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Box 7, Folder 10, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 7
  • Text: JOHN W. GARDNER THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL Shennan ANDREW HEISKELL 1819 H Street, N.W. * Washington, D. C. 20006 A. PHILIP RANDOLPH Co-chairmen (202) 293-1530 LOWELL R. BECK | Executive Director April 25, 1969 Mr. Dan Swest Office of the Mayor of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Swert: Mr. John Gardner and Mr. J. Irwin Miller testified yesterday before the Senate Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty. At the request of the subcommit- tee chairman, they were the lead-off witnesses. They stressed the importance of significantly expanding antipoverty efforts in both urban and rural communities. We believe you will be interested in their prepared state- ments. Sincerely, f ip a , < Al a > _ . ie L Ath if » pee PrC Lowell R. Beck
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_002.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 2
  • Text: April 28, 1969 Mr. Duane Beck Executive Director Community Council of the Atlanta Area, Inc. 1000 Glenn Building 120 Marietta Street, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Duane: Attached is a copy of a draft position paper establishing the National Urban Coalition's role in health, I would appreciate any comments you or your colleagues may have. Sincerely yours, Dan Sweat
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 8
  • Text: Statement by JOHN W. GARDNER, Chairman The Urban Coalition Action Council before the Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty Committee on Labor and Public Welfare United States Senate April 23, 1969 Mr. Chairman, we are pleased to be here on behalf of the Urban Coalition Action Council. The Action Council brings together various leaders from segments that do not normally collaborate for the purpose of reaching agreement or solutions to our nation's domestic problems. We are here today to discuss poverty in the United States. By current Social Security Administration criteria there are 22 million poor people in the United States. The number has declined from 39 million in 1959. To lift 17 million people out of poverty in 10 years is a considerable achievement, worth bearing in mind in these days of discouragement. It should give us courage and confidence to tackle the remaining task. To let the achievement lead to a slackening of effort would be the worst kind of folly. Twenty-two million poor people represent a tremendous amount of human misery and deprivation. -?2- In his excellent paper entitled "Who are the Urban Poor?" Anthony Downs offers some highly relevant data. Of the urban poor, -- the majority are white -- almost half are in households that cannot be expected to be self-supporting: the aged, the disabled, the mother with infant children -- forty-one per cent are children under 18 -- nearly one-third are in households headed by employed men whose earnings are below the poverty level. It is worth reminding ourselves that the poverty remaining after decades of unprecedented affluence is not like the poverty that was once widespread in this country. It is the hard-core that remains. It is not the genteel, threadbare but benign poverty of the 19th Century clergyman or teacher. It is poverty . at its most stubborn, poverty rooted in the social disintegration of urban and rural slums, poverty linked to severe cultural deprivation, poverty complicated by illiteracy, physical handicap, advanced age, or mental retardation. In such poverty, hunger and malnutrition warp the normal course of child development; physical ailments go untreated and turn into lifelong handicaps; children are never exposed to the stimulation that would ensure their intellectual development; the environment breeds hopelessness and lawlessness. It is a world of victims and it breeds victims. An individual born into such an environment does not--cannot-- enjoy the opportunity we regard as the birthright of every American child. If our commitment to the values we so proudly Sei Bee profess doesn't move us to right that wrong, our self-interest should. Out of all proportion to their numbers in the population, the children of poverty become, in later life, economic burdens on the rest of the community. If we are unwilling to spend the money to cure the problem at its source, we spend the money later anyway--in the social cost of crime, narcotics addiction, social unrest, mental illness, lifelong physical handicap and so on. The attack on poverty must be far broader and more varied than is generally recognized. We have to begin with management of the economy and with attention to economic growth and full employment. Back of everything we seek to accomplish is the economic strength of the nation. That strength makes our social programs possible. It provides the jobs and pay checks that enable most Americans to eat well, keep their children healthy and function as independent citizens living their lives as they please. We often fall into the habit of talking about our economy as one thing and our social programs as a completely different subject. They are the same subject. Economic growth is our main social program. The freest and best money a man receives is the money in his pay envelope. The best program for creating independent and confident citizens is a vital, full-employment economy. Thereforé we must expect the Administration and the Congress to use the tools of monetary and fiscal policy to avoid inflation or recession, to facilitate capital growth -4- where possible, to expand job opportunities and job training, to seek