uninsurable because of physi cal hazards. The erant may be made only to rehabilitate the property to the extent that the Secretar.y determines necessary to make it meet reasonable underwriting standards imposed by the statewide plan, The Secretary of Rehabilitation loans 'rhe rehabilitation loan program has been broadened in the same manner as the rehabilitation grant program with respect to properties located outside urban renewal and code enforcem:nt areas and those found to be uninsurable. ( The amount authorized t o be appropriated for each fiscal year is increased from $100 million to ~150 million ru1d the program is extended to June 30, 1973 (in lieu of the previous expiration date of October 1, 1969). Eligibility for residential rehabilitati on loans is limited to persons whose annual income is within the locally applicable income limits for the section 221 (d) (3) below-market interest rate program. Limit on LPA rehabilitation in urban renewal areas The previous limits on the acquisition and rehabilitation of residential properties by local rene wal agencies are r e moved. Under prior law, an LPA could acqu:!.re and rehabilitate for demonstration purpos es no more than 100 units or 5 perc ent of the total residential units in en urban renewal area, whichever is lesser. Dis osition of ro ert, for low and moderate income housintL_ Land in an urban renewal area is authorized to be leased i n addition to being sold as previously provided) for low or moderate income housing at a price consistent with the use for that purpose. A builder is permitted to purchase the land at the write-down price for low or moderate income sales housing. Under this provision land can also be made available at the write-down price for housing assisted under the 221(h) program, and the new interest reduction payment programs authorized by the Act for homeownership and multifamily housing. Grants for low and moderate income housi ng in open land projects Grants are authorized for open land urban renewal projects where the land is to be disposed of for low and moderate incomP. housing. Previously, open land projects were not eligible for grants. The grant may be for �14 two-thirds of the differenc e between the proceeds from any land dicpoaed of at its value for low or moderate income housing and the proceeds which would have been realized if the land had been disposed of at its fair value without regard to its special use. Demolition grants - rat harborar:es The Demolition Grant Program is expanded to permit grants for the demolition of structures which are rat harborages or potential rat harborages. Use of air rights sites for educational facilities Air-rights urban renewal projects, and the construction of necessary foundations and platforms in any type project, are authorized for the development of educational facilities. As in the case of industrial development, an air-rights project and the construction of foundations and platforms would only be available for educational facilities if the area is unsuitable for low or moderate income housing purposes. Low and moderate income housing in residential urban renewal areas A majority of the total number of housing units in a community's (__ residential urban renewal projects which receive Federal recognition after August 1, 1968 must be for low and moderate income families or individuals, with at least 2~ of such total for low income · families or individuals. The Secretary may waive the 20i requirement to the extent that the units are not needed in the community. Workable program requirements in case of Indian tribes An additional period of time, until January 1, 1970, is provided for Indian tribes, bands, or nations to adopt and carry out minimum standards housing codes for workable program certification. · Interim assistance for blighted areas The Secretary of HUD is authorized to contract to make grants aggregating up to $15 million a year to cities or counties to assist them in taking interim steps to alleviate harmful conditions in slum or blighted areas of communities which are planned for substantial clearance, rehabilitation, or federally assisted code enforcement in the near future, but which need ~ome immediate public action until permanent action can be taken . The Secretary is required to encourage employment of unemployed or under-employed residents of an assisted area in carrying out the activities to be assisted. Grants may not exceed two-thirds of the cost of planning and carrying out an interim assistance program, except that three-fourths grants can be made to any community with a population of 50,000 or less. A community has to have an approved workable program for community improvement to qualify for assistance, and relocation assistance and payments will be available. �.,___ - 15 Rcl.oca Lio11 l'a-: r1 1t : t1l.:, ~--Relocation adJu0LT!li;11L pay1w::nL:, m· c) bn1.:.id0ncd to JJCrmit. p.::iy rr1ent.,:::; of up to $)00 per J8:.J.l ', !\J!.' .-L / - J c:::i r r1:::'l'~.(ld . ::ur:ll p::.y11tt.mL~: !J:.J.ve be en heretofore limited to :.J. rnaxjJn11m of $S\..HI pa~_,a:;le OVL!l' a ;; rnonLh period . A new pRyment is a nt hori_:,ecJ for a dinpl.:lced owner-occupcmt ul' residential property t o cnahlc !Ji.ill Lo p urr.has c c.1 r e placement d1,elline . Tlte payment, which cmmo t exceed ~~1_' _,000 , le l,hc• dil'fen.mc e bet.,_·men tlte avcr:i.gc price for- an adequa t e replaceme n t homt.i und the ucquis i tion price of hi::; former home. Tl'l'Jl~ VI - ln-1. 01\N PLi\NN:rNG AND FAC ILITif;_; Comp:?:"ehe ns i ve pla!m.r nc (_ The section 701 planning as:::;istance e:rant proc ram ls exter1sivo ly revised. The Secretary oJ' HUD i s ,not-·authorized to make _comprehensive plannine: grants to State pl:rnning agencies for ass i stance to 11 distr ict 11 planning agonc ie::; for rU1·al and other nonmetropoliLan areaG. Consultation with the Secre t ary of Ag r iculture i s required pr ior t o approval of a n;y district planning grants. The Secretary of Agriculture and, when appropriate, the Secretary of Conunerce may provide technical ass i ::;tanc e in connection with the establishment of districts a nJ the carrying out of planning by them. Such Jistrict planning may not b e aimed at assistins businesses to reloca te .from one a rea to another. Other new provision::; authorize direct planning grarrts t o Indian trib a l planning counc ils or other bodies for planning on Indian res ervations; to re g iona l and district councils of governmen t as we ll as those organized on a metropolitan ba n i ::; ; to reg ional commiss ions and economic development distric ts established unJe r tho Public Works and Economic Development Act of 1965; t o cities, without regard to popul:.J.tion, within metropolitllll areas for plarming which is part of' metropolita n planni..11.g ; and t o official Goverrunent pl<-1.nninr: a ge ncies for nreas where rapid urbo.niz.:i.tion is expected as a result of a new c oJ11JT11111i ty- cie ve Lopmc nt a s sisted under title JV of this act. The Secretory i s r cqnir e d to ·cons ul t i,J ith the Secr e tary of Cormnerco Lefore rr1c1 king any pl3I111in;_~ gnmt which includes any part of an economic d~velopment d i strict . The definition of c ~mprAhensive pl~nning is broadened to include planning for the provision of governme nt,3 l servlces and for the rievelooment ,3nrl utilization of human and natural resources. The inclusion of· a housing element is required a~ part of the pr eplration of comprehensive lani use plans. The USP. o f private consultants, whP.re their profe s si0na] sArv i c~s are dP.P.med appropriate by the assisted governments, is added to the stated purposes of the program. The authorlzation of apnropriations for grants is increased by P35 mil~ lion for fis~.:ll y~1r 19t;9 (includ\.ng t 20 million ea r m::irked for district planning) ancl by :$125 million (induding plO million for district planning) beginnin ~ fiscal YA~r 1970. It is also provided th.qt an additional $10 million of s P. ct\. on ?Ol apor or r i~tions i s to be avail able fo r study , fes e a r ch ani de~onstr~tion proje~ts. �16 Planned areawirle rlevPlopm~nt Supplemontary grants (rt es i gnP.d to Anc0'1r;i.ge areawide planning) are autl1orized for F'P.der.11ly-assisted projects in ;ill multi j 11risdictional areas (not just metropolitan ar~a~ as previou ~ly provided )su~h as the rural pl;mninp; distri c ts proposeri to ~e assisted with co·TJprehensive planninR grants unde r t he comorehensive plRnnin g provisions of the law. UnUBed authorizations for appropriations for supplementary grants for fiscal year 19~7 3nd 1968 are made available through fiscal year 1970. Advance Acqui sition of l and The adv::ince acquisti on of bnd progr.:im is extensively revised. Among the more signific::int ch::inges is a broadenin g of the definiti on o f eligible land from land "pl::inned to ~e utilized in connec t ion with the future construction of oublic works and facilities" to "land planned to be utilized in the future for public purposes". Grants can also be made for the imputed interest cost when a public body does not use borrowed funds to acqui~e the land. Authority is given the Secretary to extend the requirement that the land must be used for its proposed purpose within five years if he de ems a longer period necessary due to unusual circumstancPs ~nd so advises the B~nking and Cur~ency Committees of the Congress. It is also provided that assistance under this program will ·not render a project ineligible for othPr Federal assistance programs and th at the cost of land acquired with assistance under this prograM will not be an ineligible project cost in such other programs. Water and s ewer f ac i lit i es progr am The interim planning requirements under the basic water an~ s ewer facilities grant pro ~ram is extended to Octobe r 1, 19~9. It is also provided that in admini s t e ring the program, to the greatest extent practicable, new job O:.lportunities shall be provided for unemployed or underemployed persons. Authorizati ons -- water and sewer, neighorhood f acilities, and advanc e acq~~ ~~ t _ ~o!1 _of lanrl prog!_cl!11S . The author i7.ation fo r appropri ations for the s e three pr o:rams is ext ended to permit the appropr i ation , fo r fi s cal ye ar 1970, of any fu nds autho r i zed but not appropr i ated p r ior to th at time . Also, an additional $150 million fo r f i sc al ye ar 19h9 an1 $115 milli on for fis ca l y ear 1970 are autho r i zed to be anor opr i a t ed fo r the wa t er and s Pwer faciliti es grant pr ogram. Open space l and program The contract authoriza t ion o f $310 mil l ion for grants under th e open space land nrogram ls changed to a lJ lO mi l l i on au thori zat i on o f appropriations prior to July 1, 1969, wi t h $150 millio~ in add i tional appro. priations authorized for fiscal year 1970 . The l imit on the amount of the fun1s that can be used for s t udies and ~ublishing of information is increased from $50, 000 to $1?.5,000 per year. �17 FPa:.ih .i. liLy ::, Lurlic s - p 11h.lic i-rork;:; pl.r. nninc :t< !'ro.ncr :, It is ·m:.ide clear th:'lt the Secret::iry of HUD has au th0ri ty t0 m;ike ;iclvanr:es for feasibility stur:lies unrier the oubl ic works pl;rnning .:i-iv;inces progr;:im. TITLE VIT - !JRBAU MASS TRANSPORTATION Authoriza tlon The autl1~ri7.,:ition o ~ appropri;itionf; for gr;ints ;,nri 0ther ::issi.c:-t.;rnce to · urb::in mass transportation is inr:re:ised by $190 mil lion ror fiscal ye;ir 1970. The a'.llount of funrls which c 'rn be used . for res~;:ireh, riev ~lopment, and demonstration projects is increased hy ~IS mill i on, c0i'!lTTl 0 nc i.np.: July 1, 1968, -'l !lri t.hP. st;itutory limit on the fun-1s av:1i1;1ble fo'!" this purpose is n ~moved, cor.imencing July 1, 191S9. Emergency rir orr am extended The emergency ma s s transportation c apital grant program expir~ti 1n d::it~ is extended from ~ovember 1, 19~8 to July 1, 1970. Defi nition The definition of "mas s transportation" in the Urhan Mas s Transnortation Act of 194+ is amended t o allow g r e;i ter flexibility 1.nd oon0rtunity for aoplication of n~w concepts ::ind systems. Non f e deral sho.re of ne t projec t cos ·t Not more thnn half of the non-federal sh~r or the n~t proj r rt ros t of a mass trRns por tation nro j ect is oermitte d to ~e paid fro~ priv ~t e sourc es , e xcept in cer t a in c as e s of rle:non s tralf:id fL=; cal in;-1h i Lity . A'1y oublic or r riv a t e tr.:rn s i.t sy st em f'unrl. s provi ciPci for l !,P. rn, n- t;"l"! ler;il sh;J.re mu s t 1-ie sol e ly fro"! unr:list.rihute d c ~sh surplu ~Ps, r w)l ::i c P11ent or de'1reci:ition funds or r <"?se rve s av.:1 il a ble i n c1sh, o r new ca ptia1. 0 1 TITLE VIII - SECONDiillY MOTITGJ\GE MAR.KET The existing Ft::ldcral Na tiona l l"iort.ra8e Associa t ion (1'1Il'iA) i s directed t o be par titi one d i nto t wo i, cpa ratc corporations . One wi ll b ~] a Governme nt spons ored privat e c orpor ation, to b e lrnmm a:.; tile Fe dera l. !la t i.cno.l Mortr.a '.:i:e Association (FNHA ), to ope rat e t h0 :,c~c ondary mortr..:i.r,e marke t. oywr:Li,l ons . The othe r wi ll r ema in in the Government a nd conti nue to ope1\1.te t he opecia l assio t a nc e funct i ons for s pecial Fe de r a lly - aided hons ing programs, and the manageme nt a nd l i qui da tin~; f unc U one of the old FNMA. TllP 112H cor porat i on wi ll b e known a s t he Governme nt Nat :Lonal Mort c;ago A:J;:;ocfo.t ion (GHMA ) . FNMA i s authoriz ed to issn8 and s e ll securities l..i.::.tckod by a por tion of i t s mortgage p 0rtfolio , with GNM.J\ ~u.'.lran t ce :i.ng pa;y11tenL on s uc h securitie s. GNMA can also euarantee s imilar securi t i es i ssued by o ther pr i vate issuers ·where they are uacke tl by FIIJ\, VA, and some Farme rs Home Administration mortgages or loans. �•• JO The spcci.:i.l assit,tance authorl7. a Lion of FU.MA. (no.-1 GNHA ) i s increa:..:ed by $500 million on July 1, 1969. The provisions of thi:.; title will become effective after a date, no more than 120 days following its enactment, established by tlte Secretary of HUD. The Secretary ho.s established this date as September 1, 1?68 . Provisions are madu uit h respect to tlie capital stock of F1'111A and its board of directors Juring a transitional period. The transiLiono.l period will end when 1/ 3 o.f Lhe FI,JMA r, omm,·,n ::; t ock is owned h•r pers ons or orc;aniza tions in tile rnorti_:.:i.;:e l endin~; , home builu:Lnr; , r eal r.stn Le or related businesses , but not sooner than May 1, 1:)70, nor .la ter than M.:.i.y 1, 1973. The ITU1jor i ty of FNMA' s board of di rec t or::; ar c. to b e; appointcrJ. by the Secretary of HUD durini; t he trans i t ional period. 'I'lic President of FNMA during this period will be appointed Ly the Prc::iident of the United States and confirme d by the Sen:i.te. One of t he ~ecretary ' s o.ppoinkes to the Boa.rd will be the President. After the trans itiona l period FNMA wi ll be governed by a 15- memuer board of directors, five of whom will be appointe d by the Pres i dent of the United States. ( The new FNMA will be sub,ject to the general regula tory control of the Secretar y of HUD, who also mus t approve the issuance of all stocks and other obligati ons by FNMA and may r equire it to alloca te a r eas onable portion of its mortgae;e purchases to mortgages i n low and moder ate inc ome housing . TITLE IX - NATIONAL HOUSING PARTNERSHJJl~ A nati ona l housjJ1g partners hip i s · to be cr eat ed f or the purpose of securing the partic ip3.tion of private i nves t or s in progr c:ww and projects to provj de hous ing for l ow and moderate i nc ome families . Ini ti.ally , a f eder .:i.lly char ter ed, priva t el y f unded corpora tion will be organize d under the Db trict of Columtia Dusiness Corpor~tt i ou Act . The corpora tion in turn will organize t he Nat i ona l partners hip under t he D.C. Unif orm Limi t e d Par t ner ship Ar:t . The corporat.i.on will serve as t he ccncral partner anrl manDr,i.ng acent of the Na t iono.l partnc1·chip and each of its stockl1olders can be limited partner s. It will provi de the staff .:i.nd expertise f or t lie Partnerchip in orc;ani zing and plannint.; project undcrtakinc;s i n which Lile p::ir L11crship has an interest, and r eceive a fee for such s crv:ices . Both the corporation .:md the Na tional par~,nership are authorized to engage in a uroad range of' ac tivities appropria t c to tl ie provision of housing and relate d facilities primarily for low or moderate income families , with or without the use of Federo.l programs, ancl m.:iy enter int o and participate in al l forms of -partnerships and associations. The National �• 19 partnershi p is expected to form pa rtnership ventures with local investors for the purpose of building low and moderate income housing projects throughout the nation. Normally, it will be a limited partner in such undertakings, with an interest of not more than 25% of the aggregate initial equity investment for the project. The President will appoint t,he incorporators of the corporation and 3 of the 15 members of the board of di r ectors. The incorporators will serve as the initial board of directors and arrange for the initial off ering of shares of stock in the corporation and interests in the National partnership. The President is authorized to create additional partnerships when he determines it to be in t he nati onal inter est. National banks are authorized to invest in a corporation and other entities formed under this title. TITLE X - RURAL HOUSJNG Housing for low and moderate income per s ons and f amili es The Secre t ary of Agr i culture is aut horized to pr ovide direct and insured loans for housing in rural areas to low and moderate income persons and families and to provide renta l or cooper ative housing for such per s ons where assistance is not available under the new interest redu8tion programs authoriz ed by t he l aw. The interest rate on the loans can be at a r ate set by the Secr etary after considering the c ost of money to the Treasury and the payment ability of the appl icants , but not l ess than 1 percent per annum. An int erest supplement necessary to market the insured loans will be paid from, and reimbursed hy annual appropriations to, the Rural Housing Insurance Fund. Housing fo r rural t r a inees The Secret ary of Agriculture is authorized t o provide f i nancial and technical a ssistance to t he provision of hous i ng and r el a t ed facilit ies in rural areas f or rural trainees (and their famil i es ) enrolled i n Federally assisted t r aining cours es to improve their employment capability. Advances for land purchase f or t he housing will be repayable within 33 years and bear inter est at a r ate (not l ess than 1 percent ) determined by the Secretary of the Treasury t aking into considerat i on the current average market yie ld on outs t anding Federal obligations . Other advances would be nonrepayable, or repayable with or without interest, depending on t he applicant ' s payment ability, from pro j ect net income and any other available sources . Mutua l and self-help housing A new program of grant s and l oans is aut horized t o provide assistance in rural areas and small t owns to needy low-income individuals and t heir fami lies f or mutual or self-help housing. Gr ants can be made to public or private nonprofit organizations to pay part or all of the costs of developing compreh nai ve programs of t echnical and supervisory assistance to aid individuals and their families in carrying out rrrutual or self-help _housing efforts. �20 loans can be made on such terms and conditions and rn such amounts as the Sacl!etary of Agriculture deems necessary, to needy low-income individuals participating in programs of mutual or self-help housing approved by him, for .the acquisition and development of land and for the purchase of building materials as may be necessary, for the construction of dwellings. Loa.ns will bear interest at not .more than J percent per annum, and be repayable withrn 33 years. A eel.f-help housing land development fund is authorized to provide a source of short-term loans to public or private nonprofit organizations to buy and develop building sites to be sold to families, nonprofit organizations,_ and cooperatives eligible for assistance under the new interest reduction progrmna for housing for lower income families. TITLE J;I - LR PAN PROP~RTY PROTECTION AND REIN.stRArJCE _T itle XI enacts the "Urban Property Protection and Rernsurance Act of 1968." ( Under this Act the Secretary of HI.JD is authorized to provide private .insurers with reinsurance against losses resulting from riots or civil disorders. The sale of reinsurance is limited to those insurers that cooperate with State insurance authorities in developin~ statewide plans to assure fair access to insurance requirements, called FAIR plans. Reinsurance may only be provided in States which have such plans. FAIB plans may vary among the States, but all plans must satisfy minimum statutory criteria. The principal requirement is that no risk can te written at the surcharged rate or denied covera~e unless there has teen an inspection of the property and a determi nation made that it does not meet reasonable underwriting standards at the applicable premium. Additional requirements relate to the procedures to be followed with respect to inspections, the provision of reasonable notice to property owners of cancellation or nonrenewal of policies, and the formation of an all-industry facility which will place the insurance in the r egu lar market. S1; ch •'AIR Plans are to be administered under the supervi sion of the State insurance auth ority. As a condition for providing reinsurance in a State, the Secretary can require additional programs to make property insurance available without regard to environmental hazards. Reinsurance is offere d in standards lines of property insurance coverage and can be pr ovid ed ·immediately followin g enactment by means of a binder agreement, which expires aft er 90 days unl es s sooner replaced by a reinsurance contract. Premium rates and the terms and conditions of reinsurance contracts are to be uniform throughout the country. The premiums for the fi rst year must provide sufficient income to cover a level of riot losses in excess of the amount of insured riot losses in 1967. �21 A .~ 1.at,p ir: 1'(!:Jt·~n· t: Lo a:-st, rr.r. .J. nnrtiori of t,hr. :u . :-.t•,s rr :in::i : rr·d r;; Lhf: Secn,t-.:i:·y 1d t,hh1 'l /£';-tr ·:' r l-:;i !,!i n r:lr.~:r. n:· i k; n1•:d. n .f'! l: !r· lr:r·i;.]:1',iw"? se ~r- i on. fhc ceil:i rw ori t.bn share 1-: ill h! c;~ o · ·.1.,. rrr·r ,,r t,~.- i: r: 1 r;"Jr.c,·.· rrc"? n:i 1 ms, r..J.rrir ·u in 1.lir: :jt:lt,r. on rr-h:st ·!'f'd ljr:r. ~; c, I' nror " rl,.' j n!:'t i r:1r:c n . ~-L.cr. sharirw 1-!i. 11 onl, h ,• r rrit j rc:rl j J' r r. instir,..,cJ .! o:::sr:s cxc,·rcl r remi!:rnr-: raid f or nd.r:s tr,1r iCf: b;.· i1s1 : r;i1 1CP. cor.,r-ad r f in that. St.:i t, ~, (pr, -r:1iur:::: pa5d ir: '.h,:, c1 -rrent ;yr·o r r·l L::~ r1·r1riit1n:~, r ·1iL ·i: . pr-:::vic.· :::, ;·'r1! ·:: :i r. P.xce~·s oi' rejr.sL-ruJ ci.a:iH.s). 1· A :·i:-:tio ,1al Inst:rar 1c'" Tlcv,n._:',.lru~tion loans by nat1onal banks 1:r to J rn ont,h.- 1n lr.rwth ·,,se:r1 C"Ji.:0fy r':!--1'.--1111 t.eci to 211 rr.onths) as an exce ption to t he limitation on r ~al cs t at.e loai1s . National f.ai1ks are pc: rmi tt c d to continue to ru r chase part.ici ra t ions in existirw mort~'.agcs, .:md it is mat:c c l ear t hat loans by nat i. onal h;mks are not to he consid e r e d as re a l e s tate loans wh ~r c the bnnk looks primarily for rerayrnent ol; t of secc rit y othi:-?r than r e al e state. ( ( �
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 7, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 5, Folder 11, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_011.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 11, Complete Folder
  • Text: ATLANTA, GEORGIA PHONE 522- 4463 From Malcolm D. Jones, Housing Coordinator FOR M 2 5 - 15 . .,, . �ATLANTA, GEORGIA PHONE 522- 4463 From Malcolm D. Jones, Housing Coordinator . , ,., . FORM 25 - 15 �ATLANTA, GEORGIA PHONE 522- 4463 ,, l . From Malcolm D. Jones, Housing Coordinator • FOR M 2 5 - 15 �ATLANTA,GE ORGI A PHONE J A. 2•4463 Ivan Allen, " Jr. , Mayor �@143.215.248.55 13:19, 29 December 2017 (EST) ATLANTA, GEORGIA PHONE 522- 4463 From Malcolm D. Jones,~ Housing Coordinat~t"' v7' · ~ ~ ~ ,,,;./!R c_ ~ ,. 143.215.248.55 13:19, 29 December 2017 (EST)-- i ~ ~~ · ~~ (t143.215.248.55 F ORM 2 5- 15 <( �@143.215.248.55 13:19, 29 December 2017 (EST) ATLANTA, GEORGIA PHONE 522- 4463 From Malcolm D. Jones, Housing Coordinator ... A. . Zoning Panel Rejects 352-Apii:rtment Collier Road P:roject By ALEX COFFIN The aldermanic zoning Committee turned down a plan Thurs' day to . build 352 apartments on Collier Road. NW at Interstate 285 after more than 75 persons protested the units. Donald Hollowell, State Sen. Leroy Johnson, Aid. Q. V. Williamson and the Atlanta branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, were among those a.rguing that the apartments would wreck the Collier Heights Plan. Hollowell gave _the committee "anti" petitions he said were signed by 900 persons. The some 75 persons also protested a shopping center, which was approved, and a car wash, which was denied-both of which· were asked for . Bakers Ferry Road SW, at Boulder Park. All actions are subject to full . board approval. The committee also: 1. Approved a request to rezone from residential (R-3) to commercial (C-1) a tract fronting 400 feet on the northeast side of Bakers Ferry Road, 776 feet northwest of Fairburn Road SW. 2. Denied a special use permit for a car wash on property fronting 125 feet on the northeast side of Bakers Ferry Road, 338 feet northwest from Fairburn Road. 3. Approved a special use permit for a day care center at 456 Collier Ridge Drive NW. 1 ,:4. :Denied a request to rezone from residential (R-5) to apartmen t (A-1) property at 1203 Northwest Drive NW. 5. Approved a special use permit for a day nursery at 3132 Delmar Lane NW. 6. Approved a special use permit for a billiard parlor at 855 Hollywood Road NW. 7. Approved a request to rezone from light-industrial (M-1) to apartment-conditional ( A-1-C) property at 2908 Gordon Road. 8. Deferred action on a request to rezone from residential (R-5) to ap<1rtment (A-1) a tract fronting 120 feet ;on the southwest side of Simpson Road NW at Dixie Hills Circle. 9. Denied a request to rezone from residentia (R-6) to apartment (A-i) a tract fronting 100 feet on the north side of North Avenue a t Pierce Avenue. 10. Deferred action on a request to rezone from residential (R-5) to apartment (A-1) a tract at 2195 Bankhead Ave. NW. 11. Denied a request to rezone from residential (R-5 ) to commercial (C-1) a tract fronting 353 feet on the nor theast side of Bankhead Avenue, 233.3 feet east of Interstate 285. 12. Approved a request to rezone from residential (R-5) to commercial (C-2) a tract fronting 409.8 feet on the southwest side of James Jackson Parkway at Hightower Pface NW. _13. Approved a request to rezone from residential (R-5) to apartment (A-1) a tract fronting 395.8 feet on the east side 18. Approved a request tc of Brownlee Road SW, 100 fee t north of Scott Street. zone from residential (R-{ 14. Approved a request to re- apartment conditional (Azone from residential (R-6 ) to -property a t 2821 Waters R apart ment (A-1) proper ty at Southwest. 1151-53, 1155-57 and 1159-61 Sells Avenue SW. 15. Approved a request to re- ~ zone from apar tment (A-1) to commercial-conditional (C-1-C) a tract fronting 210.18 feet on U1e east side of Boulevard SE at Hansen Street. 16. Denied a request to rezone from residential. (R-6) to commercial (C-2) property at 908 Bowen St. NW. 17. Approved a request to rezone from · residential (R-4) to apartment~ onditional (A-1-C) -property a t 2786 Hapeville Road. -~- - - - - ----- - �MINUTES HOUSING RESOURCES E IBCUTIVE COMMITTEE AND LOW-INCOME HOUSING COORDINATING GROUP MEETING March 14, 1968 The regular monthly meeting of the Housing Coordinating Group and Housing Resources Committee Executive Group was held in Committee Room 2, City Hall, March 14, 1968, at 10 a.m. Thirteen (13) members of the Housing Resources Committee Executive Group; seven (7) invited key individuals concerned with Low-income Housing; three i3) other :L~vited guests; three (3) developers; and members of the Press attended the meeting. List of those invited, with attendance incµcated, is attached to the file copy of these minutes. Also attached to the file copy of these minutes are copies of invitational notices sent out for the meeting and the agenda used at the meeting. Chairman Alexar.der presided. Mr. Alexander opened the meeting by stating that there are two matters under consideration: (1) There is going to be a Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing to be co-sponsored by the tlanta Federal Executive Board and other voluntary organizations. Twenty-five (25) organizations have signed up as cosponsors i.e. Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta, CACUR, Community Relations Commission, Interfaith Housing Corporation, Georgia Council of Human Relations and many others. He mentioned the fact that the Mayor is backing this conference . The primary purpose of this conference will be educational. This conference will seek to bring those of different backgrounds and viewpoints around the table to discuss the problems - to have Atlanta people talk to Atlanta people. Broad participation by organizations and individuals throughout Metropolitan area will be encouraged. He read to the Group the objectives contained in brochure passed out by :t'ir. Nat Welch at the March 12 preliminary meeting called by the Federal Executive Board. Mr . Alexander made a suggestion that the Housing Resources Committee might become a co-sponsor of the conference by lending their name as cosponsor without going on recor d as to how the Housing Resources Committe911 feels about the matter. Mr. Palmer made a motion that the HRC be a co-sponsor of the conference on Equal Opportunities in Housing on this basis; the motion was seconded and Committee voted on and approved the motion.. (2) Mr. Alexander then proposed that a Resolution be drawn up tc,.request that an Aldermanic Committee be established on Housing. He stated that a call should be made to either set up a separate Aldermanic Committee or to take �housing into an existing committee which would concentrate its efforts on the Low-income Housing Program. He stated that at present we have the Planning and Development Committee under Yir. Cook; however, housing is not one of their specific concerns. He said that he felt having an interested and responsive gr oup in the Aldermanic Board would be very beneficial to the program. Mr. Archer Smith made a motion that the Mayor be requested to set up a Committee f or, or refer to an existing committee, consideration of the ~lty 1 s Program on Low-income Housing. The motion was s econded and carried! Mr . Alexander t hen asked Hr. Collier Gladin to explain the Land Use Map and its effect 0 :1 the Low-income Housing Program. He mentioned that of some 54 sites bei ng consider ed for this program only 12 are consistant with the Land Use Map, Mr . Gl adin explai ned that the Land Use Map represents a distribution of our portion of the growth that we anticipate coming into the City by 1983. The acreage shown on the map is to absorb the anticipated growth of 150,000 people. This Plan should encourage greater density of housing and at same time protect single f amily r esidential areas. Parks and other s ervices are planned i n advance of all this growth. This Plan ser ves as a guide to housing, schools, parks and s ewer r equi r ements. He said this was not a zoning map; just a guide. He stat ed this plan does not indicat e rapid transit. Detailed changes will be made as they become necess~ y. He said the Mayor's statement that this Plan was a "policy guide on which we can build" is a good description. Mr . Alexander asked how many additional acres were for housing? Mr . Gladin didn 't have the answer available at the meeting. Mr. Alexander asked if an owner of pr operty came in and applied for rezoni ng wi thout a developer, what would happen? He asked if there was anything in the Ordinance that r equired t hey have to be ready to develop? Mr. Gl adin said that when a reques t i s received, it will be farmed out f or considerat i on. Recommendation of School Department and others concerned will be consi der ed . Mr . Jones asked if a proposal is br ought in f or rezoni ng a sit e and the t ype of development is cons istant with what is projected in 1983 on the Land Use Map, in g2ner al coul d t he developer anticipat e f avorable considerat i on by the Plannins Dep&rtr.~rmt and Zoning Commi ~t ee? Mr . Gladin r e~pondcd t hat the Planning Department will suppor t pr oposals along these lines ~ Mr. Alexander then sai d t hat being the case, when a developer comes in with a proj ect f or a s ite that i s in conformance with the Land Use Map and we think is a good pr oj ect he f elt the HRC should therefore support i t. �3 Mr . Winn asked what effect the Land Use Plan would have on the plans of 54 sites of which only 12 were in conformance with the plan . Mr. Alexander said it would probably hurt us. Mr. Jones said we would have to realign our plans, Mr. Gladin asked how many Rcres were in the 12 sites that were in conformance with the Land Use Plan, Mr. Jones said approximately 320 acres. Mr. Gladin said that maybe we should take a look at the number of units that have actually been built. He stated that many proj ects had been planned, but not actually built yet, and that some sites had also been turned down for reasons other than zoning, Yir. Palmer asked if the Land Use Plan shows sites in any instance that the Aldermanic Board has already turned down? (They are not indicated specifically as such.) Mr. Archer Smith said if there are particular projects in this general connection, that the HRC should send advocates to Aldermanie Board and Zoning Committee to support them. Mr. Smith also stated that he felt the HRC should act as advocate at the Zoning and Planning Commission levels for particular low-income housing pr ojects which conform to the 198J projections of the Land Use Map of the Planning Department of the City, Mr . Jones brought out the point that the HRC should not be required to suppor t all developments that are in conformance with the Land Use Map ; that proposalsmight not be appr opriate, Mr . Archer Smith then suggested that an addendum be added to the Resoluti on s tating that the res olution would not exclude the HRC f r om supporting proj ects that are not in conformance wi t h the Land Use Map. After considerable discussion, it was concl uded that t he Resolut ion not be amended, as this would t end t o weaken it. It was then decided and agreed t hat Mr. Alexander and Mr, Archer Smith would get together and draw up specific wording of a Resolution stating that the HRC would give its support to develophients of low-income housing by going before the Planning Board and Zoning Committee of the Aldermanic Boo.rd. The following is the Resolution developed. "Housing Resources Committee will support and advocate in each instanca before the Zoning Committee and the Aldermanic Board those appropriately planned development projects which conform to the 1983 Land Use Map of the City Planning Department, as it _Presently exists or is hereafter a~rnded,»-· �4 Mr. Pclmer asked for a list for Mr. Clarence CQleman by March 20 of major proj:scts that hact--been. .turned down already by Zoning Committee or Aldermanic Board, but which now might be desirable in view of the Land Use Mnp, Mr. Jones sru.d he could give him a partial list by that date. Mr. Alexander asked about this npproach in terms of the Turnkey Program.Mr. Persells said it might be a means of finding more land for development for this program. He stated th2t consideration should be given by builders to what sorts of people will live in the housing; that developers may determine whether they could mnke more money building for low-income or high income people as both types of housing are needed in Atlanta. However, he suggested that zoning should be on basis of appropriateness of the area to meet the long term requirements of the City as to location, density, schools, parks, etc., and not on the basis of what kind of people will occupy the units; that when we reach the point of zoning on plans for future utilization of the land, rather than on who is to use or live there, we would be much better off. Mr. Alexander asked Mr~ Persolls if this Land Use Map was going to be used by the Housing Authority as a guide? Mr. Persells indicated that it had been us ed; however, the Housing Authority does not turn down a project simply because it does not conform to the Map. Mr. Alexander then discussed the role of the Housing Authority further. He stated that we are ahead on the 221 program and Rehabilitation phas e , but behind about 2500 units on Turnkey and Public Housing. Mr. Bystry asked if HUD had checked any of these areas for Public Housing? Mr . Gladin stat ed thct the City is r equired to maintain a Land Use Plan under the Workable Program. The problems are finding more sites and get ting t hem zoned; that turnk ey proj ects must go through HUD in getting appr ovnls. Mr . Alexander asked from the developer s point of view for the pros n.nd cons of Turnkey ver sus the 221 program. He asked if the 221 program w~s more appealing to developers than the Turnkey program. Mr. W. L. Moore said getting l ruid zoned f or Publ ic Housi ng is more difficult .· Mr. Alexander asked about economix ( a mixture of Public Housing.,. 221 d ( 3)., and single frunily dwellings) t o be developed in one area, Mr. Persells said the Housing Authority preferred to have that kind of mixture. However, each program would require separate mortgages and separate approvals and that it would be a complicated process, Mr. Bystry said t.his might delay the program, ., �5 Mr. Alexander stated that much stronger support would be likely if particularly large tracts were developed under the 221 program with only a smaller portion of the tract for public use. Mr. Noorc stated that the biggest problem wa s the high cost of land in Atlante! and the difficulty of financing l and under the 221 d (3) program and; secondly getting the land zoned. He f elt that this type financing (interim construction lonns a t reasonable interest rates) might be encouraged by this Committee . He also suggest ed that perhaps banks and other financing institutions might be encouraged to set aside a certain amount or percent of their money for fin ancing of low-income hous ing. He mentioned the fact tha t insurance compani e s ar c nc:iw participatL:g in fi nan cing of this type. Mr. Alexender said that most of the l arge banks in Atlanta are repres ented on this Committee . He stated that perh~ps the Business Participation Panel could do something about encouraging this type of financing. Yir. Alexander then welcomed Mr. Richard Ce cil, who was r epres enting Mr. William C. Bartholomay, Prosident of the Atlanta Braves, and newGst member of the Business Participa tion Panel; and Mr. Robert C. Hatkins, newest member of the Construction and Design Panel. Mr. Al exander praised th§ persistant efforts of the developers in the face of so many problems and roadblocks. He stated that the City of Atlanta owes the developers a great debt for their contribution to this program. Demi Jackson brought up the ques tion "Who is r esponsible for physical s tructures in terms of r e creational or social needs in a housing development? Is this the responsibility of the developer?" Mr. Alexander stated that on the National scene, the Community is responsible. Mr. Jones expl ained th.:it in Public Housing pr oj e cts , Federal regulntions require certain consideration be given to open space and recreational faciliti es . He pointed out that t hi s wa s also given consideration by the Planning Department in regards to zoning; that the Planning Board its elf has turned down projects tha t did not provide enough spa ce or recreational facilities. He stated that the social elements were being given more consideration today than ever before. Mr. Alexander commented that there is c gap tn social services to be performed in low income housing proj e cts and suggested that the Community Council and non-profit groups such ns Interfaith may fill tho gap of social planning. He asked for a report from Dean Jackson's Committee Fl.S to proposals for social planning in low income housing. YJr. Palmer mentioned that there was t l,000 set aside to see how practical it would be to bring available recreational activitie s to Senior Citizens • . �6 Mr. Alexander stated that according to our figures, Public Housing is running behind schedule and asked for any suggestions that might be helpful. Nr. Persells said this .