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Box 5, Folder 2, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 3
  • Text: MINUTES HOUSING RESOURCES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE March 13, 1969 Special meeting of the Executive Committee of the Housing Resources Committee was held at 10:30 a.m., Thursday, March 13, 1969, in Committee Room 1, Second Floor, City Hall. Invitational notice, list of those invited, with attendance of members and guests indicated, and other related documents are attached to the file copy only of these minutes, The primary purpose of the meeting was to consider 2a proposal made by William L. Moore for rezoning of a tract of land in Land Lot 30, 14th District (FF) (annexed to the City of Atlanta, December 1, 1968) for 700 units of cooperative Townhouses and 200 units of rental apartments, ail to be financed under FHA Section 221 d(3). Chairman Alexander called the meeting to order and announced that before he took up the main item on the Agenda (consideration of a particular zoning proposal), he wished to discuss briefly some other matters. He then read a proposed letter to be sent to Representative Julian Bond (copy attached to the file copy of these minutes) supporting in principle Bond's Biiti on the suspension of rent (through payment into an escrow account) on dwellings certified by the Building Department as unfit for human habitation, Seven (7) exceptions (changes) however were suggested as result of a poll of the entire membership of the HRC, the results of which were 26-for, 3-for with reservations and 2-against, The Chairman then referred to a requirement for the HRC to submit by March 15 its plan for the 1969 Summer Program in certain central core areas of the City. In this connection, the Chairman emphasized the need for: 1, An overall rezoning of the City to provide for the City's future development needs, to include adequate areas for low and medium income housing; and 2. Establishment of some emergency housing to provide living accomodations for special cases which repeatedly occur. The Chairman recognized Roger F. Rupnow, Assistant Professor cf City Planning at Georgia Tech, who explained briefly a project which a group of his students proposed to underteke during the Spring quarter commencing about April 1 on a study preparing a plan for future development for the Southwest area of Atlanta. The plan is to be submitted to the City as a recommendation for consideration by the City in developing a plan for this area, The students’ group proposes to work closely with the residents of this area and with the City of Atlanta as to their wishes on existing zoning and future development needs, to include low and moderate income housing in the area, Mr. Gladin, City Planning Director, informed the Committee that a group of civic organizations in the area, known as Federation of Southwest Clubs has requested preparation of a pian for the future development of the Southwest area and had essentially asked the Zoning Committee for a moritorium on zoning changes in the area until such a plan could be developed. Mr. Gladin further stated that this is impractical and cannot be done; that the Land Use Plan for the City, adopted by the Board of Aldermen about a year ago, is inten
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 12

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_012.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 12
  • Text: February 26, 1969 MEMORANDUM TO: Mr. R. Earl Landers Administrative Assistant Pursuant to your instructions, I met February 24 with Lester Persells, M. B. Satteffield, Gilbert Boggs and Howard Grigsby of the Housing Authority and on February 25 with Bill Wofford and Jim Smith of the Building Department to insure appropriate coordination pertaining to the attached Memorandum. As a result of these discussions, the Housing Authority has agreed to report to the Building Department (Housing Code Division) on a weekly basis, the names and addresses of families and individuals which they have “certified” to move into Public Housing, because of substandard housing conditions. This report is to also include an appropriate date of anticipated move. Upon receipt of this report, the Building Department proposes to inspect the locations involved within two working days after receiving the reports and to initiate appropriate action where necessary for compliance with the Housing Code. (The only fallacy that I can see with respect to this arrange- ment is that currently the Housing Authority takes the prospective tenants’ word that they are living in substandard housing and apparently makes no verification of this. In discussing this point with the Building Department, it appears that before certifing a family to move into Public Housing, because of living in sub- standard housing, the family involved should first request and obtain a certificate from the Housing Code Division that the unt is substandard and then present such certificate to the Housing Authority.) The Building Department has been submitting requests to the Housing Authority from the Housing Code Division and the Codes Compliance Office (as result of Court action) separately for re location of families. The Housing Authority has heretofore re~ ported back to the Building Department on a monthly basis those families which they have relocated, a | Mr. R. Earl Landers February 26, 1969 Page 2 (The Building Department has now decided to consolidate its reports, through the Housing Code Division only, to the Housing Authority, and the Housing Authority has agreed to report relocations back to the Housing Code Division on a weekly basis.) The Housing Authority has requested, and the Building Department has agreed, that requests for relocation be more specific than they have been in the past in order to provide better understanding as to why relocation is necessary and determination as to when it should be accomplished, : Mr. Satterfield suggested that he did not think that the Housing Authority should approach a family to provide relocation assistance until the property and the need therefor, had been adjudicated by the Courts; that otherwise the Housing Authority might create antagonism on the part of the Landlord, or disturbance of the tenants, er both and therefore be criticized as acting unconstitutionally. I pointed out that this would be entirely too slow and would not accomplish the desired results and that such delay is unacceptable, It also developed that on the initial visit by a Housing Authority Relocation Worker to a family, that attempt is made then and there to arrange for relocation (normally this is unsuccessful). Mr. Persells suggested that perhaps the first visit to the property by the Housing Authority Relocation Worker should be purely exploratory to find out what the Gircumstances are, with view to subsequently making staff determination as to appropriate action which should be taken. I heartidly agree, However, it was then brought out by the Housing Authority that this type of visit is more in the nature of social work and that the Housing Authority has no Social Workers; only Relocation Workers. It seems to me that the solution is obvious. The Relocation Workers should determine the social aspects, as part of their relocation assignment, before the tenanés or the landlords are notified that relocation is mandatory. If the initial visit was done quitly and on an exploratory basis, much anxiety and disturbances on the part of the tenant; and annoyance and hostility on the part of the landlord would be considerably reduced and in most instances could conceiveable be eliminated all together. The Housing Authority feels that in many btances the requests from the Building Department for relocation are everly simplified in that the names and niimbers of people are usually not provided and, if relocation is being requested in order to reduce overcrowding, eee te r8quired to move and ones permitted to remain are not Spec ° Mr. R. Earl Landers February 26, 1969 Page 3 The Building Department feels that these details are functions which could and should be determined by the Relocation Workers, as part of their relocation assignments, using the Housing Code as a guide and should not be expected of the Housing Code Inspectors. I am inclined to agree with the Building Department in this respect, but have requested the Building Department in making its requests