wage-price stability, to encourage the development of new products and services and the advancement of science and technology, to foster increased productivity, and to protect natural resources, . The attack on poverty also calls for adequate programs of income maintenance--unemployment insurance, social security, public assistance, and probably new forms to come. These programs have not been surrounded with the glamour that has touched some other aspects of the attack on poverty; indeed the public assistance programs have been the subject of widespread hostility. But it is a plain fact that most of the poor are too old or too young or too sick or disabled to enter the job market. No matter how brilliantly we pursue remedial programs, there will always remain a large number who can only be aided by providing cash income. A comprehensive attack on poverty also requires that we rehabilitate the victims of poverty and eliminate the urban and rural slums where poverty is bred. To help the individual we must have adequately funded programs of education, job training, health care and social services. To change the environment involves massive urban efforts, such as the programs called for in the Housing Act of 1968; as well as regional and rural development activities such as the Appalachian Program. In short, the total effort to deal with poverty reaches into aveey domestic department of government. As you know, the Office of Economic Opportunity has controlled something less than -5- 8% of all federal antipoverty funds expended during its life. Agencies with far more resources at their disposal are concerned with. housing, manpower, health and other needs of the poor. If we do not adequately fund those broader programs, the attack on poverty will be crippled. 1 would place particular emphasis on -- modernization of the existing welfare program, including Federal support of national welfare Standards, and hopefully, early consideration of a more thoroughgoing revision of the national income maintenance system -- a stepped-up training program with built-in incen= tives, better tailored to the needs of the several categories of poor, e.g., the welfare mothers, the unskilled teenager, the employed low earning family head -~- Job creation--an expanded JOBS program to increase private employment, and a public service employment program -- education, health and nutritional programs to counter the effects of poverty on the considerable number of children growing up in poor families. We must begin to think in terms of much higher levels of funding in areas affecting the poor. Actual appropriations generally are significantly below authorized appropriations, We often hear that poverty programs are failures; that they do not work. And yet, they seldom are given the necessary funds or =6§= the long-range commitment to insure their success. Some examples will show the glaring disparities between authorizations and appropriations. The Model Cities program-- intended as a coordinated attack on blight and treating social as well as physical problems--was given $625 million last year although more than $1 billion was authorized. This year only $675 million has been requested, with an authorized amount of $1.3 billion. The home ownership and rental assistance provisions of the Housing and Urban Development Act called for $150 million the first year, and only $50 million was appropriated. These funds have been fully committed for several months, and many are beginning to question seriously the government's commitment under the Housing Act. The Nixon Administration is requesting full funding for these programs and Congress must act on this request if the Housing Act is to meet its promise. The Office of Economic Opportunity has consistently failed to secure full appropriations. And in education and health, there has been a noticeable failure to spend the amounts necessary to have an impact on poverty. Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, which provides federal funds to school districts that have special projects for dis- advantaged children, received an authorization of $2.726 billion yet it was allowed only $1.123 billion in appropriated funds. And so the story goes. It is unrealistic to believe we can - solve our nation's problems if we do not provide even the authorized funds after long and studied debate over proposed solutions. And now let me turn specifically to extension of the Economic Opportunity Act and the Office of Economic Opportunity. Mr. Chairman, in preparation for this testimony, I reviewed the history of the Office of Economic Opportunity since 1964, and I must say that I am impressed with the role that this Committee has played. The Committee has shown concern and insight. It has worked hard to educate itself and to serve as an advocate for the poor. It is easy to criticize the hectic early years of the OEO. But when the smoke clears away, I believe that history will record significant achievements. The OEO's vigorous efforts stirred a concern for the victims of poverty that made possible a mobilization of resources reaching far beyond the agency itself. Programs in behalf of the poor in every other domestic department benefitted by the generative force of this new effort. Beyond that, the OEFO has injected an element of innovation into a number of programs addressed to the problems of the poor; it has identified and fostered community leadership among the poor and among minorities; and it has enabled many of us to gain valuable insights into the impact of institutional inadequacies on the lives of the poor. Looking to the future, I want to speak very briefiy of three themes which were prominent