-ms definitely not because of lack of interest on the part of developers, but the difficulty of obtaining a piece of land to present that is properly zoned. He stated that a project should not be selfcontninod, but be part of a whole community; that recreational facilities should be available to entire neighborhoods. Mr. Alexander announced that he would appoint a Comnri.ttee of three to study the "Analysis of Atlanta's Low-income Housing Program," dated February 7, 1968, which would make· a report of recommendations back to the Executive Group. Mr. Alexander mentioned that package rezoning is still under consideration. He stated that one of the problems is so much land in this area that could be developed in this program that might receive favorable recommendation by HUD, but be politically opposed by others. · Mr. Moore asked if there was any way to subsidize, such as limited dividend? Mr. Alexander stated that John Steinichen of Interfaith was looking for proposals. Mr. Palmer asked if anyone had tried to get the land in the Southwest quadrant that is artificially overzoned industrial, rezoned for a more reasonable price? Mr. Moore stated tha t on one particular site, Mr. Shuttleworth would probably recommend multi-family. The price on this land has come up to industrial, He also stated that in certain Wards, 221 d ()) houses are not allowed because of opposition from Aldermen in those Wards• Meeting adjourned a t 11:30 a.m, Respectfully SUbmitted, a-lA-'"~14~~-~:..U..rl2_./ Malcolm D. Jone ~ ~ Housing Coordinator �CI'I'Y OF, .ATLANTA. CITY HALL ATLANTA, .G A. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING COLLIER B. GLADIN, Dir e ctor rc. 2.5 . 19 DltU _..,...., • -f oau ,. i ., t 1,• are u. of 1 • CM will k 11\ ~ .,, �pril 12, 1968 rand Toi Refer .e i aii.onua:· Aprl.l yor Allen 4• 1968 to to Zoning P tition ..,on an pro · of Jo boro Ro d,. S. nut con t.ruction ot • o th or ru.;1r.1,4.~,&.t11.u11 l o unit Turnkey day to find 0 �p 2 orand To; . ayor Allen, April 12, 1968 velopor is entt king r consideration ~md propos · to ait for nrd of Aldermen on th i u bofo he ecep f orn l in uiey to th Housine Re 0u.rco C tt defe t or ubrn ts !utility ot De lop Housing Progr • t ptin tut e X ""uonin for th 7th· r-d, w b en sue ful ajor proposau in tb t · rd h re onln h u rl'lfld in Atl their unwillinlrllt:HJIII rly I p~rt,ic t p.roportione ot c n Ol'l atford o p Y c ;, y fo , • �p 3 M orandwn To :· . ayor All.en, April 12 , 1968 Unless this l og j · can be broken soon,. .. ucc ss of t h low -inco. housing progr in t-lantil i ser1-ously j op rdi~d, it not d d. Re peotfully ,, Malcolm D. J-on Housing Coordinator i nels: l. 2.!I CCH r~ D Copy of D veloper ' ~ stat ant d letters a to av ilnbility or c unity facilities,. f il d ~1th Nl n.i p t1tion . Tel1Ct or Dev: loper's presan tion t Public Hearing . , • ~we ,ir.. C ell A. A t, Jr. X ndor • �C ITY 0~ ' .AT L Ptl'J':~ CITY HALL HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE Room 1204, City Hall ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR CECIL A. ALEXANDER, Chairman Housing Resources Committee MALCOLM D. JONES Housing Coordinator April 2, 1968 Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Alderman Rodney M. Cook Alderman G. Everett Millican Mr. Jim Crawford Mr. Collier B. Gladin Mr. Lester A. Persells Mr. Edwin L. Sterne Mr. Carey S. Hooks Dr. John W. Letson Mr. A. B. Padgett Mr. Jim Parham Mr. Johnny C. John son Mr. George W. Kennedy Mr. James B. Pilcher Dr. Sidn ey L. Davis Gentlemen: The next meeting of this Coordinating Group, for the purpose of getting together, comparing notes and exchanging ideas in intere s t of obtaining more effective coordination in the Low-income Housing Prog ram, will be hel d Thursday, April 11, at 10:00 a .m., in Committee Room 2, City Hall. This will be a joint meeting with the Executive Group of the Housing Resources Committee. The several p reviou s meetings of this group have been very stimulating and help f ul to the Low-income Ho using Program. Mr. Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman, Hou s ing Re s ources Committee, and I hop e th a t you will be a ble to a ttend thi ~ me eting, as your ac tiv e pa rticipation i s s olicited and will be v e ry help f ul in f urtheri ng th e pr ogres s of th e Low-income Hou s ing Program. A return add r essed post al card i s enclo s ed fo r you r convenience in info r min g us wh e th er you plan to a ttend t he Ap r il 11 meeting . Sin cerely, '$ //',,,Id ¥2.., C-£+1~ ' '1..-·~ Mal c ol m D. Jo!:e Hou sin g Coo rdi nator .. Encl: Po s t al Ca rd �C IT OF ~J. .'IL.t HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE CITY HALL ATLANTA. GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 Room 1204, City Hall IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR April 2, 196 8 CECIL A. ALEXANDER, Chairm an Housing Resources Committee MALCOLM D. JONES Housing Coordinator Dear Housing Resources Committee Member: The regular monthly meeting of the Executive Group of the Housing Resources Committee for April 1968 will not be held April 4 as scheduled, but will be held Thursday, April 11, at 10:00 a.m., in Committee Room 2, City Hall. Th i s will be another joint meeting with the newly established Coordination Group composed of Heads of other Departments and Agencies ir.volved in connection with the Low-income Housing Program. As you of course already realize, we are still in a critical phase of the Low-income Housing Progra; and are seeking ways and means of resolving the difficulties confronting the program, the greatest of which is land. Please be prepared to present a brief report on your Panel's efforts this year. We hope that you will be able to attend this meeting. the date on your calendar. Please reserve A return addressed postal card is enclo s ed for your convenience in advising us whether you will be able to attend th~ April 11 me eting. Sincerely, 13:19, 29 December 2017 (EST) Malcolm D. · J ~ ~ - . Housi~g Coordinator Encl : Postal Card �AGENDA Housing Resources Committee and Coordinating Group April 11, 1968 ~~.._-.__.... l. Report on Resolution by Chamber of Co!im13rce - Curtis Driskell 2. Request to Mayor to provide an Alderrnanic Commttee to work with Housing Resources Co:rrunittee and support: its efforts in the Board of Alderman. 3. Report on Housing Resources Conmri.ttee's support on Re-zoning Petitions - Jones 4. Need for series of Panel meetings. 5. Charge Land Committee: (a) Work with Planning Depart:nent and Joint Planning Board on coming up with plan to provide land. (b) Proposal for Rezoning Entire City. 6. Reports from Panels 7. Other Businesa �A RESOLUTION The Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors, through the work of the Chamber's Housing and Redevelopment Committee, has supported vigorously from the outset the efforts of the Mayor's Housing Resources Committee to relieve the city's shortage of housing for low income families. As a result of its investigation of this problem, the Housing and Redevelopment Committee delivered to this Board in August, 1967 a report entitled "The Low-Rent Housing Gap in Atlanta," which included specific information underlining the critical nature of the housing need. This Board was informed by the report that the process of rezoning land suitable and feasible for multi-family, low-rent housing appears to be the single most difficult obstacle in the task of providing, during a five-year period, some 16,800 units of the type hoµsing required. The Board also was made aware that available vacant land is scarce within the City of Atlanta for any use , and outlying areas have not seen fit to qualify for programs which allow construction of federally-insured housing of the type which would help meet the current need. · A resolution by this Board in September , 1967 urged immediate steps by the City of Atlanta Planning Department and the Board of Aldermen to adopt an updated • land use plan, from which a new zoning ordinance could be evolved . The resolution further declared: " ... Any new zoning plan adopted by the City of Atlanta should make provision for adequate land for multi-family housing and open up land for increased density of housing in all quadrants of the city, in order to serve the best interests of a changing and progressive City of Atlanta." Since that time, diligent study has been given by the Atlanta Chamber of Comm erce to a proposed "package zoning plan, " the purpose of which would be to rezone simultaneously several sites of land throughout the city for development in public housi ng . Be it resolved that the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors reiterates its position in support of dispersing multi-family housing to all quadrants of the city. iff'()weve1- ;-n-eithe1 • thts"'Boai'd"'fl QUS~cl R-ede V ~l.bi,flB'iffi,a,1;-4ee beJJ.a sir.able feasi:bi h-e: -rd.r~mtai ehamb·EIDrot-.<:,; pro.iii ·te:s 0 And be it fur ther resolved that the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Board of Director s supports the principle of the package z oning proposal as an approach well wor th considering toward the efforts to alleviate this serious problem in our community. Submitted to the Board of Directors Atlant a Chamber of Commerce April 10, 1968 �h 8, 1968 Mnt ./bee: Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. I J �OFFICERS J . M A RIO N CRA IN. P RESI DENT J . AD A IR McCOR D . VIC E P RESIDENT . A . H . STU RGESS . J R.. V ICE P RESIDCNT NOEL C . TUR NER. V ICE P RES IDENT FRED 0 . S C H EER. T REASURER BRUCE 8 . W ILS O N . SECRETARY . MRS . TO MM IE J A C KSO N. EXECUTIVE SECRETARY DIRECTORS HEALEY BUILDING March 4 , 1968 HENRY C. BALDW IN MARION BLAC KWEL L , JR., THOMAS V. C A U B L E. J R. J . MARION C RA IN ROY A . D O R S EY EMER S ON HOLLEMAN C . 0 . LEBEY. JR. HAR R Y N O RMAN . J R. FRANK C . O WE N S. JR. JAM E S L. S T ARNES STEWART W IG HT WARD WI GHT Col. Malcolm D. Jones, Housing Coordinator City of Atl a nta City Hall Atlanta, G e or g ia, 30303 Dear Col. Jones, Regarding your l e tter of F e bruary 14 conc e rning Mrs. H e st e r's proper t y at 902 All e n e A v enue , S. W., Mr . J. M. Grain , Pr e sid e nt, o f our Board advis e s m e that th e Board m ight be w illing to stand th e exp e ns e of th e material to b e us e d in repairing Mrs . H e ste r's prop e rty pr ovid e d you and I could g e t the labor unions to join w ith us in d o ing th e w ork. The date for R e altor W ee k has not b e anno unc e d yet but it w ill b e s e t shortly and w ill b e some t ime in May. Pl ease s ee w hat can b e don e in getting th e unions to coo pe rat e w ith us . Cordially, c) ~ HCB/tj y H e nry C . Ba:ti:J.w in, Cha ir ma n PUBLIC RELATIO NS CO M MITTEE �.I'-., . . . , • > , , , D PA T E T OF HOUSING AN D U 0 B .J DEVELOP ENT RENEWAL ASSISTANCE ADMINISTRATION WASHING TON , 0 . C . 20410 January 15, 1968 LOCAL PUBLIC AGENCY LE1~ER NO. 446 SUBJECT : Utilizing Section 1O7( a) of the Housing Act of 191~9 for Low- Income Purchasers under YtlA Section 221(h) · FAA recently Se ction 221(h ) of made available to wit h a n option to determined that units rehabilitated under the National Housing Act, as amended, may be low-income families utili zi ng a r ental agreement buy . .~~-T"- Therefo_e Section 1O7( a ) of the Housing Act of 1949, as amende d , applie s to any sal e of project land to an eligible nonprofit or gani zation which has obtained froill FHA a commitme nt to insure under Se ction 22l(h ) and which has agree d to re nt all units it will construct to low- income tenants under a renval agreement n th an option to purcha s e meeti ng the applicable r equirements of FHA . Ac ting De m s~ for Renewal Assista nce HUD-Wcsh . , D. 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'· ~- '.• to ., ·- :- . · .' . ,:/ . "~.. ,, . .J .. ·-,-. .7< ,-,<;__ __· . ·- .. . t, ~, '· - --2. 7(.. . .• -·,. ·, .. ...... t ..· .... ·,. .'· ... ,' I Al~--'·-:, 1.0 . · ,• • ,:,· ' .. ·-... ·: . ,~ 4,Q .. "I _.: . •·t. ·, _ ,t ._. __ ' . : -~- .. ........ · 1 ... ." . .... :. . /);;.~'11~- 40 . \~' .... '.·... ··- . • ...... A,b · , .. · .:~-~ '~·f· ..:·. -~-~-· .· · · 23 . 0 ' ' . . / .. . . .,•,,. 36 · ·-1' · • - •• ~ ~ • .-1 · _,..p , 6 ,',',..,., •- ··: '\. · • f ,; . - ~:-::~•. -· . . . ·. · ':~ . .~- , ·, ./. :. : '> ./ ·: ••• ~ •• , , • - ·, 10 ...· .1,. . ._.. f · ._,. -~' • .• .. .•.· ,.',. \ .... , ,·.· •' . .. - "I ,• '\ . ,., •. ... t:.- · ti' ...... . '• ·, _1 ,.·. ":' \I '· · .•1· •' '- '. •. -:!\ ., ~ ,. ,.· 4 ·,_ • • ' ·.••,, I;, ..... . ......;.. •• ,, . ,.·, . . ,,·, . , •· , ... ._ ; . .. . .! .. • . ,, ~., . ·.· .....·.. ,· · .. .• "/· ·~. ·. ·'. ,. .: ~· . ~~ ·,.4 .- ' ' ...... ' ··. ... ... ·Z- c8-10--C tW ,. . - ... :, ' '": ....., . . .·.- , ',..' . ·..; · -· A;);'l ... O>t 'L. ~~ "r,.~ ;. or,~tt ·' . ' . · ·.· . ,· ·. ,. ,,., .. 1.,1, ... I •', '!> .i· I, ., • • '/i;1~···!\'~i;s ... } , . ,i'"": ... ..... · , , ,· '•.J,.' .'i" • I ~ ' • I' ·, ' ', • ' · ,. ., ',, r·.;. '..,_ �February 2),. 1968 MEMORAN!lJM To: M or Ivan Allen, Jr. Malcolm D. Jones From: Re 'J1J¥' memorandum to you yesterday pertaining to the propos d eompromis on off site improvements for the Turnkey project on Gilbert Road at Flynn Road. Mr. By-stry, the Whiting..,Turner develo r, haa informed me that ho has turned the matter over to Mr .. S tterfield and will bid by tJ.n:T sol ution orked out by Mr. tt rfield w1 th the City. Mr. tterfi ld reports that he has con eted the HIJD attorney in Banson s office, as sugge tcd by Henry Bowden, d that th attorney ' s opinion is that the Cooperation Agr nt bew the City of Atlanta and the Housing Authority doe apply to Turnkey proj cts in deV1 lopment, as though th& project ctu:u.ly bing dev loped by Housing Authority itself. 1 r. tter.f'iol.d s ( 1) tes that in ess ce the Cooper tion Agre ent provide a C1 ty will provid ne-aessaiy oceas streets and boundary str and (2} The City will bring to the ei thi incl.ud r) . all n cessary facillti s (that Henry Bow n will be info ttorn ,y•o opinion obtain d info I will haTi exand.nat1on. I ces ., • Dan E. caw ot et, Jr • Coop tion Agr nt o dq, bru8J!7 26, tor t J �March 8, 1968 Honol"able Fletcher Thompson Membel' of Congress House of Representatives 1641 Longworth Building Washington, D. C . Dear -Fletcher: Thank you for the low i-ent housing report. We shall c :rtainly c · 11 upon you for as istance in securing approval of th lea in ea. e it ls necessary. Thank you for you,:- h lp. Since~ely yours, D nSw DS:fy bee: Mr. M. B. Satterfield Col. Malcolm Jones t �FL"E: I CHI!!~ THOMPSON 1641 LONGWORTH MEMBE;. OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON, D.C. RICHARD ASHWORTH ADMINJSTRATJVE ASSISTANT 5TH DISTRICT, GEORGIA ~ongress of tbe ilniteb ~tates 0LC PoST OFFICE, ATLANTA 1!,omse of l\epresentatibes mh1~bington, 119.~. February 29, 1968 Mr. Dan Sweat Governmental Liaison Mayor's Off ice Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Dan: Enclosed is a report I have received today from the Regional Administrator of the Department of Housing and Urban Development concerning low-rent housing in the Atlanta area. I thought you'd appreciate receiving the information. If there is any way that I can help to secure approval of the additional leases me ntioned in the l e tte r , I will be glad to do so. Kindest personal regards. Member o f Con g ress FT/ j Enclosure ., �DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PEACHTREE SEVENTH BUILDING , ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30323 Room 645 REGION Ill Office of the Regional Administrator February 27, 1968 IN REPLY REFER TO: 3H Honorable S. Fle tcher Thompson House of Repr esent tives Washington, D. C. 20515 Dear Mr . Thompson : 'l'his is t o acknowledge your letter dated Febru.:!ry 23 requesting information concerning the Summary of Lo~~Rent Rousing forwarded you earlier this month . The 800 units authorized for le sing by the Atlanta Rousing Authority will be locoted wherever such housing is availabl~ throughout the Atlanta area . Currently, the Atlanta Housing Authority has leased 2J.7 units for lo - rent houoing purposes 3nd 17 of these units are located ,ithin the Fifth Congressional District . The Atlant Hou ing Authority also is negotiating for additional leases ~md some of theso will be ·within the Fifth Congressional District . In College Park, only one unit of low- rent housing is being cancelled . The College Park Housing Authority was given authorization to con · truct 174 units of lowprent housing and 173 of these unlt hsv been compl ted nd are occupied . llawever, during conotruotion it wa found th.at en outcropping of rock extended over the site _,mere one unit as proposed . Therefore, g9ing ahead ~ith construction of this unit uould have been extremely co tly, and it w s decided to cancel this one unit . Should we be able to ~osist you further, please let me kn-ow . i2"r ly~~,f;Ed~ ! .xter ~ egion 1 Administr tor �rch 11 , 1968 Ci n ral Carl Suth :rland P raonn 1 Dir cto~ City Hall Annex Atlanta, Georala 30303 Dear General Sutherland: 'Ihb i• to l"eapectfully r q at the recla••iftc· tio of Po,ition N ber 8 in th Houain R eourc • Divlato , Dep anent of yor fr teno raph r-Cl rk, Salary Ran 3S to entor r. Salary Ran · Ju•tiflcation lor d acriptio pr Co rcU tor.. Yo 3 • • requ at le coaitain d in the attach d J b re y C on l alcolm Jone•, Houain conai entton rf • r qu at will be L:lp CC: Fi ance Committee/ Mr. Da Sweat / Col el M lcolm Jo es reatly appr cs- te • �Functions of Secretary to Housing Coordinator· Acts as secretary to Housing Coordinator, Office of the Mayor, City of Atlanta; and the Housing Resources Committee. ship of approximately functions. SS The Housing Resources Committee has a member- members organized into 8 Panels, each with its own specific The members of the Committee are very prominent businessmen and educators in the City of Atlanta. Secretary sends out invitations monthly to the Housing Resources Executive Group meetings; Low-income Housing Coordinating Group meetings and· called meetings of the entire HRC and its various Panels., held in City Hall. Takes and transcribes official minutes of these meetings and makes distribution to all concerned. Arranges for use ,1.• _.,.,. of Conference Room at City Hall and confirms by phone whether or not Committee members plan to attend each meeting. Notifies all concerned of changes in time or place of scheduled meetings. In addition to taking and transcribing official minutes for Housing Resources Committee meetings., takes and transcribes complex reports, such as the HRC Annual Report, Analysis of Low-income Housing Program and Proposed Plan for Lou-income Housing sites; and suggested speeches for the Mayor i.e. speech for Ma;ror in Thomasville Urban Renewal area recently, in connection with financing low-income single family homes by the Insurance industry. Takes dictation and transcribes corresp,Jndence prepared for signature of the " . ~ Mayor., Chairman of the Housing Resources Committee and Housing Coordinator, which requires considerable knowledg3 of business English and spelling and appropriate paragraphing and punctuation. Secretar-J helps compile informati on for the quite involved periodic Inventory Report of Low and Medium Income Housinz in Atlanta. T}pes in final form this complex tabular report consisting of approximately 33 pages. Gets the report reproduced and makes distribut i on. This report is the only means of showing and keeping up with the status and progres s of the Low-income Housing Program. Secretary must uork independantly mala~~--7'-ft~ Malcolm D. Jon---C· Housing Coordinator �• I CITY HALL HOUSING RESOURCES COMMIT'rEE ATLANTA, G A . 30303 Tel. 522 -4463 Are a Code 404 Room 1204, City Hall IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR February 26, 1968 CECIL A. ALEXANDER, Ch ai rma n Housin g Re sources Com mitt ee MALCOLM D. JO NES Housin g Coordinator This letter sent to foll owimg Developers: Mr. Matthew D. Bystry Mr. Vi ctor Maslia Mr. Lewis Cenker flll..r. William L. Moore Mr. Jos eph H. Leopold Mr. Fred R. Kaye Dear f'..r . We wish to extend to you a cordial invitat ion to attend the next meeting of the ilice cutive Group of the Housing Resources Connnittee , whi ch Hill be held Thursday, March 14, in Committee Room 2, Second Floor of the City Hall. We would like you to meet the members of our Exe cutive Group and part icipat e in discussion of some of the problems confronting the low-income housing progr am, as we feel that you are in a position to pin point problems and offer sugges t ions that will make valuable contributions to success of the program . We are also asking the heads of several Departments and Agencies conne ct ed with low-income housing t o meet with us at this meeting. Mr. Alexander and I hope that you will be able to attend this mee ting . Please reserve the date on your calendar. A return a ddressed postal card is enclosed for y our convenience in advising us whether you w-111 be able to attend the March 14 meeting. Sincerely, ~ h-£'- c - d ~ ,£---- - ~~;;7--;-- Malcolm D. J Housing Coordinator " -·: �HOUSING R&Svlffi S C ..!ITTEE ch 1$, 1968 �CITY OF .ATLANTA CITY HALL HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 February 7, 1968 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison MEMORANDUM To: Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Director of Governmental Liaison From: Mal colm D. Jones Considerable thought and effort has gone into development of the attached Analysis of Atlanta 's Low-income Housing Program. From experience gained during the f irst year of the program, I am convinced that current policy and procedures are inadequate to meet requirements of the program; and if the program is to succeed, some changes will have to be made. The attached Analysis proposes adoption of ten (10) changes from current pro cedure, none of whi ch ~ rash or radical, and I believe that each of the recommended changes would make a worthwhile contribution to the overall eff ort. I would like for this Analysis to be considered by you, the Mayor and the Housing Resources Committee (I have a copy for both Cecil Alexander and the Mayor). I intend to suggest to Cecil that this Analysis be taken up with the Executive Group of the Housing Resources Committee and, if f avorably considered, that a formal recommendation for its implementation be made by the Committee to the Mayor. Sincerely, Mal colm D. Jones Housing Coordinator Encl: Analysis �HOUSING RESOUR CES COMMITTEE February 7, 1968 An Analysi e of Atlanta ' s Low-income Hous ine Program and Proposed Procedures for Its Improvement Although the most recent report (copy attached) of the Housing Resources Committee on t he status of the Low-income Housing Program shows good progress t o dat e , the cream has already been skimmed· from the initial potential and prospects f or the future of the program look extremely dim. This analysis is lengthy but is justified by the gravity of the current s ituation and the necessity for adequately explaining each of the features proposed herein. There is no need to dwell here on the major problem areas involved such as neighborhood objections, zoning, Federal policy, funding, etc., as we all are quite familiar with them. The resulting effect however is very disturbing. Substantial land promoters, developers, and builders on _whom we must rely for actual developments are losing interest in the proeram and are directing their major efforts elsewhere. and in other fields not involved with the difficulties encountered locally in attempted production of low-income housing. Without their continued active participation it will be extremely difficult to meet the alre ady established goals for the program (and it 'now appears that even t hese goals may not be adequate ). Our policy to date has been to follow prevailing established procedures by depending on the land promoters and developers to select the sites, take options on the land, attempt to get it rezoned if require~ and then develop the site. This procedure places t he entire initiative on private enterprise and l eaves in their hands primary responsibility for overcoming neighborhood objections and pol itical resistan ce. work. This is good, if it works, but f r equently i t does not This also habitually places the City in a vulnerable defensive and embar- rassing position, if the efforts of ·private enterprise do 'not succeed, and discourases other developers. if This is happenin~ entirely too of ten for continuation of a healthy progressive program which is sorely needed in Atlanta. �2 Instance after instance can be cited where the above has occurred. Some of the more prominent specific cases which have suffered or failed under this policy are: Browntown, Butler Street YMCA, Sewell Road, Browns Mill Road, Empire Drive., Golfview, Wilson Mill Road, East Lake #2 and Wellswood Apartments sites. (The last one was considered under the leasing progTam.) In fact, most of the 8,266 units proposed, which did not materialize (see Note A of Low-income Housing Invento:::-y Report of January 15) can be attribu:ted to strong objections from one or more groups under our current private enterprise sponsored, hit or miss, development procedure. The availability of land, one of the critical elements, which can be obtained at prices developers can afford to pay and still make a profit from their venture, is rapidly becoming a vital issue within the City limits of Atlanta. This factor a],one is primarily responsible for the lack of current development in single family sales housing for •low and moderate income families, although there is a great demand and substantial market for this category of housing in Atlanta. The rapid growth of the City and phenomenal rate of new construction is fast limiting the desirable sites on which low-income housing can be located in Atlanta, from both an economic and public relations standpoint. It is evident that in the past the procedure of letting nature take its course by depending entirely on private enterprise to initiate propos ed locations for lowincome housing and then carry the ball on obtaining the necessary approvals and zoning changes, is not adequate to insure success of the Low-income Housing Program • .. This is particularly true of Turnkey sites for Public Housing. A few specific examples clearly illustrate this: (a) Attempted rezoning of the Browntown site for 450 units under the Turnkey program has been delayed until July 1, 1968 for further consideration at that time as to positive provisions for the timely construction of essential community facilities, one of which is an Elementary School to be built on the project to serve i t and another anticipated low-income housing proj eC} in the same general area . In anticipation of the rezoning it was understood that the School Department would place this school in top priority on its proposed bond issue for the Spring of 1968. However, since the r ezoning last fall did not go throueh when expected and has been definitely delayed until at least July 1968, the School Department has now changed its priorities so as to accommodate those projects which are already' definitely approved, under cons truction or where plans for early �3 development are actually pro6Tessine satisfactorily. Department's position is justified and understandable. This chanee in the School However, as far as this' particular school is concerned, it does not bring the Browntown site any nearer to fruition. It is also likely that plans for improved sewer facilities for this area will not have a~ high priority as would have been the case, if the proposed zoning had already been approved. (b) A similar situation also applies to the Butler Street YMCA site on Hollywood Road in the same general area and which is equally dependent on the proposed Elementary School discussed above and improved sewer faciliti es. (c) The Sewell Road project is a typical example of an excellently planned and designed Turnkey project for Public Housing which was well located and adequately isolated and screened, but which went "by the board" as a result of pressure of public opinion from the neighborhood. (d) Another instance is the requested rezoning for a proposed 221 d (3) project on an excellent site on Wilson Mill Road,. immediately across from a developed City park, and where other adequate community fac~lities exist. It received an adverse recommendation from the Planning Board, supported by a recommendation of the Planning staff, because of anticipated objection from residents of the neighborhood. (e) One well known out of town developer, highly recommended by FHA, after having to give up three proposed developments in DeKalb County because of DeKalb's lapse of its Workable Program, subsequently filed applications with FHA for three substantial projects -in Atlanta under the 221 d (3) program. applications were later withdrawn. All three It is understood that two were withdrawn because of neighborhood resentment, which he experienced early, and anticipated rezoning difficulties. The third proposed project, for which the site was already zo~ed appropriately, was given up primarily because of high land costs and partially _because of anti cipated neighborhood resentment, plus economic problems encountered in trying to design and develop a creditable proj e ct which would overcome the other difficulties. The foregoing are typical illustrations why previous us ed and long established procedure is not working adequately for the Low-income Housing Program. The success of this program is as important to the future well being of Atlanta as the School, Sewer, Traffic, or Parks programs and should be approached with the same considerate deliberation and coordinated planning as has been found necess ary and which is currently being pursued in other City programs. �4 After careful consideration of the foregoing factors and based on experience with low- income housinp, i n Atlanta f or s everal years, i t appear3 that some new pr ocedures are practical and would be helpful. However, dilligent effort will continue t o be made under the current procedure, until it is changed. Recommend that the followinc additional procedures be adopted as soon as pos sible: 1. Written recommendation from the Mayor to the local Director of F1iA that t he maximum limits for FHA mortgage insurance under the 221 d (2) program in the Atlanta area be increased from the current $12,500 to $15,000; to compensate for .increased cost of land and construction since the present ceiling was established several years ago. (This should provide additional flexibility and incentive to builders to construct and market single family sales housing in Atlanta under the 221 d (2) program. Acti vi t:r in this field has been quite dormant since the Low-income Housine Program started. It is one of the most needed categories, for which there is a strong demand and adequate market. Home o,mership should be encouraged when- ever possible, as it is one of the most stabilizing factors for low and moderate income families). 2. To supplement the above, adopt an additional Single Family Dwelling Zoning District in Atlanta, to permit erection of dwellings havine a minimum of 720 square feet floor area, on minimum size lots of S,000 square feet and with minimum f rontgage of so•. Similar proposals have been previously made to the Administrative Assistant and to the Director of Planningw (This would permit an increase of 50%in house f or which the currently applicable R-5 current density of the 221 vari ety zoning district requires ·7, 500 square feet of lot area, 810 square feet minimum floor area and a minimum frontgage of 60 1 • This additional zoning• district would provide ample land area for houses in this category and i n the price range of the 221 d (2) program). J. Request HUD to modify its current FHA policy by per mitting mort gage i nsurance under its FHA 221 insured mortga ge proerarn in areas which do not now have certi fied Workable Programs, when Sl.lch developments will serve to alleviate unsatisfactory and overcrowded housing condi t i ons in areas such a s Atlant a which do have certi fied Workable Programs in ef fect. (Although t he purpose of the current restrictive Federal policy in those areas was well intenti oned and expected to s erve as an _.incentive to t hose areas t o es t ablish �5 Workable Programs, the actual r esul ts have boomer anged by excluding cons truction under this type financi ng fr om nei ghbor ing areas (which inci dentally are apparently desirous of having it excluded) and thereby placing incr eased low-income housing burdens on comrrrunities , such as Atlanta, which do have Workable ProGrams). 4. Modi fy the current Zonin g Ordinance to permit structural changes in non-conforming residential dwellings in other zoning districts, when ne ce::,sary in order to meet requi r ements of the Housing Code. 'lj·, (This is no't permi tted now and serves to perpetuate unsatis f actory and substandard hous ing conditions in many areas of the City, which :i.n the past have been premat urely zoned for uses other than residential and which will probably continue to be so used f or the foreseeable future. In many of these areas improvement i s stagnating because of the f act that existing residential buildings cannot be s tructurally altered and if demolished another can not be built in its place , plus the past difficul y of obtaining financing in these areas for housing improvements, due partially to the zoning restrictions, and of the problem of private enterprise in assembling tracts in thes~ areas of sufficient size and price to justify substantial development). 5. As a companion measure to the above, eliminate from the Housing Code Enforcement Map and Policy and Procedur e Guide all so called 11 Clearance - Code Enforcement 11 Area classification and place all of these areas in top priority for strict Housing Code Enf'orcement on a house-by-house basis, except where formal application has been submitted for a Federal assisted project for th e area or other planned development is eminent.( Although some modification was made during 1967 in Housing Code Enforcement policy, t he current policy in these areas of which there are many in the City, for pract ical purposes is still essentially one of containment, in that Code .Enforcement in t hese areas consists of: (a) Pl a card where warranted and seek demolition (b) Cor r ect hazzards (c) Reduce overcrowding (d ) Vacate unfit units (e) Clean up premises . Under existing policy, there is _no specif ic requir ement or priori ty i n t hese areas , which contai n much of the wors t housing i n t he City, for bri neing all dwelling units into strict compliance with the Housine Code .) �6 (Furthermore, the theory of clearing such areas throueh Housing Code Enforcement is a fallacy and is a long drawn out, impracticable as well as unprofitable procedure, in that the Housing Code is not, and never was intended to be, a punitive or clearance weapon, but rather a tool to encourage, improvement and with which to maintain good standard housing conditions throughout the entire City. . The so called \ "Clearance-Code Enforcement" areas are extremely difficult to operate in and have been generally neglected in interest of obtaining more compliances in less difficult areas where violations are less serious and compliance is much easier to obtain. Early improvement of substandard conditions in existing housing in these worst areas would materially relieve the long range burden on the Housing Resources Committee of providing adequate new standard units for many low-income families, for which the existing housing in many instances in these areas could be made adequate.) (The financial burden or even hardship, on the owners ' of these properties for bringing them in ' to compliance with the Hou~ing Code would be no greater than it is now and has been in other areas of the City, where the Code is being strictly enforced on a house-by-house basis.) 6. Modify existing local building codes to permit erection of prefab residential construction, to incluae preassembled plumbing, electrical, and heat facilities, when it has been-determined that the materials and workmanship are satisfactory and can be inspected during assembly at the factory. (The application of assembly line procedures and techniques to mass production of low-income housing is as essential today as the assembly line procedure has been - to the automobile, major elect.;rical appliances, prefabricated kitchen cabinets and other similar products, if we are going to meet the current day.' s needs in low-income housing.) 7. Encourage prompt formation of a Non-profit Housing Development Corporation, I having a city-wide scope of operation, to assist development of low-income housing. Such a corporation could provide much needed seed money on a loan basis to local neighborhood non-profi t sponsors; bank land f or future low-income housing projects; and lend technical and other assistance in promotion of low-income housing developments. (The formation of such a corporation ·i s well under way through the efforts of the Finance and Non-profit Funds Panel of the Housins Resources Committee . Thia corporation ia much needed in Atlanta now. A revolvins fund in the nei ghborhood �7 of 1-1½ million dollars could probably be procured through loans of perhaps ten year durat ion from Private Enterpris e at low interest rates, with principal re-' payable as available. This money would serve to finance activities of the Corporation on a r evolvi ng basis, in a manner similar to procedure which is being success.fully used in Hartford, Connecticut and several other cities.) 8. And almost l ast but not least, recorrrrnend that suitable sites be carefully selected j ointly by the Housing Resources Committee and the Planning Department, in all f our geographical quadrants of the City (not necessarily· equal dist ribution) sufficient in number and size to bring the current Low-income Housing Program up to 20,000 units; that each of these sites be earmarked for Public Housing under t he Turnkey or conventional program, housing under the FHA 221 insured mortgage program or conventionally financed similar priced construction; and that special effort be made to rezone these sites simultaneously in one package; with the help of wide-spread, well placed and care.fully selected public support and on the conditi on that low-income housing will eventually be constructed on these sites when adequate community facilities will be available. The plan should include several areas f or a reasonable number of single family sales houses. ( It is believed t hat this approach can be successful, if careful a t t ention is given to selecting sites which will serve the intended purpose, but which are most l i kely to be the least controversial (omitting those which are obviously likely to arouse strong community resentment). This procedure has recent ly been r esorted to in New Orleans f or Public Housing , after s i te s electi on by private enterprise f ailed. This would spread the locations- and not concentrate the bulk of such housing on two or three sites which are likely to be particularly controversial, and on which it would not be wise to concentrate l arge numbers of low-income f amilies , even {f appropriate zoning could be obtained.) (There are suff ic1ent sites in the former category. Many of these sites , if appropriat ely developed, would excell ently serve the needs of low-income .famil ies and at the same time would 'materially improve the areas involved. In sever al instances t hese are areas in which l ow-income famil~es already r eside and will probably continue t o do so for a l ong time , but i n which current densities can be increased and the environment improved .) (Still, other areas to be consi dered should be those located where nice well planned low-income housing devel opments would improve the area, shoul d pr omote a mininrum of cri ticism from the res idents of the communit y and l ocat ions that are not l ikely to be developed in the near future for bet ter or higher use . �8 In some instances however , this will require modification of current policies and thinking of some planners as to zoning classifications for such locations, by permitting a mixture of uses in the general areas involved rather than continuation of all single family Residential or all Industrial or Cornmerciai as the case may be.) 9. When the proposed reZPning of suggested sites is accomplished, then concentrate on coordination of all Departments and Agencies involved in planning for the proposed developments to provide necessary Community facilities ~imultaneously with scheduled development of the low-income housing. This is possible and offers the best opportunity for getting what is needed in the nature of Community Facilities at the time it is needed to serve the proposed developments. Two good examples of where such coordination efforts have recently worked successfully are: (a) The arrangements made for extension of Cleveland Avenue to serve the proposed Golfview development project; and (b) The compromise recently worked out satisfactorily between the developers and the Water Pollution Control Division for sewer service at an extremely early date for the proposed Bankhead Highway Turnkey project. 10. In order to speed up development on land in Urban Renewal projects sold to developers, recommend that the period allowed between award on bids and beginning of actual construction be reduced from the current permissive time of one year. · It appears that 6-9 months should be ample. (Examples of disturbing delay are the Ebenezer Baptist Church project and, to a somewhat lesser degree, the Rockdale project; whereas planning for the Friendship Baptist Church pr0ject is much further along, which illustrates that others could do likewise.) All of the above explained procedures are believed to be feasible and if adopted should insure completion of the established goals in the Low-income Housing Program within the time alloted and with a minimum of difficulty and disagreement between I those involved in accomplishing the Program. Encl: Report - Status of Accelerated Low-income Housing Program, dated Jan. 15, 1968 �March 11, 1968 To: Mr. R~ i Lander Administrative Assistant Fronn , -col.m D. Jones Bottaing Coordinator R c end that Ser tary' s poa5..tion be racl si.fied from. Stenographer Clerk, Salary _ 35 ( 35S ... 438 per month) to S nior Stenographer, a.ry.l\alll:ce JB ($403 ... 