to the Housing Authority for relocation to be as specific as practical. In general, relocation consists of two categories, i.e., families living in Urban Renewal projects and those living outside of Urban Renewal projects. The Housing Authority is authorized to provide financial relocation assistance to families residing in Urban Renewal areas, These families also get number one priority for Public Housing. The Housing Authority claims that this presents no major problem, but that the principal delaying factor in relocation of families residing outside of Urban Renewal projects is financial inability of the families to provide funds for drayage, utility meter deposits and first month's rent. These families get second priority for Public Housing, if required to move because of Housing Code Enforcement and third priority, if moving of their own volition. However, the Housing Authority has no funds for providing the iniiial financial assistance required for the last two categories and consequently, frequently, weeks and sometimes even months elaspe before the families involved are able to accumulate enough cash with which to meet these initial relocation expenses. As a result, the Housing Authority has proposed that it be permitted to use, as an experiment, $2,000 from relocation funds allocated to it from the City of Atlanta, as a revolving fund and from which the Housing Authority would, on its own determinationy make no interest rate loans of from $10 to $100 to such families, to be repaid to the Housing Authority on a weekly basis over a period of time not to exceed one year. Since it has been pointed out by the Administative Assistant that the City of Atlanta appropriated funds cannot be used for this purpose, I have contacted Bob Watkins, Director of the Greater Atlanta Housing Development Corporation, suggesting that his fund make a grant of $2,500 to the Housing Authority for use by the Housing Authority as a revolving fund for the purpose indicated above and that in consideration of such granty#, the Greater Atlanta Housing Development Corporation require the Housing Authority to hake a semi-annual report to it as to the utilization and status of such fund. Bob Watkins thinks that he can get favorable action on this proposal within 10 days, a tei Mr. R. Earl Landers February 26, 1969 Page 4 If this should fail, Dan Sweat has contacted Jim Parham of EQOA who thinks that his organization may be able to assist by permitting the Housing Authority to draw against certain EOA funds for the purpose described above. I am requesting both the Housing Authority and the Building Department to follow up closely on the effectiveness of coordination and cooperation efforts enumerated in this paper and to advise me of any breakdown which occurs or of improvement in procedures which should be established, Sincerely, Maicolm D. Jones Housing Coordinator MDJ/mc Encls: Memo dated Feb. 11, 1969 cc: Mr. Dan E, Sweat, Jr.
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 15

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_015.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 15
  • Text: "4 Diary arbi oe x tory Ae Mr. Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman See!" eth au/erds Housing Resources Committee je = = Finch, Alexander, Barnes, Rothschild and Paschal 1Oth Floor Standard Federal Building 44 Broad Street, N.¥W. Atlanta, Georgia 30363 Bear Cecil: It is with regret that I was unable to attend the Second Annual Meeting of the Housing Resources Committee on December 12, 19658. However, I have received and read with interest the Comnittce's report and wish to thank the Housing Resources Committee for a job well done. I note that although our initial replacement goals of low and medium incone housing are in the pipeline, those figures do not take into consideration interim growth of the City, formation of now fanilies and any ine-nigration which may occur. These factors will undoubtedly increase our roquironents in the low-income housing field. Also, it is necessary to follow through after units get in the “pipelins"™ to insure completion when they are mest necded. I note in the "FUTURE DIRECTION" portion of the Comaittce's report that you request consideration by the Mayor and Board of Alderinan ef the proposals nunecrated therein and a revised statement of missien for the Counittce, It is ny undorstanding that copies of the Comnittes's report have been provided all members of the Board of Aldermen and I feel sure will receive synpathetic consideration, With respect to revised nissioa, as we are all sadly aware, in spite of our efforts and acconplishnents to date, in the low-income housing field, there still exist: several sizable slum pockots in the City. Until these can be elininated, through the Neighborhood Developncnt Progran, or otherwise by private enterprise, I want the Comiitice to renain in tact and work agsressively tovard our ultimate goal of providing a decent, safe and sanitary dwelling unit for all of our citizens, To this end I suggest that your Committee concentrate on the followings: 1. Endeavor to get loveincone housing developed near sources of enploynent for the occupants. 2. &Encourase and cocperate in developnont of low and nediun income heusing in unincorporated areas of adjoining Counties, whit. 2 Mr. Cecil A. Porao 2 eur Jvanuary Se 5. G. Alexandor Stive for elimination of slum pockets within tho City, through inclusion of such areas in future annual increnents of the Neighborhood Davolopment Program and or by other means. Assist, where feasible, in rehabilitation of appropriate structures in all areas of the City, especially in the gray arcas.approaching Gecay. Encourage development of medium and hich priced housing within the City. Continue to encourage the development of advanced building methods in the areas of low income housing, Direct your attention to the social problcns involved in low income families and neighborhoods in changing patterns. In addition, I suggest that a joint study of the housing necds of “| the City be conducted by the Atlanta Housing Authority, the City Planning ¥ é . ape Benen and the Housing Resources Comnittee to determine the truco /extent of Atlanta's needs, It is ny understanding that A.R-1H.P.C. is conducting a survey of housing needs in the metropolitan area and it is suggested that you call upon them for assistance, Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. Hayor
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 32

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_032.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 32
  • Text: AN OFFICIAL OPINION oF TCV YK ub RADIO/ATLANTA 1601 WEST PEACHTREE 537., N.E. WSB VIEWPOINT "THE NEED FOR MORE SUBSIDIZED HOUSING" by Elmo Ellis, General Manager Broadcast Sunday, December 22, 1968 Novelist Jan Struther once wrote: "A city is greater than its bricks and mortar; it is greater than tower or palace, church or hall; a city's as great as the little people that live there." We agree with the sentiment expressed in these lines, but if we expect the little people to prove their greatness, aren't we duty bound to ask ourselves, what kind of living quarters are we providing for them? Many families in Atlanta are living in decrepit apartments and rat-infested slum housing. Their so-called homes are unfit for raising children. They lend themselves more often to serving as breeding places for discontent, disease and crime. While we have replaced some of these hovels and shacks, and expect to meet the Mayor's quota of 16,800 replacement units by 1971, we aren't providing nearly enough low and middle-income housing. And we aren't subsidizing the building of such units in enough different places in the city. — Clarence Coleman of the Housing Resources Committee of Atlanta headed a team that studied this matter thoroughly. Its members concluded that (1) subsidized housing must be fairly distributed through the city; and (2) the only politically feasible way to do this is by a "package deal," which designates some ten areas located in various sections, north, south, east and west, all of which are suitable for housing development. The plan isn't new, but its never been given a vote of approval by the Board of Aldermen, If they would say yes, housing development could move ahead in a way to make 1969 a banner year for Atlanta. Our city has proved its ability to redesign our skyline with magnificent new office buildings, hotels, luxury apartments and shopping complexes. This same kind of vision and energetic leadership is sorely needed in the building of adequate subsidized housing. Besides eradicating substandard dwellings and bringing new sunlight into thousands of lives, such an enlightened effort on a massive, city-wide scale could nerhaps do more than any other thing to promote social and economic stability and stimulate peaceful progress throughout our community. A great many business, professional and church leaders are solidly behind this program. A number of our top civic organizations are enthusiastically supporting it. What we need now is a resounding expression of approval from the vast majority of our local citizens. If we make it clear and convincing that we, the people of Atlanta, are behind this package proposal--and we earnestly want to see subsidize housing distributed throughout the city--then we will improve vastly the chances that our Housing Authority and our Aldermen will hear and give this program the green light. ### ae, d = = ; = rie =< COX BROADCASTING CORPORATION stations; W38 AM-FM-TV, Allanio © WHIO AM-FM-TV, Dayton @ WS50C AM-FAM-T¥, Charlotte Wy WIOD AM-FM, Miomi 6 KTVU, San Franciseo-Ockland ° WIIC-T¥, Pillsburgh