in the early conception of OEO's function: innovation, community participation and coordination. The innovative approach must continue to characterize the OEO. The infusion of "research and development" techniques into social program areas should be firmly supported and expanded. The innovative approach is well illustrated in the delivery of services to the poor. Breaking out of the mold of traditional agency patterns, the best poverty programs have shown that legal and health services, pre-school education, multi-service program integration in neighborhood centers and other techniques could in fact reach persons long considered unreachable. It is not generally recognized that the innovative activities of OEO had a far-reaching impact on the old-line departments. The latter would be loath to admit it, but many programs undertaken by the old-line departments between 1965 and 1968 were influenced by the philosophy of the OEO. At the heart of the controversy surrounding the OEO has been the question of public power for the poor. The "War on Poverty" provided the first major tools with which the poor could seriously affect some policies and programs at both the national and the local levels. It is true that in a typically American burst of enthusiasm, the OEO went at this task with a maximum of energy and a minimum of reflection. But perhaps such things can only be accomplished in a burst of enthusiasm. I am thoroughly familiar with the problems, inconsistencies, tensions and mistakes that have arisen from application of the requirement for "maximum feasible participation." But we are more skillful in handling those problems today than we were two years ago, and we are still learning. It was wise to seek to give a voice to the poor, particularly wise in the case of minority groups (because of their systematic prior exclusion). I believe that we will move toward increasingly sound and effective forms of citizen participation. | Even today, as my own staff moves about the country helping to organize local urban coalitions and seeking the cooperation of leaders from the black community, we find that many of the ablest local leaders we can recruit for our purposes are men and women who had their first taste of leadership in the Community Action Programs. I have emphasized that the attack on poverty, broadly conceived, reaches into every domestic department. Such multifarious activity cries out for coordination, and of course the OEO was placed in the Executive Office of the President to accomplish just that. As we all know, it never did, partly because its energies went into operating new programs, and partly because coordinating Cabinet members is a difficult task at best, OEO's achievements in coordination have not been altogether negligible. It has worked out checkpoint procedures through which federal agencies, grantees, state agencies and local communities engage in mutual consultation before grants are made. And it has developed joint projects such as those involving displaced farm workers in the Mississippi Delta, Indians, and migrant workers. But much, much more is needed. I believe that my views on the coordination of domestic programs are fairly well known. PR I do not accept the widely shared notion that Cabinet members Cannot be coordinated. They can be. The first requirement is unflinching determination on the part of the President to bring about that result. The second is a suitable instrumentality (and I may say parenthetically that the Economic Opportunity Council, properly used, would have been quite adequate to the purpose). The third requirement is that the instrumentality must be headed by a man of stature, implicitly trusted by the President. There is a serious question as to whether OEO can ever fill this coordinating function so long as it is an operating agency -- and therefore, in a sense, a competitor of the departments it hopes to coordinate. So we may have to look to President Nixon's new Urban Affairs Council to accomplish the desired result. It will do so only if the President himself takes an active interest in it, and only if a strong and substantial professional staff is provided to plan, evaluate, sift priorities, develop alternative courses of action and make recommendations to the President. While we're on this subject I want to say a word about rural poverty, because it involves the question of coordination. We will not solve one most pressing urban problems as long as widespread rural poverty exists. The heavy migration from rural America to the blighted areas of our major cities clearly shows how bad economic and social conditions are in rural areas; despite the privations felt by the urban poor, dshononlains urban conditions continue to represent a substantial improvement over life for the poor in rural communities. With improving agricultural technology, ever more persons will have to find employment outside agriculture. Already the great majority of the rural poor are not in any way involved in farming. Industrial development in rural areas should be vastly expanded wherever sufficient potential exists. States are uniquely situated to combat rural poverty. Programs of economic and community development in rural areas frequently require multi-county planning and coordination. Federal funds, including CAP funds, should encourage the development of state-coordinated demonstrations in rural areas -- perhaps several in each state -- with special emphasis on economic development and on training of administrative and program personnel for all phases of community development, from public administration to staff for social welfare agencies. Such demonstrations should extend to education, health, industrial development, transportation and all other relevant fields. Obviously, programs of that scope are not the appropriate primary function of the Department of Agriculture alone; rather, there should be a coordinated attack by the Departments of Agriculture, Labor, Housing and Urban Development, Transportation, Health, Education and Welfare, and the Economic Development Administration. The OEO might conceivably be the instrument for accomplishing such coordination although -- as indicated earlier -- its capacity to operate and coordinate at the same time remains in doubt. 