497 per month) . Justific tion tor thi~ r equest i contained in tb a.tt oh-d job d scription. Then d tar thi ebange is intensified at this timi becaus rq present S t,retary, • uby Countryman, r centJ.y taken th ~st for Senior Stenogr her, es d it, ha beon placed on Personnel ' s lig1.bl.e list far posi tJ.on in t ol 1£:i.ca... tion and 1 looking for such position, for tho 1ncr a e in p which she ne s . offi - , a. ten on P r onnol.' el1g1bl li t for enior ocn for intervi for that cl sitic tion. ap ct.ion C C • to Housing • t. Jr. ordinator �Functions of Secretary to Housing Coordinator Acts as secretary to Housing Coordinator, Office of the Mayor, City of Atlanta; and the Housing Resources Committee. 55 ship of approximately functions. The Housing Resources Committee has a member- members organized into 8 Panels, each with its o,m specific The members of the Committee are very prominent businessmen and educators in the City of Atlanta. Secretary sends out invitations monthly to the Housing Resources Executive Group meetings; Low-income Housing Coordinating Group meetings and called meetings of the entire HRC and its various Panels, held in Cit7 Hall. Takes and transcribes official minutes of these meetings and makes distribution to all concerned, Arranges for use of Conference Room at City Hall and confirms by phone whether or not Committee members plan to attend each meeting. Notifies all concerned of cha~ges in time or place of scheduled meetinGs• In addition ,:,o t aking and transcribing official minutes for Housing Resources Committee meetings, takes and trans cribes com~l ex reports , such as the HRC Annual Report, Analysis of Low-income Housing Program and Proposed Plan for Lm-r-income Housing sites; and sug5 ested speeches for the Mayor i.e. speech for Mayor in Thomas ville Urban Renewal area recently, in conne ction with financinG low-in come single family homes by the Insurance. industry. Takes dictation and transcribes corresp Jndence prepared for sic;nature of the Ma~;or, Chair man of the Housing Resources Committee and Housing Coordinator , which requires considerable knouledge of business Engl i sh and spelling and appropriate paragraphing and punctuation. Secretary helps compile information for the quite involved periodic Inventor y Report of Low and Medium Income Housinz in Atlanta. T_ypes in final form this complex tabular report consist:j_ng of approxima tely 33 pa_-:;es. Gets the r eport r eproduced and makes distribution . ' This report is the only means of showing and keeping up with the status and progress of the Lou-income Housing Prot;ram . Secretary must uork independantly r:1a..'k:ing 01m 1-rork decisions with minirnurn super- vision, as SU:?erv:i.sor i s frequently busy attending meetings , having confer ences v1ith developers, and checking out l and sites for low-i ncome housing . This position require s general office experience and knowlecl.e e and a eeneral concept of city or;::;anization and responsibilit y for functi ons. Receives telephone calls and personal callers ; answers their questions or directs them to the r esponsible party. Refers t hose to the Housine Coordinator which, in her �opinion require his personal attention. Schedules appointments for Housing Coordinator according to knowledge and i mportance of his schedule. Keeps r e cords of his scheduled appoint mer.ts. Searches and accmnulates data from files for specific correspondence, studies or projects undertaken by superior. Maintains active and inactive fil es. Maintains up to date lists of all members of the Housing Res ources Committee, to include cor r ect mail ing addresses and telep~one nmnbers. Maintains current list of developers inter:ested in building low-income housing. Types and keeps up to date list of proposed sites offered for low-income housine which includes location, amount of land in each·, tract and who controls the site. Takes dictation from, and t ypes documents of a t echnical nature for, the Consultant to the Housing Resources Coi:,mrl. ttee, who devotes one day each 1-reek to work j_n the Housing Resources Cammi tt~e office pertaining to t e chnical details of the 101-r-income Housing Program . �~- -:.,;. ,...- w· ,;-•.·•. :.; ,. , . ,, ... · ~ ... 1 • • • , ~• • , ~ .._ ,.....: - II · - - - : · · • .: - --' .. . - . . . . - •- - I ~ STATUS OF CO-SPONSORS - March 18, 1968 (As of March 18, 1968, thirty-seven co-sporu:;ors have given firm commitments on the Atlanta Metropolitan Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing. They are listed below under "committed. 11 ) RELIGIOUS Committed .. . . , Bishop John Owen Smith Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta Coordinating Committee of the United Presbyterian. Churches of Greater Atlanta East Lake Methodist Church Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta Interfaith, Inc. National Conference of Christians and Jews, Inc. · urban Training Organization of Atlanta Unitarian-Universalist Congregation of Atlanta Wheat Street Baptist Church Suggested . Atlanta Jewish Welfare Foundation Board of Christian Social Concerns of the North Georgia Conference of the Methodfst Church Christian Council of Metropolitan Atlanta SOCIAL SERVICE AND EDUCATIONAL Committed Ad Hoc Committee of Northwest Atlanta for Fair Housing American Friends Service Committee Anti-Defamation League Atlanta Branch of the NAACP Atlanta University Atlanta University Center Corporation The Atlanta Urban League, Inc. Clark College Community Relations Commission of Atlanta Council on HQ~an Relations of Greater Atlanta Druid Hills Fair Housing Committee Economic Oppor tunity, Atlanta Georgia Counci l on Human Relations Interfaith, Inc . League of Women Voters of Atlanta- Fulton County League of Wome n Voters of DeKalb County Lea gue of Wom en Voter s of Georgia Me tropol i t an Atlanta Summi t Leadership Congres s, I nc . Mor ehouse College Southern Regional Council , I nc . Sou thwest At lantans for Pr ogress (SWAP ) YWCA of Atlanta �:. ... . ... ,, ,:., .., ____,.,..,..-·~· --- - - , - - , - - - - - -. -2Suc:gested AF'L-CIO Georgia Planning Association · of tho American Institute of Planning BUSINESS Committed Dnpire Real Estate Board Suggested Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Atlanta Junior Chamber of Commerce Atlanta Mortgage Bankers Association DeKalb Chamber of Commerce Georgia Savings and Loan League _ Lockheed Georgia Corporation South Fulton Chamber of Commerce GOVERNMENT Committed Atlanta Federal Executive Board Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal City of Atlanta President's Committee on Equal Opportunity in Housing Suggested Housing Res ources Committee of the City of Atlanta Metropolitan Planning Commission • • • • • The Atlanta Region MAC LOG �PROPOSED TITLE: Atlanta Metropolitan Area Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing CO-SPONSORS: To be sponsored by a broadly based representation of educational, religious, labor, business, governmental, social service and human relations organizations in the Atlanta Metropolitan community, a community composed of Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett Counties. PURPOSE: To bring together people of many backgrounds and interests in a democratic context in order • to stimulate discussion of open housing in the Atlanta Metropolitan Community. . . . To facilitate such discussion .VJ~ _ wou ld expect to: 1. Analyze all available information concerning the problem of open housing in the Atlanta Metropolitan Community. 2. Analyze the problem of property depreciation, deterioration resulting in blighted areas on the economic development of the Metropolitan Area. 3. Assess the pot.~mtial effect of equal opportunity in housing on the total community. 4. Explore ways and means to inform the entire public concerning the problems and potential solutions available to the Atlanta Metropolitan Community. �/' I . \, March 25, 1968 ar Ivan Allen, Jr • '01 • Cecil A. Alex:an(ter, Chairman Jfou· i sources tte A. Mr. ell.or ell on which FHA 1 or co Uk• 1.soo soo 2,000 . 3,000 oo 2 000 . , volftd l'\Ull • �eh 2s~ 1968 orandum to, l · or Ivan Allen, Jr,. .. ail. J.. Alex der • U 1:1'..&..L.I...IJ.ir,. read3' t inter into this operation either on his own or r r r bl7 1n coi:mection llitb th~ ty ot AU or non-protit corpor t1on, to purchae the houses, procur t site and ce the in.,.,..... ,.,. eonatruct1on . ne , !! tba Ci is in vance th City's bl sa on this eneral. id cooper ti on the undertaking. in s snd t thie otti. authori d to enc:ou:r;,-ag~ vigorously. par to coop · CCf th1 • e:ov1ded c ob surance or tb Clty•s 1t3 emit~ n p~i\J"tll propoa will ..--=.i,........- 'lbi8 proposals feam.ble . JnJ' quick ct.ion 1) tb1 propoa d mit arul the Bu:U proj ot•. • ell r to pursue ��arch 25, 19 • • • ll �• I March 14, 1968 Col. Malcolm Jones Atlanta Housing Authority City Hall 68 Mitchell Street Atlanta, Georgia Dear Malcolm: John Cone, who is our Public Service Director, has offered to produce television spots for all three stations in town which would enco urage private firms - and especially churches to venture into sponsorhip of non-profit housing projects. Could you be good enough to give us - not a great wealth of rules and regulations - but a capsule page or so of what you think are the most important points to encourage such participation. We'll take it from there with visuals, etc. J've dabbled on this far too long, so I hope you'll move swifter than I have. Thanks so much. Cordially, zl Ray Moore, Director of News WSB - Television RM:s j cc: John Cone Don Heald Ru s ty Bruton COX BROA DCAST ING CO RPORATION ,1a1;ans, WSS AM-FM -TY, Atlanta Vl/O0 AM·fM, Miami c, E> WHIO AM -FM-TY, Dayt o n 1> KTVU, San Fron ci-.co -Ooklond WSOC AM -FM- TY. Char lo tte ct WIIC -TV . ?itt sb urgh �~I'.!!., _.-~ > ~ ~ · LJ URBAN STUDY ASSOCIATl;:S, Ltd. r:;¼·~ WILLIAM 2112 BROADWAY • NEW YORK, N. Y. 100 23 • ( 212) ,143.215.248.55, A. MOSES PR~SIOENT February 15, 1968 Mr. Malcolm D. Jones, Hou sing Coordinator City Hall Atlanta , Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Jones: • Thank you for the material you sent regarding housing in At lanta . I will be in further communication with you shortly to discuss the information y ou sent and any additional thoughts you or your staff may have r egarding propects for National Association of Manufacturers investment in low-income housing, at a profit, in Atlanta . Very truly yours, WAM/bk 799 - 1100 �F .E I 142 .J EFFE RSON A R C . ITEc -- - A . .. A . STREET SAVANNAH, TELEPHONE G EO R G IA (912 ) 31 401 2 36 - 562 1 February 7, 1968 !'fir . 1lia lc olm D. Jones Hous ing Co - ordinator Room 1204 City Ha ll At la nta, Ge orgia 30303 Dear Mr . Jones: I wish to convey my apolo g ie s to you and Dr . Harrison of Georg ia Tech f or the inability to attend our mee~ing schedul ed f or January in Atlanta . • The f lu -bu g had me out of t he offic e for some time and I a m j us~ now getti ng back to my r egular schedul e. In r e ceni dealings with Mr . McNamara, he has indicated a concern for premature publicity for his building sys tem, prior to securing final pa tent rights. He t her efore haB indicated t ha t he would prefer to delay any f urther con s id eration a t this time . We a sk y our indul gence in having th e o pportu ni ty of me eti ng wi t h you again in the neav fut~Fe, Yours truly, ~~, 143.215.248.55 Architec t �MINU'fES Land Panel, Housing ,esources Committee Meeting February 15, 1968 A special meeting of the Land Panel, Housing Resources Committee, was called for 11:00 a.m. this date, in Committee Room 1, Second Floor, City Hall. The foll owing participants attended the meeting: r-:r . Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman, HR C ' lderman John M. Flanigen ?-'.r . Robert Veal, r epres ented Mr. Wallace L. Lee Mr . H. W. Gates, HRC, Consultant 1".lI' . L. J. Fuller, Empire Real Ji:state Board, represented F~r . J . A. Alston Mr . Henry Baldwin, Atlanta eal Estate Board, represented Hr . Stewart Wight Mr . Hilliam Litchfield, Adams- Cat es Company Hr. Malcolm D. Jones, Housing Coordinator I~ . Alexander, Chairman, Housing Resources Committee, pr esi ded. He opened the meeting by explaining that at some point in the past the Corr~ittee had come to the conclusion that it shoul d not back specific areas on natt ers of rezonin~ , but of course would continue to work in support of the overtll program; that it appeared the Committee could be more effe ctive t his way. Hr. Jones asked Mr . Litchfield to explain the purpose of his pr esentati n . Mr . Litchi'ield explained that in the past HUD had come up agair.s t s ituations where developers have come into Atlanta and put much work and effort on a project only to be turned down at the last minute by zoning requirements . He s aid the Committoe 1 s endorsement that this l and is a good site for a Turnkey . rojcct. is needed so that the paper work can be a ccomplished and the ·actual construe ,.,i on can be s t art ed a s soon as the funds are available; that Turnkey ~un.::ls :,::-.... i ::- --:en until July l, _1968 ( except f or Turnkey 3). · Er . Litchfield stated that he was proposing ·a Turnkey project cons5.st:.nr, of a 16.3 acre tract in Northeast Atlanta off Dekalb Avenue at Hampton Ter race and Southerland Terrace on which to build approximately 200 units . Facil ities needed for Public Housing are available. A densi ty of twelve units per acre is contemplated and feasible beca.use of hieh land cost. He believes this would be the best way to use this land. He stat ed that the City of Atlanta Housing Authori ty has endorsed this site for a Turnkey project and that Mr. Shuttleworth of the Plarming .Department feels that it would receive favorable recommendation from that Department . He further stated that Mr . Flanigen, HUD, and NAACP, were in favor of this proposal . ,, �2 !',r . Alc.xanc.er said that t .is was e;ooci . oca t ion ee oer ar,hi cc:.lly for a Turnkey Publi c Housi n._, proj e ct . He menti oned that the Cati-.olic .'\.rctdio cese had backed away f r om t hi s prop erty be cause of zonin£; problems. He sai d he would be gl a d t o s ee housing construc t ed i n this are a . Mr . Fl an i e;on said ther e is ne o ci. or housinc i n this area . 81.uo Heav,m, approximatel y one mil e f r om t he proposed Turnkey site , is one of the wor.:;t s l um areas in Atlanta . The str el~ts ;;:-e :.1arr ow and t he ditches and trash are a hazard t o children . :Mr . Fl ani:.,en sai r1e doesn I t look f or any se~ious obj ect i on to t he r ezoning , but t her e may be s ome. r,:r. Alexander a sked what kind of homes were in t he area? Hr . Litchf i eld s aid ther e 1vere older homes r angi nt; from $12, 000 t o $15,ouo. Ya- . J ones s tated that if apar tments for l ow and moder ate income f amili es are going to be built , Turnkey is t he best t ype f i nan cing f or a pr ogr am such as thi s. Mr. Flanigen said that we should start looking for small er tracts of land . He said that these small tracts , such as Gilliam 1 s place , s houl d be ut ilized. 'Jr . Jones said t he Gilliam pla ce cGuld be useful . be built ther e although it is now zoned s inele- famil y . Perhaps dupl exes could r. Fuller asked i f this proper ty was bet ween Rogers and -Iarren? Mr . J ones said yes and that it has a partial frontga~e on Boulevard. 11r . Li tchf i eld said that only Turnk ey 3 f unds are avail abl e until July. He said t hat !'fi r . Boggs and Mr. Sat t erfi eld might consider Turnkey 3 in order to e et s tarted. He menti oned that t he City of Knoxvil le, Tennessee, had us ed this method of f inancing f or a cooperative high-rise f or t he elder ly . Mr. Alexander pointed out t ha t housing is needed for couples who are not elderly . ~.r . Litchfield stated that t he Railroad Avenue, Lenox Square site would be an ideal l ocation for housing for couples . Mr. Alexander s aid he s aw no reas on why t he Committee could not write a letter t o HUD endorsing this l and site for a l ow-in come housing Turnkey project, that this pr oposal is definitely in aereerr,ent wit h the pr oeram that the Cor:rrni ttee is worki ng f or. Mr . Litchfield asked if it woul d be pos sible t o ge t t his area on the zoning agenda without waiting i ts turn? . �3 iJ' . Fl arigen said it mi ght be poss i ble; however, February 14 ,-,as closing date f or some ar eas . Mr . J ones said :·,e have a uortin::; agreement ui th Mr . Gladi n; that if we fee l somet hing is justifi ed he will t ry and work i t ino r1i.r . Litchfield said this site i s sho,m on 1983 L and Use Map as apar tment zoning . ·a-. Alexander said he ,-, as deli , teci ~o h::i.ve r epresented and a sked for comments. oth Real ·~s tate Boards Lr . 3aldwin s aid he fel t certair. that this proj e ct would have the suppor t of his Board . ~:r . Fuller expre ssed concern 0vc units deteriorating to ::;ub:::..:::..--:d.:.:--c. conditions so r apidly . He fe els tha~ more enphasis should be placed on keeping up proper t ies. -!r . lexander s aid approxiJ!la tely 10,000 homes have been rehaoili ta tee~ through Housing Code enforcement duri:-ig t he last yea:r . :-:r. Al exander s :a ted that the Social Problems Panel should be more active in J.Ormine civL., g:co..i.;,s to work with churches and schools to get peopl e to ke ep up their property. Ee said that Gar den Clubs and other civi c groups can do a great deal of good . i-'ir . J ones s tat ed that there were 10 ,157 homes r ehabilitated through Housing Code enforcement from November 1966 thru De cember 1967 . Hr . ?uller mentioned the di fficulti es of having cars moved off public streets and the problem of junk cars on proper ti<~s in the City of .4.t-~ani:.a . He asked if there was any law against parki ng an automobile in the middle of the yard on the front lavm? Mr. Jones said there was not. He stated that an inoperative automobile. canno t b e parked on property for more than 60 days . Hr . Baldwin said he 1-1ouJ.d estimate tha t there a.re 250 ju.nl{ automobile~ propert~,r in Atlanta at present time • I •l n .}~r . Alexander said maybe the Automobile Industry could ao ::3 oriethfr,g :i..'~ ~~ut the junk car situation . He mentioned the big Oil Companies concern over ::ies ign of stations. A survey indicated that the gimmicks such as streamers hangin~ all over did not help business at all. }Ir. Baldwin asked if there were any la1-1S regulating pqysical_ conditio~1s of commercial pl a ces? r'ir . Jones said there was no regulat ion in Atlanta. 1'il' . Litchfield said thnt a group or person could ea thc.r up 2QO cr-::rii_t cards and send them in to a large oil company such as Standard a.lor-ig wi tl1 . co:-:inlur.:t a.boµt poor conditions of a station and irm:iediately the station in auestio :.r~ulli_ be fixed up and cleaned up and credit ca:rds returned to 0wners. . · · · I �r-. 4 i·:r. Alexander s a id EOA is s u~,.·, ,.:.~ --d 1., .., oc organizing eroups to work t o keep up and improve neit; hborho ods. -ic mcnti ·.m ed the fa c t that Druid Hills Garden Club had helped the Poole Creek ar8a get landscaped . ~fr . Flanige n told about the Civic Club cleaning up the Martha Street aroa . 1r . l exander t ol d about the 221 (h) pr ogram whereby church gro"J.ps could buy propcrt ..:..es (up to S units) and. r e habilita t e them. Then they could sell them back to original 01mers or someone else. ·ir . Fl;:i.ni:;en asked whether ;'!,r Q \:addo:;: ::;ot his Hesley J\partr:i.ents approved? Mr. Jo .es said 150 .units ( a t er arner.ded. to 119) were approved under l ease agre er ent to be rehabili tac.,. . " Meetine ad journed at 11 : 50 a . m. ·Re spectfully submitted, �FACT SHEET ON THOMASVILLE URBAN REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT The Thomasville Urban Redevelopment Area , loc ated four miles southeast of downtown Atlanta, was desi.gnat ed by the Board of Aldermen on August 19, 1957 as a slum and the site for a predominately residential development. This area covers 277 acres of land and originally contained 356 residential structures, 67% of which were substandard, that housed 402 families. The area was marked by unpaved streets, dilapidated structures, lack of park and playground facilities, overcrowded school, and inadequate utilities. Since entering a Loan and Grant Contract with the Federa l Government on July 10, 1959, the Atlanta Housing Authority has completed acquisition of 453 parcels of land, relocated 283 families, 26 individuals, and 19 businesses, and demolished 302 structures. . The Authority has compl eted contracts for roads, sidewalks, and sewers • In addition,the Authority has sold 314 single-family lots, on which 222 dwelling units have been complet ed , and construction started on 92 units, 69 lots r ema in to be sold. 350 public housing units are pr oposed north of McDonough Road . Bids for the construction of these units will be let on March 1, 1968, with an estimated completion date of construction in September, 1970. The urban renewal plan also propos es six church site s and a 10-acre commercial tract. The Thoma sville Urban Renewal Area is fast becoming 3 madel residential neighbor hood, with paved streets, sidewa l ks , fine home~ , parks und er development, new el ement ary schools .o2oe.i, and provision for chur ches and a shopping center. The Federa l Government has recently announc ed that approximately 95 acres of land will be given to the City to provid e additi.onal housing for f amil i es of low and mode r ate income. Renewal Project. ,. This l and will be add ed to the Thomasville Urban �44 Broad Street N.W. Atlanta, Georgia, 30303 February 6, 1968 Mr. Collier B. Gladin Department of Planning City Hall Atlanta, Gergia Dear Collier: The progress with the package plan has been good and I congratulate you, Johnny and your staff on the work. I would like to point out that one of the areas selected is, in my opinion, so very controversial that it will endanger the entire concept . This i s the ball park site . It seems to me that no public housmng per se should be included in this area - that it should be a mix of commercial, some 221 D-3 and conventionally financed. The placement of the 221 D-3 should be carefully arranged so that they will be buffered from the surrounding residential area. As you know there has been a strong effort to maintain the residential patterns north of Ponce de Leon · and this proposal will fly in the face of the most strenuous opposition. Please give this your consideration. Sincerely , _Cecil A. Alexander vb cc: . Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. / �/v, Y J'y,/ 4 Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. 'fo1 I colm t n., Jono Low-cost singl £ I J J 17 housing evelo nt in Tb a. • I --- vill u. &-oject �I CITY O F _AT ANTA. . . < HOUSING RESOURCES C:Tst 534 I '. Comment De signation -i- - Medium sized apartment developments. units completed under cohventional financin 1, (Locatiom sho m ir prE viou 3 reI ort) Completed Conv. l I -s 281 ~otal under lease agreement. J -6 lllJ 9044 0,157 . i ! -8 I I I Now Leases negotiated by HA. Can take possession only as units become vacant. (See P.R. Summary f or locations) H. c. Enf. Now Units rehabilitat ed thru the Housing Code Division. These do not provide a gditional hqusing, but do i ncr ea se the supply of s t andard housing units . Now Reha~ilitat ion compl eted by Housing Authority. Now Enterprise Cor p . , 130 Piedmont Ave., NE is interes ted i n buying dilapidated low cost structures and r ehabi litating them . Proporietor , George P. Hart, has r ehabed JO units. Throughout City (other than in U. R. Projects) l I 48 !-7 ~ .&Dec. 1966 . ing 1967 rrotal (Previ )us Report) Leasing fo1 P. H. - ~'1ov. & Dec. T uring 199 247 1966 West End U. R. 1967 Project I- Rehab . ki'ed. assist total i; l ' iI ~o Scattered I i Conv. tlehab. l J 1 l I I j . l I - i i L, . ,. l ,.. -.~._.... .. - ~ . ' . I , ' ' I ,~. ' �,:- . '- .. 3 HOUSING RI:SOIJRCES COMMITTCE DA TE January 15, 1968 An Invent ory of MI:DIUM COST HOUSING IN ATLANTA Recently Cornpletcd 9 ~Development and Proposed .! LOW AND t Item No, Uni ts }Te~ust No--4----.UC-1 J -~':'_:;if;Oi:i t i on ~ ---~~- L~::;ation -~,~--~-- I Park 100 Pro;:;,r;-:m ,_Nolc:.~,~;,_'.dr'2,c::;:_'~~ ~J-ln143.215.248.55t2:a-~::: · AE,s,at'-~W)m_haabetnlee - -~ =---~,,------~"-- ..~,-~-=~· --~ West Apts .#t NH Cor. intersec. 221 d (3) Gordon & Bolton R<. L. D. L ·"' 84 12 . 26 I ill " 2 II II 3 II Optle1ermri tVaoJ_ure _, Sept . 1968 ' 700 , 000 >er . Oct ' 67 R. S. Total 221 d (3) Below Market !' 185,000 1 Construction started June 1. 6.3A @ 15 . 9 U/A . Lewis Cenker , Legal. Owner - Park West Co. Builder Developers Service Co. First units occupied in Hov • 2 Appl . filed with FHA 9-20-67 I 3 In planning stage. ! I 1 Clollege 96 85 3751 Gordon Rd NW) 221 d (3) I UC.;.2 75 l, Comment ,-~----~--~r~~-~ ---~~-143.215.248.55---~ I II ( IP-3' ( 52) 178 .:, -= ~-= 143.215.248.55 Plaza, Inc. University Center U.R . Project 1017 Westview Dr. 96 ] 221 d (3) s.w . Construction s·tarted 2-27-67. Spring 1 68 1 Perrni t 1 Builder - Randen Construction Co. I $792 , 930 . I (3 bldgs .) Legal - Fisher ~O %completed (1-1-68 ) 7350 . I UC-3 I I 36 I i ! I ' i I l ! I l I ' \ London Towne , Houses CUshrr.an Circle, s.w. (Off Boulder Park Dr.) 221 d (3) Co- op 1 l' iI (48) (48) -w- 9*1 I 4 - 105-ll II ! (IP-4 69 1 84 I 4 i 59 8 61 122 I n· II n n n· II n ti Total r . n Il Permit 36 Units permitted $216,000 May 1967 .. ~'-4 Bedrooms Town Houses Diamond & Kaye Builder I I i II Committed by FP.A 8-14-67 (4 phases) 20A. Sponsor - FCH, Inc. (Same people who develop ed Eastwych Village) 6 different monthly pmts. 1 ,2,3,4 bedrooms, some with basements. Down payment $135. 6 model units 60% co~plete (1-11-68) Formal opening about Feb. 1. June 1968 to July' 69 ,.I I - . .. �4 HOUSING RCSOURCES COMMITTEE DA TE January 15, 1968 An Inventory of LOW AND MEDIUM COST HOUSING IN ATLANTA Recent_½'~CO!:_l:letcd 5_}n_D143.215.248.55 13:19, 29 December 2017 (EST) Pr.9_e143.215.248.55 ' !ten No, I i ~c~- ~~, g n ~_ts r:e;.; Sxis t J , ~oB ~·· 143.215.248.55;I I · Monthly Pmts .. Estimate Noc Bedrooms or Rentals ~:::~~[f,;,:;:-·~~ti~;~~:ii__,_ "ii ~-( Dcs ion a t i on i...-:- :::ution Prog ram -1~·2-·t ' ·3~· ·-r-·-~2~·7- 3)-- · :" ~:- - - , Parcel C-3B ! Parcel ·I C-11 38-88 Younge St. S. E. -~4- -~~ , 95 28 85 8 When j Permit or Avai lable :i Other Value ·::~-::~I co,;oo- ~ons~~cti: st: :d -~~-- Comment -8-2:-6 ~ 7=~-.~ p1.,~ Al j Jan . 1969 I Permit '. $793 , 000 1 ~-. Rental incl. all utilities. Sponsors - I. Saporta and Russell. O\mer - Gartrell Court Assn. Builder - Gartr ell Court Assn. 50;h complete (1-15-68) ---+---+-,----;'-·- - - - - - - - + - - -Perry Homes Ext ension UC-5 650 IPublic Housing 6t UC-7 i *19 t July 1 Single Family . 1 20 ; Aug. 67 ! -r,42 Sept. 1 67 48 ' Oct. 1 67 Nov. '67 I. *72 13 Dec. '67 214 Total - - - - - + - - -----1---+-~--1-~---4--_..---ll--~----1--------'-F_ 'i·_r_s_t_oc_c_u~p~an-cy planned in Feb. Oct . 1968 $2, 238 , 900 Large units (3-5 bedrooms) . See 78 P.H. Perry Homes Ext . su.TJ!lllary of Public Housing, attached, South of Proctor for breakdown, Bids opened 1-'tarch 7, 46 - 4 IR Creek. Permi t is sued May 1967 - Builder 16 - 5 lR 1730 Kerry Dr.N1i H. L. Coble Construction Co. Construction started Hay 1, 19671 on schedule compl . planned by Oct 26, 1 68. I McDaniel st. s.w. P.H. I. 248 Av. Cost Spring 1961 $14, 500/U 402 Fall 1968 Included in summary of Public Housing, attached. Const. started Ifov. 1, 1966. 1st stage (125U) conpl. except for pavir.g. Occupancy Feb. 1 68. Completion of 2nd stage (123U) planned for Mar.26. Final comol. scheduled for Au~. 22. 6 month Permits under *Permitted. after perm t $15,000 ea. Single family houses permitted prior to July 1 67 (more than 6 moJeare a ssumed to have been com~:>leted and/ included in Item Various throughoui Conv. City. l c-2. ~--- I ti,. ' ' �5 HOUSING RCSOIJRCES COMMITTEE DA TE January 15, 1968 An Inventory of LOH AND MCDIUM COST HOUSING IN ATLANTA Rcc~_y~~cd 9__jn~evel~ment_and_ Pr·oposed No , Units f 1':~ - -.1~t Dn -1.'anat~on ,...:n~ ?~~ -,;_:::__£~,._~-.-::.;':_!',. -.,_::. _: __~ Item No, --~ UC-8 5A Comment Lc-:ati on I 387 Lanier St. NW Conv. Spring i 1930 Flat Shoals Rd. S.E. Conv. Spring 1 68 t 200, 000 Conv. Spring 68 Ii 17,480 O\.mer - Jefferson De Shaza D.L. Conv. Spring 168 52 , 000 Owner MINE Enterprises D.L. 18,275 Owner - E. 1 68 $24,000 Owner - A. J. Smith Builder - Mitchell Const. Co. I I 32A I I Duplexes I.and I small Apt . . Small Apt. Bldgs. 1803 White Oak 2D 8D Developments 1(32 uni ts or less 2D Hollow N.E. 1521,27,33, & 39 Longston Ave. SW I Spring 1 68 I 1193 Warfield Ave. Conv. N.E. Note: 2D . AD -' LA' 6A Apartments Duplexes 1 Owner - F. L. Alberson Builder - Holms Inc. s. Everett D. L. 68 8,000 Owner - J. L. Dodson D.L. Conv. Spring 1 68 16,000 Owner - Marie Moore D.L. 50 Peyton Rd.SW Conv. Spring 1 68 80,000 Oi-mer - Peyton Center Inc. Builder - Scotfre, Inc. Spring 168 126,000 240 Lowery St.NE Conv. 884 Neal St. NW (Co ple I Spring d) · 1 Owner - H. M. Alford & J • .M. Sellers D.L. 28A ! 2661 Beeler Dr.SW Conv. I 12A ! 520 Park Ave. SE Conv. I Spring 1 68 66,000 Owner - Park Apts. Inc. D.L. I 11A l 1152 Sells Ave.SW Conv. i Spring 1 68 47,300 ::1st "P-17 J62 I Monthly Pmts •. Estimate !No. BP.droc;ns or Rent als When Permit or Comment l --·2 ---3 Avai l able Ot her Value ---+- --------~-~-- ,, ___ ., ___ .,,__..,.___., _____-.. ·- -·---~· . . .-y-~-1. __.. .__.. ·~ ·--:r ~---:-..·-.a::. -~ --- ---------1-~---~~-~~----~-~ I Lc- :::ation Dcsi .. nation Central l·leth. Ch. East side of Project Fairburn Rd. SW N. of SeHell Rd. 196 551J rotal- IP-13 (a) Pro~rarn site. Rezoni ng from i-:-land X-2 approved by Bd. ·Ald. Jan. 15. A-1 & A-2 cievelopr.1ent planned. Promoter - C. C. Thornton Sponsor - Central Hethodis t Church (Revo A. S. Dickerson - Pastor) ~rch. Heery & Heery 221 d (3) 40A Nonprofit Elderly (JOO) :lellswood Apts. v. of Boulevard SE P. H. S. of Pershi ng Ave. Leasing 100 118 ) 83 (b) 119 A.manda Gardens Apts. I (c) !1 l '·:eyman Apta ~frotal i Mayson Ave. SE at 1st Street P.H. Leasing 221 d (3) Rehab 119 I I Park St. P.H. Leasing 191 j I I I Contract signed week of ~ug. 25 for purchase by Horowitz; HA was trying to negotiate lease; will require rehabili~ation; 60 - 70 units vacant. Lease negot iations dropped. Previous o,mer - Sin1s 1-'!addox Jr. J\-mership .changed . Harne changed toi\rnanda Gardens Apts. Require rehabilitat ion. Entire development has potential for lSO usable units ( excl. of terrace ~pts.) . Requested FHA to consider 221 d (3) tehab Project. 5 year l easing agreeMent ompleted (1-15-6~. uease being negotiated. �r 17 HOUSING RCSOURCES COHMITTCE DATE Recently Complc1:=_d,~~eve lo~ment and Proposed . I?-1• Monthly Pmts.- Estimate No. BP.d roorns or Rentals . ter: r l,o. Units r;c:...7 1:xlS t 'o: · L Dcsir..':._~-~1:.-.~---- - . 48 ~:.at1•_0::_~_ ~-..p.!:.°!3E~_":_ N. side Gordon Rd t-J'. of Adarns ville Dr. -1----2-·-·:f· 1·~2~·--3- . -~ --~ ___ __.~ ·---- _ • Com?T:ent ·-----------------.r----------~---------- Conv. 3½\ site Sponsor c. C. Thornton Favorable rec. by Plan. Bd. Oct. 11 to Zon. Cor-1. ;;ov. 16 Approved . I?-2( -u. of Bro1-mville Rd. between Jackson P'way & Boltor Rds. N. W. Bro:mt<»m Rd. Site 450 -· I SlA site Zoned .·1-1. Whiting-Turner has option. Approved by HA & HUD; ?lanning Bd. recol'!1;.lended favorable action; Zon. CoM. denied unanimously Aug. 10; &i. of Ald. denied Aug. 21. · ?lan. Jept. sponsored re-opening the proposed rezoning. Zon. Cori. agreed rrov. 9 to permit project to be reintroduced. Plan. Bd. favorable reco.:m11enciati::m Nov. 15. Zon. Con. reconsidered and deferred to July 1, 1968. Turnkey ) I . ! IP-2 - 180 Butler St. YHCA W. of Hollywood Re. 221 d (3) Project N.W., N. of nonprof·t Y,agnolia Cemetery I I !I I ' Ii 15A site Sponsor - Butler St. YHCA Owner - J.A., S. H. & W.P. Hudson Architect - John Cherry Legal - Hall Hare Favorable rec. by Plan... Bd. Oct. 11 To Zon. Com. t:ov. 16. Deferred (Z-67-200D). Zon . Cora. reconsidered Dec. 7 and deferred i ndef init ely. I I l . I I . . 11 II i When l Penni. t or Available ; Other Value S. W. , I ,I January 15, 1968 An Invcntol"y of LOW AlJD MEDIUM COST HOUSING IN ATLANTA ' ~ ' I ~.. . �18 .. HOUSI NG RCSOIJRCES COMMITTCE DATE J anuary 15, 1968 An Inventory of LOW AND HCD!UM COST HOUSING IN ATLANTA Recently Comp leted , in DeveloI?_ment and Proposed _____________ I -:o: I l\o . Units -;-- ----;::.-~ !, c ;..• ..._!... X :l.St IP-2~ 450 ter:i 150 600 ' . Monthly Pmts . . Es t imate No . BP- dr oo;ns or Ren t als When tc:=:ir, nati on Lc ~a t ion Propr2m --·-------- - ·--------•-?"" - ~----- Turnkey -1 ,--=----..., 2 --- J Penni t o r ·-3 · 1 - ·-2~ · ~ Ava ila ble ; Ot h e r Va lue Corra,ent - I -~ --- ~- - - ~ ··- - - - - - - - - -- - - - - ~- ---~~ 221 d ( 3) Part of Com..'1Illl1.ity Unit ?l ari on 95A tract. Announcement of Fed. par ticipati on and all ocati on of L50 P. H. units ~ade Dec.12. Site plan be ing developed by Pla,.Dept. 221 d ( 3 ) F1-IA Feasibility l etter is sued 11-30-67 1970 Fed . Honor Farm #1 P. H. ·1cDonough Blvd . S. E Turnkey Total . IP-2 32 BC-1 65 BC-2 204 ·lest l ake Manor Single ~amily Thomasville tJ .R. Project 65 . . ot s uncomm· t tee f or) di s DosaJ • 22l· d (2) 3etween Hollywood 221 d ( 3 )" 1d & Gun Club Rd.m, 60 144 : kni Site proposed to Housing A 1t hor ity or ey , ~e cl j ned. FHA w, s ori ginal ly cool touard t hi ; si i e be<1aUS( of proxuni tJ t o Rockdalt • Is now willing ~o consider pro, ect slin his area, I I I I Originally 157 uns old lots . 53 lot s sold to Natl. Hofles Const. Corp. 20 lo t s com..'7itted to another b~ilder 19 lo t s co:nmitted to Natl. ·H~mes Const. Corp . 20A. Res. (Low Rent) 7- 1~ . Co;;un. Proposed FHA .financing. ?remoter J oe Anderson, Roy D. Warren. Re-zoning approved Jan. J. ( Tied in with Item BC-3) To be presented to FHA soon for considerat ion. ·· �.. 19 HOUSING RCS OIJRCES COMMITTEE DATE J anuary 15, 1968 An Invent ory of LOW AND MEDIUM COST HOUSI NG I N ATLANTA Recently Complctcd 9 in Deve l opment and Proposed -···- - - - -- -. _______________ ~cr-J o: f l\o. l:n i ts 1 !-'~-..- 1:.:::0.st 3C-3 Monthly Pmts.. Es timate No . B~d roc:ns or Rentals ' Dcs ..... i p'..~-t_i_<:_Y:_. _,._~c- ::_a _t1_·o ~- - - 150 of Gun Club Rd. S. of Alvin Dr.NH E. --~B.::~rn__"_ :2=-~-2----:!· _~_l~-~2 ~ ... --·- ·~£ , When j Pe nni t or ._A_v-a~.~l_a_b~l _e_,_ o_t_h_e_r._V':~ 221 d (3 ) Approx. 12A. (Tied in with Item BC-2) Rezoned from R-5 to A-1. Approved 20 1-~ar . '67 Promoter - Joe Anderson of Roy D. ',Iarren Co. Same situa~ion as B-2 50 IS. side of Hestvie,-: 221 d (3) A. ve. s~.-l in 1-Jes t .21d Lim. ))j_ v. J. R. Project J. H. Richardson of Johnson, :lichards:m ~ Assoc. wants to purchase this City owned Land (nostly zoned R-5)~along S. side of ~-.restview Dr. between Darga..11 Pl. and Holderness St. (a.pprox. 3.L.A) U.R.Policy Cor.Lmittee declined to act on. Proposed to hold status quo for present. Purchase of this site also requested repeatedly by Chas. A. Huell er. _ 1 This prope i-ty lase. celient potehtia: for devel oJment under 221 1 ( 3 • RE pealed J nqui "ies !have been m, de by interested devE lopeJ s f,Dr rE lease of this site b~ the City. 3C-5 I 36 Seminole Apts. I I t ct. I ear N. Hit:;hland North Ave. NE Turnkey r,c Rehab. I Efficiency In fair condition. Owner wants to sell. Listed by Ed. L. Barnum Realty Co • . I I l . 32 4* i I l I - .. . .. - --- - - - - - ~ 'm:.~----- I I l . �~............ . t ........__... _ _ _. .........- - - - - - - - -- -- - -- - - - -- - 20 . HOUSING RJ:SOIJ RC[S COMMI TTEE DATE J anuary 15, 1968 An Inventory of LOW />.llD l1I:DIUM COST IIOUSING Recen t l y Cornp lctcd1~ BC-t · BO Harwell -Rd . at Oakcliff, N.W. rn ATLANTA ~ev elo_prne nt and Propos ed 0 2 A. tract . Cenker 221 d ( 3) Apartment use for the major port. on of this s ite appe ars more practica family, for w1ich area is now zo ~ed. 3C-' 100 t han single Sponsor - Fort St. :t-:ethodist Church, Rev. J. D. Grier, Jr., Pastor Ar chitect - Francis B. Sheetz, Jr. of Sheetz & Bradfield. Seeking sui table s i te. D Doubtful 221 d (3) D 3C-a )i I 65 Railroad Ave. NE In v ew of currently mdetermined f uture of this lin i ted area, i t apr:~ars that erection of prefabs on existing l~ts and constructi o1 of a smalJ high ris~ a1.e1.1. " r--nt c evel )pment on Co µn t y 01-me i land in this ar ~a, is the most fea ,ibl e solutj on a!t th~s time. l I • & Ki ngloff 0-.-mers - Developers. Der:sit:r 12 .5 U/A, Zoned R-5; Previ ously approved by Zon. Corn. 6/23/66. Denied by Bd. or Ald. 7/6/66 on objections from Qo V. Wi llia;;;son as i ncor;.sistent with . original Ada.r.1sville plan. ·Denied by Plan. Bd. Aug. 16. Deferred by Zon. Com. Oct. 19 . Approx. 6.r_5A. (includir.g school site of ab out 2.SA.) Promoter - Noyes Collinson, American Fri ends Servi ce Conrni ttee. Architect - Henry Horris. Is now interested in prefabs for this area, pending poss ible ul_tima te a cquisition by City for Rap id Transit . �21 .. HOUSING RCSOIJRCES COMMITTCE DATE J anuary 1,5, 1968 An Inventory of LOW Alm MI:Dill/1 COST HOUSING IN A'fLAIHA Recently Completed , in Developme nt and Proposed - -· Permit or C en t -- ~---~~---------~--~- Other Value c-9 .,500 O;;l!;", E. of Jonesboro Rd. Turnkey SE opposite facadonia Rd. 165A~tract zon~d R-4. Pro~oter cor.sidered Comnunity Unit Plan approach and gave it up as too complicated, in vieu of' multiple Oimership; excellent location. Proposed to H.A. for Turnkey. P.A is interested in only ,SO Acres. Pro~oters - Bill 1_,fo odward & Bob Cousir.s. Prom9ters willing to co::uni t re!'!aining 1151,_ at a reasonable price t o a land bank, thru a. nonprof it Housing Development Corp. Site being considered now by'Zir-.merman, :::Vans & Lea.pold for development under Comr,U11ity Unit Plan 5 C:C-l(D 150 T. side of Jacks on Turnkey or btway NH just south 221 d (3) bf Proctor (,'reek Co- op D 14.JA. tract Zoning now R-.5 SponsorOwner - A. L. Roberts, American Co~panies Deferred ~y Plan. Bd . Aug . 16. Deferred again Oct. 11 for study of plans. Sponsor contactsd and advised of inadequacies of Plan. Eade appointr.:ent to come in to discuss revision. Did not show • Called Dec • .5 to advise that he is still interested in gettir.g this tract zoned to A-1. Advised that proposed Land Use Plan proposes this site as Open Land. Plan. Dept. (John Uatson) advised Jan. 11 1 68 of status of this tract and made recor.u..endation for A-1 Zoning • . . - li • I I I ! l I I I . t . . I • I I . �22 HOUSING RCSOURCES COHH ITTCE DATE January 15, 1968 An Inventory of LOW ,11.tm MCDIUM COST HOUSI NG rn ATLANTA Recently Completcd v in Development and Proposed Ite~ r Ko. u nits ' -~-·_o_,~:....-_i;_c__..,. J~xl s ~-- 3C-ll Desi0nat icn L(: :::ation Pro ~ram Monthly Prr.ts •. Estimate 1 No. Bedroc;ns or Rentals When j Pcrmi t or -y ~- 2-M-3 · 1 ·-~·2 - · 3 Ava ilable . Other Value 1 '~---------....J'----: -- -- - - - - . _p - . . - - r··---n ._ ~ -~- - l . of -Boulevard SE ands . of Pershing Dr. adjacent to ellswood Apts. Turnkey - -•..- a-.-.o::. - - Corr,rr,ent _ __,_ _ _ _~ - ~ ~ - - - - - ~ ~ - ~ -~ 20A. tract zonf?d A-1 Qi.mer - ~Jells Appvd. by HUD for Turnke;f. Owner has not agreed to sell for this purpose (Boggs Aug. 9). ?remoter - Nicholas Ber~an, Adar.JSCates Developer - James P. Jones, Colur1bus, Ohio Land cost too high; Developer is attempting long term lease for n::; is now exploring tax: angle. Opinion of City Atty. obtained and provided promoter and H.A • ... BC-12 175 ~ast side of Jonesboro Rd. SE Just Horth of Circurni'erential) D '3C-1J D 50 I l i I Il Turner Momunenta Block bounded by Church Project 3oulevard Dr. SE -Ioward St. , Hollman St., Saunders St •. Turnkey or 221 d (3) lSA. tract. · Requires rezoning. Sponsor - ? Approved by HUD. Ovmer has not agreed to sell. (Cost of land prohibitive.) Housing for EJ.derl. Turner l-1onumental Church AHE Pastor Rev. C. C. Huges Desires acquiring property near church for construction of J0-50 units. Heeds seed money • . Real C:state aeent ( Bob ~;at thews) who was working on project died suddenly. �23 HOUSING RCSOIJRCl:S COMMITTCE DATE J anuary 15, 1968 An In ve nt ory of LOW JI.HD MEDIUM COST HOUSING IH ATLANTA Recently Cornplct cd 9 in Developme nt and Proposed -~------·---. Monthly Prnts. - Estimate Iteo :r1 No ! Ko. units Rc-...,-:t:xI_s_t ' rcs i "n a t ion ----~---·...;.', 0 BC-ll 260 L,,::c1t ion Propram No. B£> droo;11s or Rental s - T - ~·-2-A-:,~- l 2 I 3 - ~-- --- - -·- ----r---- ~~-J ____. . . .-.. ~ S. of· AHP RR ·J. of S. Expressway ~ ·- ----.., ------~ .. -.-.c.. - - When J Permit or Ava ila ble ; Other -~<:._lue · - --- - ~- l · --~------~___£__~~t-~--- 26A. site Propqsal by Wm. L. Haronker, 1.·!ard Realty Co. (9-11-67) Zoned n-6 ( Coi1. U.) Interested in promoting non-profit orgn. to develop. Good site. 221 d (3) Honprofit --..,----i-----~--------1------------ -:,--~--------·-- - - ----- __...;._____-+------i------~-------------. BC~; Ga. Teachers Devplopment Inc. 225 Land acq'..l.ired by Q.V. Willianson after turndo,m by HUD for Turnkey development. Aoul. filed with FHA for allot.-nent. 221 d (3) tlon-!,rofi1 .. ~ ) - - ; - - - - t - - - - + - - - - - - - - - + - - - - - - - - - - - - + - - - - --·~--"----'1--'.e--J-----l~--~-------1'-------l--------------------BC~6 Her;.i..an A. Russel Off Etheridce Dr. Property N.W. 262 221 d (3) F"tfA originall, reluctant to apprbire because of JI 244 t 65 75 ough teri ain a.rid bro;~ nity to Roe} dale. Has subsequen ,ly expressed willi 1Gness to r1 com ider , BC~7I 250 j i I I I I t iI S. of Oak Dr. SE E. of Empire Dr. 221 d (3) Co-op 1 18.6A. Applica tion submitted to F1L6.. Dec .. 28; Density 15 U/A Sponsor·- I. Saporta. Proposed rent includes utilities. Preliminary appl. submitted to IBA • . 25A. site now zoned H-1. Promoter - Robert La..-x:on. 0.mer - Lee Fore. Builder Victor Haslia. Developer - FHA Inc. FHA thinks 01'~. 1:!ard Ald. strongly opposed to rezoning . Owner wants property placed in "pac}cc~'ti.,u.