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 36

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_036.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 36
  • Text: DRAFT Mr. Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman Housing Resources Committee Finch, Alexander, Barnes, Rothschild and Paschal 10th Floor Standard Federal Building 44 Broad Street, N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Cecil: It is with regret that I was unable to attend the Second Annual Meeting of the Housing Resources Committee on December 12, 1968. However, I have received and read with interest the Committee's report and wish to thank the Housing Resources Committee for a job well done. I note that eithourk our initial replacement goals of low and medium income housing are in the pipeline, those figures do not take into consideration interim growth of the City, formation of new families and any in-migration which may occur. These factors will undoubtedly increase our requirements in the low-income housing field. Also, it is necessary to follow through after units get in the "pipeline" to insure completion when they are most needed. I note in the "FUTURE DIRECTION" portion of the Committee's report that you request consideration by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the proposals numerated therein and a revised statement of mission for the Committee. It is my understanding that copies of the Committee's report have been provided all members of the Board of Aldermen and I feel sure will receive sympathetic consideration. With respect to revised mission, as we are all sadly aware, in spite of our efforts and accomplishments to date in the low-income housing field, there still exist. several sizable slum pockets in the City. Until these can be eliminated, through the Neighborhood Development Program, or otherwise by private enterprise, I want the Committte to remain in tact and work aggressively toward our ultimate goal of providing a decent, safe and sanitary dwelling unit for all of our citizens, To this end I suggest that your Committee concentrate on the following; 1. Endeavor to get low-income housing developed near sources of employment for the occupants, 2. Encourage and cooperate in development of low and medium income housing in unincorporated areas of adjoining Counties. Mr. Cecil A. Page 2 January 3. Alexander Stive for elimination of slum pockets within the City, through inclusion of such areas in future annual increments of the Neighborhood Development Program and or by other means, Assist, where feasible, in rehabilitation of appropriate structures in all areas of the City, especially in the gray areas approaching decay. Encourage development of medium and high priced housing within the City. Continue to encourage the development of advanced building methods in the areas of low income housing. Direct your attention to the social problems involved in low income families and neighborhoods in changing patterns. In addition, I suggest that a joint study of the housing needs of the City be conducted by the Atlanta Housing Authority, the City Planning Department and the Housing Resources Committee to determine the true extent of Atlanta's needs. It is my understanding that A.R.M.P.C. is conducting a survey of housing needs in the metropolitan area and it is suggested that you call upon them for assistance. Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_004.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 4
  • Text: Ss. Spier March 21, 1969 MEMORANDUM TO: Mr. R. Earl Landers Administrative Assistant Re your note to give you my opinion on Mr. James A. Smith's Memorandum of March 14, 1969, to Mr. Wofford pertaining to first batch ofvweflylists from the Housing Authority of families certified for Public Housing, the following is offered: Hasty perusal of the 45 certifications indicates that only 11 locations listed appear to actually justify Housing Code notices (4 of these already had Housing Code notices, and notices were prepared on 4 others as result of these inspections); a few may have been justified because of overcrowding. The remaining 34 certifications because of sub-standard housing conditions or overcrowding include: Public Housing unit in Perry Homes outside of the City Limits i given which could not be found Remainder apparently unjustified (in opinion of Housing Code Inspectors) Attention is invited to paragraph 4 of my Memorandum to you of February 26 (copy attached) in which I pointed out the fallacy of the Housing Authority accepting the tenants’ word for sub
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_019.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 19
  • Text: ~~ Mies ef es Aus Pet oy . » aa February 11, 1699 HELCRAI WU TO: i. i B. Satterfriec oe Eeecutive Director ~. Hous: Ug Authority” Laettttve Bisvesbes The Hayor ‘has requested na to ask you, to be sure that adequate machinery is sot up to insuro nctification by the Housing Authority to the pasiding OLficial -(éo include location} when over.a fanily fanad is moved sduto Public Yousing frou a substandard unit cperated by Private Enterprise, , AG tho same tane ho is asking the Building Official to chock on the effectivenoss of his notification to the Rousing Authority whenever en oscupled und is eoudesaad as unzit for human habitation. # ee Pha pane : _ a se ? The latter is in ‘order that the ‘Hous sing Autho: vity may velecats the Zanily into standard housing as soon as feasible and vovort back to the Building eeacdal when this is cone in an effort to prevent BEOther fanity, ty "on noving 2n80 the sare substandard unit. ‘ nth Maesbioas eouze s145°bo : eiticevels. oer y: Se Way did they cua ua iviaata? Se 4iwue tinew tiged :Maleoln D, donos Housing Coordinator UDI/ne Btnesvedy, sel a “| Eo ficvoh bene Se ha ee See, ethan NA Sterne Pd Ov et oho," ws ve og ety a wil te Pfenet
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 23
  • Text: a January 10, 1969 MEMORANDUM TO: Mr. Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman Housing Resources Committee Se See aa ee This seems an appropriate time to review the organization, list of members and current procedures of the HRC. These are some suggestions; b. f. Designate Chairmen and Vice-Chairmen of all panels, Streamline the membership list by dropping those who never or seldom participate (unless it is desired to retain their names on the member- ship list for other reasons). Assign specific continuing type or limited time projects to each panel, Change time of meeting to 10:30 a.m. (We have been encountering increasing difficulty in getting attendance, particularly from members of the Coordinating Group). The later meeting time may heip. In order to create more interest and improve attendance at Executive Group meetings, endeavor whenever possible, to include in the notice of the meeting, mention of appropriate matters to be taken up at that particular meeting. Try to call for discussion and formal ns chane tarREae Ee tne aR or he matters pertaining to work of the Committee, This would give those who do attend the meetings a feéling of participation, rather than just coming and listening.