29> | In the final analysis, substantial economic development is the key to ending rural poverty. There is at present no federal policy guiding the application of the nation's - considerable potential in this area. Resources of the Economic Development Administration can be brought to bear only where the most severe conditions already exist, and even then there is virtually no coordination between the Economic Development Administration and major federal agency procurement and contracting functions. There has been much discussion of whether the various OEO programs should be moved to the regular departments. I believe that some definitely should be transferred under carefully drawn conditions. I confess that I am equally impatient with those who are totally hostile to the OEFO and those who want to preserve it under glass, utterly unchanged. I need not remind this Committee that about 40% of the funds appropriated under the Economic Opportunity Act have always gone into programs delegated among various federal agencies. The great bulk of these funds has gone into a series of work and training programs, and they have been the basis for much innovation within the receiving agencies. I am keenly conscious of the problems involved in transfer. For example, federal departments presently function heavily through state agencies; they do not, in the main, have strong relationships to local leadership and organization. If the departments receive programs from OEO they must continue to foster the new constituencies developed around the programs ie PF ces at the local level, and Congress must encourage them to do so. Similarly, they must protect the innovative values of the transferred programs. If these programs cannot survive in the regular agencies as the latter are presently organized, then there is something gravely wrong with the regular agencies, something that should be corrected forthwith. To insure an appropriate outcome, it seems advisable that, at least initially, delegation should be favored over outright transfer. Transfer should occur only as the regular agencies prove their capacity to nurture the delegated programs. - 14 - I have been asked my views on how many years the present legislation should be extended. I do not have fixed views on that subject, provided that two principles are observed. The first is that every program should be open to periodic revision as experience is gained. The second is that the nation should exhibit an unwavering commitment to fight the poverty battle continuously, this year and next and the year after, never relenting until the job is done. It is not an off-again-on- again kind of problem and it doesn't merit that kind of answer. In closing, gentlemen, let me revert again to the totality of the government's effort in combatting poverty. I am firmly convinced that more billions must be poured immediately into the broad spectrum of housing, education, health, manpower development, and other federal programs which make up the broader anti-poverty package. Millions are still hungry, or live in inadequate housing; the majority of poor heads of households work fulltime; health services are still inaccessible to millions; school systems and entire cities across the country are facing bankruptcy while providing minimal services to needy citizens. We can and must deal with those problems at once.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 23
  • Text: THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL JOHN W. GARDNER CHAIRMAN 1819 H STREET, N. W. WASHINGTON, D.C, 20006 Community Self-Determination Act of 1968 Senate Democratic Version S. 3875 Senate Republican Version S. 3876 House Democratic Version H. R. 18976 House Republican Version H. R. 18460 Title I (All Title references are to S. 3875) Title I creates a National Community Corporation Certification Board (NCCCB) and outlines the procedure and purpose of individual Community Development Corporations (CDC's). The NCCCB acts much like the National Labor Relations Board in its union certification procedure. It will be com- posed of five members, and its primary functions will be the issuance of corporation charters, conducting and supervising referenda, service as counsel to the CDC's and as an information center for parties interested in forming CDC's. A National Advisory Commission advises the NCCCB but does not have direct impact on the latter's specific activities. Section B of Title I states the structural outline of a local CDC. This is the heart of the Act. It would have a broad social improvement purpose as well as the promotion of business activity. CDC's operate in areas in which the 16-year and up population ranges from 5,000 to 300,000. The geographic area within which a CDC would operate is designated by the applicants for a CDC charter. Any resident within the designated area may be a shareholder of the corporation, but the Act requires that a minimum of 10 per cent of the 16-year-old and up popula- tion residing within the area hold stock in the CDC. The shares would have a par value of $5, and each