-,e.Malcolm D. Jo.nil'" Housing Coord.'.fnator �LEON JAY MEYER I 142 JEFFERSON ARCHITECT - A.I.A. STREET SAVANNAH , GEORGIA 31401 TELEPHONE (9121 236-!5621 January 22, 1968 Mr. Malcolm D. Jones Housing Co-ordinator Room 1204 City Hal I Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Jones: Thank you for your cal I of the 17th. This is to confirm that Mr. McNamara and I will be i"n Atlanta on the 25th to meet with Dr. Harrison. If there is anyone else you feel we should meet at this time please let us know so that we may make our plans accordingly. Many thanks for your co-operation and interest. Yours truly, L~~-143.215.248.55 Architect • �HOOSM RESOORCES ca ffiE January 15, 1968 uvo~ .. or Panel tte t Technology ._ 30)13 . �2 . To: . .- .............. can t 11th tbi at ucb te on M\ntrtr-t.av, JtUU.iGl,"7 221 'l'hursdq J JQ.tnWJ' e dates I could t vith -• Pl LiA,,uu,S ion • hJOt vise alcolm D. Janes , Roan 1204, if Y'OUZ' P, can Ille, t. V th tb:i. . 2, I �MINUTES SPECIAL MEETING, HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE January 2, 1968 Special meeting sponsored by the Housi~ Resources Committee of key individuals involved in low-income housing, (in accordance with Item 1 of Chairman Alexander's proposals at the Annual Housing Resources Committee Meeting of December 14, 1967) was held at 11:00 a.rn. this date, in Committee Room 2, Second Floor, City Hall. The following invited participants attended the meeting: Mr. Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman Alderman John M. Flanigen, Chairman, Zoning Committee Mr. Collier B. Gladin, Director of Planning Mr. Howard Op)enshaw, Director of Redevelopment, Housing Authority, representing Mr. Lester A. Persells Mr. Gilbert Boggs, Direc~or of Public Housing, Housing Authority, representing Mr. Edwin L. Sterne Mr. Ralph Johnson, Chief Underwriter, FHA, representing Mr. John A. Thigpen Mr. Robert L. Sommerville, Olairman, CACUR Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr., Director of Governmental Liaison Alderman Rodney M. Cook, Chairman, Planning and Development Committee, Mr. Jim Crawford, Chairman, Atlanta-.F 'ulton County Joint Planning Board, and Dr. Vivian Henderson, Acting Chairman, Land Acquisition Panel, Housing Resources Committee, did not attend. Additional guests included Mr. William S. Howland, Executive Director, Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal, Mr. Al Roland,- Chief Appraiser, FHA, and several members of the press. Chairman Alexander presided. Mr. Alexander opened the meeting by explaining its general purpose i.e. to provide an opportunity for key individuals involved with low-income housing in the City to get together, compare notes, and exchange ideas with view to accomplishing more effective coordination. He advised that over all prospects are good for finalizing establishment of a City of Atlanta non-profit Housing Development Corporation, being sponsored by Mr. Lee Burge's committee, which, am0ng other things, might: �2 (1) Provide seed money to local neighborhood non-profit organizations. (2) Bank land for future low-income housing developments. (3) Assist in sustaining neighborhoods; and (4) Although officially limited to housing activities within the City limits, we hope eventually to involve the metropolitan area. Mr. Alexander then told about a non-profit organization that had recently formed, called Interfaith Inc., consisting of Catholic, Episcopal, Presbyterian and Unitarian churches, in which John Steinichen is the moving force. He urged that this group be given full cooperation by all concerned with low-income housing. Mr. Alexander then referred to the ten point s he had specifically mentioned at the December 14, Annual Meeting of the Housing Resources c.ommittee (included in the minutes) and announced that the Housing Resources Committee is interested in ~etting housing in all sections of the City. He then proceeded to raise a variety of points for discussion and called upon various participants for their views and comments on specific items. The discussion which followed was healthy and tended to pinpoint sane of the under-lying features which contribute to the difficulty encountered in meeting the City's goals for low-income housing, These all seemed to stem from the following factors, which evolved as the essence of the meeting: (a) Lack of any one body or individual empcn,ered to make top level policy decisions essential to the program and to see that they are carried out effectively, (The structural organization of the City, in this as in other fields, appears to be the primary cause. ) (b) Breakdown in communications and inadequate coordination of efforts of various Departments and Agencies involved in the program for carrying out a general plan to meet a specific time schedule , (c) The necessity for establishment of definite time schedules for matt ers essential to the low-income housing program~ For example: establishment of supporting community facilities; .wditional proposed Urban Renewal Projects; initiation of devel,opment of some units in areas already known to require l~i:QCOme housing, such as in Vine City and the Model Qi.ties area, even though . complete requirements and all specific locati~ .may not yet be determined. �3, Mr. Gladin was called upon to comment on the Model Cities Project. He discussed how his Department is trying to tie in housing requirements for five years with the Bedford-Pine and Model Cities areas; that exact housing r equirements for the Model Cities area are not yet known; that planning funds in the amount of $172,000 have been made available, whereas $500,000 was requested; that new housing in the Model Cities area is several years off, with the possible exception of the proposed Stadium site; that we have always had to wait until we could get into an area before any actual new housing could be built; that if we could get someone interested in the Stadium site , four decks of parking could be built between Capitol and Frazier Streets, South of Fulton, and development of a platform for housing above this; that the Zoning Committee has suggested that applications for re-zoning in the Model Cities area be held up for six months; that "we" are trying to work out Housing Code enforcement policy in the area during the next six months; that the planning stage covers twelve months from November 15, 1967; that a r evised work program proposal is being considered today; that the next deadline is May 1 for determining of types of treatment needed; the time from then to September 15 will be devoted to detailing (application due in to HUD t hen); HUD to review by October 15; that November 1 is the deadline for utilization of the first year's allocation of planning funds; that we should have an indication by the first of March of what our first year's development allocation will be; that initial development should be in areas similar to Hill Street and Grant Park that are substantial and which are not likely to change very much; that citizen participation is being emphasized; that citizens shouldn't feel that a plan has already been developed before they have a chance t o indicate their desires. Mr . Alexander expressed hope that there will be a positive effor t mad~ in accordance with t he plans developed by t he proj e ct Executive Committ ee, to invit e developer s to s ee the land that i s to be used for apartments, etc. Mr. Alexander then explained the proposal of attempting to locate Turnkey developments in s everal areas of the City and express ed hope that t he Hous i ng Author ity woul d make a posi tive effor t toward l ocating some of t he Publ ic Housing required. Mr. Gladin s t at ed that his Department is t rying t o come up with a pr oposal of perhaps t en sites f or Turnkey t o mee t our total r equirements and on which to get allo cations for the r emainder of the five - year progr am. He pointed out t hat we need a package proposal f or getting our total r equirements . Mr. Boggs stated that Public Housing may be pla ced in Ur ban Renewal projects, in t hose areas which the Hous i ng Authority owns the l and. Mr. J ones stated t ha t i n order t o get start ed earl y on additional housing in the Model Cities area we could a s sume that there is need for some Public Housing in the area and that perhaps some areas could be selected �now and started on, even if we do not yet know the total requirements; that it can be anticipated when so many people are to be dislocated, a certain percentage of them would need Public Housing. Mr. Alexander stated that there is apparently little use being made of Limited Dividend. Mr. Johnson said FHA has several projects under construction and others being considered. He cited Gartrell Court, College Plaz~, and Park West 1, 2, and 3, as examples. He also stated that there is a $32 million unused allotment in the Rent Supplement program plus $10 million additional and also. a $1 billion fund has been allocated by insurance companies for Rent Supplement and similar loans; that s everal Rent Supplements are under consideration in the area (one is in Marietta and four in Metropolitan Atlanta). One Atlanta Rent Supplement project is now under construction. Mr. Johnson said that FHA will consider row-type housing under 221 d (2) mortgages, if separate real estate entities exist. With respect to a suggestion that 11 Economix11 be used, Mr. Sommerville said he feels that "Econ.omix" will not work except in certain residential areas. Mr. Jones stated that an example of what he thought would work is townhouses which might be built in certain r esidential areas and cited as an example a 12-14 a cre tract in r ear of existing single family houses constructed on very deep lots in an R-5 area, on which he sugges t ed townhouses might be built; and that there are many other similar areas in the City which are not now serving any useful purpose and might be developed in this manner. Mr. Johnson said this is what he was talking about when he mentioned that FHA would insure row-housing under 221d (2) ; that the two main probl ems are getting the neighbors to agree to apartments being built and getting the land re-zoned for higher density.• Mr. Alexander asked if FHA foreclosure properties could be obtained and whether t he Housing Authorities could .run ads for such? Mr. Boggs said this could be don0 , but hasn't been tried here, that the Housing Authority is negotiating for l easing; 162 units have already been leased and that an additional 175 units are about to be leased. Mr. Alexander s t ated t hat some way should be set up whereby the developers could build public facilities such as schools, outfall s ewers, etc,., if needed to serve proposed developments, and lease them to the City until such time as the City is in a position to acquire them.• �s Mr. Sommerville comtnented that School Superintendent Letson said this is not legal in Georgia. Mr. Alexander stated that if this a good approach, perhaps the Georgia law should be modified; that if neighborhoods and cities could become interested in getting schools built , inadequate schools would not be a problem when new housing developments are built. Mr. Alexander expressed a desire for the School Department to be repres ented at the next meeting. Ya-, Jones advised that Dr. Womack of the School Department gets a copy of the Low-income Housing Inventory r eports every 60 days, but the problem is that by the time the propos ed locations get on the report, if the f acilities are not already provided for, it is usually too late. Mr . Sommerville asked if Georgia school funds could not be ~sed? The answer was not readily availableMr . Alexander s aid that Federal funds may be available for leases in t hese s ituations, as an e couragement to builders , and have been used i n other parts of the country; that the School Department would eventual ly buy the s cho.o ls • Mr . Alexander then asked wher e Vine City now stands in terms of the ef f ort t p ge t the Vine City Urban Re newal Project under way and if funds are avai lable ? Mr. Gladin said t hey have or ganized a communi ty group r ecogniz ed by the City. A r epor t i s being made by the City along with the group ; t hat an Ur ban Renewal Project is required to all eviat e problems in the Vine Ci t y area; t hat the s chool whi ch is under development there would give the City the l argest capital improvement credit to be used in meeting the City's one-third share of' t he cost of an Ur ban Renewal Pr oject; t .h at we have only about three years left in whi ch to take credi t f or thi s f acilit y, Mr. Alexander expres sed t he opi nion that t he City needs a t ime-table to get rid of the worst areas throughout t he City. Mr. Gladin admitted that the Nash-Bans Project is dragging; t hat SO% of his staff will soon go to the Model Cities Project; that the Planning and Development Committee should come back and ask the citizens what they want, or tell them that they should be willing to go along with an Urban Renewal plan to be developed by the Ci:t,y. Mr. Alexander then asked if this did not essentially resolve itself to responsibility of Mr-t Cook's Committee? Mr~ Gladin agreed that it did. �6 - Mr. Flanigen then asked why is there so much delay on all Urban Renewal Projects? Mr~ Gladin explained that delay in the Vine City area was caused by an attempt to involve people in the community; that we are waiting for them to docide what they want. Mr~ Alexander again emphasized the necessity for deadlines in planning and stated that he felt the City should move on its principal proposed projects in accordance with a time schedule; that it is well to involve people in the area, but they should be given a time limit for coming up with their proposals and if they did not meet that schedule, the City should go ahead and develop -plans and submit its own plan for the Urban Renewal Project; that if we are to eliminate slums, at some point the City must move into its worst areas, Mr. Boggs said authorizations by City government for Public Housing b another problem; and that federal funds can now only be used in an areaif there is housing and employment for the poor. Mr, Oppenshaw said that Federal funds are limited and that timing of submittal of projocJ;_ npplic~tion8 is all.inPortn.nt; that every Urbe.n RenewaJ. Project in Atlanta has been amended and that takes additional time. He then quoted figures as to the number of Public Housing units under construction and planned for Urban Renewal Projects, Mr. Johnson said that the Rockdale project now has an FHA commitment for 600 units; that FHA has reviewed the ( Central) Methodist Church plan md is ready to approve it; that the Ebenezer Church program is dragging; that according to the Housing Resources Committee Annual Report, the FHA 221 program is the furtherest advanced in meeting the City 's goals. Mr, Jones confirmed this. The question was raised about the slowness in getting housing started on some of the Renewal land sites. Mr. Oppenshaw said he had recently written to Mr. Rosen about this with respect to t he Rockdale Project. Mr. Alexander agreed to write a letter to Mr. Robinson about the Ebenezer Church project and also Mr. Rosen. Mr. Alexander proposed a Workshop t;, which developers and involved groups would be invited, to explain how we suggest developing this program, what we have available, etc. and that key Department Heads should also be invited. Ha asked for opinions as to this idea. Mr. Jones responded that he thought this might be very benificial. �7 In summary, the necessityfor over-all decision making; timing; and authority and res ponsibility for following through to get things done was the essence of the meeting. The meeting adjourned nt 12:10 p.m. Respe ctively submitted, .P / ·l..,6i'J..c :-::;-f!_t,.;-"·\~ :~ 1 ,J,.,~ l--C~-__......,.... Malcolm D. Jones ...,,,,.,,. I . Supervisor of Inspe~ion Services • �I - ,-. • - .' ·,· •. , , , / . I - • ,. . i~...,-., ,· V i ",,.., I t' / I Barricade at City I-Iall Th rrbu ·e 1\[;i~·or h ·;m Allen rlelivc rcd lo \lla nra alrlcrmen in his " .s:t atc of the city" .i ddre.s:s 11·a.s: mild in comparison with what he might h.w e s;i id. "Xnt ;i sing! majo r ro rrrcf ive or crc.ili vc prog r:im h:is conH' 011! of Cif y !fall wit h wh ic h to cop wit h ihr prohlrms of slum s and trc1nspnrta thln ." the 111:iyor rlrcl:irrd . Bui it"s rn' n wnrsc than that. Jn the right ,gains! slum blight. thr ;i!clerm  :rnic boa rd actu;i lly h:is been a hindrn nce. which dese rves se ri ous co nsideration i:; se lect.ion or mult iple sites sca ttered 1.hroughr)llt I he city's four qu adra nts for low-cos t. housin g. These sites would be submitted [or zoning approv;il as a package to avoid accusal ions that any one srction is be:iring more than it s reasonab le share of housin g for the poor. B ui. until the ::ilderm rn ge t some back bone rnd show somr initia tive , the mayor 's worthy program 1.o find decent housing for all Atlanta 's citizens will falter. s Th:it point w;is m;ide abundantly clea r in anothe r mild-spo?·en re port- one delivered l:i st month by the Housing Res0urces Committee, a group of civic le;i ders ;ippoin ted b.' tl:e m:iyM Lo e.·prdi :e his low-cost ho usi ng plans. The HJlC observed that almost all urban renewal land on which low-cost housing might be built already has been committed. Most other sites zoned for rnull.i-family use already are be ing used fo r that pu rpose or are prohibitively expensive . And yet there is reasonably priced vacant land in the city. It 1s zoned for other purposes, howeve r. This i.ndicrtt.es ," said HRC's annu al report, "that the bulk of remaining land needed for the program will have lo depend on rezoning of appropriate tracts for this purpose." • And there's the nib. Aldermen have been notably reluctant to rezone for housing for the poor-unless the site were in someone else's ward. In its repor t, the Housing Resources Commi ttee out! ined a broad-spectrum attack on sl ums, utilizing "turnkey," 22l and other privately developed projects; vigorous rehabilitation programs, leasing of privately owned bu tld ings by the Atlanta Housing Authority, add itional urban renewal, and close intergovernmental cooperation. A key and controversial recommendation ~: �January 17, 1968 MEMORANDU11 FOR RECORD Pursuant to instructions this date from Mayor Allen, I called a me eting at 2:00 p.m. this afternoon between representatives of the Developers of the Bankhead Turnkey site, their architects, the Housing Authority and the Water Pollution Control Division in an eff ort to resolve the sewer problem. pertaining to this site which was raised in a letter of January 12, 1968 to Mayor Allen .f'rom Sheetz and Bradfield, architects for the project. The following attended the meeting: :Vir. Jack Jones, Hr. McLauren and Mr. W. D. McGrath, H. L. Gobel Construction Company, Greensboro, N.C., Mr. Richard H. Bradfield, A.I.A., and Hr. Hatt Welsh, Sheetz and Bradfield Architects, Inc., Mr. M. B. Satter.field, Housing Authority, Mr. Robert H. i-Torriss and Mr. Raymond Adair, Water Pollution. Control Division. After explaining the purpose of the meeting (to try to arrive at a mutually acceptable plan for resolving the sewer problem in connection with this project) Mr . Morriss was called upon to present a proposal which he had made pertaining to this matter substantially as contained in his memorandum January 16, 1968 to Mayor Allen. Mr. Morriss also explained several other details related to this project involving requir ements of his Division. Mr. Morriss also explained that his proposal is subject to approval by the Public Works Cormnittee of the Board of Aldermen, but that the City's portion of the cost involved would come within his budget and that he had no reason to believe that it would not be approved by the Public Works Committee. I then asked Mr. Bradfield, Mr. Jones and Mr. Satterfield separately i f they were agreeable to the proposal presented by Mr. Morriss. They all said t hey were and agreed to work closely with :Vir. Morriss' Division in developing the preliminary and final plans (in so far as the Water Pollution Control Division is concerned) for the project. Mr . Bradfield asked for confirmation in writing from Mr. Morriss of his proposal and inquired when could he get such. Mr . Morriss replied t hat he would provide Hr. Bradfield with a written statement of his proposal, including a sketch of t he area 1whi ch was used during t he mee ting 1 and that he would get this out t omorrow. He also agreed t o provide me with a copy. As there was no further business to transact in connection with t his particular issue, the meeting was adjourned at 2:40 p.m. ~ct'l-~'1. ...~.....aMalcolm D. ~~ Housing Coordinator �J.i. LTY.ROUNDUP '-< U l ,,, .,.• 1.../ I ·/~ , " ,.; -) I ~ ,/o Ae e y Ilv T0:'11 WALKEfl .-\11anln j ou rnnl Hc:1 1 1-:5 1:tlo J,:clilor Fm·nishcd mode.ls of a projc tcd S3 million, 200-unit, SouU1wc.sl J\ll:rnt, cooperative (own hou.,c dc\·clopment " i ll be availabl fo r inspect.ion ns~t nonth , Phil Di::imoncl of Di::imoncl and J,; 1 _·e Building Co. sai d. Tl:~ London Towne Jiou,;es are lth '. l ··d ;1t. Boulde r Park Dri\·c 111d Gordon Hoad . In add ition lo the rcsidenli::i l units, the de\·clopmcnt wi ll include a pri\·atc club house. '.The tO\m houses )Vill r ange in price from $59" per month fo r one-bedroom units to $105 per month for four bedrooms. A cooperative development is 01rned by the residents , with each member having a vole in the corporation which owns the property. TIIE l\lOi\'THLY purch ase price includes principle, interest, insurance, maintenance and taxes . Total down payment on ~ondon ~owne Ho~se unit is ,·J.1.J , i\fr. Diamond said. In the cooperatfre, a board of rurectors made up of residents will establish the sta ndards and requirements fo r living in the community. Diamond and Kaye are metropolitan Atlanta's bigges t developers of cooperative apartments . They have constructed some 700 uniLs. The London Towne Houses are being built wilh an FHA-insured loan. Ci tizens & Southern Xational Bank is providing the _construction financing. A display and information office is located at the London Tmrne Houses site at 3242 Cushman Circle SW. It is open daily from noon until 8 p.m. Mr. Diamond said the cooperative apartments which his fi rm has developed have been "enormously successful." They are not only full, " he said, "but there is a long waiting list for each cooperative. We think cooperatives provide a fair and hon,,.:;t approach to housing and an enjoyable way of life." Blonder Elected Gerald A. Blonder has been elec ted president of the Security '4 i) .' • r• r, ! 7 '.' fl 0 Dr\· lopmr nt and Invcstnwnt Co. , ,1n At.l a11ta-bascd cons truction comp;rn y. Other o[ iccrs are David Berkma n, ex ecutive l' · vice pres ide nt; Robe rt Towler, vice prc:- id cnt, and Bruce R. · Davis , secretary. Security Development owns and bu i l cl s apartm ents in mrl rupol it.an All anla , and currcnll y Jias under construction 5~0 apa rtm ent units. An add itiona l 500 uni ls are schedu le~:,,J. ~ million , '.:00-unit, Sou!11- I \H'.,t Allan 3 coopcr:iLi\·e (own '10.1- .:! d.:-1·clop111rnt wi ll be :ll'ail.1,,'::- fl' · inspc2Lion n~~t JJlOnlh . I' ··: l)i:uncmd of Di:imond and K 1:- c Bu1.di11g Co. s:iid. Th,• Lo:1do11 Towne llo11scs arr I 1 .1,,' :it B0t1ldcr~ark Drive  ? 1i Grnlon Hoad. In addition to the residential units, the den .'!epmr : t will include a priYa k club house. · The 10·, 11 houses ,,iJl r ange in ;iricc from $59 per month f,,r one-bedroom units to $105 rwr month for four bedrooms. A cooperative development is 0-.111rd by the residents, with <'Jl'h member ha1·ing a vote in ,>rporaLion which owns the I ptilC'1·0;il'rty. ! i\10 ;TllLY purchase includes principle, inter, r.~t, insurance, maintenance and 1 t:ixes. Total down pay111ent on 1 :i,..London Towne Jlouse un it is I ~J:Vi . .i\rr. Diamond said. Jn the coopera tive, a board of directors made up of resi1dents will establish the standards and requirements for living · in the community. . Di:imond and Kaye are met1ropol1 i.an Atlanta's biggest deI 1·cloj1ers of cooperative apart1 mr nts . They ham constnicted TIii:: I rrice I IS0 lll~ 700 units. The London Towne Houses are being built with an F1IA-ins11red loan. CiUzens & Southern '\alional flank is providing the construction financing. A d~~pl::Jy and information of-· fice is locntcd at the London To11 ne Houses site a t 3242 Cu. hman Circle SW. It is open da ily from noon until 8 p.rn. i\lr. Diamond sa id the coop- , era!ive apartments which his finn has developed have been "enormously successful." They are not only full," he said, "but there is a long wailing list for each cooperative. We think co1 operatives provide a fair and ho:1•.sl approach to housing and 1 an enjoyable way of life." 1 Hlondrr Elected Gerald i\. Blonder has been I::cc. I.(·~ presid: nt-~the Security 1 I �C ITY OF A.TLA1""1.TA_ HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE ROOM 1204, CITY HALL CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR June 28, 1968 CECIL A. ALEXANDER, Chairman Housing Resources Committee MALCOLM D. JONES Housing Coordinator Dear Housing Resources Committee and Housing Coordinating Group Members: . Since July 4 falls on Thursday, the regular monthly joint meeting of the Housing Resources Committee Executive Group and -the Low-income Housing Coordinating Group for July will be held Tuesday, July 9, 1968, at 10:00 a.m. in Committee Room No. 2, Second Floor, City Hall. We hope that you will be able to attend this meeting, as several interesting developments in the low-income housing program are under way and will be considered. · A return address postal card is enclosed for your convenience in informing us whether you plan to attend the July 9 meeting. Sincerely, 143.215.248.55--.fi~ Malcolm D. J~~ Housing ·coordinator Encl: Postal Card , �ATLANTA, GEORGIA PHONE 522- 4463 June 3-1 1968 From Malcolm D. Jones, Housing Coordinator To : yor The llen tt-acbed nt teri· 1 erta · ning to pplication of Housing Code En orcement and the "In R •1 ur 1 t OmllllOllt O y Ul" ct. �r. Colli r Gl din Jun 26* 198 · 1 ult nous itb · unit on uob Non- :rofit t t~ do r _t ., �r. Colli r Gl dill. J'un 2., 1 ff ettv n v rifle lpful 1·n pnpul ti o . inc . r, ly , o. 0 . COOJ' i. / C I �HOUSING R SOURCE ITTEE C 1204, CIT BALL June 25, 196 TOt r. Cecil A. Al nd r.,, Ch ir Hou in R ources Co ittee R C ntly .l d· n tb t acr county itb r nt "c1t1 . , within t of h th· 1 to to provtd · 11 c · taciltt1 b �------- ---- EMORANDUM June 25, 1968 P ge 2 of d elling units , but by and large they should be ge red g ner lly to lo and moderate income f 111 s. hiob ould h ve siilarities in back round, education nd nviron nt, in ord r to for a cohesive residenti 1 co unJ.ty. r . Budg ns dv1sed t the is bl , ready and willing to under~ake such project in one of the neighboring (parhap Dougl s) Counties, provided it is det r ined th t th City (ad inistration) isbes to move in tbi dir ction and ill 1 nd ctive support to such n effort . Anotb r d v lopEr, endel Ro n , Jr., h s t I ed ubst nti lly the sa xpr s d by r . Hudgens. on sever 1 occassions voicing id as nd conclusi.o ns to b V d not in th., tr nd nd 11 r 1th e gener 1 h eon b 1nv1t to t let d roup four yor, to furt r ~plor Malcolm D. Jon Bou in coo~di toz �A source close to the House Committee said that members who attacked the measure viewed it as a frill in light of proposed Federal spending cutbacks of $6 billion. He ~lso cited the difficulty of defining "new communities," as opposed to housing and commercial developments. On other items, the Committee followed the recommendations of its housing sub-committee. It tentatively approved an increase from $1,500 to $3,000 in the maximum renabilitation grant for lowincome home owners, compared with an increase to $2,500 as proposed by the Administration and approved by the Senate. And the Committee okayed ' 2 related amendments which would provide rehabilitation loans and grants to home owners in areas of substantial blight outside urban renewal and code enforcement areas a~d would authorize rehabilitation assistance to home owners in deteriorated neighborhoods whosq,roperties are uninsurable under proposed riot insurance legislation . .. \\ ��• • LIVE CARE-FREE ... M~INTENANCE FREE!! AH this is yours in a ... LONDON TOWNE HOUSE ATTRACTIVE EXTERIORS ... Your London Towne House and those of your n~igbbors will always look attractive and well-kept-with a minimum of time and attention. The exteriors are of aluminum siding and face brick . .. exterior d!llots are protected by aluminum screen doors ... patios have side privacy fences. BEAUTIFUL GROUNDS ... When you move into your Towne House, you move into a completely landscaped home. And what a wonderful place for children! -with safe, fully equipped play areas provided. All streets are paved .. . with curbs and gutters ... and ample privat , lighted, off-street paved parking areas serve residents and guests. DELIGHTFU INTERIORS ... Inside each Towne House are a host of desirable custom-type features. Here's everything you've always wanted in a home- BED.ROOM .. . Peaceful sleep is assured in every bedroom because extra care was taken to Sound Condition the walls of your town house. The huge master bedroom is typical of the spaciousness you will find throughout. furniture finished wood kitchen cabinets with formica counter tops; full size Hotpoint refrigerator and luxurious Sunray double oven tri-level gas range; hardwood and parquet flooring throughout; exhaust fan in kitchen . .. some models with extra half baths; twin round sinks set in six-foot marble type vanities with plate glass mirrors in the bathrooms; foldfag closet doors; copper plumbing; some with full basements; balconies; and gas forced warm air heat. NO ADDITIONAL MAINTENANCE EXPENSES .. . You save money living at London Towne Houses because your home, except for interior redecorating and any improvements you may decide to install yourself, is maintained for you with all costs included in your low regular monthly payment. And all plumbing. heating, electrical equipment and appliances supplied with your home are repaired and when necessary replaced for you at no extra cost. BATH . . . With such features as a marble top vanity with twin sinks, the classic richness of dram atical ! styled bathrooms will bring sighs of delight from admiring guests . KITCHEN ... Start with a giant Hotpaint refrigerator, add o beautiful color coordinated tri level oven and range, mix artfully with beautifully grained hand rubbed wood cobinets and you have the perfect recipe for the most ultra modern kitchen ever designed! �Lon on owne Live Like Never Before In A Honie of Your Own . Cooperative housing has spread rapidly across the nation because it provides more luxurious living than a single family can afford by themselves. Year 'round maintenance is covered in your monthly payments. Such tireson:ie chores as lawn and shrub care, plumbing, h ating and electrical repairs, mamt~nance of all community areas are taken care of for you by the cooperative management. Living in a London Towne House is a new carefree living experience. But now, you may wonder, in this era of rising prices, can a family find so much luxury at so little cost? ouses The answers lie in three important categories. 1. "Volume Buying" . . . made possible through cooperative home owAership purchasing power. 2. "Land Utilization" . . . in Townhouse living arrangements, expensive property is utilized to its fullest extent. 3. "Low Interest Rates" ... especially designed for this program. You don't have to be a millionaire to live like one. If you can qualify make the smart move into a London Towne House. London Towne Houses are located in a fine residential area near Gordon Road just off Boulder Park Drive and Brownlee Road. LONDON TOWNE HOUSES Ideally Located Churches of many denominations are convenient to Cooperative residents. Nearby are Shaw Temple (A.M.E. Zion), Union Baptist Church, St. Paul of the Cross Catholic Church, Jackson Memorial Baptist Church, Radcliff United Presbyterian Church, Southwest Christian Church, and Berean Seventh-Day Adventist Church. Several shopping centers and late hour convenient curb stores are located nearby to provide residents of London Towne Houses with all the services and necessities for comfortable living. Downtown Atlanta employment and shopping is also only minutes away via the Interstate 20 Expressway. London Towne Houses is near a number of city and private schools for children of all ages. West Haven, Margaret Fain and West Manor Elementary Schools, as well as Harper High and South West High are easily accessible to the London Towne Houses location. Under construction are the new Peyton Forest Elementary and Simpson-Hightower High Schools. Within a few miles of London Towne Houses residents may enjoy a variety of recreational activities including tennis, golf, baseball, swimming and picnicking. Mozley Park, West Manor Recreational Center, Adamsville Community Building, and Washington Park Tennis Center are presently serving this area. Two new Parks to be loca ted on Peyton Road and Collier Road are scheduled in the near future. For those golfing enthusiasts the Adams Park Golf Course (18 hole) is just four miles away. ��COMPARE THE ADVANTAGES OF MODERN COOPERATIVE LIVING AT London Towne Houses LONDON TOWNE HOUSES IF YOU RENT FROM A LANDLORD COOPERATIVE PLAN IF YOU OWN AN INDIVIDUAL HOUSE MONTHLY COST Your monthly payments are amazingly low. You pay only actual costs. Your la ndlord charges as much as he can get. Individual buying means higher monthly cost to you. TOTAL COST Costs are cut to the bone; longest mortgage term, special low interest rate, controlled builder fee, no closing costs . Your rent includes high cost of commercial construction, financing, and landlord's profit! Individual mortgages have higher payments, higher interest rate, uncontrolled profits, substantial closing costs. OWNERSHIP The residents are the sole owners of the property. You occupy the towne house of your choice as long as you wish . You own nothing ( except a pile of rent receipts). You own-and are completely responsible and liable fo r -your house. LIABILITY You have no personal liability on a mortgage or note. You have no personal liability. You are personally liable for the mortgage and note. MAINTENANCE Your cooperative takes care of your towne house inside and out ( except for redecorating). You have no control over maintenance standards . You ar~ full y responsible for all costly repairs and mamtenance. MANAGEMENT E~ch co-op family has one vote in election of directors. Business affairs are handled by a professional management firm . You h ave no voice whatever in the management or policy. You alone are completely responsible for all decisions ... and mistakes. COMMUNITY CONTROL You help establish policy, rules and standards for your community. You have no control. You have no jurisdiction except in court at your expense. IF YOU HAVE TO MOVE You give 60 days notice. Your co-op will purchase your membership, or sell it for you, for a small fee to cover overhead expense. You are bound by the lease drawn up by the land lord. You must sell your house yourself and pay large brokerage fees. EQUITY The value of your membership increases under an equity formula written into your co-op bylaws. You can m ake improvements in your towne house and garden area and get credit for them on resale. You deduct from your income tax report everything paid for interest and real estate taxesalmost two-thirds of all you pay. For the average member this deduction will make possible a savings of about $ 1O per month if you itemize your deductions. You ga in no equity. Whether you realize any equity depends on market factors beyond your control. Any improvements you are allowed to make belong to your landlord. Same as co-op. You get no income tax benefit. Same as co-op. · IMPROVEMENTS TAX BENEFIT . ..• CAPITAL GAINS If you sell a house and then buy a co-op memhership, you obtain the capital gains deferment benefit. You must pay the full capital gains tax. Same as co-operative homeowner. REPLACEMENTS Money is waiting in the bank in your reserve funds to replace items as they wear out. The landlord decides when, and if, to make replacements. Yo:.i have to foot the bill for replacements. �WHERE YOUR MONEY GOES ... Each penny in your monthly payment Your Exclusive London Towne Houses Community· Club House is carefully allocated to provide you with the finest housing at the lowest possible cost . . . all on a non-profit basis. Your monthly payment covers all expenses and reserve funds . . . there is nothing else to pay and a subtantial portion is tax-deductible. special purpose rooms there is also a convenient coin operated laundry as well as a main lounge and kitchen. Serving as the focal point for social life and Community activities your London Towne Houses Club House will provide many hours of enjoyment. The London Towne Houses Community Clubhouse and recreation center is available for you and your guests to enjoy various activities planned throughout the year. The Club House building contains the London Towne House Cooperative office and in addition to various Mortgage Interest ____________________43 % Real Estate Taxes ____________________ 16 % Mortgage Principal __________________ 19 % Maintenance ____________________________ l 2 % Reserve Funds ________________________ _s % WCOHY Administration __________________________ 5 % Landlord's profit _____________________0 % 100 % COOPERATIVE COIN LAUNDRY tax deductible items 15 °x 19' ' COMMUNITY I MEETING RECREATION HALL • I 38'x 19' I COOPERATIV E 12·x 12' MANAGEMENT OFFICES u 'x 12' LOBBY MEETING 13'x 12' ROOM CLUB ROOM 13'x 12' .... PORCH -- --- - - reprinted from t he Internal Re venue Service Official Instr uctions �LONDON TOWNE HOUSES WILL BE A COMMUNITY, OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE PEOPLE WHO LIVE THERE. N I These questions and answers tell how it works. WHAT IS A HOUSING COOPERATIVE? A cooperative is a business owned by the people who use it. You may belong to other co-operatives, such as credit union or mutual insurance company. Each member of London Towne Houses has an equal vote in the cooperative corporation which holds title to the property. A Board of Directors is elected by and from the residents. The Board establishes standards to keep the community a pleasant place in which to live. IS IT LIKE RENTING? Yes, in terms of convenience. You make one payment a month - easy as rent _ without worrying about insurance, taxes, mortgage payments or mainten ance. It's luxury living without a landlord, therefore, cooperative
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 11, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 5, Folder 16, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_016.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 16, Complete Folder