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 35

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_035.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 35
  • Text: Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal January 21, 1969 Cecil A. Alexander, F.A.LA. The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Ivan: Malcolm Jones reviewed with me a letter he had drafted for you to send to the Housing Resources Committee. We are delaying another meeting of Housing Resources Committee until we hear from you. As a matter of fact we would like for you to address the meeting. Sincerely, CAA: vb Architects Engineers Interior Designers 44 Broad Street N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Phone 688-3313 State National Bank Bldg, Huntsville, Ala. 35801 Phone 539-9648
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 13
  • Text: February 24, 1969 MEMORANDUM TO: Mr. Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman Housing Resources Committee Attached (Encl. 1) is copy of Memo from Eric Hill Associates to Collier Gladin, entitled "Expanded Means To Lower Cost Housing”. Collier has discussed this briefly with Dan Sweat with view to under~- taking an updated and expanded study of the housing portion of the CIP. This would presumably be done by Eric Hill Associates. Dan feels, and so do I, that the initiation of any major up= dating study on housing in Atlanta should be initiated by the Housing Resources Committee, Eric Hill Associates is perhaps the best housing, planning consultant firm I know and there is little contained in the attached proposal with which I disagree. However, it seems somewhat in- appropriate to initiate another major study when we have not yet been able to implement the recommendations of the previous study, although we are fully aware of the major factors which are still holding up implementation of the previous study. The following are some of the more important of these; a. The number one problem of course is getting site approvals. b. Other difficulties which have not been adequately corrected and for which specific recommendations were made formally by the Housing Resources Committee to the Zoning and Planning andsDevelopment Committees of the Board of Aldermen, August 2, 1968, include; 3. “Revision of the Ordinance governing non-conforming use of land to allow structural changes in improving dwelling units to meet requirements of the Housing Code." ae CREE ee a aa aa ara > = = Mr, Cecil A. Alexander February 24, 1969 Page 3 I was called upon by a City Official for current figures on units Completed, Under Construction and in Planning in the Low-income Housing Program. The best I could offer was to provide figures as of November 15, 1968. I have not been able to compile a more recent report, although, it is known that the figures have changed considerably Since the November 15 report. 5. Attached (Encl. 5) are copies of recant Memos from this office to Mr. Satterfield of the Housing Authority in an effort to obtain some essential data pertaining to Public Housing and to encourage coordination efforts toward insuring rehabilitation of existing substandard units, from which occupants move into Public Housing. In addition, the CIP contained a specific recommendation for establishment of a Housing Resources Bureau. Extract of the proposal is attached (Encl. 6). About 2 years ago, I provided Mr. Sweat with a brief concept, including tentative proposed organizational structure and personnel considered necessary to implement such an activity. If established, that organization should probably function under the guidance and as a facility of the Housing Resources Committee, with a specific Housing Committee of the Board of Aldermen designated to steer and carry the program's activities through the Board of Aldermen to fruition. Realizing the local Administration's desire to reduce rather than add Departments and in order to avoid appearances of empire building, I have thus far refrained from recommending establishment of a Housing Bureau or Department. However, although a good start has been made in housing, I feel that we have barely scratched the surface of the overall housing needs of the City during the next 20 years; and that this problem can best be attacked through an increase in, and elevation of, Housing Resources facilities. Perhaps the time has now come when we should seriously consider expansion of such facilities and follow the recommendations of the CIP by establishing a small Housing Bureau or Department, In summary, the proposal of Eric Hill Associates is in general practical. However, I cannot see any particular advantage of such additional study at this time, unless there is, or will be, ample organization and political structure for implementation of its findings. This does not exist now and should be a prerequisite to initiation of such a major new study. Recommendation (if made) for such organization and political structure should, in my opinion, originate with the Housing Resources Committee. Mr. Cecil A, Alexander February 24, 1969 Page 4 Sincerely, Malcolm D, Jones Housing Coordinator MDJ/me Enclis:1.Expanded Means To Lower Cost Housing 2.Draft dated February 10, 1968 3.Memo dated February 11, 1969 4.Memo dated October 31, 1968 5.Memos dated February 11, 1969 6,Extract from CIP co: Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Mr. Cecil A. Alexander February 24, 1969 Page 2 There are several related documents which have a direct bearing 4. “Accelerate the Urban Renewal program particularly in the NASH-BANS, Vine City and other areas outside the Model Cities area." (This being only partially implemented now.) ¢ 6. “Adoption of a revised district zoning map based on the new Land Use map, to include adequate areas for low-income howing." on this matter. The more pertinent of these are: i. The Second Annual Report (FUTURE DIRECTION Section) which spelled out certain recommend- ations for future course of action for the housing program and called for a revised statement of mission from the Mayor for the Committee. Copy of draft proposed (2-10-69) for revised mission is attached (Encl, 2). It contained, among other things, suggestion that a joint study of the housing needs of the City be conducted by the Housing Authority, Planning Department and the Housing Resources Committee. Such study might substitute for, or be absorbed in, the proposed study by Eric Hill Associates, Some suggestions for a more practical approach to solving the low-income housing problems are contained in Memo to Dan Sweat, February 11, 1969, copy attached (Encl. 3), Proposal for specific housing and related activities for the recently approved Urban Observatory are contained in Memo to Mr. Sweat, October 31, 1968, copy attached (Encl. 4). It is doubtful however, that 211 of the proposed activities can be assumed by the Urban Observatory, certainly not initially. The Housing Coordinator has repeatedly pointed out the need for, and requested the services of, a Statistical Clerk to keep up-to-date and periodically reproduce the Low-Income Housing Inventory Report. That important report cannot be kept current, through existing facilitiés.of the Housing Resources Committee office. Just recently, as frequently,