  • Text: I Sk'lls Trai • g, uca o , and Area evelo men Experience and capability in innovative programs with people, government, and industry �Training and Education To respond to opportunity, opportunity must exist. For many Americans the lack of opportunity has been an awesome reality. Economic deve lopment of our depressed areas and natural resources is important; development of our people is mandatory. Thiokol has grown in depth of knowledge and experience through early commitment of our total Corporate resources to America's socioeconomic struggle. Through an innovative social engineering system, Thiokol helps convert the unemployed to motivated taxpayers with a future. Our nation's growth will be greater tomorrow by creating employment today. sk·1 s ra·nino, Ed calion,a d ea e . _____ eI Program experience demonstrates Thiokol's unique capabilities Thiokol training programs are, for the most part, job placement-oriented. In some instances, such as the tenant management training program in Gulfport, Mississippi, jobs are not the end result. But regardless of the objective , all Thiokol training is based on the following principles: 1. Every trainee has individual capabilities and learning rates. 2. Each training program has unique objectives, trainee population , and organization structure. 3. Each training program is a complete system since it is an assembly of people and materials unified to meet a common goal. Programs, designed and conducted by application of syste ms anal ys is, provide individ ual ized instructi o n leading to specific objecti ves and invol vin g all components of the EDO training concept. Educational Products Robert L. Marquardt Vice President Economic Development Operations Th iokol Chemical Corporation 2 national socio-economic problems. The EDO technique of total area development includes: 1. A thorough systems analysis of the community or area to be developed or redeveloped. 2. Preparation of a detailed technical plan outlining the tasks required to achieve the objectives of the program . 3. Implementation and operation of the program . Emphasis is placed by the company on industrial plant location , including product market analysis and housing and recreation development . Complete training programs offered in this total development concept include curriculum development , housi ng occupancy, basic educational , vocational , and-social skills training . Necessary rapport also is established with other private companies, and with local and federal governmental agencies to coordinate efforts needed to solve problems. I tml IB ,,11, _,,., Area oevelopment Thiokol's successfu l systems management experience gain ed by Thi okol as a lead ing aerospace syste ms producer gives t he compa ny an unmatched capab ili ty to def ine a nd help so lve loca l, state , national , and even inter- Because of the growing general need for vocational and basic educational materials, EDO established its Educat io nal Pr oducts organ ization . It i s staffed by c urric ul um experts from many academic and technical disci plines. These highl y qualified educators have ex perience in bot h traditional and unu sual t raining-educat ion situations . The Educati o nal Pro du ct s fac il ity , located ,n Ogden , Utah. produces educational material for use in Th iokol programs an d for distr ibution through publ ish ers an d ot her marketing fi rms. 3 �• Basic Education Basic education must impart to trainees the academic skills req ui red for successful job training and placement. The content of Thiokol basic education courses is geared to individual vocational courses. Both remedial and advanced courses are offered, dependent on the needs of the trainees. Courses currently being conducted in the various programs include read ing, mathematics, communication skills, personal development, high school equivalency (GED), and driver education vocational Training Training and Education The Components Thiokol vocational training prepares trainees for entry level positi ons within a cluster of job skills. Specific courses offered in each of Thiokol 's1 many programs are based on the projected manpower needs in those fields for the following ten years. Specific job positions provide the basis for organization and operation of the vocational training course. As a contingency, "step-off" achievement levels are built into each course to facilitate placement of trai nees who do not com plete the program. Individualized courses currently being offered in the various company programs include electronics assembly, weld ing , surveying, hospital services, clerical , baking, meatcutting, cooking, farm equipment operation, sheet metal processing, refrigeration, air conditioning , plastics patternmaking, plastics molding, plastics reinforcement, machine shop operation, and automotive services. • counseling and social Skills Counseling and social ski ll s developme nt are vital compone nts of Th iokol training . Accep t ab le behav iors are reinforced and the new attitudes and perce ptions required for a welladjusted life are developed . Group counseling techniques are used to all ow trainees to test their views and behaviors and to receive critical react ion or su ppo rt from th e i r pee r s. Wh ere the nee d e x ists , ind ivid ua l counsel ing procedures are implemented. Tec hni ques utilized include the use of ro le playing and simul at io n games 4 and problem-s o lv in g situations to provide trai nees with models of real life experiences. on-The-Job Training In addition to the vocational training component, EDO also can offer t raining in actual job situations. Thiokol training emphasis is given by demonstration, appl ication , and practice. On-the-job training avail able includes such positions as cabinet assembler, medical assistant, machine shop operator, teaching aide, metals and welding technician , offset press operator, air condition ing and refrigeration technician. Home Management Skills Th iokol t rains entire families in the procedures and skills needed to maintain a home. Subjects taught include maintenance, housekeeping, landscaping , budgeting, and pu rchasing . This content provides instruction for individuals and famil ies experiencing life in a new home for the first time . Add itional remedial and en richment courses also are offered those trainees having a need or interest in a particular subject. • Placement Several thousand graduates of Thiokol programs, have been placed in jobs related to thei r training. Many others have gone back to high school or col lege; or have entered the armed services, for which they had not been educati o n ally qua lif ied be f ore train ing . Thiokol is placing more t han 250 men and women in productive jobs each month throug h its prog ram graduations and the operation of its job placement ce nters. Curric ula and objecti ves of each Thioko l v ocational tra ining program have been prepared to conform to the job descripti o ns found in th e Department o f Labor Dictionary of Occupational Titles. Graduation requirements meet these descripti o ns, assuri ng jobs to those who successfully co m p le te the train ing . c1earne1d Job corns Urban center Clearfield, Utah The Clearfield Job Corps Urban Center provides a residential program of total trainin g for economically disadvantaged yo un g men 16-1 / 2 to 2 1 years of age. The Operation was established April 1, 1966. Cu rrent trainee e nrol lment at Clearfield is 1,350, 200 of whom are designated as stu dents of t he Advanced Corpsman Institute for Para-Professi onal Train ing. Academic, basic educatio n, classes are geared to the vocati onal t rain ing e ntry level of each indi vidual and include read ing , mathematics, personal developme nt, language arts, and drive r ed ucation. Each corpsman is assigned to a dormitory with 31 othe r corpsmen and a resident counselor. There he re cei ve s g roup and i ndividua li zed counsel ing. Avocational activities are co nd ucted d uring w ee kdays afte r classwork and on weekends and holidays. The average corpsman is enroll ed at the Ce nter for a peri od of eight to ten months. While the re, he earns $30 a month. The federal government sets aside an additional $50 a month to provi de the corpsman an adj ustment allowance betwee n the time he completes his train ing and until he earn s hi s first regu lar paycheck. More than 2,500 former unem ployables have completed the program and have taken jobs, gone back to high school, or gone into the armed forces. Many also have gone on to coll ege enrollment. Du ring the first two years of operat ion, more than 50 enrollees graduated from hi gh school wh ile at the Ce nter. More than 300 earned GED certi ficates and 200 enrolled in college. VOCATIONAL CLUSTERS Automotive -Automotive and smal l engine repair and maintenance. Plastics- Courses in plastics molding, reinforcement, and patternmaking. Food Services-Complete meatcutti ng, baking, and cooking skills training. Metals and Welding -Training in gas, arc, and tungsten inert gas welding techn iques. Medical-Personal health, sanitation and safety , fi r st aid, and hospital attendant t rainiog. Agriculture- Training in farm equipment operation and maintenance; farm landscaping, constructio n, and maintenance ; and livest ock f arm hand. Air Conditioning/ Refri gerationSheet metal, refrigeration , and ai r cond it ioning skills training . 5 �Trainees get practical experie n ce as para-professio n al teachers , counse lors and recreational assistants. Advanced corpsman 1nsmu1e for Para-Professional Training A need tor well-trained para-professional recreation, teaching, and counsel ing assistants became evident early in the Clearfield Job Corps Program. This need, fo und to exist also throughout the ed ucation industry, led directly to establ ishm e nt of the Clearfield Advanced Corpsman Institute tor ParaProfessional Training. Teaching Technique Th ioko l's systems analysis techn ique couples social ski ll s developme nt with job-related skills train ing. Trainees are c hallenged to develop their potential by systematically looking inward, assessing their aspirations and goals, and experime nting with new behaviors. Simul ated interpersonal confronta6 tions typical of real-life situations force the trainees to react. These reactions then are reviewed for their effectiveness in coping with the situation . New reactions and patterns of behavior are ex plored and practiced . Thus , enrollees are involved in training that emphasizes creative ways of solving problems. This small, group-oriented program provides a supportive atmosphere in which both social skills exposure and theory are integrated . Such training techniques as microteaching, closed c irc uit te levision , and role playing are introduced to the Institute trainees. On-the-job exposure also offers them the oppo rtun ity to practice their newly developed ski ll s in public school c lassrooms and in other work situati ons. Awareness of se lf, concern tor others, and helping others lea rn to d eve lop their ow n potential are all f oca l points of th e training . Placement Several hundred corpsmen have completed the para-professional train ing at the Clearfi e ld Job Corps Ce nter. Approximately sixty-five percent of these young men graduated with high school diplomas or general equivalency certi ficates. Twenty perce nt of the graduates have gone on to college, while another fifteen percent complete mil itary obli gatio ns before resuming social services caree rs. Graduates from Thiokol 's Institute have been placed as counsel ing, personnel , teaching, and recreati o n aides in Job Corps, Peace Corps, VISTA programs, and in other projects and programs sponsored by the Office of Economic Opportunity. They also have accepted employment with t he Utah State Employment Commission, the Washington State Social Services Office, the New York State Board of Education, Thi okol 's GATE H ouse (Job Corps p l acement office), th e Dall as and St. Louis Em ployment Security. Offices, the Seattle Publ ic Schools, the Newark Public School System , the Bellevue Mental Hospital in New York (chil dren 's recreational therapy), and the Juvenil e Detention Office in New York City Co u nter cl ockwise : N ewly arri ved st udent.and fami ly, gets f i rst m e al at Cente r . S tuden t g overni n g body d isc u sses student projects . T rainees learn w e ld i ng . o the r t rades . Program concept Roswell Emo1ovmen1 Training cenrer Roswell, New Mexico A lack of vocational and social skills has prevented many American Indians from attain ing proper levels of productivity and social standing . Their training and adjustment from inadequate or primit ive housing and a state of unemployment to permanent employabi I ity is th e basic goal at the Roswell EmploymentTrai ning Center, where the train ing period averages nine months. No rmally more than 500 trainees are enrol led continual ly. An outstanding feature is the moving of total famil ies for t he fi rst time from the hogan, pueblo, o r igloo to a single family house on the Center following training in how to occupy and maintain a home. The Cente r provides vocational, related basic ed ucational. home livi ng and soc ial skills training to volunteer sing le adults and entire fami lies from all the nation 's Indian t ribes. As many as 3 7 such t ribes from a dozen states have been represe nted there. We ll equipped nu rse rie s and structured train ing are included for pre-schoo l age ch ild ren. Training Clusters The vocational training classes, supported by exten si ve classroom work in the related basic educational subjects, inc lude automobi le mechanics, welding , e lectron ic s asse mbly, cl e ri cal duties, survey ing, high school GED, drive r trai ning , nu rsing, and personal development. 7 �·hiO I exas, Inc San Antonio, Texas President's Test Program Thiokol joined the President's Test program to provide manpower training and new jobs for the hard core unemployed of San Antonio , Texas. This was one of the five "target" cities chosen to pilot-test the program that would provide jobs for individuals economically handicapped by inadequate education or other problems. Thiokol responded by acquiring two San Antonio businesses, Tex-Wood Cabinet Company and Empress . Brick Company, with which to establish its training-employment operation. Thiokol Texas produces kitchen cabinets and manufactures decorative ceramictile . The two operations have been relocated at a single 3-1 /2 acre plant site, where training and production efforts are proceeding. Training the Hard core unemployed Thiokol 's Operation Turnkey trains disadvantaged in normal living arts and home making . At least 100 new jobs are being created at Thiokol Texas , Inc. Thefirstphaseoftraining is designed to build self-confidence. Trainees are taught to think positively and as winners, attitudes completely foreign to most. In directed group seminars, the trainees discuss their thoughts, expectations, and fears . They define for themselves the meaning of success. Language laboratories equipped with audio tape recorders improve the reading and speaking abilities of the trainees , many of whom speak mostly Spanish. Basic job skills training is designed to build further confidence. Trainees visualize, verbalize, and apply what they have learned during the lesson. Peace Corp s v o lunteer survey ing for new farm road in Iran . Training tor Other companies Gulfport, Mississippi The Center also will design and conduct similar training programs for other companies and government agencies. scope 01 Program Photo : Peace Corps . Thiokol initiated this first-of-kind training and research projectto help the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in a program designed to assist lower income families become successful homeowners. Many such families now occupy homes in Gulfport and have lease pu rchase righ ts to these structures. The objective of the training program is to provide tenants with the organizational and social skills needed to maintai n the housing . Intensive pre-occupancy and occupancy trai ni ng designed to meet specific needs of the homeowners incl udes counseling, budgeting , and financial management. This training increases the likelihood of later successful homeownership. Thiokol research from this pilot prog ram will enable HUD to institute similar training th roughout the co un try Manual skills training class leads to Peace corps Training Programs 8 Thiokol 's highly successful Peace Corps training prepares volunteer trainees to live and work effectively in other cultures. Volunteers have been trained for service in Iran and Libya. The Thiokol training creates immediate and sustained trainee involvement, presents highly individualized instruction, gives the trainee the responsibility for his own learning , and provides him with an underlying methodology that serves to help relate and interrelate all aspects of training . Language training is based on an audi o-lingu al technique that also includes ro le playing , sit uational exe rcises, an d cultural simulation . Many of t he geographi cal reg io n and crosscultural studies also co nsist of role Thiokol 6UIIPOrl Tenant Management Irainino playing and situational exercises. In addition , the studies include group discussions or problem solving activitives involving the role, requirements, expectations, and problems of the Peace Corps volunteer in his job, his assigned country , and community . Training takes place in small group settings where learning is creative and participative. Interaction, self-analyses, evaluation of experiences, and problem solving behaviors of the group all stress the importance of each member's role as a resource . Each member compares his reaction to various experiences with the reactions of others of the group . He also gauges his understanding of material and concepts, ideas, and opinions with those of the other members. Homeowner Association --- t A Homeowne r Assoc iatio n orga nization will be organized during the Thiokol training to stress se lf-government of the tenants of housing develo pme nt as a sig nificant phase of the prog ram. 9 �changes necessary to' provide a c lean America. Economic Development \ computer Technology I ~!' Area I oeve1oomen1 The back cover of this booklet locates Th iokol 's c urre nt ope rati ons and service lo ca t io ns , devoted to aerosp ace , c he m ic al , indu stria l , and econom ic developme nt o pe rations. Its Corporate Headquarters are in Bristol , Pennsylvania. Due to remote locales of some of the pl ant sites, it was necessary to uti li ze systems engin ee ring techniques in area developme nt. An example is Thi okol 's Wasatch Di v i sion (cap it al asset s exceed ing $1 00,000,000) located 30 mil es west of Brigham City, Utah , in valleys of the Promo ntory Mountains and B lue Sprin gs Hills. Complete area development requ ired techniques identical to those needed in urban area deve lopment. These incl ude bu ildings, roads, power transmission sys t ems , potable wate r supplies, ai r qu ali ty , waste water treatment an d renovation , disposal of solid waste s and garbage, neutralizatio n of che mi cal and other industrial wastes, sanitation , heal th, and safety measures. 10 Advanced computer pro.grams and computer capability facilitate the effectiveness and efficiency of every training , research , business, and technical service operation under EDO. Student accountability and progress data are retrievable on a daily basis. Statistical programs prov ide rapidly analyzed data to aid in behavi oral research and training evaluat io n. Employee payroll, accounting , inventory, and other business operations assist management in every department. Computer system s, including the IBM System / 350 Model 50 , that meet the needs of varied organizations, ex pand the capability offered to our customers. These computerized se rvicesand numerous others are available and are recomm ended because of proven valu e in design , impl e mentat ion , and e valuat io n o f any EDO se rvice . Environmental Research Thiokol co nducts research in material and method systems technology to provide low-cost h o using m ee ting essential health an d safety standards. This techn o logy includes th e important ho usi ng-related social concerns of lower-in co me famili es. Studi es of possibl e structural systems utilizing nat ive reso urces for remote area housing for Indi ans and Eskimos are being co ndu cted. Thi oko l also is participating in researc h studies to develo p improved eq uipment and syste ms necessary to m e et t he r eq uire m e nts o f f e d e r al , state, and loca l gove rnm e nts in the co rrectio n of sani tatio n and health defic ienc ies resul tin g from wate r and air po llu tio n. Primari ly , Th iokol promotes the deve lopment and uti li zation of improved equipment, more effecti ve chemica ls, and a co mplete systems approac h in Thiokol 's di rect approach to solving socioeconomic problems and utilizing systems techniques in area development has been successful in stimulating economic development in both urban and rural areas of persistent unemployment. An e x perienced Thiokol team works cooperatively with governmental agencies and community groups in con d ucting market research , natural resource studies, personnel and plant location surveys, transportation studies , financial and training studies, organizational surveys, and schedules for implementation. Model Cities Planning Ec~ omic Development Operations is consulting with the various levels of federal , state, and local governments in the application of systems management and computerized techniques in Model Cities planning programs. The broad aims and objectives of the Model Cities program are : 1. Rebuild or revitalize large slums and blighted areas. 2. Expand housing , job, and income opportunities. 3. Reduce dependency on welfare payments. 4 . Imp rove educ at io nal facilities and programs. 5. Combat disease and ill health. 6. Reduce incidence of crime and delinqu ency. 7. Enhan ce recreati o nal and cultu ral opportun ities. 8. Establi sh better access between homes and jobs. 9 . Gen e rall y impro ve living condition s fo r peopl e w ho live in such are as. Custome rs of EDO Bureau of Indian Affairs Dept. of Commerce Dept. of Labor Dept. of Health , Education, and Welfare Housing and Urban Development Office of Economic Opportunity State and Municipal Governments Governments Abroad Other Industries of chronic unemployment. Trainees were placed in group situations where they tested new behaviors, received immediate critical reaction or support from their peers , and planned for needed change . Early successes led to the i ncorporation of a social skills development concept in all of Thiokol 's training programs . The resultant increases in successful training and placement prompted Thiokol to offer the Social Skills Development Kit to other companies engaged in training the hard core for employment. curriculum oevelooment Curricula and related teaching materialsdeveloped by EDOand formulated through the systems approach emphasize and utilize the latest learning theories and technology. Any of the following services can be provided by Thiokol : • Task analysis to determine curriculum co ntent. • Curri culum o ut lines. • Linear prog rams. • Training kits . • Models. • Audio-visual materials designed for specific applicati ons. In-service instruction training programs and curriculum implementation . All curriculum materials developed by the Educational Products organizati o n are fi e ld tested and validated in one or mor e o f Th i ok o l 's training programs. social Skills oevelOoment Kil Through its training experience, Thiokol has learned that the maj o r problems of the di sadvantaged are the ir inappropriate and in effective work be havi ors. Pri o r to trainin g, the majority of the e nro ll ees had histories of failu re and lacked self-co nfidence an d t he effective mea ns of dea lin g wi th job related proble ms. Thi okol appli ed t he principles of group pro bl em so lvi ng to t he d il e mma The Kit consists of a complete series of exercises, games, and simulation materials design ed to provide hard co re une mployed trainees w ith the desirabl e behavi ors , and social skills needed to stay on a job. The Kit contains complete trainer direction , teaching aids, and trainee material s needed to support a forty hour learning laboratory for fifteen trainees . Each exerci se is written explicitly to assist t he trainer, eve n those havi ng onl y marginal experience in leading group discussi on, in conduct ing th e co urse . The course outline covers th e following major topi cs: • Trainee Orientation • Basic Work Habits • Interpersonal Skills • Co mmunicati o n Skills • Pro blem So lv ing • Goal Settin g Punctuality , atte ndance , and personal appearance are also stressed . Tra in ees are taug ht to gain and accept respo nsibility, to co mmu nicate and liste n w ith un de rsta nd in g , to take pride in perso nal hab its , to look positive ly at superv isory re lationships, and to deve lop a pattern of overa ll success at work, at home , and in the co mmunity. Audio-Visual Instructional Programs Varying educational levels are inherent in student populations of all training programs. This fact necessitates g re at emphasis on audi o-visual techniques for use in individualized instruction . Although use d e xt en sively , each media is researched completely fo r specific stud e nt impact and program applicability. The highly experienced staff of EDO media specialists ensures proper use of audio-v isual techniques, which include 16mm motion pictures, 8mm an d 16mm sound and silent continuous loop singl e topi c films , 35 mm slid e and film st rips, progra mm ed instructional material , overhead tra nsparencies , au d io t apes , an d e le c tr ica l transcriptions . Compl ete photog rap hic, illu strative , and so und rep rod uct ion facil ities are availabl e at EDO, w here eac h phase of d e v e lo pmen t is ca rr ied to the " master co py " leve l. Reproduction of addi tio nal co pi es normall y is subcont racted to establ ished compan ies. Many trainers fee l th at vocational progra ms shoul d utili ze t he actual hard ware appli cable to the desi red ski II posit ion . Al t ho ug h soun d , th is conce pt is not always pract ical si nce act ual equi pme nt , besides be in g ex pen sive, is not always th e most effective way to d emo n strate ope r ational c once pt s and prin cipl es. Work in g mode ls of equi pment that have proven to be highl y effective in instructiona l situations have bee n deve loped by Thiokol. These devices, fabricated of transparen t materials, all ow students to see pa rts relationship , sequence of ope ration , and flow of raw materials. 11 �Economic Development Operations The world of people is part of the Widening World of Thiokol Operations and Service Locations AEROSPACE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Astra-Met Division Ogden , Utah 84402 Operation Headquarters Techn ical Services and Educational Products Ogden , Utah 84402 Elkton Division Elkton Plant Elkton , Md. 21921 Bri stol Plant Bristol, Pa. 19007 Georgia Division Woodbine, Ga. 31520 Huntsville Division Huntsville, Ala. 35807 Longhorn Di visio n Marshall, Texas 75670 Reaction Motors Division Denville, N.J. 97834 Wasatch Division Brigham City, Utah 84302 District Offices Washington, D.C. 20006 Huntsville, Ala. 35801 Dayton, Ohio 45402 El Segundo, Calif. 90245 Lancaster, Calif . 93534 CHEMICAL HeadquartersTrenton, N.J. 08607 Moss Point Plant Moss Point, Miss. 39563 Thioko l Chemicals Limited Coventry, Warwickshire , England Thiokol Canada Lim ited Burlington , Ontario , Canada Thiokol Australia Pty., Ltd . Sydney, N.S.W. , Australia Clearfield Di vision Clearfield, Utah 84015 Roswe ll Division Roswe ll , New Mexico 88201 Thiokol Gulfport Tenant Management Training Gulfport, Mississippi 39501 Thi okol Texas, Inc. San Antonio, Texas 78208 INDUSTRIAL The AFA Corporation of Florida Miami Division Miami , Florida33147 Owens Division Palatine , Illinois 60067 Dawbarn Di vision Waynesboro, Virginia 22980 Delta Corporation EastGranby,Conn . 06026 Dynastar Laboratories Denville , N.J. 97834 •Humetrics Corporation Los Angeles, Cali f. 90064 Logan Division Logan, Utah 84321 Panelyte Industrial Division Trenton , N.J. 08604 CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS P.O. Box 27 Bristol , Pa. 19007 WASHINGTON OFFICE 839 17th St. N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006 Additional information about the Economic Development Operations and its many services can be obtained by contacting : Mr. Bernie R. Diamond, Director, Program Development, Economic Development Operations, Thiokol Chemical Corporation , Post Office Box 1619, Ogden, Utah 84402, Phone : 801 / 399-1191 �,~' . l t ' - ~ ~ • '·2.7· I I �, ! ! / ~r?d ' Q,-7 /V,J..:i ~/ \) 2.1, '7 ~C/l!J~) /::;,..Jrj4/Vl4' ~~Hf I p ~ ~ -w ;;/ l'n ed o.--f ( fM-acJ. ~ JI ;, oei fl?~ c.J~ • t:Y-1 A1 ;.,~to- ~Yl-'- ~~t._, C e,,u I ~ "'Id J'lc~ f;,v ~ gtJ fl di~ ;) ~ f µ,,.s' # f_ I~ ~v~)/ /'~ ~ ;I #~ .iha.r-e. .. I Z ~ ~,,,, 'k /J;Tend . }), ~ ��DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS CITY HALL - 8th Floor ATLANTA 3, GEORGIA Supervisor of Inspection Services DATE MEMORANDUM T O : - - -- - - - -- - ~ ¼ ~ ~~ 4,/47/ r / ~ , c1" ,..,_.. 7~..s:f. N .. J.~ uJ •• · ~ ' ~ ~ �DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS CITY HALL - 8th Floor Supervisor of Inspection Services ATLANTA 3, GEORGIA DATE - - - - -- ,,C?g_ ) ~ MEMORANDUM TO, . ~-,.~ J. cJr~3C/3/3 ,t/~ j-~ 't I;"'~ a-dd i ~ .., ~ ~I$, 'H; , ~~ r. ~ / ~~ ~ t),- . ~at.I.~~ FORM 4·H·11 1v1r �Department of Planning MEMO FROM: Collier Gladin DATE: July 25, 1969 TO: _ _ _D_a_n_S_w_e_a_t_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ TIME: _ _ _ _ _ _ __ D For your information O Please make necessary reply 0 Advise status of the attached Attached for your information 1s the position paper on the Residential Manpo-.yer Center in Uptown Atlanta prepared for Buck Benner of OEO. FORM 30-13 �WESTERN UNION SENDING BLANK CALL LETTERS FJT 6/2 4 /69 ~~ARGE Mayor's Office, City Hall Mr. Barry J.Argento Chief, Program Deve lopment Division Job Corps - OEO 1200 - 19th Street, N. W. Washington, D. C . The City of Atlanta welcomes the establishment of Inner-City Resid e n t ial Manpower Center here. It will serve a critical need for skills training of women fr _o m among the disadvantage d. Our cooperation with OEO, Labor and other agencies is pledgedo Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor Send the above message, subject lo lhe terms on back hereof, which are hereby agreed to PLEASE TYPE OR WRITE PLAINLY WITHIN BORDER-DO NOT FOLD 1269-(R 4-55) �ALL BY E SU 'ECT TOT-IE FO-LO' INC T R S: HIS CO r t ti• i ,..'C .. C t 'l l, •t:i. D ,,_ { r •'d,e ' " •1•0 ~t: '. appl;, to j), "~~ 1 1 flO,t <:( t!Jf! H 1 <' i- u., ...- uc.r.•LJ to,. n 11.c; • • 1t c, !tr r h ,Jr uch n. r "', c 1 lo 2 A. \f . fortlcllHrytbe rollo,rlm;:awrnlr.c. •L r.a:l 101, th:w ltt 1, !c a..:n o:- 1J y L<:tttr rat . INTERNATIONAL SE!'lVICES FULL RATF: (FR) Tl, pr, d r. tt'!'t n ,tll· ovcnc or\"lcc. ?-.by be \\Tltl~u In c~de, clp!l.cr, lD !< th:l"I c,r lo :&.D),' l!.Jle~c e,s., LCTTER TELEGPA•/1 (LTI J r u·,l·.w,rb~r:.1.1r.t.u: u.:i. m~ ,. .ath:i.lr-ratt". Mln.!mumcl!:ltb.,;fOrZ~wo..'\!sappllel. SHIP RAnlOGF:Ar/1 11.,r n, < t a.11J rrom J.I~ t eC'i. �WESTERN UNION SENDING BLANK CALL LETTERS FJT 6 / 24 / 6 9 ~~ARGE t Mayor's Offie e, City Hall Mr. Barry J . Argento Chief, Program Development Division Job Corps - OEO 1200 - 19th Street, N. W . Washington, D. C. The City of Atlanta w . le ~es the establishment of Inner-City Residential Manpowe ereo It will serve a critical need for skills training of wome from among the disadvantaged. Our cooperation with OEO and other agencies· is pledged. iqJo-/ Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor Sencl the above message, subject lo the terms on bock hereof, which ore hereby ogreecl lo PLEASE TYPE OR WRITE PLAINLY WITHIN BORDER-DO NOT FOLD· 1269-(R 4-55) �{ THIS COMPANY AR ·'1 l' \I T •c: ~1.-.r 1 Cuu p .~.J tor .J\ - t: tu'1 . n, 0 T t - FOLLOW! G T SUBJEC I! ,, t:.1:1 l.d CQrT , ~ lo --t tr ' C' .h.c.f U. \ 1 !1 t1 J -.ud.1 r CLASSES OF S!::RVICE DOMEST'~C SEP.VICES INTCRNATIONAL SERVICES ~ELEGRAM lu f DAV LETTER (DL) A ,,t r1 rrcd Dl .-day rdt'l' t lo;; r:i.t .• SHIP RADIOGRAM I<, &nL _ _ _ _ _ __ ~ ants you to call 0 Returned your call D Left the following message: D D Is here to see you Came by to see you J~I/~;./.,_______ Time _ _~/ -...,'3........o~ _ a . m. / p. m. Date: _ _ By------~ - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - FORM 25•5 �Thi .. i~ :i :·.,-.r mc-, ~.i- · .· unlc,_.: i:~ ,1c~·. ·:r(·.! . ..·h. ict cr i:;: in,: i..:.H1.·. J l·y rh .: p ;;opcr symt,o !. '/ , P . Mi\R S H ,\LL ._ ,,\ !/{M A N OF TH C 0 , )/\n0 u TJELEGRAl\11 f) f. ... n .1y Lc tr c r N L ... N1g hr L<'rrcr · . R. W. McFA LL LT = lntrrn:,tinn:11 Pn r,;::; I DCNT Lener Telegram ® T ht (d in,: ri::lc :-lh·rn n :.l :b. ,:.: re lin e o n ,l,,mcs ti( cclq;r:uns is LOC,\L Tii\iE :a po inc of or igi n. Time o f receipt is LOCAL T il\1E :i.c po int o f dcc; tin:uio n = = = 1024,:, E· 3 67 .a.L!-50 U.. YO'" J L Z2 lL Z2 1 l PD ATL AN - G 13 ~ti. CO ~-. JC~'::'.S HO SI G 10 RESO :iCE C CI I [-~,:.ll ,~, A ~v C "T! - ~.: (" z143.215.248.55 13:19, 29 December 2017 (EST)s TH N ' RT!-~'7E S 1C ITTEE UD NG PERRY H • ES sco s CR SS 3 ~~,~~OLN Oi'1 S A JD BO TO H~l S AR E CONCERNED OVER YOUR ~-:-.: ..,. ,..,:• -o --1E ALDER ANIC . ZO NG CO MITTE,.. DENI A 0 ?Ai :E (; ~ ZC "'~ G ON ~ E ROWNTOWN ROAOo WE CON S IDER OU~ SE L\IE: S AS GOOD C TIZE 1So WE SUPPORTED YOU IN YOUR ELECTION FOR MAYOR ('.!VAN AL EN c WE tJOULD L KE TO SEE AD QUATE HOUS ING PROVIDED . . EVERY C.i.T .Z E OF ATLAN -Ao O - HI S END WE ARE CALLING AN E ERGENCY ~Eu!NG -Hrs UE SO Y AUGUST ~5 9 - 5 PM T HE NORTHTJJEST PERR Y HO. ES Eo O Ao CE TER 9 ~27 HOLLV[,J OD RO D . WE WOULD BE MOST ·PPREC ~IVE F YOU WILL PRE SET ALONG WITH ANY INTERES ED ~MBZR .. C, T' .:. REZON ING ORDINA, CE FOR THIS AREAo FOR ADOITIO AL sF120ItiJ~c@RMAT:,N YOU ~ AY CONTACT MRS GEORGIA. HOLLOWAY 799""'.9322 0 u CLASS O F SER VI CE T his is a fo st r.--:.c .. !-.l[!'.C unl ess ia ddcrrcJ .:-h:ir~ tee r is in d 1c:,t cJ by_t' c p :opcr :>ymbo!. W. P. MARSHA L L CHAI R MAN OF THC BOAR D TELEGRAM 0 SY !v!SO LS L =- O.,·: :..ctrc: r NL - :,. .,; 1,: h , Lc:rr c: r R, W. McFA LL. PRE SI DEN T ® The :il.n ,; ":-r.c shown in rhc d,rc line on domestic rclcgrams is LOCAL TIME nr point of origin. T ime of receip r is LOCAL TIME at point of dcscinarion _P/ 2 LL Y011 LLZ2 LLZ2 MRS OD SS D HILL ~ CHA IRMAN LINCOLN HOME S CIV IC CLUB INC 1RS f'RA!\ KYE S MP SON CHA IR MAN AREA BLOCK 4 LINCOLN HOMES COMM I TV, ROEZRT DOBBS CHAIR 1AN NORTWJEST PERRY HOMES E O Ao ADVISORY co:-..'. - TEE AND MEMBER COMM U\!ITY RELATIONS COMMISSION - -· - - . �HOUSI RESOURCES ITTEE Civ Hall Roan 1204, August ll, 1967 orandum Toi M or Allen co t Th Jon s ction of th Zoning .LI.l..l.ttee yester wu.. . in turning down ths re~oning Sl. acre tract off Brovntu k the Board of Ald~.. ._-....u.. to de.for action on thi peti.tion, rather than to turn it own, hen it c e before th · t 21. �)961 This l s,,:wtJ,1.,1, ' to policy beC!aWte Respectively, colm D. J Bm:i19r,;r1.Jrcno HDJ/ sll of Inepection 1'1AT_, ·~g �August 9 1 1967 HOUSING RESOURCES COMMI'ITEE Memorandum To: Subject: Members, Executive Group, Housing Resources Committee Report on Vacant Land in Atlanta The attached report (Encl. 1) has been provided by the Planning Department upon request of HRC (July 6 Executive Group Meeting) for total acerage zoned Apartments, Commercial, Industrial and Residential. (Tabulation of vacant acerages by Land Lot and District which accompanied the report has not been reproduced.) Totals for each of the above zoning categories have been tabulated in pencil on first page of the report to facilitate overall comparison .. The report shows the amount of vacant Industrial land to be approximately 3 times the vacant land zoned for multi-family and 6 tfmes the vacant land zoned · Commercial. This appears to be excessive in view of current immediate needs of the City, particularly for low income multi-family development. The report also indicates that vacant land zoned Rl-4 is approximately 3 times that zoned R5-9, The latter category only is applic~ble to low income families, which apparently constitute the majority of families in Atlanta. For detailed comparison between the HRC July 5 Analysis of vacant land zoned for apartments (tabulated from Zoning Map previously provided by the Planning lepartment) and the Appendix which accompanied the attached .Planning Department report, see Encle 2·, attached., Encls t ' 1.. Memorandum from Planning Department dated July 21 2. Comparative Tabulations ' I �. ' .. . .\ .:.-:.-: CITY OF ATL~TA . / ·.. CITY HALL ATI..A.NTA. OA. a03oa Ttl. 522·«63 Ar11 Co6d Brawnto,m Ro ('JISlJ;)anJ' ,;;J.Ui,Lll.lo."' I I I con t.ruction o£ �1~· ~?~ ====~- --~~- - -404/351-4325 [Q)=u COMMERCIAL-INDUSTRIAL-ACREAGE SALES SUITE 113 - 1705 COMMERCE DRIVE, N. W. - ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30318 November 16 0 1967 Mro Hami l ton Doug las 0 Jro , . Attorney Na ll 0 Miller 0 Cadenhea d & Denn i s 24 J 4 Nati on al Ban k of Georgia Bld g o Atlan t a 0 Geor g ia Re : Brown town Re - z onin g De a r Earn , Unde r separate cover t he Plan nin g De partme nt i s send ing y ou a c opy of the Nort hwest Brown t own Area Nei g hbor ho od Study Re p or t , and also a t wo pa g e check l ist of which City Depar t ment is to b e con tact e d re gard i n g the recommenda t i ons in t h e r e porto I t alked wi th Dan Swea t t h i s mor n i n g 0 and h is b e s t jud g eme n t is tha t we ha ve a 50- 50 cha n c e of success f u l re -z on i n g. S i nce y ou will nee d to know the s tatu s a n d pro jec ti on s f or sewer, schools, and recreati on; he suggests t h a t y ou tak e the prime responsibility in ge t tin g .u p-t o - d ate -0n wha t commitments can firmly be made and wha t commitments will ha v e to come in the next b ond issue. Hopefu l l y t he l att e r will be a reality b y the time the Brown town pr oje c t is c omp l e te d t wo years from n ow. We are in the pr o cess of s etting up a 9 :3 0 A . Mo meeting on Wednesday, Novemb er 22nd with Dr. Womack and Mr o Satterfield so that we can get bo t h of t h em t o agree on the school site and on the Land Use Plan o I will le t you know wh en eveTyone has committed themselves t o the 2 2nd meeting date , and would like to suggest t hat you make arrangements to attendo When you have had an opp ortunity to review the Browntown Study, I would appreciate your comments. Sincerely 0 , .,_J I { • •' r (. William Ho Woodward WHW/lm Copies: Mro Matt Bystry Mr o Bob Couslns �i . ' .. C TY OF A TLA TA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 October 30, 1967 JACK C, DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER Mr. Collier B. Gladin, Director Department of Planning City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia SUBJECT: Neighborhood Study for Northwest - Browntown Area Dear Collier: My staff and I have read with interest the preliminary study of community problems in the Northwest-Browntown Area of Atlanta. Havinq been asked to comment on the contents of this report, our observations regarding the problems, needs, and recommendations included in the report are set forth in this lette r. To beqin with, we would like to comment on the several references to Gun Club Park. Early in the report it is stated that Perry Home s has virtually no City recreati onal facilities and programs and v e ry limited access to those in other areas (Page 5). While the large Gun Club Park will serve a s a community park for the entirn study area, it was acq uire d primar ily to serve the r esidents of Pe1:ry Ho mes and i s located i mme d iately adj acent t o the Perry Homes Pr oject. Further, t he report make s several references t o Gun CJ. uh Park o e ing a n · inao.equ a t e and poorly d e v eloped park (l?a9es § , 6 ,10 & 11). T'h,~ report st:a 't;es t h at what h a s been bui;l..t: shews little a ppreci a tion for the p refer e nces o f the loca l re side nt s, t h a t plans s h ould b e d rawn up in s uch a ma nne r that the l ocal resident s can hav e a v o ice in sel e c ti n g the t y p es of f a cilities to be erect ed in the park (Pages 6 & 12) . Befo re c o nstruction began on any of the development of this par k , a master plan, which incl uded nearly every facility y ou would fi nd in a community p ark as wel l as a recreat i on building and s wimming pool , was completed. The rr.c1ster plan for Gu n Club was d i scu ssed o n two occasio ns with Perry Homes citizens and o ther area residents. (This is the procedure! followed prio r to development of any new park. ) The Perry Homes citizens asked for and endorse d tennis courts. The park will (Cont'd) ..,, no) ' I •I• V ,-;;r.:R01 1 1rl)f'•Y , I x 1 no 1 • 11,• y �... ,·, Mr. Gladin October 30, 1967 -2- include many facilities such as basketball-multi-use courts , (included in the present phase of construction now under way) which have not yet been built. For financial reasons, we must develop all new parks in stages over a period of years. In most cases, the first phase of development includes few facilities above ground that can be seen. Most of the money goes into preparation of the site, utilities, sewers, and underground storm drainage during the first phase of construction. The first phase of constrµction of Gun Club began on April 11, 1966, and was concluded in February 1967. This phase cost $83,4!56.00 and included the following items: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Clearing and grubbing Rough grading - West- area Utilities - water - sewers - lighting Drive and parking Sidewalks Two tennis courts Playgrounds Fencing and retaining walls Restrooms Storage buildings Concrete benches Landscaping - trees and shrubs Finished grading and grassing. On Auqust 4, 1967, construction began on phase two of development, estimated to cost $52,206.00, which includes the following items: A. In the South portion of the park 1. The remaining portion of the parking lot 2. The addition of landscaping 3. The multi-use court area 4. The play hill and related play area 5. The erection of playground equipment and structures B. In the North portion of the park 1. The day ~amp ing areaB and related parking 2. The grading and establishment of an athletic field with two baseball diamonds and a football field 3. Entrance drive and parking Phase two development, mile scheduled for completion in December, 1967, is running behind schedule due to technical problems but should be completed in early 1968 . This department recently received a windfall of $350,000 . 00 from the S1:ate to purchase park land and for capital improvements in exist:Lng parks. On July 26, 1967, the Aldermanic Parks Committee appro,red the allocation of $75,000.00 (the largest single allocation ' to any one park) for further development of Gun Club Park. Our original plans were to attempt to secure matching funds from the Federc1l Government and, if successful, build a major s ize swimming poo l c1nd bathhouse estimated to cost $ 150 , 000 . 00 . In the meantime, howE~v·or, a study group has been organized to prepare a park and recr ec1tion survey and plan for the entire city with projected needs ,' 11 x,~nol '"f' - - f (Co nt'd) ( xi- Ao \'"' (.ll•Y ; ( xi-Qo 1 ' ( ' l)" V �Mr. Gladin - 3'. - October 30, 1967 according to population trends, etc. through 1985. This comprehensive study is a joint effort of the Community Council, E.O.A., the Parks and Recreation Department, and the Planning Department. Staff personnel £rem each of these agencies are devoting considerable time to this project, which should be completed in late December, 1967. We have asked this group to study the Northwest area first and attempt to determine from the area residents their preference regarding the swimming pool or a community building. It should be emphasized that we only have $75,000.00 allocated and our regular community buildings, which do not include a gym and would not be adequate for the population, have been costing approximately $85,000.00. Feder~l assi st ance .i s not ava i lable for thG construction of a recreation building as such. In order to qualify for Federal assistance, a building would have to be a complete neighborhood facil:Lty offering various services other than recreation. Further, it should be pointed out that the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation is the only Federal agency that approves grants for swimming pools; and, B.O.R. funds allocated to the State of Georgia being rather limite d, we have no assurance of Federal a~iisistance in the construction of a pool. We welcome and solicit comments from citizens• group:3 in the Northwest - Browntown area concerning their preferences. In reqard to Center Hill Park, only $20,000.00 has been allocated; and, ,:1gain, we shall attempt to secure matching Federal funds. Center Hill Park, being an older park, has no design plan. We intend to develop a master plan for this park, including the improvements you have mentioned in the report. There are references throughout the study of the lack of recreational services in the public housing projects, to the insufficient distr:lbution of recreation leadership, and to insufficient recreation leadei~ship due to poor development of recreat i on facilities in general (Pages 5,6,10,11 & 12). This Department has realized for many y ears the need for recreation leadership in public housing projects and we have never been able to secure funds to pay salaries of recreation leaders in these projects. However, during the summers of 1966 and 1967 we were able to provide recrea t ion l ea d ershi p through our contract with E.O.A . in Perry Homes, Bowen Homes, and Gun Club P ark. We have provided recre ation leadershi p at Scott School for appr o ximately th irty years. On a number of occasions, we have ch ecko d out other schools in the area only to find that none are des i gned for other agency use . Several years ago we attempted to p r ovide r ecreation leadership at Whitaker School only to be asked t o leav e when the p r incipal at Whitaker School objected to our staff bei n g t h ere a nd even secur ed petitions f r om area residents demand i ng we wi1:hd r a w our progr am . In rega r d to poor facilities fo r r ecr eat ion pro grams , a tremendous i n c r ea s e i n appr opriations to park s and r e crea tio n \Tould .be n eces s a ry be f o r e we c o u l d begin buildi n g a n d sta ffing needed r e cre a tion c e nte r s . The c o s t o f s ta ff ing o n e r e creatio n center properly would be a minimum o f $17,29 0 . 00 annua lly. ·' Thi B :;tudy refer s numero us times t o l a ck of communication b e tween c itiziins in the Northwest- Browntown area and the Parks Department . While communications h a v e been l es s than p e rfect, we have on .many c,c cas ..ons discusse d Gun Club Park, play l ot s , r e cre ation leader ship , e t c,, Hi th civic l e ade r s , including one or more listed in the (Cont'd) �r . ·: ': . Mr. Gladin ,·. • ' .' -4- October 30, 1967 Special Planning Committee, and with Mr. Arthur Smith, Housing Manager of Perry Homes. I believe I am correct in stating that no community in Atlanta has had more consultation regarding parks and recreation. Any suggestions for improving communications would be greatly appreciated. We sincerely appreciate the efforts that have gone into the NorthwestBrowntown area study and suggest that copies be sent to each member of the Parks Committee as well as the Park and Recreation Study Group. Thanking you for the opportunity to comment on this report, I am ordially, neral Manager of Parks and Recreation JCD:lq x,-,1ol r- 1J t •Y f f l\ ' ... ~ no ' ( ll ' y ,. �( - ( - J J- �~- - -- - - - -~ ~ ~ . ~".- ~ ::'"- -T. .:,,..--::..i;.•·.; .6----- .,1-,--·- ·. -..,. _ -._,,.- .,. _• . ., . . ·.--_._.· .__.,..._.. ... . .- , J,_. ,. _ __ _"J.._., , L• • , . • - - - - - - -- - ~-- , -. ~. -24- 1 Another aspect of this situation is that various city and county service agencies very rarely plan projects 5-10 years ahead. Of course, it would be • I ideal if they were involved in long-range planning so that they could anticipate problems rather than respond to them as they occur. But due primarily to limited funds, the agencies are more or less compelled to respond pragmatically to community problems. The value of this report then is that it tends to make up for the lack of long-range planning for various city services. Through its assessment of ... community needs and its recommendations, it can be of invaluable assistance to public officials by pointing out what needs to be done to meet existing problems and foreseeing future needs in the Browntown Area. RECOMMENDATIONS In order to eliminate existing deficiencies and bring about orderly growth in the N. W. Browntown Area, it is recommended: '· Schools (1) That a vertical addition to Archer High which would increase its capacity to 2000 students be placed on a bond issue by Spring, 1968. (2) That an elementary school site be included for any new housing project_s approaching 300 units or more in size. (3) That planning be started now for the construction of a new high school in the area as population increase d~mands it. ( 4) That plans be started now for the construction of a junior h i gh school on the already acqu i red site located west of James Jackson Parkway as popu lat ion incr e a s e demands it. Parks and Re cre at ion (1) That a ,. r equest f or a neighbo rhood park fo r Linco ln Homes be p l a ced on the next bond i ssue. (2) \That the City find a means of paying all of the .personne l costs needed t o maint ain recreational services in Perry Romes. I ~ , ..: �-25- ! ' (3) That plans be started for securing funds to build a community club house and fully equip Gun Club Park as a community park. (4) That plans be started for the development of a community park to the west of J _ames Jackson Parkway as population increase demands it. (5) That plans be started for the development of at least one more neighborhood park in addition to the two already proposed for the area. (6) That the Parks Department be prepared to expand and improve upon existing parks and recreational facilities as population increase demands it. Sewers (1) That· the Sandy Creek Improvements Project be :i,nitiated as soon as possible in order to bring about the major solution to most of the sewage and flooding problems in the area. (2) That until the Sandy Creek Improvements Project is initiated whatever temporary solutions are feasible be implemented to alleviate sewage conditions before large new housing projects are constructed. (3) That a plan of action be developed to identify and aid the owners those homes which are too poorly situated near Proctor Creek for anything economically feasible to be done about their sewage and flooding problems. of Other Facilities (1) That a public transportation study be made to specify problems faced by residents in terms of access to library, health, and employment facilities and to recommend feasible alternatives for resolving the situation. (2) That the City make a conce ntrated effort to upgrade street and tr·a ff ic facilities in the area, including the ere ction of traf f ic facilities at needed inte rsections, the construction of street lights in unlighted residential areas, and the general maintenance of clean and well paved .streets. (3) That efforts b e made to attract to nearby industrial area s firms that · would genera t e employme nt opportunities fo r local residents. (4) That t he Cit y requ i r e that deve lope rs of any publ ic housing p r oj ect s i n in the area hire local residents first in recruiting workers • . General (1) That l ocal community groups es t abl ish t he nec essary organizational machinery to direct t heir complaints and requests to the appropriate public agencies and to fo llow through and s_ee that their complaints and requests are acted upon. -· �-26(2) That the public service agencies act upon complaints and requests from local community groups and give the groups a ~lear explanation if they are unable to meet a requested service. (3) That every effort be made to develop a healthier mixture of low and middle income housing types throughout the City so that public housing d does not become further overconcentrated in the Northwest Browntown. �t• .. ,· ..... MEMO Tom Shuttleworth ro: From: Peter Labrie and Tom Bane Subject: Rezoning of Northwest Bankhead site for 540 units of public housing We have examined various factors and issues concerning the rezon~~i of the Northwest Bankhead site for 540 units of 'turnkey' public housi~ 6 and have · come up with Che following findings and recom.nendations. Community Facilities and Services Needed According co our information on the NW area construction of the 540 units at the Bankhead site would probably generate the following needs in community facilities and services: ? (1) One (1) elementary school (2) One (1) neighborhood park (3) Public tran$portation improvements provi9ing efficient access to a library, connnunity park and shopping centers J (4) Book mobile to provide library service within the area (5) An increase in urgency to resolve high school problems of t he area. Construction of the public housing project would brin~ additional high school students into the area. This would probably increase the overcrowding at Archer or Fulton High Schools, but still not justify the construction of a new hi£h ? school, thereby further aggravating a deteriorating high scho~l situation. �- .. . ' -. . ·-- ' .. ' Prob l ems in Provision of Needed Facilities .1. nd Se rvic es One can also expect certain problems to be encountered in Qecting ? the needs listed above. 7 (1) These problems would probably include: Competition between the Il,:ml~l~ead an_d Browntown public housing sites for elementary school funds. as the following: next bond issue? 7 X both projects? (2) This brings up such que s t ions Is it too late to place the schools on t he Would there be enough funds for schools for If not, which project would come first? Reinforcement of already prevailing attitude among N'~ residents that their area is becoming a 'dumping ground' for public housing. More over, rezoning of the Bankhead site would undoubtedly make residents less prone to accept rezoning of the Browntown site. (3) Considerable difficulty in making necessary public transportatio.1 improvements. From the residents' point of view, efficieat bus service would be a dire need, but from the point of view of the bus line, which is privately owned, there would not be enough people in the project to make the improvements profita~le. Ad dition al Considerations In addition to the above problems there are some other highly si &nif- icant consideration which must be taken into account. (1) Construction of the Bankhead project would in fact contribut e to the current trend of an overconcentration of public hous ing in the NW area. This in turn would aggravate the develo? in.; social problems in the area, especially the feelings among the residents of social isolation and hostility toward city hall about �.... . . .... ...... -· , ' ... l'agc 3 being 'dumped ' into public housing pro j ects . in t he out!.ki rts ? of the city. · l' In fa~t, it may very well be that the benefits of erecting additional public housing projects in the N.,,/ will be outstripped by the costs of increased soc~al problems. (2) ~ t, I .> ,\i ·,V D ,\ {,' f~ ~f There is a lack of information on development plans for t he area surrounding the Bankhead site. Such factors as compa ta- J ' bility of nearby ind us tries, potentiality of an employment base , . 'J ' . vi,_~, possibility of a mixture in types of housing, etc. should be \~u..f' ~}' ,v. . . carefully examined before ~ decision is - made on rezoning t he ~.,. y· /'v site. Recommendation In light of the above findings it i~ our recorranendation that the Bankhead site not be considered for rezonin~ for publi~ housing until t he f ol~?wing conditions are met: (1) The stu dy on public housing is released which shows that e very effort is being made to distribute public housing throughout the city. (2) Preliminary provisions are made for meeting community faciliti.:~s and service needs: schools, parks, public transportation s e=vice, ' etc. 1,). . .1 ~G'I J~ vrl" . ~ui (3) More information exists on the potential and probable devclo? - ($ . ment of areas surrounding t he site. ' ''/ ~7 ?he a.i::..Pt!. ~c~'v..i~ · fo_'-#t:. i,~ d.-l'~U-~ '-:_ih~ re..~u/Jt.. £)3/e<,c"'/rvi CA;..:/~) <>Y o//2e,v-J~, )'), ~.2/-e...(M_;d 7o ~ . ...:>t' ~ 0C-1..JrJ(ene_e,J 0£;:d1CN1-J -~~ c-<,~IIYI ~ "7 M ~~ r;;v-G ~ n o.f fj t. v"'Aa, 14- --~ f) ry,d·. ~7 �... ~- I ATLA TA DEPARTMENT of CONSTRUCTION 301 CITY HALL Atlanta 3, Georgia September 29, 1967 RI CHARD W. RE $;:>E~ S RAY A . N IX ON A SS T. CH I E F O F c c,r ,.~ TRL.CTI C ' , Ct, ief o f Con s tructi on ROBERT H . M O R RISS ASST . CHI E F OF C O NS.TH ' C 1 1.:., · . Mr. Ross Arnold At.torney at Law 904 Stand ard Federal Savings Bldg. Atlanta, Georgi a 30303 Dear Mr. Arnold: With reference to your letter of Se ptember 26, i.967, the follor.. ing corr.men t s are offered relati ve to the pr opos ed devel b pme nt of appr oximatel y 65 acre s of l3nd on the no_rth and south side of Ba nkhead Highway, N.W. at Maynard Drive . l-{r . Fr a ncis B. Shee t z, Ar chite c t , h a s pr eviou s ly ·a dv i s e d this of f ice of a prop osed deve lopment in this a r ea and his pl ans for such deve lopment are pre s en tly und er review from the standpoint of sewer availability. Mr. Sheetz advised us al s o that a ny development i n this ar ea was a t least 12 to 18 months i n th e fu t ur e a nd pre s ented no immediate probl em fr om the standpoint of requiring sani ta r • s ewer s . Thi s offi ce has advised Mr . She e tz i n t he pas t t hat t he pr opos ed dev elopment i n t h is area would be serv ed wi t h s anit ar y s ewers a t an appropri a t e time c o pe r mi t deve lopment by s ome means to be deve lope d in cons ultation wi th t h e devel oper . At this time, we antic ipate that a sma l l package e j e c t or s ta t ion loc ~ted somc\.J e·· J near the westerly boundary of th e proposed development will be required to l if t sanitary s ewer flows t o an existing outfa ll sewe r in Carroll Road. I t is a nticipate d furth er tha t thi s package eje c t or s ta t i on cou l d be e limina t ed wi t hin t h P next 2 ye ar s by t h e ins t a l lation of a ma jor - s a nitary t r unk s ewer runni ng par3l l e 1 wi th the Chattahoo chee Rive r at a point ne ar this dev e l opment and flow i ng to t h e Sa ndy Creek Wa t e r Pol l ution Contr ol Pl ant . A firm s chedu l e with r egard to th e l atter line is impossible t o s e t at t h i s t ime. The Publ ic Wor ks Comm ittee o f t h e At l anta Board o f Al dermen i s committ ed t o pr ,· i c •' sanitary s ewer se rvi ce to deve lopmAnt where such deve lopme n t is consid er "d h t ~ desirable and reasona bl e . Th is offi ce con side rs you r devel opmen t at this lrntfrn as both d esirable ~nd rea s onable a nd will as neces s ary, wor k wi th the dev r l 0~nr in providinr, f or san i t :iry sewer far.il it i es. Such fa ci.li ties, particul:~rl : ·hrr e a sewage lift sta t i on i s re quired, mi gh t wel l add to th e proposed cost of d ~v l rment and this factor s hould be consid e red o t t hi s t i me . Thi s office woul d e xp ~ t the developer to .bear t he cosf of t he ins t a l lation of a l ift station if such n station were necessarY, and the ass ociated force main, toge t h er with nll s~wer s 0n the deve lope rs site, as needed for t he deve lopmen t. �.. ,· -- . .. -:.. Page 2. September 29, 1967 More detail with r egard to cost and construction problqms in ·this r egar d wi l l be available shortly, upon the completion of surveys being conducted by thi s o ff ic e . I trust that this will adequately fulfill t h e ne eds cited in your letter of September ' 26, and permit you to proceed in this regard. · Yours very truly~ Jffdii~I Water Pollution Control Director RHM:ck cc: Mr. Tommy Shuttleworth Planning Department �- ~• I • • . . .. . • \ ' ATLANTA · PUBLIC SC A0MINl6TRATION BUIL91NCi 224 CENTRAL AVE .. 6 .W. ' ATLANTA . GCORCilA Of"FICE OF' ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR SCHOOL J-LA.N T PLANNING AND September 29, 1967 CON8TRUCTl0N Hr. Ross Arnold Arnold & Cate 904 Standard Federal Savings Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Re: Banl-<~ 1 { , '-..) . 1J.1..,-.-•\..-<\.. <:.,,l_ Darwin W. \voma ck Assistant SupCl.' .i.n t.~ud~~n t D\v'W: pu cc: !vl r. Cecil Thornton ) 30J 0 .3 t (· �,., \ • • r ) ' It ~ ., ' DEPARTMENT of WATER WORKS • < ..... . 68 MITCHELL STREET, S. W. .. ! r: ; .· : .- . ,, 102 City Hall "" PAUL WEIR JACKSON 5-8341 Atlan t a, Georgia 3 03 03 September 29, 1967 WE !JEL L R . c.r~ ",j ,'.> _ GENERAL M A NACER OFF l : C:: ' /J.-•,,-..-=,·- WILLIAM T . BUSH W. CU9Tl3 h : ~T E.: " ASST, GENERAL MANAGER ,:.u;;:,1-v R Mr. Ross Arnol d Arnold & Cate 904 S-tandard Federal Savings Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Ross: Thank you f or your lette r relative to the availability of water for a 45_ acre tract of land on Banlchead Highway between the drive-in theatre and the Chattahoochee River. We have a 8-inch main in Bankhead Hi ghway, a 12-inch in Carroll Road, and an 8-inch in Maynard Road. Atlant a ' s Water Depart~ent is a modern, muqicipally owned utility valued at $175 , 00 0,000. We have a continuous program of upda;ing and strengthening t he system to .provide the most reliable water service possible to all our ci tizen-customers. However, fa ctors beyond our control such as water m&in breaks, elect ri cal po~ir fa ilures, et c. can cause a reduction in pressure and volume or complete suspension of service during tne period of repairs . We cannot assure any customer of uninterr4pted service during these e~ergencies. · If a building req ui res a guaranteed minimulTI wat er pressure and volume, it is the responsibility o f the OWJler to provide adequate storage and booster pumps. It will be a pleasure to work with you in providing water service and fire protection for this proj ect. Paul Weir PW:sb "AILANT11 Gl'( ...:'~· The parks we hope to have well developed by the end of 1969 are Collier Drive, Wilson Mill and Gun Club. · I hope the ·above information will prove of use to you. Sincerely, f ~/,/~ A. P. Brindley Parks Engineer APB:cj ' • . J �k1; (_ ~ 2_ C.-V -1:_ , U '._ ~,_., ,L t_, 0-o r\/'v,_.v, :_ct::_~__.__ -).\ ,~J'-' a,;t.,6 o; HOUSING RESOURCES COH!1ITTEE Room 1204, City Hall August .14., 1967 . Y.ir . Jim Crawford, Chairman Atlanta-fulton County J oint Planning Board Adair Realty & Loan Co . 56 Peachtr0a St. N. W. ..·•. Atlanta, Geor gia 30303 Dear Mr. Crawfordi Reference is made to Zoning p tition #Z-67-lJl~E on the Agenda of the Atlanta- Fulton County J oint Planning Board for conslderation August 16, 1967. .. , On August 9 the Executive Group of the Hou.sing ·Resources Committee considered the proposed re-zoning of this 45 acre tract from M-1 & M-2 t o A-1 for ~onstruction of low-income housing under the Turnkey program for Public Housing., as part of the City 1_s ac celerated low-income housing program . The Executive Group of this Committee feels that this prDposcd housing project ii badly needed in meeting an important portion of the City's critical houaing needs, unamiously endorsed this proposaJ. and adopted a Resolution that your Board be requested to recommend favorable a cti on nn t he proposed r e-zoning of this site for Public Housing under the Turnkey Program. Reference ia also made to Zoning petition //Z-67-138-E on your agenda for consideration at your August 16 meeting . The Executive Group of the Housing Resourceo Committee on August 9 also considered the proposal for re-zoninz of approximately 69 acres of a larger tract from R-3 to A-1 for the purpose of construction of approximately 360 dwelling units under · the 221 d (3) co-op program. · The Executive Group of this Committee feels that this proposed housing project is des.Lrable in meeting a special seement of the overall housing requirement for low and medium income .families in Atlanta and adopted a Resolution that your Board be requested to also recommend favorable a.ctio~ on the proposed re-zoning of this site for the purpose stated. · Sincerely, .. · Cecil A. Alexander~ Chairman Housing Resources Committee MDJ/sll 2· ec~-,; .J..J M A ,, Sf+,;11}'-~~,fh �- - - - ---- -- - - -· - -·- J..J<..c;i '. H~ '--:_ &/_'7._r-t»-<~ ~~ t ~ , 12.-. Hai SING RESOU CES C1)HHI TTES Room 1204~ City Hall SeptGmber 1,;~ 1967 Mr. Jim Crawford,. Chn.irrnan Atlant~-Fulton County Joint Planning Board Adair Realty & Loan Co. 56 Peachtree Sto • Wo Atlanta, Georaia. 30303 Dear Mr. Crawford: . Enclosed are copies of l etter to you d.:lted Aueust Mr. Cecil A. Alexander, Chairma."1, 14, 1967, f'rom O-.lsing Resot,z-ces Committee., advisini of endorsement by tha Housing o~ources Comtllttco of re-1,oning petitions Z-67-lJl...E and #Z-67-.138-E proposed for 101-.-inc ome housin~ development and requesting favorable recom.~endations by th~ Plenning Board. a Alexnnder has as1-ed me to r equest ~ou to please hav0 transmitted, with the report of the recommendations of the Planning Board, to the ZQ.nine Cam.":'.!ittce o.f the Board of Aldermen, co;ios of the above indicated l.otter shooing the posit ion o.f the Housing Resources Committee i:-rl.th r espect to the~o t10 petitions . Sincerel y, Halcolm D. Jones Super•Jisor of Inspection Services Mill/ sp Enclt cc: 2 copies of HRC l etter dated August Y~. Tamrrr:, Shuttloworth .14, 1967. �. , . .. MINUTES HOOSING RESOORCES COMMITTEE MEET!NG October 23, i967 T h e ~ ,· HRC Conmittee, aild the Land Acquisitio~ Panel ~t the Housing Resources Comnµ.ttee met jointly with the members of the Plantrl.ng Department at 11:00 a,m., Octobe~ 23~ 1967, in Committee Room #2 1 City Hall, pursuant to invitatiortal. notice attached~ The roiiow:1.nt me~bers were present! Mrl Mr; Cecii A. Aiexartder~ Chairman, Housing Resources Committee F.· C. Terrell, rep:t-esenting Mr. Wallace L. Lee, member, Land Acquisition Panel Mr •. Cl:.ayton R, Yates, member, Land Acquisition Panel Mr. J. A. Alston, member, Land Acquisition Panel Mr. W.W. Gates, Consultant Also present were invited guests, including: w. Kennedy, Jr., Chairman, Chamber o!' Commerce, Housing and Redevelopment Committee Mr, Len E. Sweat Jr,, Director of Governmental Liaison Mr. Ge'orge Planning Director, Collier Gladin, presided. Mr, Gladin stated that he and the members of his sta!f were very happy to have an opportunity to meet with the Housing Resources Committee and discuss mutual problem~, He stated that every effort.would be made in the future to work with the Housing Resources Committee. Mr. Gladin briefly explained the progress being made by his Department in produeing a new Land.Use map. He presented a map showing progress to date, but . explained that many changes would necessarily have to be made before the map is completed and approved by other city officials. Mr. Gladin also stated that coll8id~ration should be given to higher densities for low-income housing, including use of high rise. Mr, Pierce Mahoney of the Planning Department explained the proposed Land.Use map in detail and also exhibited a second map indieating projections to 1983. He stated that the locations of the proposed rapid transit •ystem stations have not been determined ·and this eould be one item that would involve possible changes, �- - - - - - --- 2 City Planner, J. C. Johnson distributed a list of possible sites for lowincome housing prepared by the Planning Department on October 23, 1967. He stated that in his opinion a package of 10 to 15 possible low-income housing sites distributed throughout the City should be submitted at one time for zoning consideration, rather than individual requests for each property. He stated that the package approach would hopefully aid in surmounting neighborhood and Feceral objections such as have been encountered in connection with individual parcel zoning. He explained that !fayor Iva., Allen's goal of 16,800 low-cost units in five years has been slo,re ·:. by obj e ctions of residents and the Federal government, high land costs and difficulty i n getting zo:ling changes. Johnson s ~id most of t he sites the plannsrs are considering aren't zoned for apartment units. Residents on nu.~erous occasions have appeared before the Aldermanic Zoning Committee to beat back requests for zoning changes that would permit low-cost housing in their neighborhoods. Mr. Johnson s2id that he hoped the Housing Resources Committee, the Citizens Advisory Committee on Urban Renewal, the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Housing Committee or some similar group would pursue the package idea, develope it and sutmit it to the proper zoning authorities. He stat ed that the list distributed was incomplete and that probably a number of additional areas could be added. Mr. Johnson submitted a proposed development plan, using the old Ball Park s ite on Pence de Leon Avenue as an illustrat i on of how a site might be developed f or mixed uses including high rise apartments, shopping areas, etc. Mr . Gates , HRC Co:;,.rnittee Consult ant, provided :member s of the Pl anning Department with a list of 22 Proposed Sites, dated October 10, 1967, which owners or those having control, have voluntarily listed with the HRC for sale for use i n t he low-income Housing Program. Only 4 of these sites are zoned A-1 however. Mr. Cecil Alexander, Chairman of the Housing Resources Committee stated that there appears to be an excess of l and in the City presently zoned f or industrial use and suggest ed that study be given to det ermine if some of t his land should be released fo~ use as apartment sites. Mr. Alexander also stressed the urgent need for an overall Land-Use plan nhich would make additional apartment sites available. �\I 3 The meeting adjourned at 12:15 p.m. Respectfully submitted, < ,-, . \ . .' ...;~.'-j~__/ ..jl!--~·-2 -Malcolm D. Jones ( / Supervisor of Inspection Services . <.• ••/ Encls: (with original only) -: • • Invitational Notice, Possible Sites for Low-income Housing, dated October 23, 1967. Proposed Sites offered for the Low-ihcome Housing Program dated October 10, 1967. �AGENDA Housing Resources Committee Executive Group Meeting 10:00 a.m. September 12, 1967 Committe e Rm. No. 2 1. Call to Order and General Comments - Chairman 2. Summary Report on Status of Low-income Housing Program - Jones ). (a) Low-income Housing Requirements - Extract from GIP - Jones (b) Action by HRC - Chairman (a) Consideration of Land Suitably Zoned for Low-income Housing - Jones (b) Discussion and Determination by HRC of Recommended Procedures to Assist Program (for Joint Meeting with Planning and Development Committee Sept. 29) - Chairman 4. 5. Requests f rom Sponsors for Support on 3 Rezoning Petitions before Zoning Committee - Jones 6. Accel er at ed Procedure - Multi-family Processing by FHA - Gates 7. 5% 8. Panel Reports - Chairman 9. other &siness (Comments on Urban Ameri ca Seminar) - Chairman Donation by Nonprofit Sponsors Propos ed for Rent Supplement Proj e cts - Spe cial Notice from Ur ban Amer ica �Si&A ¥04£4A4b #§@2#$,!Q(J 4 ;g;_ MINUTES HOUSING RESJTJRC'SS COMHITTI:E :SXECUTIVE GR,)H? l-:IE?.TL '!1 September 12, 1967 The Executive Group of the Housing Hesources Committee met at 10: 00 a.m., September 12, 1967, in Cormu.ttee Room f2, City Hall. The following members were present: Mr. Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman, Housing Resources Committee Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, Co-Chairman, Housin1 Reso·....rccs Committee Mr. Archer D. Smith, representing Mr~ Charles L. Weltner, Acting Chairman, Legal Panel Yir. Henry L. PJ.lls, representing Mr. Le e Bur 6 e, Chairman, Finance and Non-Profit Funds Panel Hr. John Wilson, member, Finance and Non-Profit Funds Panel Mr. Charles F. Palmer, representing Mr. Clarence D. Coleman, Chairman, Public Housing Panel Mr. F. c. Terrell, representing Mr. Wallace L. Lee, member, Land Acquisition Panel Dr. 'Vivian Henderson, Acting Chairman, Land Acquisition Panel Mr. J. A. Alston, member, Land Acquisition Panel Mr~ Stewart Wight, member, Land Acquisition Panel ~an Williams. Jackson, Chairman, Social Problems Panel Mr. Edward S, Simon, Vice-Chairman, Business Participation Panel Mr. Dale Clark, Chairman, Public Information Panel Mr. Malcolm D. Jones, Director Also present at the meeting were: Mr. William S. Holland, Executive Director, CACUR Mr. Lester A. Persells, Associate Executive Director, Housing Authority Mr. Alexander opened the meeting with comments pertaining to the program and then cailed on Nr. Jones to present the current status report of the program. Mr. Jones stated. that his office was in the process of retyping the low.. income housing inventory report but had only the summary ready for this meeting (Item 2 on the agenda and document 2 in the folder which had been presented to Executive Group members) . He explained that included in the inventory are apartment units bei~ developed under conventional financing which do not cost more than $10,000 per unit to construct, $12,000 for each side of a du~lex and $1S,OOO for a single family house. He explained that the last page of the summary contains notes, ro me of which are especially significant •. He explained that Item A of the notes gives a comparison of the status of the program on August Jl, as compared with the previous report of June 28 and stated that on the whole we have lost ground in this program since the previous report two months ago. �2 He then called attention to the extract from the CIP report pertaining to low-income housing requirements (Item 3 on the agenda and in the folder). He also pointed out that we are not rec1.lly building low-cost housins in public housing but low-income housing . He also explained Item 4(a) on the agenda and the corresponclin:; document in the folder passed out to Committee members, pertainj_ng to availahle land sui tabl)r zoned for the low-income housing program. At this point Mr. Alexander explained that Mr. Jones' office was understaffed to hancUe the statistical data required by the CIP and proposed that from here on out when someone GOes to the Building Department for a pennit we should try to r-;et the Per1rdt Desk to list what the rent on the units will be and number of bedrooms per unit; thc>.t there is no way we can require this legally; and that another thing that we need to clo is to <1lso go back to the developers now in the program and get more specific information on their plans. He proposed for this purpose that the City provide a Clerk to the Committee for not less than 3 months. He stated that he felt the structures bein5 built are reasonably r,ood and that his feelin: :s are that a great deal more interes t should be put in the lowest rental-purchase ranges ; that we can get more in that price range from the prefabricated housing; th2.t the carrying charges on these per month is important and we should find out what it is; that to meet the really tough part of the program misa.as going to the City for additional help. He also asked for comments f rom members of the Committee. Mr. Clark said he would sup::_Jort askin.:; f or more help; that he also saw a news report for housinr, that would rent for 1~50 to fi>70 per month, under the Farmers Association program; that it is in DeKalb County, and is called City Line. Mr. Alexander stated that is a good start to ~et low.cost housing in the counties. Another member stated that the Farmers Association pro,~ram is also a part of the FHA program. Mr. Palmer inquired as to the definition of low-cost housing? Mr . Jones replied that it is essentially a matter of interpretation, Mr. Alexander stated that is was from $0 to ~55 per month, Mr. Palmer commented 11 And they want low-income housine built under private enterprise?" Mr. Alexander replied it is thought of now primarily as a Turnkey development. Mr. Jones added "And even Rent Supplement11 • �3 Mr. Alexander again proposed askin~ the City f or a Clerk and developing a form for the Building Department to get filled out at the t ime permits are obtained and. c tated that we will have to talk to Mr. Hoff ord about that. A motion was made that the matter be left in seconded it. The matter was drop'.:Jed there. M r. Jones' hands, ¥ir. Yates Mr. Alexander then explained that the roll of this Committee in zon.i.ng matters is not an open ru1d shut case as to how to make 1~ecormnendations to the Boo.rd of Aldermen; that we have been taking this on as a extracurricular roll to a ;,sist the developers in this progr am; t hat this has been done in several instances, but no members of this Committee have been asked to eo around lookin£s at these sites to r e commend those which we consider r easonable, Mr. -Jones explained thnt this is what he and Mr. Gates have been attem0tint; to do; that they have been out with the s-,Jonsors and actually looked at most of the aites and have only listed ancl encouraa;ed thos e which they felt were pr actical and desirable, t hat in a several instances they have di scoura~ed sponsors fr om submittinc: s ites which they f elt were i mpracticable or unsuitable . Hr. Alexander continued that his f eel inc i s that we should t ry t o aid and assist the builders in this progr am but that we have no power to chan;:;e what is going on and that we are hnvin s our pro_)osals turned down one by one f or various reasons. He stated that t he approach which he f elt we should truce i s to i ssue a gener al s tatement about t he housing progr am, i t s needs, and t he shorta~e of l and that is now suitabl y zoned and t o work toward gettin:s a rezoning of the entire City , with due consi derat ion f or low-income housing needs; t hat as for working wit h the developer s we should be governed by what we see i s a ccept able to the Board of Alder men and the Building De~artment i n· granting permits; and f ur ther to come to some conclusi on about t he probl ems. He s t at ed t hat we shoul d also hel p the developers arr ange meetings with the Aldermen, Departments involved and anyone 1>1ho 1-1ants t o talk to t hem about deficiencies in Communit y Facil ities r el ated t o t he housing program, which in some instances have been l oeimatc , such as parks, transportation, traffic, schools etc . He further stated. that at t he same time the ur,'sency of this program has seemed to es cape s ome ?eopl e; that one thi ng whi ch we also need is to emphasize the requirement f or additional l ow-income housing in the neighboring cities and countios and make it clear tha.t we are not trying to create a haven here in Atlanta for the whole country to come to and move in on this program; that this may happen, but we should t ry t o avail' it. He st ated that the CIP requirement is for replacement of houses and apartments that are unfit for human habitation • . He then called upon Mr . Jones for comments . Mr. Jones stated he feels tha t it wo do not take a position to actively sup:iort the cJ.evelopers who have proposed good projects and which ap~ear~ reasonable, he di d not know who would; that he was personally inclined to feel that we can do a service if we asa Committee take a -·JOsition on such proj ects; that he docs not think however that many ar ens will be built in the City which already have a surplus of cormnunity facilities; that he has hopec:_ that we can supµly facilities such as parks, nchools, pl aygrounds etc. simultaneous with the development of the housing proj e cts, by r elying on other Agencies and other Department s; �4 that those details should be chocked into carefully and coorc;ination made to provide these services as adequately as we ca1~. He said that he felt personally that a statement from the Housing rtesources Committee on each of the projects proposed f or low-income housing would be helpful to the Planning Boa;.~d and. the Zoning Committee when they make their decisions. He pointed out difficulties which we have had in gettine sites approved up to that point and e:;~)lained that he and Hr. Gates (the Committee Consultant) have attempted to look at each proposed site but have been unable to follow through on aJJ. details such as checking on the adequacy of community facilities etc.; that in several instances he and Hr. Gates have discourn:~ed sponsors for this reason or that; such as ground too rough, facilities not available etc. and that as a result, sever al of the sites originally proposed have nevP.r come up for rezonin~. He further stated tha,t he was inclined to feel that on those pronosals for Turnkey development that it would even be 1-roll for the Planning Board and the Zoning Committee -to know whether or not the Housing Authority considered the sites as favorable ~.nd suitable. One member commented that perhaps the whole City needs to be rezoned. Mr. Alexander replied it seemed to him that we must create additional land through purchases for the ci ty-·wide a pproach; that when the individual developer canes along, there should be a body looking to tho interest of the whole city and it ap;:>eared to him that these things have thus far been considered only by the Board of Aldermen; that he wonders whether this is doing the program the best service? He stated that consulting with the Planning Board is also very 1~uch in order, presumably. In referring to Item 4(a) on the agenda and the corresponding marked docU17lcnt in the fol der, Dr. Henderson inquired if this material is whc>.t his Committee had asked for? Mr. Jones s t at ed that this is l1hat the Planning Department pr ovided in r e:Jponse to his a zoning ma:9 of nnd a report of by Land Lot and p.'.lilel's request; thnt when ue got it, it crone in t wo f orms: the City with va cant land areas superimposed on it in orange; total land in tho various zoning cat aeories and vacant land Dis trict. Mr. Jones furth0r explained that the Planning fupartment is now making a co~prehensive Land-Use s tudy to go before the Board of Aldermen with s ome proposed chti.Il~es in the overall land-use of the City; that he felt the bes t thi n3 this Committee could do now is to cct its r e commendations presented to tho Planning and Development Committee; that we have a Joint Meeting scheduled for the 29th of Sept ember . Mr. Alexander then told Dr. Henderson that he s hould meet with Mr. Jones to go over the mat erial provided by the Planning Department, but that i n trying to resolve this thing we are s till short on l and and thos e two should cane up with a proposal , say in Sept ember, as to the number of a cres needed and its dis tribution. Dr . Henderson asked approximately how many a cres does tha t involve? �5 Mr . Jones replied that the maximum 0.ensity authorized f or garden type .::partments is 16 units per acre, but that the Housing Authority has been trying to hold that down to about 12 units per acre. Mr. Pcrsells stated that was correct; that 3, h, Qlld 5 bedroom units, which t he Housing Authority particularly ne eds, results in reduction of the density below 16 units per a cre. Mr. Jones explained we had one project which has been approved by FHA at 16 units per acre , but it is in an Urban Renewal project; that we had a developer recently dro~ a project becnusc he had bought the land expecting to develope it at the ma.xir.um authorized density of 16 units per acre and that in preliminary clis cussions, F"rlA suggested 10 uni ts per acre. Mr. Alexander stated that it is open to deb~te about how many total acres would be required.; that our exp8rience to date indicates that no more than 1/3 of the land appropriately zoned actually gets into the low-income housing program, due to turndovms by HUD, FHA, nei ghborhoods etc.; that to date only about 1/3 of the land zoned has found its way into this program. Mr. Alexander stated that there ap:1ears to be a need to r ezone the City at large; that there wer e 51 zoning petitions on the agenda recently for one r-.co ·::ing of the Planning Board. Mr . Jones expl ained that the current z oning was especially planned f or }ndus1;,ry; that many areas were original ly planned but never used as industrial, 1-;:C.