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 16

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_016.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 16
  • Text: ——Ws Aer Syy eed we) es c hae = SS ‘+ * s a _ 7 "1 > bee = ee eee ence ae te SAE tei, Lee “TFebuazy ty 1969 3 Pk iby STE Got ONG a . o% wow ® UE at : 2»? “a . "t $i ; Sal wa? CREA ae ? ie BHEMORANDUM.. of CM UEam OL ts Wetim. Te cies ep dong yo Besa Pe yee oP BSS ese ES me EM OF ae et 4 . RT<+ ™ Cie seat, iv i& a eat see og tae ph at Oy Rat ae 2 he TO: Fil’. Dan aoe wut ia oa 2 oe Bes it . fi) ee Director of Govormontal Liaison ~« * .72 octane Action on Souewene potitions recently, § such as Sowell Road, Kimberly Road, Brounlee Kond and Brownstown oad (still pending) Ror lovy-ineene me jing projects has been mos t SES GOMEBEANS 5 but is understandable Pe hah EE Ds Pg, fnis has donb ed ne that wo are not going to got needed sites approved in the Zorsceadlo future unless we resort to Gifferent procedures. f gv esa s> toh as flso, I smn convinced that 20 is not gacd Zor the City to repeatedly create such extensive hostility ia substantial residonptial neischborhoods by continuing to attempt rezoning of erens for aparinents when the cards ave clearly stacked to loose. There must be move practical wethods that could be enployed, I Sucgests Le Bat as Y PARR SF oa SD i. Utilization of exis a NDP, for new dovelorr of loyeincone housing, particularly Public Housing. This would create little or no oppositicn fron 3 fo ues wesldontial nelighborhe OuS, ox othervise, except wtds .¥ ... perhaps the Plannars, who consistentiy oppose . eet era ‘vad « Logalizing housing in many such ereas thru 7 - Slun aren 3, Shrouck ci ees ge Deets of ORRNeS s in actual or planned sonins. I refer angel tick ly to portions of Lightning, Ruri Road, a substantial area off old Harictts Ros¢g in the viesnity of Spring Avenud, Piunkettesn ond others. fe nust be practical and adjust some previous theertical concepts to nécot tho oxisencios of the sctual situations in which we currently fing or Taeaaves, = ? = aentb-w 2 ar es % a + 3 = . Cha Fe ' Lend 2 Hz. Dan FE. Sveat, Ji. 9 Yebruorvy 7, 3035! Page 3 2. Utilization of certain City-owned prop net now being profitably utilized, portions of Lalrowo ed Parl property, Prison Farin oe cortain othor sr ts within the City. Suitable trac Several not now boing pre sree star Be. Adoption of an all cut campaign to ence ‘ and pursuade County Cormissioners erties, such as Federal aaller, but There are fitably utilised, OUPALS An acjoining AO: ie, De: ‘wnbncorporated areas to agree to comstzuction fries acy Bnd supporé of Public iiousd Ww oOo ee nd or othor lovieincens housing projects within their Respective jurisdictions, close to PLES 2 wel Zgy Levees “Gptain authontie statistical data as to” Me tegh ive oe (a) Hoy lonz cecupants of Public Housing have residod within the Ci avy Lindits of Atlanta; rks . Cb) Where they cane from to Atlanta; (c) Why . Cis hs unde Gig they cono to Atlanta; (3) How lenag have | GoD égereed: oy. they been in Public Lousing? Sinn,.B. -Selection by the Planning Depaytnent of ample rayaeteliy s-.areas for Public Vousing and provide for. wevarotiie’ rc appropriate ete thereofk, in counection -.. wi siuta ety with ea Cityeyvide veeanalysis of Zoning. Since Rutty, Thsve we hava 9 vee ties tions of Residential - Erie Tg SSK ZOULRS , which Goefinitely stratify construction 7 econonically; end 5 classizications of Comnoretal, ere 3, Z.can see no Iegical reason uhy we should not | ea Lusther stratify Anavtnuent Zoning and pernaps have a special aategory Ror Public Housing. &£s I see 3%, the above ste ops ave cisen atiol 6 successful pursukt of tho lsveincome housing program in Atlanta. I would welccue your opinion on the above and ov other don $ fox practical Slution of the d3 CREA e : g% san Litas Et es ache boas titi fre: Bincorely, * a, 3? : = ei nat 4 ' 2 ste Bah SE ea atte 8 ae ” Ss ot bees d Spey s 28s Siti tL Maléolnm p. Jones“ oa : bie hoses eg at Housings Coordinator — MDI/mae ces Mayor ivan Alien, Jr. ir, Cociil &A. Alexander
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 17

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_017.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 17
  • Text: HEMORARDUM #O% fred. 4 Eh? « Director of Gg be roy eo oe a at for ch Ce Ban BE, Swea ‘ ail Liaigon you with cO you Menorandun of etober 28 h n Usban evaluation projects to furnis on which a #Y ht setsist this Conte e2 and the LoweEncone Nousing "ahe lloiing is sussesteds Determination, by Sampling or otherwise, the Following statistical Gata on low and noderate ducome Lanilics in Atlanta: (1) Nuwbexr of such faniises ( and numbow in family) with annual fanily ancomes bolow $3,060; and betucen eo $28 spr Os C3 we py eiuics yy gers (2) Length of time fanily has vesided within the City Linits of Atlanta. : OP BRS (3) Type housins proferred: Public HMousins, lagi rontud apartnents , rental duplexes and home ovner- ship (sinsleeZanily ox ceoperative). Assembly and evaluation of figures on averase rental for standard 1 DR, 2 Dn, 3 ER, and 4 Da and bath avartmnents in Atlanta (mot in escess of $150,060 por nonth for 24 PR unit): and within th 2 Netrepolit san of Atlanta isavavitely) Heintata data on number of dvelling units, by bedrocia eenneoehoe and “onthiy xoutals o: pus renase payndcnts, an time of availability for osecupancy oF all nowly constructed Gr yehobilitated low and mediun income housine dovelopnents in Atlantis, Sponsor amd ov conduct Lorriald certificsies of proticloncy —\, é = =e ot aleher a including vouses) « wedi 7 Sa, e ioe ayavdin GX te op and nadntenunsce Pe Peet on Te BICOL » J26 3 Pace 21: unsol * a for ¢ - fl #) i Ge on wa proy el —_ wi oo awe IH ea ee oo 2a ri oO oo &) Cs aS C3 re fs ou 42 _ em es i GF oO fl ert @ re o.oo oy bat Q) Ss © & co oo i t Pp & ca 1D not . “é we y nay bes oo ote eth > ¢ Gn te ub tna “ewe > = A CHtGHt OF ere u Do Go 74 ? noe da Ly ~*% ate GULL ave 7 as fm 3 a} “ — a3 tw ent sao heus NoCue a UIT a A es oy ~ ze eos for Low and tr Lee ete tea etl he v « res wa oA oad t ae Tae ei f-*". me mest © G3 .- on * "So nm a emtem) O5 Prov Hous AtLar Ze aAGvE X i 5 * et gc o an ! Na eo fa Get or aS Pou a 6 i oy _ = Wau ne! or ay wa fs wi Oe oh > Bd memes 02 el oe a 2 oO wrod oa et feist et fa Oo, 3 a alone ou Se eat 4 ; bl i 43 wi Ca TI 0} "mS Sa oo SB fie > : cs 6 et O 34 492 Set Oe Siert fm o sr) tog & Ss? C) £1 07 ft Pa, Lye cp 4 Ci 0 Deri o Ae 22 Fa 0} 02 G ol ra 2 ® rm Pw OM etl ewierd 02 Set 2 Delo” Oo ae ee a at © fa vet Searls a ts i ty O : Sa ene “CY 3 SOR aS Ovid Oo & roe G me Wie sea mam Ow EQ atl et Gi 64 i wl oa £8 mow O bet CG est wd Ca To D'S HSS seuoax w 2 2 eae be rv on wt a3 oe nd wt ae ae aud racy DUNC be oy aeoy x r Rn > = G avis at Ginaét < Coo nan doe ‘er ©. How! 4 ENF Li Ox a T. ts pir 9 4 ine ~ 3 nee he 16) es aes LQ. 7" “it Meyers Ole wl ba %. Coeil A, Ale Magy /ne 1 a cc:
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 5
  • Text: OFFICE OF INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS Atlanta, Georgia 30303 March 14, 1969 JAMES A. SMITH CHIEF HOUSING CODE INSPECTOR WILLIAM R. WOFFORD, P.E., R.A. INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS ELMER H. MOON, E.E., P.E. ASST. INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS Memorandum To: Mr. W. R. Wofford, Building Official
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 20
  • Text: INXTRA CT from ATLANTA'S GOMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM REPORT SECTION TWO: DEVELOPING AN AFFIRMATIVE RLOCATION PROGRAM * * * AN AFFIRMATIVE RELOCATION PROGRAM The factual analysis of relocation housing practices and relocation housing resources as related to those persons and families displaced by governmental action presented thus far results in one unavoidable conclusion: Atlanta does not have the nousing resources to meet the needs of persons to be displaced bv future governmental action. Before Atlanta can proceed with expanded code enforcement and urban renewal activities it must increase its low= income housing stock, In addition, an affirmative relocation program for Atlanta must include changes in organization, procedures, and policies apvropriate to the findings of Section One of this report. Section One shows the need for a definite system of low-to-moderate income housing planning which will provide replacement housing at the time of displacement. It also reveals the need for overall coordination of community development efforts; better récord keeping and data use; improved timing of relocation counseling services and survey; improved use of existing relocation resources; and an improved policy of local initiative in providing local assistance to displacees when such aid is not available through existing programs. The following recommendations have been devised to meet the needs outlined. They are presented in two categories: (1) recommendations of an interim nature for immediate action to alleviate the present low-income housing shortage, and (2) recommendations on organization, procedure, and policies aceaiaeven necessary for effective long range relocation and relocation housing planning. we * * Recommendation 3 That a Housing Resources Bureau be established oe a major division within the proposed Community Vevelopment Department recommended as a part of the reorganization plan of the "Government of the City of Atlanta = A Survey Report” by the Public Administration Service. fy od 4 It is the intent of this recommendation that "Housing Planning" be elevated to a position never before achieved in Atlanta as a highly technical entity with its own staff. Responsibility would be broadly based and not narrowly confined to urban renewal objectives. The major activity would be the planning of housing resources through research for all types of displacement and relocation needs; therefore, this new technical division could be called - for lack of a better name = "Housing Resources Bureau", The proposed Housing Resources Bureau should have as its head an assistant to the Community “evelopment Department Director. It should be staffed with capable, informed economic analysts and planners with demonstrated knowledge of the housing industry, the community, and the local housing market. This new governmental agency would have the following responsibilities: Ae ‘Basearen Maintain a continuous inventory of housing in the City of Atlanta by size of unit, whether for sale or rent, condition of unit, type of unit compared to significant rent/cost ranges, and specific location. In addition, the Housing Resources Bureau would retain sufficient data on the characteristics of the low-income to moderate-income population and their housing locations and needs as necessary for a continual assessment of market potential. Although costly, the retention of such housing and population data would be an extremely valuable planning tool for both public and private interests. Futhermore, this function is seen as the only practical way definitive "client analyses" can be achieved to obtain the best possible housing balance in the area or to plan for maintaining that balance with the criteria attached to the various existing and proposed housing assistance programs. The Housing Resources Bureau would identify the potential of use of housing assistance programs in advance of all governmental community redevelopment projects. Through cooperation with the appropriate agencies the "Bureau" would program and initiate loan, grant, or unit reservations for housing assistance at a time sufficient to assure such houptne FantiPties are "on the ground" at the time people are displaced by governmental projects. B. Public Information Periodically, reports would be issued and distributed to realtors, devel- opers, banks, and concerned public or private agencics. These reports would indicate existing housing imbalances determined by comparing the characteristics of the existing housing stock tothe changing character of area ecomomy and population. C. Technical Assistance The Bureau would be responsible for providing designated city agencies with information on housing and population characteristics necessary to the major report forms required in the administration of their programs with the Federal Government (Workable Program forms, Survey and Planning Applications for urban renewal, public housing nacarvation information, etc.). Such information would be of a designated format confined.to housing and tenant “characteristics and provided at designated intervals. This responsibility would provide important consistency and, hopefully, improve understanding and accuracy of such data. The Housing Resources Bureau would purposefully solicit and encourage assistance and support from area realtors, developers, and the like, by offering special services in defining and describing special housing market needs, and, wnere appropriate, applying information on the potential use of governmental assistance programs for low-to moderate-income housing markets. * % cy a= 7 ee SA ee SR
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 39

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_039.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 39
  • Text: WSB TELEVISION WHITE COLUMNS ON PEACHTREE CHANNEL 2, ATLANTA, GA, 30309 AN EDITORIAL OPINION........ January 3, 1969 VIEWPOINT - An official expression of the editorial opinion of the management of WSB Television. American Builder Magazines' Centennial issue asked a hard question: "Who really give a damn about housing?" And answers: "Not the cities - they're headed for a decade of failure. "Not the suburbs - they couldn't care less." "Not the rural areas - everyone's leaving them." "Not the power structure - all they do is talk, talk, talk" Then the magazine recognizes Atlanta as one of the few oasis in a desert of apathy. Because Mayor Allen, Dan Sweat, Cecil Alexander and Malcolm Jones have pushed us far ahead of other cities. But still not far enough. Even the Mayor's crash pro- gram falls short of help in the area of the greatest need: units that will rent or sell for $30 to $50 a month. So what can be done? Here is what WSB Television considers some key recommen- dations: The Federal Housing Act of 1968 allows the FHA to make some loans for home ownerships at one per cent interest: But there's not enough money for this project - or for many of the other housing programs. Congress must see the crisis - and vote the money. , Building codes must be updated to allow for new, more economical assembly-line building techniques and