- .ich development will not occur in the f orsecable futur e , and that the same c_pplies to much of the land now zoned residential ( singl e family development) t-:hereas tho immediate need of the City now i s for low-income multi-family housing. Mr. Persells e.xpl ained that the Housing Authority has gone back over the l anu to cons:i.der addit i onal parcels 1vhich could be used f or the low-income housing c~tegoriJ where chrin gcs seem to be reasonabl e . Mr. Alexander stat ed the builders have claimed that FHA procadurea were hol d.inc them up , that Atlanta is one of the City's in which FHA now clcims that it can process an application in l ess than 2 weeks; that this i s a change in nttitude , but the 221 d ( 3) proeram does not come within the direct line of FHA 1 s principal insuring policy. Mr . Alexa,~der asked Mr . Clark if the report prepared by Mr. Gat es on the accelerated procedure for multi-family processing by F1IA could be carried to the press (Item 6 on the agenda, with co-::iics in the folders ) Mr . Clark indicated that it would probably be better for this tY}Je of announcement to be made by the local FHA office rather than f r om this Committee. �6 Mr. Alexander then referred to Item 7 on the agenda pertaining to the proposal in the Rent Supplement program to require nonprofit sponsors to put up 5% equity (in effect a donation); that the reason the attempt to put this thine; in, is the theory that if nonprofit sponsors 2.re financially imo lved in the success of their project that they will have more permanent interest in it; that Urban AmGrica's feeling is, if this is done the Rent Supplement program will die before it gets nn opportunity to grow; and Urban America has suGgested that those interested send telegrams to their Senators and to Senator Warren Magnuson sugGesting th2.t this approach of requiring the 5% equity will defeat the purpose of the program; that what he would like to do is to eet an authorization from the Committee to sign a t 8l egram in support of this position and to urge cons ideration of this matter in the final preparation of the bill. A motion was made by Mr. Palmer, seconded and unanimously adopt ed asking Mr. Alexander to send. such telegrams to .:i.ppropriate Senators, Mr. Cl.:i.rk asked if the 5%o.onation Mr. Alexander stated that it i s nonprofit, s1Jonsor is not sup;iosed to 2.nd it is asking too much of him to Mr . Alexanuer also said that to give nonprofit projects one can borrow up is what you are competing with, in a is a known step or a new development. new; that the thinking is that the be get tin~ any profit back from the project put up 5%equity donation to the project. tho other sid0. of it is, that in 221 d (3) to a 102% of the project coat and this sense. Mr. Pers ells asked Mr. Alexander to explain the l02_;i . Mr. Alexander explained what the extra 2% takes care of. Mr. Alexander again asked for and received unanimous consent to r equest the City for a GI.erk for at least 3 months. Mr. Alexander then called for hrief reports from the Panel Chairmen. Legal Panel - Mr . Archer Smith made a very interes ting presentation of his case study and the significance of the She.ffer vs. City of Atlanta Housing Code Case, which he announced was coming up for hearing the next day. Constructi on and Design Panel - As no one was present to represent this panel, Mr. Alexander explained a proj e ct which that panel was working on involving Building Codes and a System s tudy. Finance and Nonprofit Funds Panel - Mr. Alexander explained that this panel is working on creation of a Honpr ofit Housing Development Corporntion, He also mentioned the favorable comment s made at the Urban America Seminar by a local banker pertaining to loans made through his bank to sponsors of nonprofit projects. �7 Business Participation Panel - Hr. Alexander cormnented briefly on his rec ent conference in Washington with Se.cretary Weaver and FHA Administrator, Braim.stein, pertaining to bringing "Big Business 11 into the low-income housing field. Public Information Panel - Mr •. Clark commented on the ill-fated Browntmm Road rezoning at tempt and to a nonprof it sponsor proj ect which is being promoted locally by the Interfaith Group of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation. Social Problems Panel - Daan Jackson explained that the avera::,;e annual income for Negroes in Atlanta is $3600 and that the number one question is the adequacy of the number of bedrooms in rent8l units . Mr. Alexander then called on Mr. David T. Edwar ds, sponsor of a rezoning petition f or an 18 acre site on the \I.Jest side of Atlanta , i'Jorth of Bakers Ferry Roacl , S. W. (LL 2h, 14th Dist. FF) to present his proposal ( one of three in Item 5 on the· agenda )~ Ytr. Edwards made a good and convincing presentation. From questions a ske d mid comments J11ade by some members of the Committee , the Cornmi ttee ai)poared receptive to Mr. Edwards I propos8l. Formal action by the Committee however was not called for by the Chairman to endorse this proj ect to the Zoning Committe e , as had previous ly been re ques ted by Mr. Edwards, as well a s similar requests from sponsors of t wo other projects which the Committe e had previously endorsed to the Planning Board. This was for r easons explained earlier in the mooting . Subsequently however, the Chairman of the Planning Board. was r eques t ed to pas s on to the Zoning Committee , with the Plannin.r; Boards' r e commendations, a l etter which had pr eviously been written by the Committee to the Planning Board endorsing those t wo proj ects. The mee ting was adjorned nt 12 noon. l_,. ~ti~ _ ,,.,_,,.,,i , ~ <~- Malcolm D. J onefJ Supervisor of I nspe ction Services Encls : Agenda Documents contai ned i n fol der provided every member pr esent (wi th file copy only ) • �NORTHWEST-BROWNTOWN AREA A NEIGHBORHOOD STUDY City Planning Department City Hall Atlanta, Georgia October, 1967 �t ri 11 11 II llI I NORTHWEST- BR OVvNTOWN AREA A i'-iEIGHBOR HG OD STUDY I. I City Planning Depa ·trne ni" City Hall Atlanta, Georgia October, 1967 ~ ... - - ------ -- ...---·- ,__._ . .. ___ . . . - __ _.. .... - _____.... -- . - · �I 1- ACKNOWLEDGMANTS. --··-· ---::---·· • I The City Planning Department wishes to express its gratitude to area r e sidents and to the following organizations and departments for their valuable assistance in this studi,-:: Northwest Perry Homes Citizens N~ighborhood Advisory Council Atlanta School Sys t""',n · . · .• · Atlanta Parks Department Atlanta Construction Department Atlanta Public Library~ . Atlanta Housing Authority ""IP" ..,._ I ' ~ - - ""';,-- -·· • . - 1 ·· ~ ... __... Fulton County Health Department It also wishes to express its gratitude to the following members of the Special Planning Committee of the North~·1 est Perry Homes Citizens Neighborhood Advisory Council for their cooperation and patience in working with planne rs to develop this study: Mr. Hub e rt Brcwn Mr. Robert Dobbs Hrs. Odessa Hill Mr. Fred A. Morris Mrs. Mary Sanford Mrs . Odess a Wheeler Mrs. Josie Wynn ( �TAB LE OF CONTENTS Acknowl edgements Table of Contents I N"T RODUCTION ---------------------------------------------------------- l SUR\'E Y OF CCtl'.:CNlTY FACILITIE S ; • l PROBLE'r-'..S &. NEEDS --------------------- 5 Identific.1.tion of Com:.mmit y Probl ems -------------------- - -------- 5 !. ,: Discussion of Con·munit y P:.:ob l ems & Needs --------------- - - ··------- 8 I MP LICATIONS O:' FUTURE RE SID:Si·i.'..'1.:/.L GROWTH FOR C01:1HU~'f:.TY F!-..G:LIT IE S 17 Residential Growth in Nor thwest ---------------------------- ~--- - - 17 I mp lications For Community Fac il i t i e s------------------------ - - -- 19 Pr obl ems of Publi~ Housing ----------- ·2 ·1 ·· .L . ·- RECOMMENDATIONS---------------------------------------------- - -------- 23 Transitional Nat ure of N. W. Browntown Area -------- - -- :- - - --- - --- - 23 Recommendat ion - - -------------------------- - ------------- - - - --- - - - 24 STUDY YiAP - --- - -------------------- - ---------·· -------------------- - ---- . · .. 21 .' j �'I I NTRODUCTION This report represents a prelimina ry study of corr~~nity problems in the Northwest Brm:m town Area of Atlanta. . It is not a comp rehensive p l an , bu t ·' moreso an assessment of the existing a nd f uture communit y need s brought ab out by the problems which the area is facing at t his par ticular point in it s development. It is hoped that the repo r t and 'its recommenda tions will g ive both residents and city officials a better sens e of direction in dealing with · the growth problems of the area. - ---·· BOUNDARIES -·· - The area referred to in this repo r t as t he Nor thwest Brmmto~m St udy Area is bounded by Perry Boulevar d on the north; the Louisville and Nashville Railway on the west; Bankhead Highway on the sout h; and Bolton and Nash Roads on the east. Included within these boundaries are t he Anti-Povert y Ta r get Areas H and I , and the residential commun ities of Carve r Hil ls , Ho l lywood Hi ll s , Lincoln Homes, Bolton Homes, Perry Homes, Scot t s Cros s ing , and Bowen Homes . HISTORY The Northwe st Browntown Area is part of the a rea wh i ch wa s annexed t o .... the City in 1952. At t he time of annexat ion i t was one of the rel a ively - ~ -~- . ·..--_ - ---· - undeveloped f ringe areas existing out side the City limi t s a nd cons isting primarily of s mall semi-rural communities . Howeve r, not long afte r a nnexa t ion residential growth i n t he area pro ceeded v ery rap i dly. Perry Home s, a l arge public housing pro jec t o f 1 , 000 unit s , was opened i n 19 55. Then other r e side ntial projects, l ar~cly in t he middle to low- i ncome range , f ollowed. Today t he are.:i cont ains ab out 17 , 00Q peop le and 4,425 housing units, of which 1 , 650 a re pub l i c and 2, 775 are p r ivate • ..,. -.· 1 �-2The re side nt ial growth ~~1i ch has occur r ed during the past 15 years i n Nort l:n;1cct Brow ntown h.:i..s generally been unplanned . Res identia l s ubdivisions have be en cons tructed without concommitant commun i t y fa cilities. The deve lo p- ment and improvement of schools, pa rks, and s ewer s have lagg ed behind r e s idential growth. The result is that today, despite t he built -up residential concentrations, the area still retains many characteristics of an undeveloped rural a r e a. One finds, for example, relatively dense concentrations of public hou sing units amidst large stretches of heavily wooded areas with unpaved roads and rough ·terrain. Most community facilities are eithe r opera ting av~r c a pacity or are still not sufficiently developed t o mee t populat i on needs. Even worse, residential growth occur ring in the are a is by no mcu ns s l owing down. Several new major housing projects and a ddi tions to exi st i ng housing totaling about 3,250 units are be ing consid e red for const r uc t io n . CIP estimates indic ate that the popula t i on of t he a r e a will doubl e i n abo ut 10 years and reach a total of about 40,000 peop l e by 1983. The dilemma facing Northwest Browntown is h?W to up - g r ade and i mprove a l ready deficient community facili ties i n l i ght of co nt inuing reside nti a l g rowth. Residents i n the area have b egun t o fa ce up to this d ilemma by organizing against f urther housing const ruction, p a rticularly public housing, unt i l more attention i s g iven by the Cit y t o scho ols, sewe rs , parks and at e r corr.rnunit y fac i lit ies and services. THE BROWNTOWN ZO NING I SSUE The most r ecent and impo r tant ef f o rt by res i dents t o p revent further publ ic hous i ng co nstru ct ion concerned the Brownt own. Zoning Issue. This ef f o rt stemmed from an app l i c at ion filed on June 29, 1967 t o change the zoning of a portion of property covering ab out 50 a cres and located north �of Brownto'Wll Road and west of Jar:1cs J.:i.ckson rarkuay. ~The application requested that the proper ty be changed from ~-1 (Light-Industr ial) to A- 1 (Apartments). The purpose of this rezoning was t o allow tL.C constru ct ion of 510 low-cost housing units under the turnkey program for public housing . Under this program the housing units would be developed privately o.nd then purchased by the Housing Author ity. A hearing on the zoning change was held .ugust 10 , 19 6 7, by the Zoning Committee of the Board o f Aldermen . At t hat ti~e they recomrr.ended adversely on the request for a change in zoning ue to comp laints by residents of the Browntown Area on grounds that curren school) park and s ewer facilities in the area are already inadequate and would be further over- burdened by the new development . Since no comprehens ive study had ever been made of Browntown's community p roblems , this study was initiated to help clarify and .assess those issues affecting it s f u ture deve lopment so that both residents nnd city officials might have a more effect ive framework f or dealing with its problens . APPROACH AND METHOD OF STUDY As c an be surmised from the above background information, this repor is merely a first st ep in provi ding orderly development of the Northwest :::- ~,: :,town Area. The approach is to focus on comrr~nity facilities and the attend u. communit y problems and needs arising from their utilizat ion. In surveying community needs the report d istinguishes both existing and future needs. Existing needs ref er to those it ems needing i mmediate atte ntion; while future needs refer to those estimated to develop in about 5-10 years , when the population is expected t o be about double its present size. �- -- I I - 4The approach taken for t hi s study cons i st ~d of t he f0llowi ng st ep s: 1. l identific ;:i.y ion of major cor.miun it y p r oblems b y City pl :rnnc r :; in ( conjunction with the s pec ial Pl ann ing Commi tt ee of 1 I - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - ~ ~ - - - he N. W. Perry Homes Cit izens Ne i ghbo rhood Advi sory Council 2. an assessment by the planne rs of exis.ting and future com::nunity needs generated by the above probl ems and an inqui r y into t he Ii implications of future reside nt ial grou t h for up g r a ding c ommunity fa cilities and services 3. the formulation of a set of r ecommenda tio ns pointing out u h at needs to be done to meet exis ting deficiencies and anti c ipate future needs 4. a final meeting between planners and the sp e cial Planning CorriIJittee to discuss the findings of the study . �] -5SUR.VEY OF COi'IT-rLJNI'.i'Y FA.CIL I TitS : IDENTIFICATION GF PROBLENS & Ni::EDS corn-mTI'Y I?ROBLEiv..S This section itemizes tRc major problems involving corr.munity £aciliti~s .i.nd sarvic es in the $tudy area. It doeG no t cover all the problc:t,W ,:.:·:1~:.:csr, d by the residents or observed by the planners, but coverG only the most signif ·icant one s affecting the general devel opment o f the area . The Problems Include SCHOOLS (1) · Serious Overcrowding at Ar cher Hi2;h School With the 10 portable classrooms current l y being con~tructed , this ~cho ol wi l l have facilities f or an approxi~ate c npnc i~y of 1, 200 students, yet as of September 11, 1967 it had an actual e1rollment of nearly 1,700 students, (2) Extended Session at Archer Due t o the overcrowded cond it ions , Archer is operat i ng on C'tended session, whi ch means that a large ~roportion o f the students are out of s chool at 12 o'clock and hence a re without parent al supervision a ra.:ijo r par-t of the day, (3) Ove r crowding at Elementary Schools Al t hough overcrowding at the elcmc nt~ry schools is no t as serious . cit is at Archer, stil l mos t ol the eleme nt ary s chools are operating near or at peak capacity. This means they are unable to abs orb any large increase in populatio n, PARl(S AND RE CREATION ~ -..-4.,,,.."-.;J,.,- ..... ". - ..... (1) No Neighb orhood Parks or Programs for Lincoln Ho~es and Perry Homes These two important comnunities whi ch cont ai r:. from 7 , 000 to 9,000 peo le have virtually no City recreational fa ci lities and programs and very limited access to those in other areas. Lincoln Homes has no neighb orhood park at all and Perry Homes, while i t has s ome :recreationa l services rendered through the YMCA and the Girl's Club, has no City rec~~c -i onal service. (2) Inadequate and Po orly Developed Parks and Pluylot: Hill Park and Hol.lywood Hills Playlot Gun Club Park, Center �Gun Club I':ir k is th e com1r.unit y pc. r ·( dcsic nccl :::o scr ,c t h e st udy nrccl po pulation. It i s currcn · ly unde r P 1asc I I of it s construction sched ule and 6 o:r 7 of the to t .:il !~2 . 9 acre s 11 .::ivc bee d8velopcd. Hm-, eve r, -1h.:1t has been buil~ _shows lit tle apprec i a tion for the p re~crences o f t he local r esidents. Fo r example, the ma in re c reationa l faci lity built so far ha s been t ennis court s. Yet res id enLS ma i ntain that the tennis courts have been unused be c ause no one in t'1e community plays te-anis and basketball courts would have been n:ore s ~ i ~.:i.1::lc. Ce 1ter Hi ll Park , a neighborhood park of 16 ac,:-e s, has i r.s uffic i er:.t facilities co nsisting only of a baseball diamond and a foot ball f i e l d . Hollywood Hills Plavlot , loc ated at the s out hern end of Nagnolia Ceme t e ry, has been the . targe t of cornp L:lints by seve:cal r e3id ents due to its cl os e proximity to an unsafe and u r,healt fu l floo d pla in. (3) Ins u ff icie nt Distribution of Re c reational Le adersh ip The . one recreational l eader working in t he whole st udy area i s stationed at Sco tt Scho ol ,-, hich me ans none o f the comrnuni ies out s ide t he service a r e a of Scott School are served by a rec rcctional leader . SEI-JE RS (1) Backup and Overflow of Sanit ary and Storm Sewase Steady rainfall for a d ay or more brings about nurr:e rous c ases of s cuage overflowing into residents' yards and into vacan t lots and open spa ces. (2) Flooding of Procto r Cr eek The flooding of Pr octor Creek during steady rainfa ll is res pons ibl e not only for mu ch of th e s ewa 6 e overflow, but o.l s o for several rm-:ning incid e nts tho.~ have occurr ed in t he area . OTHER FACILITIES (1) Ins u ffi c ient Access to Health and Library Facilities De c entralized health centers in the study a re a arc not conveni e_ tl y a cc essible to al l r esidents , es pecially those of Carver Homes and Holl ywood Hi lls, and there i s no direct publ ic transportation rout e to ~he nearest hospital . The nearest l ibrary, the Dogwood Branch, is located at the·southe rn periph ery o f the study area and there is no direct acc ess t o it fron much o f the nort h ern part o f t he area. (2) Inadequat e Public Transportation Inadequate bus service is basic to the p rob lc~s of a cc ess to health and l"ibrary facilities and places of P.mployment. Public transport ation do e s not provide dir e ct rout e s to these fa c ilities . . · . . -.: ' �,.-- ' -l- (3) Hi scellaG~ous T1: .1f{ ic 2nd St:::e ct :t ?roblcms ,. I' This r efer s t o su ;b problems .'.l S t he lack of a t_.:i:'..'fic ::; i 0 nul i.l .: J .:::c'.-:s o n p~1.-:(,.1.:ty .::;nd l\rO'i·m l\G\m Road, a major inte:rscct:f_o r;_ c:;:os ·:cd dv.ily by school childr-21-:, /.,nd the general neglect to clear rubbis h anc tr i-;.-; 0 r o.s s along t h e s treet J) 1 ,, I (4) Employ~-nt Probl & s \, ,, Host of the res i ~rnts who work rr.ust g o ou ·· sid-2 i:l1e area to their ?l a ce o £ employment . ·,fnc e they are primarily of mid d le - to - low incor;-.e this pla c es a h e avy lrr d en on them i n terms of c osts for t ransportation , child car e serv i es, etc. ,,f1 .,/ ! ii ' 'i r I /' Iii ) .I ,_. // I / / 1/1 ,/'/ I , / /t / / I f / ./ ' 7-: -~-- ./ ,.,.y_ I /J I' './ -·-- ·--·-· �DISCUS SION OF COHMUNIT Y PROBLEMS & 1"7EEDS .This se ction expands upon t1e p .oblems i dentified in the p r evious section. It exa.'1li ne s what is being done to allevi a te t .c pro l ems ar:. mo re i mp ortantly asse·ss es the existing .::md future corr.r;;unity neecL whi ch the p roblEn:s gene rate . When possible, cost est inates of selec ted corrmunity needs are provided. SCHOOLS (1) Ove rcrowd ing and Exte nded Session at Ar cher High 3chool Based upon t he conc ern expressed by resid ents, overc rowd in 6 a t Arche r repre sent s the sing l e most c ritical probl em in t he study area . T. is prob l em is fort l:--er complicated by the inadequ at e a creag e of t he school s i te a nd the ot1tmoded design o r the school build i ng . West Fult on is another h i gh school located near the study are a which could serve a smal l part of its population, bu t i~ als o is overcrowded. (2) Overcrowding at Elereentary Schoo l s The ~ain p roblem here i s the inab i li y of exi s ting element ary schools t o absorb signific antly l arge increases in po-~lat·o n . (3) _ Cu rrent Devel opme nts (a) Expansion of Arche r and West Fulton Hi 0 h Scbools Pre s ently th e re are pl ans fo~ t he vc rtic .21 cxp~nsio n of both Arc her and West Fulton High Schools which would incrc.:isc thei r capa citie s to 2,000 students each . Barring a ny s udde n l .:ir ge in c rccs c ::; in popul a tion, t ·lis expans i on wou ld do r,mch t o allevi.:it e the ove rcrowded conditions. The main problems conironting expansion arc I i 3ncin3 end t iming . Fun's fo r the exp ansion are contingent upon~ possibl e school bond election in t te spring of 1968 and whether the bond issue pa sses . It usu a lly ta k es two years t o 3et a s cho ol cons t r ucted f rom th tine a bond issue passes. However, if an .2rchit e c t c a n be aut ho:: - i zcd t o b~f. in pl anning the p roject bef ore the bond i ss ue pa3s cs, abo ut G·~ .. i0 ~onths c an be cut from t"he needed amount of time . If this p;:-o c e.i,i:::c w-:::! r o foll ued in relat ion to the e xpansion of Archer High School , cons t r u ct i on could start in the summer of 1968 and be complet e d by the fall of 1969 provid i ng that the bond issue passes. (b) New Elementary Schools �- 9! Since most clcxcntary sclc o l s arc ope r ating _at pRa~ c~p~city, it will be desirable for a ny ne,-1 l a r g e l:0usint pr.03 ect s · to include cit2s for elementary schooli int .cir plans. One of t he major propos e d projects, Roc'.·dal c Pa rk, includes a site for .:m clerr.enta y school in its p lans, but some of t h . oth rs do not. (4) Est i mate of Comr~unity N2eds Existing Ne eds (Tho se requi ring inuned i ate at ten ·ion.) (a) Exp.'..l.nsion of Archer 2nd West Fulton ligl Schools by Fal· of 1969 \ This would r equire t hc t the expansion be pl a c d o. sc~ool ond i c s ue by Spring of 1968 and t: hc.t an ar ch i tect be au tl- orize' to begin planriing "t· .e expans ion befo re the bond ele ction. (b) Inclusion of El2mentary School Sites in any Neu Hous i ng Proj e cts Appro· ching 300 Units in Size This has spe c ial referen c e to the B m-1ntm-,n Road publi c hou s ing which 10 acres s nou ld be se t aside for a elcment.3ry s chool i _ units of publi c housing ;: ·o b constructed. .. . _. .... !"\ J._ ,_ ~ , .j lC on 510 Future Leeds (T- ose likely to devel op in a pe .. iod o f about 5- 10 years, during whi ch t i~e the popu lation i s pro jected to double.) (a) New High Schoo l Although a rrew high school is not neede nm·, unde r cur-- ent school s anda ds, increasing population over the r:.ext f ew yc .:n:s wi l l crea " the nee £or a new facil it y. Plans for t e £.:ic ility shou l d be;s i no¼'. (b) New Junior High School Tha construction o f a junior h i gh s chool i n t he fut ur e wi ll help to alleviate potentia l overcrowd ing i n t he e l e~cn ·ary s chools. T~e Ci y own s a possible site for su ch a. 3chool. west of J ame s Jackson Par. way a nd north of Williams Elementary Sc1Lool. (c) New Elementary Schoo]_:, Anywhere from 4-8 new el ementary schools wil l be r equi ed to s erve t he population over the ne~t 5 - 10 years. The s i tes of the s chools will depend upon future growth patterns. (5) Cost Estimates of Selected Items Archer High School New high s chool (20CO students ) v erti c al additional tot ~l cons t ru c t i on mi nus land co s ts $2 , 000 , 000 5, 000, 000 �-i ! L1:ew j r. h i 0 h s chool ( 1200 student s ) New e l eme ntary school ( 1000 stude nts ) tot al c ns truc tio~ n i nus l a :1d c o s ts 3 , 000 , 000 t ot al cons t_u ct io n mi nus l and co s ts 2, O0O, OC PARrs Al'.1) RSCREATION 'i ( 1) No Parks and Rc crcat i onal Servic es At Linco l:.:1 & Pe.:- r y ::0~;e: ::; Lincoln Home s Actua lly t h e n e ed f or a ne i3hb o~hood pa _k in Linc oln Eo ~s was b~ cught out i n A rovi 'es access £:::err, Pe rry Eonc s to Gun Club Park is cur ren ly being met by t he At lc: 1: t · :-.:)US ing ,ut· ority , which b egan receiving bids for construct··on of t h<:: bridge on Scpterr:ber 21, 1967. Center Ri ll Park The Parks Department h as allocate $40 ,000 from i~s Supplemen~al ?und to bring about general i mµ rovcm0nts for Center Hill Pl! .. k during t e coming year. These ir.:provcmcnt ;; ui ll include ; site p:c~ 1).'.l _atio u:i.d drainage, drive- uay .:m-. ·,:\ and developed. As a result, it is not adequately suited now to serve · · . ·..\ · ·; .-.--. the newly built up population. This is the reason for much of the over -. ., . ... ; /~_--:'<;/ f l ow and more specifically is the reason why the worst cases ,of overflow . .. -· ··-·· occur at residential homes and areas bordering the creek. · ·..· ' ·.·· · · · ,· There is no question that this problem of Proctoi Creek .is a large scale one which demo.nds a long -term s olution.. The solution prcposed by th e ·· . ._.:_:· . · :-· ;_i_ /:::<'.:~ . :_ ~ Cons truction Department is the Sandy Creek Improvement Program ( Phas es I ·. t o III) which i s supposed to begin some time in 1969 and will require 15 ·.· to 20 ye ars for its completion. Up until the time of the i mp le~e nt a t i on ·· ·· ·· . ~of the Sandy Creek Improvement Pr ogram, the Construction Dep art me nt wi ll · · '.__.· · · be utili zing whatever temporary solutions are possible. Presently under . ··' . co nz ideration i s the construction of a small 'package 1_ plant to alleviate · ..~<· ·· - .., ,. the l oad on some of the major lines. ·--:--·· . ', ~I _ The_ problem of flooding itself in Proctor Creek can only ·be resolved . ·.. . --~-'·/ .. .. .. ·,, ;~-:. - . ' - ~+ by r e s t ricting children from the floOded portions and by preventing · t l1e · . .. ~-- ('t ... ·:- :__-- · . ··.: . ·· . construction of residential homes and play areas at sites near the creek wh ich are too low. This point leads into the second major recson behind ·. ,.. ;,·,:: )\ the flooding and sewer problems in Northwest Browntown. Poo r Si ting of Residential Homes Act ually several homes built ne ar Proctor Creek,· i.e., along Clarissa Dr ive , never should h ave been built there in the first place bec ause t he ir sites are too low in rel ation to the creek. It has been s ugges t ed : that the City purchase these homes since there is no economically feasible s ol ut ion for h andling their sewage and f looding problems. . ·; ' Generally De f i c i ent and Obsolet e Stor.m ~r.d Sanitary $ewers· · Undoubtedly, -many ca ses of flood ing i n the a rea a re due to t he ol d , obs olet e sewer s throughout the area. Replacement and repairing of these s ewers , howeve r , a r e minor in comparison t o what needs to be do ne with Proct or Creek and will be handled by t he Cons t ruction Department as qu i ckly as it s limit ed funds will · allow. (a) Initiat ion of the Sandy Creek Improveme nt Pr oj ect As Soo n As Possible. This is the only ultimat e s olution t o t he maj or sewage problem in the a re a . So its imp lementat i on should be giv en h igh priority. (b) .,,-- - f - - ..... . -- Some Planned Action on Poorly Sited Homes The re is an urgent need for s omething to be done with those homes which are· t oo poorly situat ed nea r Proctor Creek f or anything economic a l ly feasible t o be done ab out t hei r flooding and sewage problems. It i s suggested tha t a study be made, pr obab l y by the Construction Department, to i dent ify t hose homes which are beyond he l p and t o r e commend a solution which wou l d satisfy bot h the owners and the Ci t y. The possib i l i ty of .the City buying the homes shou ld be carefully s t udied. . /·; -:.. �l -15- l I re" (3) T - ..a-..;.; - :-- - ' • • . . . _ ,, I,. r·· -v· , Co s t Estimates of Selected Itema Sa ndy Creek Improv ements: / Phase I Pha se II Phase III General Storm Sewer Improvements: $3,3L.O,OOO 2,050,000 5,166,000 400,000 OTHER FACII,ITIES The time and scope allocated to this report was not enough to allow f or an indepth s tudy of tho s e pro!)lems associated with library, health, employment and trans portation faciliti e s. Thus no attempt is made to analyze all the various r amific ations of these problems or to specify the existing and future community needs which they might generate. Instead attention was focused on only the most obvious and general needs in these areas. The Needs Include: (1) More Effective Communication Links Between Local Community Groups and Ci ty Services An investigation into several traffic and transportation problems r evealed the ne ed for stroneer co-.:cmunication links between local community groups a nd the various City agencies furnishing community services. For ex ample, note the following two cases: Lack of Traf fic Si gn.?.l at .Jacks on Parkway and Browntown Ro ad According to :the Traffic Engine e ring Depar tment a study wa s made of this i nt erse ction 5 or 6 years ago which revealed that no traf fic light wa s needed at the time. No complaint s had been received about the i nte rsec tion then, so the depart me nt had no way of knowing it was a troub l e s pot. However, upon request of the Planning Dep a rtment the Tr a ff ic Enginee r i ng Department will make a no t her s~udy of traffic condit ions at t he intersection, after which it can de termine what type of t raff ic f acility can best handle the contlitions. Poor Care of St r eets The Sanit at i on Div i sion of t he Co ns truc tion Department confirmed that it handle s the clear ing of rubbish fr om t he s treet, but that the trimming of gras s border i ng t he street s is a r e spons i b i l ity of the property owners. It fur the r s tat ed tha t it had a s hor t ag e of wo r kers to clean the streets s o that its men a re s pread thin Qv er t he City. However, if any community f e lt it had been neglected and wanted ·cleaning services f or its streets , the community should make a request to the Sanitation Div i sion and the request wi ll be acted upon. More Effe ctive Communicat i on Links \ The ~ain fact or unde rly ing bo t h of t he above traf f i c and Gt.~oet c8re problems is the need f or mo re effective communication links between l ocal �-16community groups and the City services. This may sound rather ·trite, but actually it has important implications for both the local groups and the City agencies. On the one hand, the local groups must establish the necessary organizational machinery to direct their complaints to the appropriate agencies · and to follow through to see that their complaints are acted upon. One the other hand, when a public agency receives a complaint or request from a community group it should act upon the, compl°aint and if unable to · do so, should give the community a clear explanation. Also, whenever possible the agencies should keep local communities informed of the various projects planned for the area. I II . I ! ii (2) - ······--···· . Pub lie Transport at ion Study an:". ..... . ..... ... . . • :.?~. ~ ·:-~=-~: community facilities. The i;urpose of this section is to look ·into the impact ·_ "' . ,· .. ~ ~ • of future. resi.dcr,tic.l growth on community facilities · in general. L\ ot!-:::1 wrn::'..,~, it will focus on such orhood Parks. (3) In the case of one large scale project, i.e. Rockdale Park, an elementary school~- and health center. Facilities Not Likely To Be Included From the above discussion it · becomes apparent that except for Rockdale Park, the proposed housing developments would not include the following facilities: (1) Elementary and High School's (2) Collll!lunity Park ( - . (3) Maj or Sewer Improvements (4) Other Facilities, such as Librarie s, Health Cent ers, etc • . ·- •••• 1 ~ ... • ... ". .·? · ...:;.·,._.. : This me;;.ns that if the housing developments are cons truct ed they will probably be creating a need for these facilities . .. (3) List of ~equired Items and Conditions Be 1.ow iB I \' • ~ . ..... ... . ..· ~ ·-. ~ ., ..:: ~ - . -.. , . : ,-(, a list of the items and conjects cur·.rE:ntly considered for Northwest BroHi'\.~ : a • ·., ,· · ., tc,1,.11:' .are ,"'.o;:lCt'L·1Kt. !C!, vl1~n possible, cost- estimates of the it ems are :·· gi·-.,,. n, I t sr.0ulo. .h.;;i lt.,::µt. in mind that these required ite ms and conditions nm <>ri·ty i;;en~r
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 16, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 5, Folder 1, Document 42

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 1, Document 42
  • Text: esate - i 5 4 4 \ MINUTES SPECIAL MEETING HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE WIT ZONING COMMITTEE AND PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE OF TEE BOARD OF ALDERMEN August 42, 1968 The Special Meeting of the Housing Resources Committee with the Zoning Comittee and the Planning and Development Committee of the Board of Aldermen was held at 2:90 p.m., Friday, in the Aldermanic Chambers, Second Floor, City Hall. Mgenda, invitational notices, minutes taken by the Planning Department, resolutions, and other related documents are attached to the file copy of the minutes, Attendance by Members of the Board of Aldermen was as follows: Present: Rodney M. Cook, Chairman George Cotsakis Charles Leftwich G. Everett Millican Jack Summers 2, VW. Williamson Sam Massell, Jr., President Absent: John WM. Flanigen Richard C, Freeman E, Gregory Griggs Alderman Rodney Ml, Cook opened the meeting by telling the group the purpose of the meeting, He then introduced Mr, Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman of the Housing Resources Committee. Mr, Alexander stated that the purpose of the Housing Resources Committee was to assist by all possible means the Gonstruction of 16,690 units of low and moderate income housing. These units were to serve as relocation for persons to be moved by urban renewal, new roads, schools and other government action. Mr, Alexander urged the Zoning Committee and Planning and Development Committee of the Board of Aldermen to support the , fOllowing (2 copy of his presentation is attached to the file copy of these minutes) + % 1. Establishment of a Committee of Aldermen to be responsible for housing, 2. Revise the Building Code# to permit innovations in new techniques and materials, particularly in Experimental Housing in the Model Cities area, Page 2 3. Revise the Non-Conforming Use Ordinance to permit structural changes in residential units, to meet requirements of the Housing Ccde, 4, Stepped-up Urban Renewal program in existing slum areas. 5. _2,000 more Public Housing units...» ' y ( ceyed 46, Bowdal Aldemean aulhevered reguesd le mode) 6. Updated District Zoning Map, including adequate areas for low-income housing. Draft Resolutions for presentation tp the Board of fidermen to implement the above were presented to the Chairmen of both Aldermanic Committees (and have since been provided each member of the Board of Aldermen). Resolkutions and Letters of 429 prominent Civic, Religious and Bducational organizaticas, supporting the Housing Lesources Committee proposal, were presented and have been provided each fidermen. (List of orgéenizations and documents attached to file copy of these Minutes). Mr. Alexander then called upon the attending members of Supporting organizations to stand to be recognized. SAbout 159 people responded, Mr. iexander then introduced Mr, Denver Gray, Vice-@hairman of the Housing and jledevelopment Committee of the ftlanta Chamber of commerce, Mr. Gray steted that the Housing and Redevelopment Committee is the Chamber task force for dealing with all matters pertaining to housing in our community. This includes a number of areas: The Urban Renewal Program, Public Housing, Code Enforcement, and the many other government programs related tc housing; that the Committee's ultimate goal, condensed to a single phrase, is to help make available decent housing for all our people, He stated that the Chamber's position is that immediate steps Shovid be taken to adopt an updated Land Use Plan for the City of ftlanta, from which 2 new Zoning Ordinance could be evolved. Such a zoning plan, said the Chember, Should previde for adequate land for multi-family housing and open up land for increased density of housing in 211 quadrants of the City. Mv. flexander thea introduced Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, Co-Chairman of the Housing Kesources Committee, Dr. Mays stated that the Jidgermen should update the District Zoning Map of the City and provide adequate locations for low-income housing requirements. He also stated that the peopie should be put in different sections of the City only where it is economically possible. Mr. Siexander then introduced Mes. 1 Glenn Parham, Jr. President Page 3 of the League of Women Voters, She stated that it would seen mandatory to zone areas in all quadrants of the City for different types of housing - low-rent, multi-family, etc. Without this dispersal, the burden becomes too great on certain areas - 25 regards schools, recreational facilities, shopping complexes, etc. With dispersal some residents would be better able to secure transportation to reach jobs in outlying areas. Sound planning and judicious zoning revisions are necessary for orderly growth, Delay in acting upon a new zoning pian will compound the problems. She urged that careful attention to be giva to design (beauty and living quality) - open Spaces and park land - supportive community services to reduce danger of isolation and in securing cooperation of both new and old residents. Mx. flexander then esiked for comments from the gifferenat organizations on the SRC proposal. lic, Otis Thorpe, ¥Fresident of the Empire Keal Estate Board said that the Empire Meal Estate Doard supports well planned and proper zoning to meet the housing needs of i.tlanta. We firmly believe that better housing generates more, jobs, cconomic growth, resulting in citizen participation in raising the standard of living of all Atiantans. We respectfully request your support cn this proposal, ir. sob FlLanigen, txecutive secretary, Atlanta Branch of the National /ssociation for isdvancement of Colored People (NAACP) stated that the ifACP feels that the West of ftlanta already has too many low-income housing units. He said that the NALCP dees not want ary more houSing units in the West erea, but perhaps in other sectors of the City, and wants assurance that additional develop- ments will not be approved ia the western part of the City until other sectors get their equitable share. liv. John Gteinichen, Jil, Chairman of Interfaith, Inc., stated that immediate steps should be talen by the City of ftlanta, through its Planning Department and the Board of Aidermen, to adopt an Updated Land Use Plan, and that a new Zoning Ordinance, based on the Land Use Plan, should be prepared for submission to the Board of fidermen at the earliest possible time. He also stated that equal recommendation should be given to the Zoning Text, because of the food plain and other considerations. liz. Milton C, Foster, President, Home Builders fssociation of Metropolitan /tlanta, Inc. stated that the Home Builders Association calls upon the Board of /idermen to move immediately toward Study, implementation and development of 2 modern ordinance of land use controls, giving due regard and priority to the necessity for increased and flexible density in all residential catagories, which will encourage the production of architectural types known aS multi-family buildings, town houses, row houses, and condominium home ownership of any or all of such properties, Page 4 Mr. Duane Beck, Executive Director of the Community Council of the Atlanta frea, inc. stated that the City of Atlanta should adopt immedietely an updated Land Use Plan and a new Zoning Ordinance, permitting the development of low-income housing on several sites in all quadrants of the City of Atlanta. Mr. George Rice, a private citizen, talked about the Railroad fvenue site. He said that he was in favor of developing this area, but that the area was more suitable to Single-family housing or garden type apartments rather than high-rise for the elderly. Mv. C. B. LeBev frem the Atlanta Real Estate Board stated that the ftlants Real Estate Board supports a new Zoning Ordinance for the City, which would update and acknowledge the tremendous changes that have occured since i9ff4, and which would stabilize land uses for the future; that it is not only essential but long overdue; that immediate steps should be taken by the City of ftlanta, through its Planning Department and Board of /idermen, to aGgopt an updated Land Use Plan, filderman }|.odney M. Cook then introduced Mr. Collier Gladin, Planning Director. He stated that 16,300 units re nmoeded for relocation; that the first year's housing needs have been met, but all the problems have not been soived. He also stated that Public Nousing resources needed to be increased. The proposed plan suggests ideas of continuing effots for dispersal fer the City and region around the City. He said that the i'ederal surplus land should be used for relocation of families; that timing of building of new housing units should coincide with the displace- ment of people because of Urban Renewal, roads, etc.; that the Planning Department is ready to assist and support the Housing Resources Committee in its effort. He stated that the Land Use Plan should be set up with an adequate amount of land that will meet the density of people in the next 15 years; that changing cf the Zoning District Map is a good sound planning principle, Go Mx, flexander recognized the presence cof both Co-chairmen ox the Housing Resources Committee, Dr. Ganford S. ftwood, President of Emory University and Dr, Benjamin E. Mays, President Emeritus of Morehouse College (who had already spoken). hidgerman G. Everett Millican questioned Mr. Alexander on Several points of the proposal and stated that enough housing units should be built to take care of displacement and gave his viewS on Several aspects of the program. Mr. flexander stated that between Ncvember 1, 1967 and June 30, 1960,2,803 people applied for Public Housing in Atlanta and i41 outsiders were turned down because of the residential requirement put on Public Housing. Page 5 fiderman Rodney if, Cook stated that time is of the essence. it is time to do something about this problem now. Meeting was adjourned at 4:00 p.m. Respectiully submitted, VYrcadur \\eea i:alcolm D. Jowtyes ‘ Housing Coordinator Bncls: As Listed (with file copy only)
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 1, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 1, Document 1

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 1, Document 1