materials. Building trade unions must stop discriminating and starthelping to train more workmen. Private enterprise must be able to build truly low cost housing at a profit. Senator Robert Kennedys suggestions for tax benefits offer the best hope for that. (more) COX BROADCASTING CORPORATION stations: WSB AM-FM-TV, Atlanta @ WHIO AM-FM-TV, Dayton @ WSOC AM-FM-TV, Charlotte WIOD AM-FM, Miami e KTVU, San Francisco-Oakland e WIIC-TV, Pittsburgh =e What private enterprise so far has not built in Atlanta, must then be built as public housing. And some of this public housing can be built in present slum pockets even in Northside Atlanta. One of the most difficult problems in Atlanta is to find land at a reasonable price zoned for apartments. WSB Television suggests the expressways. That's right - the expressways! Not on the pavement during rush hour traffic. But in the air space over the freeways! Not only is it possible to build housing over the expressways but it has been done in other cities. The land is already owned by the government. And the government encourages use of the valuable air space for such necessary urban projects as housing. Incidentally, for rapid transit, too. Without the expressways, only 200 to 400 acres inside Atlanta are zoned for apartments. With the air space over the free- ways there would be a minimum of 2,700 acres of expressway right- of-way within the city of Atlanta. Already there's plenty of parking available every rush hour. +H #
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 28

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_028.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 28
  • Text: TO: The Housing Resources Committee of Atlanta FROM: Sub-Committee on Public Housing During the last year the Sub-Committee on Public Housing held numberless meetings with many community leaders and visited a great many acceptablé sites for projects. After days and nights of discussions and tireless blending of opinions, plans for action-were unaminously agreed.. The only logical conclusion was reached that (1) sub- sidized housing must be fairly distributed throughout the city and, (2) that the only politically feasible way to do this was by a “package deal" simultaneously presented to Council by the Mayor and Atlanta Housing Authority with overwhelming community support. Our full Committee, the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, the Mayor's Citizens Advisory Committee, church organizations and many others approved and endorsed such procedure. But when submitted to the Housing Authority the Authority stated it hadn't studied the plan, failed to approve or dis- approve, but instead proceeded with the single shot approach which had failed before. The result was continuing turn downs of rezoning by the Aldermanic zoning powers. It is the opinion of the Sub-Committee on Public Housing that it is not too late to resubmit those rejected zoning applications through the "package plan" on a simultaneous basis to meet the city's needs for subsidized housing and that the Mayor, the Board of Alderman and the Atlanta Housing Authority should proceed to do so forthwith. If the same energy, zeal and leadership of our "power structure” and city officials that was mobilized to build our dazzling stadium, luxury apartments and magnificent hotels and office buildings in our urban redevelopment areas had been applied with equal energy, zeal and leadership to providing subsidized housing for those who were bulldozed out of slums to make room for these majestic structures, the goal of public housing our Mayor publicly proclaimed so long ago would now be nearly reached, We have done wonders for the rich. Now, let us do wonders for the poor: Therefore, as Chairman of the Sub-Committee on Public Housing and on its behalf, I move that our full Committee does now reaffirm its position on "package rezoning", and calls upon its fellow organizations of the city and those responsible for its implementation to cooperate to put it into effect. E SUB-COMMITTEE eo i hi Hachinca pCa, ‘Sea Cheer ess, Clarence aciaien ed s. CEI bo aatesacaele Vice- Chairman, «Charles F. Palmer by?" ¥ ers mere 2 fa Ph Oi of WF ene ao y 3 See th | uv Ctr: = =X. ‘ am ate, EP ay aes, Menken: William Bohn 28 toe = why, Ny December 12, 1968
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
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  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 22

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_022.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 22
  • Text: 5 aia tae cee a me W td ss eK LJ . on a a fSCH Kl A zoning class in the graduate school of the * City Planning Department of Georgia Tech will begin work soon on a short-range plan designed to make zoning recommendations on vacant land in Southwest Atlanta. The recommenda- tions will relate both to the reactions of the peo- ple in the neighborhoods concerned, and to city objectives, according to Tech Associate Profes- sor Roger F. Rupnow. Rupnow says he hopes the class can get to work on the project around the first of April when a new quarter begins. The some 15 students, who are in Tech’s two- year City Planning graduate program, will, Rupnow hopes, generate their own program of work once they have been given the boundaries within which they are to work and have some knowledge of the zoning problems of the area. Then, these students will take their plan of work to the executive committee of the Federation of Southwest Clubs (FSC), explain it, and defend and modify it, if necessary, based on their con- versation with the executive committee. The boundaries laid out by FSC (the council made up of representatives of civic clubs on the south side, which is seeking both a short-range and long-range land-use plan for the area) are Gordon Road on the north, Campbellton Road on the south, Donnelly Avenue on the east and Ful- ton Industrial Boulevard on the west. Rupnow says the students will try to come up with a zoning plan for the entire area and, in arriving at this zoning plan, they hope to relate both the reactions of the people and to the city requirements. The class wil! work closeiy with both groups. This is the first time such an approach has been used with a zoning class at Tech, and the plan came about through the Atlanta Urban League which has been working with both Tech and citizen groups in Southwest Atlanta. Rupnow said he wanted to emphasize to the public that his class would be making recom- mendations—they are not empowered to go beyond this. And that the recommendations would possible include suggestions for amend- -ing city zoning ordinances as well as sugges- tions for zoning in the southside. “We are going to try to come up with a plan that might be more specific than what now ex- ists,"’ Rupnow said. { The plan must be achieved during an 11-week period, the length of a quarter at Tech. The City Planning Professor admits this-is quite an un- dertaking. but he is optimistic that his students will be able to achieve it. “The students will be looking at the neigh- borhoods first hand,’’ Rupnow said. ‘‘They will study them from the sense of land use and what zoning ordinances permit in the areas under consideration.” Yay tA ¢ 9 v = | Cak i O} [7 \ | (C Poatoad GW
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
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  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 29

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_029.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 29
  • Text: . = . 7 - : ' B THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION, Friday, December 13, 1968 - By ALEX COFFIN Mayor Ivan Allen Jr.’s five- year low-cost housing goals ap- ‘pear sure of being met, the mayor’s Housing Resources Committee heard Thursday. And the committee voted unanimously at its second an- nual meeting to push again the so-called “package plan,’ which |means zoning for low-cost hous- ling throughout all sections of the city simultaneously. Two aldermanic committees ment to study the matter last August, but indirectly seemed to hope the matter would be for- gotten. since August. Col. tare under construction and 7.337 1966. Allen at that time had sel a by 1971. Jones said that some of {he 7,337 in planning stages may fall by the wayside, but 6,215 units being considered will more than compensate for any losses. Jones said that the program is 4,100 behind in the public hous- ing category, but 4,068 in the Planning department: director Collier Gladin Thursday: reported no substantial progress | had been made on the matter: Malcolm Jones, staff! man for the HRC, said 3,217) hunits have been completed, 6,278 - are in the planning stage—a! total of 16,382 since November, | goal of 16,800 replacement units Allen’s Hlousing Goal Seems Sure; Panel Pushes Zone “Pac slightly more costly 22i(d) (3) housing. Although Jones’ report was the most optimistic news by far relating to the goals, attorney Archer D. Smith III issued a pessimistic warning. “We're deluding ourselves,” he said, “if we take these fig- ures and quit working... We've got to be realistic and get be- hind the package zoning plan.” Barlier in the meeting, Ald. George Cotsakis took exception asked the City Planning depart- | —— % + cage Plan’ to remarks made al this week's annual Chamber of Commerce meeting that the city’s building codes are antiquated. Cotsakis, chairman of the Building Committee, asked that the HRC and the chamber show him specifically where changes would help the low-cost housing program without jeopardizing health and = safely. If such changes are shown, Cotsakis said, “I assure you you'll get. 100 per cent cooperation.”
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
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Box 5, Folder 2, Document 37

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_037.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 37
  • Text: ad = OO mF OOF ie Atlanta ( One ‘of 2 ‘For HUD Housing Home ownership for low-income families who have poor ‘credit ratings was brought a step closer to reality in Atlanta and 11 other cities Wednesday through a new pilot program launched . by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The program was authorized by the Housing and Urban De- : velopment Act of 1968. Operat- ing through the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), HUD will insure mortgage loans for low-income families that .might not otherwise qualify as borrow- ers due to previous credit his- tory or irregular income. P. N. Brownstein, assistant HUD secretary and commis- sioner of the FHA, said a local service organization in each of the 12 cities will provide budget and credit counseling to the low-income families who receive an insured loan under the new program. f In Atlanta, the service agency the Consumer Credit Counsel- ng Service of Greater Atlanta, INC.) The other cities where the pilot plan is being tried are Rochester, N. Y.; Jacksonville; Milwaukee; Denver; Seattle; Washington, D.C.; Duluth Minn.; Wilmington, Del.; Pitts- burgh; St. Louis, and Memphis. BROWNSTEIN SAID in his announcement that the control- ling factor in the FHA’s decision to underwrite a mortgage will be the local service agency’s promise that the family involved|* can be helped through budget counseling and guidance to han- dle the responsibilities of home “ownership. Said Brownstein: “With this new program, we hope to offer the prospect of home ownership to people who have had little hope of ever owning a home.” He said the local service agen- cies invited to take part in the pilot study were selected on the basis of their previous experi- ence in dealing with limited in- come home buyers under other HUD programs for low and moderate income families. Mortgages insured by HUD under this program will have to meet the same requirements as existing FHA mortgage insur- ance plans, except that regular credit and income requirements will not apply. MORTGAGE LOANS up to $15,000 will be eligible for insur- ance. The amount is up to $17,500 in high cost regions. However, the monthly payments of principle, interest, insurance and taxes must not total more than 25 per cent of the family’s ‘average monthly income. ~!
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 5, Folder 2, Document 31

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_005_002_031.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 5, Folder 2, Document 31
  • Text: THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION Monday, December 16, 1968 A Fight cat All Levels Two groups in the vital area of housing heard good news last week in Atlanta, but members immediately got off their laurels to continue their work. The mayor's Housing Resources Commit- fee was told that Mayor Ivan Allen Jr.’s five-year goal of 16,800 units of low-cost hous- ing surely would be met. More than 3,000 have been completed, an- other 6,000 are under construction, and more than 7,090 are in the planning process. All wasn’t optimism, however. ‘We're deluding ourselves,” said attorney Archer D. Smith III, “if we take these figures and quit working. . . . We’ve got to be realistic and get behind the package zoning plan.” The committee voted unanimously to seek again such a plan, which would zone for low-cost housing simultaneously throughout all sections of the city. Such an approach has been studied by the City Planning de- partrnent since last August. The Citizens Advisory Committee for Ur- ban Renewal, meantime, was hearing that for the first time in urban renewal history here housing construction exceeded the demolition rate. Lest this set off jubilation all over the place, Atlanta Housing Authority official How- ard Openshaw had a somber message, part of which was as follows: “Tn our affluent society, it is unthinkable that millions of Americans remain ill-housed; that affluent whites continue to flee to the suburbs, leaving our urban core to the poor and blacks; that spreading slums and blight are Jeading us not to decay but destruction, while in many cities, officials remain insensi- tive to the plight of the people.” Starkly put, yes, but a,summing of a national concern. It is well that Atlanta sees the problem and is fighting it through com- mittee, agency, and individual leadership, This is one of America's most imporlant bat- tles, and it must be engaged at all levels of government.
  • Tags: Box 5, Box 5 Folder 2, Folder topic: Housing Resources Committee | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021