  • Text: He vsing Kesouvees Committee October 31, 1969 CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel, 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR CECIL A, ALEXANDER, Chairman Housing Resources Committee MALCOLM D. JONES Housing Coordinator MEMORANDUM TO: Mr, Dan E. Sweat, Jr, Chief Administrative Officer Please see attached copy (Encl, 1) of letter to Planning Director, dated September 25, 1969, (which is self explanatory) requesting assistance in providing material for inclusion in next revision of the Status Report on Atlanta's Low and Moderate Income Housing program. Also see attached copy of reply from the Planning Director, dated October 9, 1969, (Encl. 2). Note that the reply from the Planning Director proposes certain studies related to housing to be initiated by the Planning Department. The desirability of these studies is not questioned, However he calls upon me for assistance in preparation of the studies, but does not agree to provide any of the information requested for the Housing Resources Committee for updating the Low and Moderate Income Housing Status Report, About two years ago, when I first requested a Statistical Clerk to keep up the Housing Status Report, I was informed by the Administrative Assistant that a new position of Planner for housing had just been authorized the Planning Department and that therefore the Housing Resources Committee should obtain any needed research and statistical data from the Planning Department, Consequently, I called upon the Planning Department then for similar information to that again requested in the attached letter (two years later), As yet none of the information requested has been provided, I do not consider this deliberate, or unwillingness to cooperate, but rather a natural consequence of another Department being so overworked and preoccupied with numerous details on too many matters, to provide attention and detailed information to another office, for which that Department is not directly responsible, I predict that the situation will not improve materially, Mr. Dan E, Sweat, Jr. October 31, 1969 Page Two The information requested for HRC is essential to meaningful revisions of the Housing Status Report, In order for the City and its officials to have any concept of progress being made in the Low and Moderate Income Housing program, it is essential that a Housing Status report be maintained and constantly revised by someone. No office in the City, other than the Housing Resources Committee, currently has this information. On the other hand, it is physically impossible for me (alone) to obtain the information needed, affect the appropriate updating of the report and at the same time accomplish other essential coordinating and administrative duties for which Iam responsible. This is why, for over two years now, I have repeatedly requested assistance of a Statistical Clerk in this field, Mr. W. W. Gates, who as FHA oriented Housing Consultant to HRC one day per week, was very helpful. However, after working for over a year with no pay, he has discontinued serving, In the absence of other assistance, last summer I requested and obtained the services of an Urban Corps Intern, primarily to work on updating the Housing Status Report. However, he was more interested in changing the system than in obtaining the needed information, Consequently, much essential information pertaining to respective housing projects, such as bedroom composition, monthly rentals or purchase payments, utility costs and estimated time of completion of many projects has not yet been obtained, An additional effort this fall to obtain another Urban Corps Intern to assist in this field has not been successful. When I was initially approached by the Administrative Assistant with view to taking over the functions of Executive Director of the Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal, in addition to my other duties, I was informed that I would get an assistant, Last July, during Mr. Landers' last month of duty, he reiterated that he planned to provide me with an assistant who, could not only be charged with monitoring and revising the constantly changing Status Report on Low and Moderate Income Housing, but who would also be capable of assisting in coordinating other housing matters, such as promoting housing with builders, representing me in conferences and even on occasions, possibly conducting meetings on housing matters, Recent difficulties in adoption of a satisfactory workable Housing Code Enforcement Plan, preparation of the Breakthrough application, housing in Model Cities and proposed housing improvements in other NDP areas, appears to justify additional coordinating efforts in the housing field, In addition, such assistant should be capable and trained to take over my duties as Administrative Coordinator for Housing when I retire, Mr. Dan E, Sweat, Jr, October 31, 1969 Page Three Consequently, I recommend that provision be made in the 1970 Budget for an assistant, Respectfully, Wojcleelds _——— Malcolm D. Jones Administrative Coordinator for Housing MDJ/mc Encls: Copy letter dated Sept. 25, 1969 Copy reply dated October 9, 1969 cc: Mr, Cecil A, Alexander Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 1, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 1, Document 38

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  • Title: Box 5, Folder 1, Document 38
  • Text: _ ATLANTA. DAILY WORLD. yc" Thursday, Merch -20,-1969, — re Mothers Atlanta Welfa Garry Story. To Washington A bi-racial group of four Atlanta mothers who will be ef- fected by the “welfare freeze are going to Washington Thurs- Russell, Congressman Thompson, and Congressman Blakburn. The mothers will tell their retpresentatives whal the welare cul- back will do to their families. - The trip is being sponsored by the Atlanta Community Relations dict. " . The Commission calls on the Con- | | Urge End day to personally tell their stories to Senator Talmadge, Senator | ‘A at D.C. | | Of Freeze i Four Atlanta mothers living on welfare visited the office of Georgia lawmakers in Washing- ton Thursday to plead for elimi-! nation of the “freeze” on wel-| ‘Commission. “The four mothers are representatives of those who are ‘trying to help themselves,” stated Nat Welch, CRC’s executive direc~ eress to repeal the welfare freeze before it goes into effect July 1,” said Welch. pls effect on July 1. : fare money scheduled to take | Sobbing, one mother told Sen. tor who will accompany them. The “welfare freeze’. on Aid to Families with Dependent Children will go into effect July 1 unless repealed by Congress. “The maximum $154 monthly frant for a family is barely enough to afford sustenance. Any reduc- tion in payments would bring abot untold hardships that stagger the imagination,’’ said Welch, These hardships could cause fur- ther breaking up of families, more school dropouts, malnutrition and the subsequent showing down of mentul processes. Remedial or re- habilitative programs, which are not. always successful, are more costly than programs of preven- tion in the opinion of the Commis- sion. “The Atlanta Community Rela- tions Commission is concerned that our nation is spending billions dn sending a man to the moon and two-thirds of the national budget to pay for past, present and future wars yet unless repealed, the wel- fare freeze will reduce by up io 40 per cent payments to 35,000 mo- thers and 114,000 children in Geor. gia most of whom do not now have enough money for an adequate) Herman E. Talmadge, “I’m go- ing to have to give up because I can’t survive.” ' Mrs. Wanna Mitchell told the senator, ‘I worked and I tried to take care of my kids,” but said the loss of her welfare % |money would leave her family without enough money to live. The welfare freeze as ap-. proved by Congress would lock the level of federal payments i to state programs at their cur- ‘ rent level, a move that Guorgia officials -says would cause as much as a 40 per cent reduction - fin payments by June 1970. ‘ The freeze was set to take ef- ' | fect last year, but was later de- layed until July 1. In an effort to marshal sup- port for elimination of the freeze, the Atlanta Community Relations Commission arranged for the four mothers to go to Washington to describe their plight to the legislators. The four also visited the of- fices of Representatives Fletch- er Thompson, Ben Blackburn, W. 5S. Stuckey Jr. and Phil Lan- drum. Talmadge told the women that he had voted last year to delay the freeze and is Inclined to do so again. Two of the women told him they had been aban- doned by their husbands, and the senator said, “We have to > ‘implement federal laws” to out- law abandonment. E 21, 1969 THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION, Friday, March ~~
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 1, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 1, Document 18

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  • Title: Box 5, Folder 1, Document 18
  • Text: MINUTES Housing Resources Committee September 4, 1969 The regular monthly meeting of the Housing Resources Committee was held 3:00 - 5:00 P. M., Thursday, September 4, 1969, in Committee Room 2, Second Floor, City Hall. This meeting was devoted exclusively to responses by candidates for Mayor to questions posed by members of the HRC pertaining to the respective . candidates' position on housing. Invitations to candidates were issued by the Public Relations Panel, HRC, which sponsored the meeting. The scheduling of time of appearance, advance press releases and letters of appreciation to candidates after their appearance were all handled by the Chairman, Public Relations Panel. Copies of these, together with invitational notice, to HRC members, Agenda, with time indicated for each Candidate (Encl. 1) and other related documents are attached to the file copy of these minutes, Chairman Cecil Alexander was out of town and could not attend the meeting, so Mr. Richard Harvey, Chairman of the Public Relations Panel conducted the meeting. Chairmen of the respective Panels prepared and sent questions to the Housing Resources Committee Office a week before the meeting in order that the questions could be provided each Candidate in advance so that the Committee would receive more comprehensive answers, Those questions were mailed to the respective candidates on August 29, 1969. Copies of the questions are attached to these minutes (Encl. 2). Each Candidate was given 10 minutes to express his views on housing, and a 10 minute question and answer period, During the question and answer phase, the Chairmen of the respective Panels asked the Candidates questions pertaining to their particular Panel interests. All Candidates were present except Mrs, Linda Jenness, who was out of town that day. Mr. John Vatava represented Mrs. Jenness. Formal opening statements by candidates Jenness and Massell were submitted to the HRC and are attached to the file copy only of the minutes of this meeting. Page Two Alderman Millican's opening statement attempted answers to as many of the written questions prepared by the respective Panels, as time would permit. Alderman Cook and Mr, Tate spoke from notes only and submitted no prepared opening statements for the record, Questions asked respective candidates were in general selected from lists previously submitted to them and notes were taken by Panel Chairmen on questions - asked, Replies were so numerous and involved and stenographic assistance so limited as to preclude recording in the minutes of specific questions asked and answers given. In general, however, all candidates with the exception of Mrs. Jenness (represented by spokesman) appeared to be sympathetic with the low and moderate income housing program and offered to assist where practicable. From this standpoint, it is apparent that the meeting was beneficial and worthwhile. Newspaper comment on the meeting is attached to the file copy of the minutes. The meeting was adjourned at 5:00 P. M. Respectfully submitted, = Ay le crlhre = 1 2 Malcolm D. Jones Housing Coordinator mc Encls; Agenda Questions by Respective Panels
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 1, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 1, Document 48

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 1, Document 48
  • Text: BALANTS Convenor TOU Dr. Morris W.H. Collins, Jr. Director, Institute of Goverrment University of Georgia Terrell Hall Atnens, Georgia 30601 Mamnar HBemMOIeTS Mr. Cecil A. Alexander li Broad St., NW. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 . nn E. Bennett ive Director anta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission 900 Glenn Building Avlanta, Georgia "30303 rH qQ Ee @ Mrs. Henrietta Cantry 787 Lynvalley Road, S.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30311 Prof. Tobe Johnson - 3405 Lynfield Drive, S.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30311 Dean Alex Lacey Urban Life Center Georgia’ State College’ Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Enclosure "Bt" Mrs. Alexander McPhedran 1365 Clifton Road, N.E. Atlanta, Georgia 30307 Mr. Howard K, Menhinick Director of Planning and Development Keck & Wood, Inc. 3722 Pleasantdale Road Atlanta, Georgia 300)0° Mr. James Robinson : Uroan East Housing Consultants 900 Peachtree St., N.5. Atlanta, Georgia 30309 Mr. Moreland Snith Southern Regional Council, Inc. 5 Forsyth St., N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dean Robert E. Steimke Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, Georgia 30332 Mr. Herbert L. Wiltsee Director, Southern Office Council of State Governments 830 Peachtree St., N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30308 * One or two additional members may be appointed.
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 1, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 1, Document 11

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_001_011.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 1, Document 11
  • Text: NDP Area Becford-Pine Georgia Tech IT 4 . Model Cities Edgewood Vine City Georgia State Lightning Plunkettown NDP TOTALS ” _ NEIGHBORIOOD DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM PROPOSED ACTIVITIES - 1970 Activity Acquisition-Parcels Relocation-Fam./Ind. Demolition-Structures Rehabilitation-Structures Disposition-Acres Acquisition Relocation-Fam./Ind. Demoli tion-Structures Rehabilitation Disposition-Acres Acquisition Relocation-Fam. /Ind. Demolition-Structures Rehabilitation Disposition-Acres Acquisition Relocation-Fan./Ind. Demolition-Structures Rehabilitation Disposition-Acres Acquisition Relocation-Fam. /Ind. Demolition-Structures Rehabilitation - Disposition-Acres Acquisition : Relocation-Fam. /Ind. Demolition-Structures Rehabilitation Disposition-Acres Acquisition . Relocation-Fam./Ind. Demolition-Structures Rehabilitation Dispasition-Acres Acquisition Relocation-Fam./Ind. Demolition-Structures Rehabilitation Disposition-Acres Acquisition Relocation Demolition Rehabilitation Disposition 1969 15h Wy 17); oO 32759 26 9 21 0 11.7 398 432. 278 431 65.8 Planning Only Planning Only No 69 Program 1 No 69 Program t No 69 Program 578 881 473 7 205.) 1970 130 27 130 Ll teh oo 59 73 8.2 183 66.) - 3a2 0 52° 922 1392 922 830 116.9
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 1, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 1, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_001_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 1, Document 23
  • Text: Questions by the Social Aspects Panel Housing Resources Committee To All Candiate s: 1. Do you see a need for emergency housing in Atlanta; and if so, do you see this as a responsibility of City Government? 2. In what positive ways would you work to insure Fair Housing in Atlanta? 3, Since Low-income Housing units are intended as replacements for slum dwellings, but yet slums still exist; what ideas do ‘ you have for eventually eliminating slum pockets in Atlanta? 4, How can the Mayor's Office work with the Atlanta Housing Authority to obtain better social services for families and senior citizens in Public Housing?
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 1, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 1, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_001_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 1, Document 7
  • Text: December 5, 1969 MEMORANDUM To: Mayor Allen From: George Berry Subject: $125 Request by Housing Resources Committee Colonel Jones advises me that the Housing Resources Committee wishes to invite several guests to their December 18th annmal dinner. These guests consist primarily of the news media and state and federal officials. He says that the cost of these invited guests will be approxi- mately $125. Will you approve the expenditure of this amount from the Mayor's Contingent Fund? GB;ja am - SS “Ce A 2
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 1, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 3
  • Text: MINUTES HOUSING RESOURCES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE March 13, 1969 Special meeting of the Executive Committee of the Housing Resources Committee was held at 10:30 a.m., Thursday, March 13, 1969, in Committee Room 1, Second Floor, City Hall. Invitational notice, list of those invited, with attendance of members and guests indicated, and other related documents are attached to the file copy only of these minutes, The primary purpose of the meeting was to consider 2a proposal made by William L. Moore for rezoning of a tract of land in Land Lot 30, 14th District (FF) (annexed to the City of Atlanta, December 1, 1968) for 700 units of cooperative Townhouses and 200 units of rental apartments, ail to be financed under FHA Section 221 d(3). Chairman Alexander called the meeting to order and announced that before he took up the main item on the Agenda (consideration of a particular zoning proposal), he wished to discuss briefly some other matters. He then read a proposed letter to be sent to Representative Julian Bond (copy attached to the file copy of these minutes) supporting in principle Bond's Biiti on the suspension of rent (through payment into an escrow account) on dwellings certified by the Building Department as unfit for human habitation, Seven (7) exceptions (changes) however were suggested as result of a poll of the entire membership of the HRC, the results of which were 26-for, 3-for with reservations and 2-against, The Chairman then referred to a requirement for the HRC to submit by March 15 its plan for the 1969 Summer Program in certain central core areas of the City. In this connection, the Chairman emphasized the need for: 1, An overall rezoning of the City to provide for the City's future development needs, to include adequate areas for low and medium income housing; and 2. Establishment of some emergency housing to provide living accomodations for special cases which repeatedly occur. The Chairman recognized Roger F. Rupnow, Assistant Professor cf City Planning at Georgia Tech, who explained briefly a project which a group of his students proposed to underteke during the Spring quarter commencing about April 1 on a study preparing a plan for future development for the Southwest area of Atlanta. The plan is to be submitted to the City as a recommendation for consideration by the City in developing a plan for this area, The students’ group proposes to work closely with the residents of this area and with the City of Atlanta as to their wishes on existing zoning and future development needs, to include low and moderate income housing in the area, Mr. Gladin, City Planning Director, informed the Committee that a group of civic organizations in the area, known as Federation of Southwest Clubs has requested preparation of a pian for the future development of the Southwest area and had essentially asked the Zoning Committee for a moritorium on zoning changes in the area until such a plan could be developed. Mr. Gladin further stated that this is impractical and cannot be done; that the Land Use Plan for the City, adopted by the Board of Aldermen about a year ago, is inten
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 12

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_012.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 12
  • Text: February 26, 1969 MEMORANDUM TO: Mr. R. Earl Landers Administrative Assistant Pursuant to your instructions, I met February 24 with Lester Persells, M. B. Satteffield, Gilbert Boggs and Howard Grigsby of the Housing Authority and on February 25 with Bill Wofford and Jim Smith of the Building Department to insure appropriate coordination pertaining to the attached Memorandum. As a result of these discussions, the Housing Authority has agreed to report to the Building Department (Housing Code Division) on a weekly basis, the names and addresses of families and individuals which they have “certified” to move into Public Housing, because of substandard housing conditions. This report is to also include an appropriate date of anticipated move. Upon receipt of this report, the Building Department proposes to inspect the locations involved within two working days after receiving the reports and to initiate appropriate action where necessary for compliance with the Housing Code. (The only fallacy that I can see with respect to this arrange- ment is that currently the Housing Authority takes the prospective tenants’ word that they are living in substandard housing and apparently makes no verification of this. In discussing this point with the Building Department, it appears that before certifing a family to move into Public Housing, because of living in sub- standard housing, the family involved should first request and obtain a certificate from the Housing Code Division that the unt is substandard and then present such certificate to the Housing Authority.) The Building Department has been submitting requests to the Housing Authority from the Housing Code Division and the Codes Compliance Office (as result of Court action) separately for re location of families. The Housing Authority has heretofore re~ ported back to the Building Department on a monthly basis those families which they have relocated, a | Mr. R. Earl Landers February 26, 1969 Page 2 (The Building Department has now decided to consolidate its reports, through the Housing Code Division only, to the Housing Authority, and the Housing Authority has agreed to report relocations back to the Housing Code Division on a weekly basis.) The Housing Authority has requested, and the Building Department has agreed, that requests for relocation be more specific than they have been in the past in order to provide better understanding as to why relocation is necessary and determination as to when it should be accomplished, : Mr. Satterfield suggested that he did not think that the Housing Authority should approach a family to provide relocation assistance until the property and the need therefor, had been adjudicated by the Courts; that otherwise the Housing Authority might create antagonism on the part of the Landlord, or disturbance of the tenants, er both and therefore be criticized as acting unconstitutionally. I pointed out that this would be entirely too slow and would not accomplish the desired results and that such delay is unacceptable, It also developed that on the initial visit by a Housing Authority Relocation Worker to a family, that attempt is made then and there to arrange for relocation (normally this is unsuccessful). Mr. Persells suggested that perhaps the first visit to the property by the Housing Authority Relocation Worker should be purely exploratory to find out what the Gircumstances are, with view to subsequently making staff determination as to appropriate action which should be taken. I heartidly agree, However, it was then brought out by the Housing Authority that this type of visit is more in the nature of social work and that the Housing Authority has no Social Workers; only Relocation Workers. It seems to me that the solution is obvious. The Relocation Workers should determine the social aspects, as part of their relocation assignment, before the tenanés or the landlords are notified that relocation is mandatory. If the initial visit was done quitly and on an exploratory basis, much anxiety and disturbances on the part of the tenant; and annoyance and hostility on the part of the landlord would be considerably reduced and in most instances could conceiveable be eliminated all together. The Housing Authority feels that in many btances the requests from the Building Department for relocation are everly simplified in that the names and niimbers of people are usually not provided and, if relocation is being requested in order to reduce overcrowding, eee te r8quired to move and ones permitted to remain are not Spec ° Mr. R. Earl Landers February 26, 1969 Page 3 The Building Department feels that these details are functions which could and should be determined by the Relocation Workers, as part of their relocation assignments, using the Housing Code as a guide and should not be expected of the Housing Code Inspectors. I am inclined to agree with the Building Department in this respect, but have requested the Building Department in making its requests to the Housing Authority for relocation to be as specific as practical. In general, relocation consists of two categories, i.e., families living in Urban Renewal projects and those living outside of Urban Renewal projects. The Housing Authority is authorized to provide financial relocation assistance to families residing in Urban Renewal areas, These families also get number one priority for Public Housing. The Housing Authority claims that this presents no major problem, but that the principal delaying factor in relocation of families residing outside of Urban Renewal projects is financial inability of the families to provide funds for drayage, utility meter deposits and first month's rent. These families get second priority for Public Housing, if required to move because of Housing Code Enforcement and third priority, if moving of their own volition. However, the Housing Authority has no funds for providing the iniiial financial assistance required for the last two categories and consequently, frequently, weeks and sometimes even months elaspe before the families involved are able to accumulate enough cash with which to meet these initial relocation expenses. As a result, the Housing Authority has proposed that it be permitted to use, as an experiment, $2,000 from relocation funds allocated to it from the City of Atlanta, as a revolving fund and from which the Housing Authority would, on its own determinationy make no interest rate loans of from $10 to $100 to such families, to be repaid to the Housing Authority on a weekly basis over a period of time not to exceed one year. Since it has been pointed out by the Administative Assistant that the City of Atlanta appropriated funds cannot be used for this purpose, I have contacted Bob Watkins, Director of the Greater Atlanta Housing Development Corporation, suggesting that his fund make a grant of $2,500 to the Housing Authority for use by the Housing Authority as a revolving fund for the purpose indicated above and that in consideration of such granty#, the Greater Atlanta Housing Development Corporation require the Housing Authority to hake a semi-annual report to it as to the utilization and status of such fund. Bob Watkins thinks that he can get favorable action on this proposal within 10 days, a tei Mr. R. Earl Landers February 26, 1969 Page 4 If this should fail, Dan Sweat has contacted Jim Parham of EQOA who thinks that his organization may be able to assist by permitting the Housing Authority to draw against certain EOA funds for the purpose described above. I am requesting both the Housing Authority and the Building Department to follow up closely on the effectiveness of coordination and cooperation efforts enumerated in this paper and to advise me of any breakdown which occurs or of improvement in procedures which should be established, Sincerely, Maicolm D. Jones Housing Coordinator MDJ/mc Encls: Memo dated Feb. 11, 1969 cc: Mr. Dan E, Sweat, Jr.
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 15

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_015.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 15
  • Text: "4 Diary arbi oe x tory Ae Mr. Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman See!" eth au/erds Housing Resources Committee je = = Finch, Alexander, Barnes, Rothschild and Paschal 1Oth Floor Standard Federal Building 44 Broad Street, N.¥W. Atlanta, Georgia 30363 Bear Cecil: It is with regret that I was unable to attend the Second Annual Meeting of the Housing Resources Committee on December 12, 19658. However, I have received and read with interest the Comnittce's report and wish to thank the Housing Resources Committee for a job well done. I note that although our initial replacement goals of low and medium incone housing are in the pipeline, those figures do not take into consideration interim growth of the City, formation of now fanilies and any ine-nigration which may occur. These factors will undoubtedly increase our roquironents in the low-income housing field. Also, it is necessary to follow through after units get in the “pipelins"™ to insure completion when they are mest necded. I note in the "FUTURE DIRECTION" portion of the Comaittce's report that you request consideration by the Mayor and Board of Alderinan ef the proposals nunecrated therein and a revised statement of missien for the Counittce, It is ny undorstanding that copies of the Comnittes's report have been provided all members of the Board of Aldermen and I feel sure will receive synpathetic consideration, With respect to revised nissioa, as we are all sadly aware, in spite of our efforts and acconplishnents to date, in the low-income housing field, there still exist: several sizable slum pockots in the City. Until these can be elininated, through the Neighborhood Developncnt Progran, or otherwise by private enterprise, I want the Comiitice to renain in tact and work agsressively tovard our ultimate goal of providing a decent, safe and sanitary dwelling unit for all of our citizens, To this end I suggest that your Committee concentrate on the followings: 1. Endeavor to get loveincone housing developed near sources of enploynent for the occupants. 2. &Encourase and cocperate in developnont of low and nediun income heusing in unincorporated areas of adjoining Counties, whit. 2 Mr. Cecil A. Porao 2 eur Jvanuary Se 5. G. Alexandor Stive for elimination of slum pockets within tho City, through inclusion of such areas in future annual increnents of the Neighborhood Davolopment Program and or by other means. Assist, where feasible, in rehabilitation of appropriate structures in all areas of the City, especially in the gray arcas.approaching Gecay. Encourage development of medium and hich priced housing within the City. Continue to encourage the development of advanced building methods in the areas of low income housing, Direct your attention to the social problcns involved in low income families and neighborhoods in changing patterns. In addition, I suggest that a joint study of the housing necds of “| the City be conducted by the Atlanta Housing Authority, the City Planning ¥ é . ape Benen and the Housing Resources Comnittee to determine the truco /extent of Atlanta's needs, It is ny understanding that A.R-1H.P.C. is conducting a survey of housing needs in the metropolitan area and it is suggested that you call upon them for assistance, Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. Hayor
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 32

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_032.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 32
  • Text: AN OFFICIAL OPINION oF TCV YK ub RADIO/ATLANTA 1601 WEST PEACHTREE 537., N.E. WSB VIEWPOINT "THE NEED FOR MORE SUBSIDIZED HOUSING" by Elmo Ellis, General Manager Broadcast Sunday, December 22, 1968 Novelist Jan Struther once wrote: "A city is greater than its bricks and mortar; it is greater than tower or palace, church or hall; a city's as great as the little people that live there." We agree with the sentiment expressed in these lines, but if we expect the little people to prove their greatness, aren't we duty bound to ask ourselves, what kind of living quarters are we providing for them? Many families in Atlanta are living in decrepit apartments and rat-infested slum housing. Their so-called homes are unfit for raising children. They lend themselves more often to serving as breeding places for discontent, disease and crime. While we have replaced some of these hovels and shacks, and expect to meet the Mayor's quota of 16,800 replacement units by 1971, we aren't providing nearly enough low and middle-income housing. And we aren't subsidizing the building of such units in enough different places in the city. — Clarence Coleman of the Housing Resources Committee of Atlanta headed a team that studied this matter thoroughly. Its members concluded that (1) subsidized housing must be fairly distributed through the city; and (2) the only politically feasible way to do this is by a "package deal," which designates some ten areas located in various sections, north, south, east and west, all of which are suitable for housing development. The plan isn't new, but its never been given a vote of approval by the Board of Aldermen, If they would say yes, housing development could move ahead in a way to make 1969 a banner year for Atlanta. Our city has proved its ability to redesign our skyline with magnificent new office buildings, hotels, luxury apartments and shopping complexes. This same kind of vision and energetic leadership is sorely needed in the building of adequate subsidized housing. Besides eradicating substandard dwellings and bringing new sunlight into thousands of lives, such an enlightened effort on a massive, city-wide scale could nerhaps do more than any other thing to promote social and economic stability and stimulate peaceful progress throughout our community. A great many business, professional and church leaders are solidly behind this program. A number of our top civic organizations are enthusiastically supporting it. What we need now is a resounding expression of approval from the vast majority of our local citizens. If we make it clear and convincing that we, the people of Atlanta, are behind this package proposal--and we earnestly want to see subsidize housing distributed throughout the city--then we will improve vastly the chances that our Housing Authority and our Aldermen will hear and give this program the green light. ### ae, d = = ; = rie =< COX BROADCASTING CORPORATION stations; W38 AM-FM-TV, Allanio © WHIO AM-FM-TV, Dayton @ WS50C AM-FAM-T¥, Charlotte Wy WIOD AM-FM, Miomi 6 KTVU, San Franciseo-Ockland ° WIIC-T¥, Pillsburgh
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 36

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_036.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 36
  • Text: DRAFT Mr. Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman Housing Resources Committee Finch, Alexander, Barnes, Rothschild and Paschal 10th Floor Standard Federal Building 44 Broad Street, N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Cecil: It is with regret that I was unable to attend the Second Annual Meeting of the Housing Resources Committee on December 12, 1968. However, I have received and read with interest the Committee's report and wish to thank the Housing Resources Committee for a job well done. I note that eithourk our initial replacement goals of low and medium income housing are in the pipeline, those figures do not take into consideration interim growth of the City, formation of new families and any in-migration which may occur. These factors will undoubtedly increase our requirements in the low-income housing field. Also, it is necessary to follow through after units get in the "pipeline" to insure completion when they are most needed. I note in the "FUTURE DIRECTION" portion of the Committee's report that you request consideration by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the proposals numerated therein and a revised statement of mission for the Committee. It is my understanding that copies of the Committee's report have been provided all members of the Board of Aldermen and I feel sure will receive sympathetic consideration. With respect to revised mission, as we are all sadly aware, in spite of our efforts and accomplishments to date in the low-income housing field, there still exist. several sizable slum pockets in the City. Until these can be eliminated, through the Neighborhood Development Program, or otherwise by private enterprise, I want the Committte to remain in tact and work aggressively toward our ultimate goal of providing a decent, safe and sanitary dwelling unit for all of our citizens, To this end I suggest that your Committee concentrate on the following; 1. Endeavor to get low-income housing developed near sources of employment for the occupants, 2. Encourage and cooperate in development of low and medium income housing in unincorporated areas of adjoining Counties. Mr. Cecil A. Page 2 January 3. Alexander Stive for elimination of slum pockets within the City, through inclusion of such areas in future annual increments of the Neighborhood Development Program and or by other means, Assist, where feasible, in rehabilitation of appropriate structures in all areas of the City, especially in the gray areas approaching decay. Encourage development of medium and high priced housing within the City. Continue to encourage the development of advanced building methods in the areas of low income housing. Direct your attention to the social problems involved in low income families and neighborhoods in changing patterns. In addition, I suggest that a joint study of the housing needs of the City be conducted by the Atlanta Housing Authority, the City Planning Department and the Housing Resources Committee to determine the true extent of Atlanta's needs. It is my understanding that A.R.M.P.C. is conducting a survey of housing needs in the metropolitan area and it is suggested that you call upon them for assistance. Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_004.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 4
  • Text: Ss. Spier March 21, 1969 MEMORANDUM TO: Mr. R. Earl Landers Administrative Assistant Re your note to give you my opinion on Mr. James A. Smith's Memorandum of March 14, 1969, to Mr. Wofford pertaining to first batch ofvweflylists from the Housing Authority of families certified for Public Housing, the following is offered: Hasty perusal of the 45 certifications indicates that only 11 locations listed appear to actually justify Housing Code notices (4 of these already had Housing Code notices, and notices were prepared on 4 others as result of these inspections); a few may have been justified because of overcrowding. The remaining 34 certifications because of sub-standard housing conditions or overcrowding include: Public Housing unit in Perry Homes outside of the City Limits i given which could not be found Remainder apparently unjustified (in opinion of Housing Code Inspectors) Attention is invited to paragraph 4 of my Memorandum to you of February 26 (copy attached) in which I pointed out the fallacy of the Housing Authority accepting the tenants’ word for sub
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_019.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 19
  • Text: ~~ Mies ef es Aus Pet oy . » aa February 11, 1699 HELCRAI WU TO: i. i B. Satterfriec oe Eeecutive Director ~. Hous: Ug Authority” Laettttve Bisvesbes The Hayor ‘has requested na to ask you, to be sure that adequate machinery is sot up to insuro nctification by the Housing Authority to the pasiding OLficial -(éo include location} when over.a fanily fanad is moved sduto Public Yousing frou a substandard unit cperated by Private Enterprise, , AG tho same tane ho is asking the Building Official to chock on the effectivenoss of his notification to the Rousing Authority whenever en oscupled und is eoudesaad as unzit for human habitation. # ee Pha pane : _ a se ? The latter is in ‘order that the ‘Hous sing Autho: vity may velecats the Zanily into standard housing as soon as feasible and vovort back to the Building eeacdal when this is cone in an effort to prevent BEOther fanity, ty "on noving 2n80 the sare substandard unit. ‘ nth Maesbioas eouze s145°bo : eiticevels. oer y: Se Way did they cua ua iviaata? Se 4iwue tinew tiged :Maleoln D, donos Housing Coordinator UDI/ne Btnesvedy, sel a “| Eo ficvoh bene Se ha ee See, ethan NA Sterne Pd Ov et oho," ws ve og ety a wil te Pfenet
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 23
  • Text: a January 10, 1969 MEMORANDUM TO: Mr. Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman Housing Resources Committee Se See aa ee This seems an appropriate time to review the organization, list of members and current procedures of the HRC. These are some suggestions; b. f. Designate Chairmen and Vice-Chairmen of all panels, Streamline the membership list by dropping those who never or seldom participate (unless it is desired to retain their names on the member- ship list for other reasons). Assign specific continuing type or limited time projects to each panel, Change time of meeting to 10:30 a.m. (We have been encountering increasing difficulty in getting attendance, particularly from members of the Coordinating Group). The later meeting time may heip. In order to create more interest and improve attendance at Executive Group meetings, endeavor whenever possible, to include in the notice of the meeting, mention of appropriate matters to be taken up at that particular meeting. Try to call for discussion and formal ns chane tarREae Ee tne aR or he matters pertaining to work of the Committee, This would give those who do attend the meetings a feéling of participation, rather than just coming and listening.
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021