shareholder would have one vote in corporate matters, notwithstanding the number of shares the shareholder actually holds. The functions of a CDC fall into six categories. First, neighborhood services and community improvement, including but not limited to public welfare programs, day care centers, TELEPHONE: 202 293-1530 hes consumer education, job placement, legal aid, etc. Second, it would own stock in businesses in the CDC area. Third, it would sponsor, own, or manage housing facilities within the CDC area. Fourth, it would be an advocate planner for neighborhood and community renewal projects. Fifth, it would serve as a representative of various community interests in other areas of public policy and concern. Sixth, it would encourage various other elements of the community such as business, labor, religion, and so forth, to become active in voluntary community self-help efforts. A CDC would be financed by earnings from affiliated businesses, grants from community development funds, foundations, trusts, etc., and from contracts with privately owned businesses, government agencies, and other entities for specified services or products. The CDC would have nine directors and two additional directors for each 10,000 shareholders of the corporation in excess of 25,000. The directors of the corporation would select the executive officers as well as the Business Management Board. The latter's primary function is to provide overall management expertise and assistance to those affiliated busi- nesses owned by the CDC. The full area of responsibility of the members of the BMB would be spelled out in the CDC charter but would be phrased primarily to afford the BMB maximum lati- tude to manage CDC owned businesses and allow for the purchase of other enterprises. CDC's can be organized by any five or more residents of a specific area covering a population range from 5,000 to 300,000, 16 years and older. For any designated area to be eligible for a CDC, however, the rate of unemployment must be higher than the national average or the median family income be proportionately lower than the national average. After applica- tion is made for a CDC charter, a 60-day period must elapse so as to allow any other interested group within the same area, or an overlapping area, the opportunity to organize its own CDC. Before the NCCCB will grant a final charter to a group of applicants, the applicants must have received pledge cards for the purchase of stock from a minimum of 5 per cent of those eligible to purchase stock within the designated area of operation. This insures a minimum level of community support. If the applicants cannot obtain pledge cards from the minimum 5 per cent, the charter application is rejected. Once the pledge cards are received from 5 per cent of the population, a conditional charter is issued. At that point, the CDC has 45 days in which to obtain additional pledge cards covering 10 per cent of the area's population. Five hundred people must have paid in at least $5,000 for CDC stock. During the =3= 45-day period the pledge money is kept in escrow pending further action toward issuance of a final charter. During the period in which a CDC attempts to raise the minimum level of funds, an additional determination is being made which indicates the relative economic need of the area in question. A Development Index is figured for the area. The Index is the lesser of two ratios: First, the ratio of the national rate of unemployment to the area's unemployment rate x 100, or second, the ratio of the nation's median family income to the area's median family income x 100. If the Development Index of a conditional chartered CDC is found to be 90 or above, the charter is dissolved because the CDC is con- sidered too close to the national average of 100. A special bonus is afforded those rural areas from which outmigration is con- tributing directly to specific urban tensions. If only one conditional CDC is left within a given area, a vote is then held in which a majority of those voting must approve the appli- cants. If a majority of those voting do approve, the final charter is granted; if a majority disapprove, the charter is dissolved. In the case of competing CDC's within a given area, referenda are held for each competitor, starting with those representing the geographic area encompassing the highest level of population. If none of the competitors within the largest given area are accepted, a vote is held for those CDC's competing in the next smallest geographic area, etc., until such time as one CDC is approved by the requisite majority of those voting. At least 10 per cent of the eligible voters must actually cast a ballot for any referendum to be valid. Once a CDC is established, a one-time seed money grant is made to the corporation in an amount equal to its current paid-in capital. Title II Title II provides for the establishment of Community Development Banks (CDB's), which are organized by CDC's. CDB's operate in an area of 25,000 or more people, 16 years and up, and concentrate on financial services to the area in question. They provide both business financing and consumer credit to individual CDC shareholders. Equity capital is obtained through the sale of stock to 1) the Secretary of the Treasury (Class A), 2) any groups or individuals other than the Federal Government and CDC's (Class B), and 3) stock sold only to CDC's (Class C). =4= Class A stock would be nonvoting and repaid by a franchise tax on the CDB's net earnings. Class B stock would be non- voting but receive dividends. Class C stock would not receive dividends. The latter point is made so that the CDB becomes a necessary financial mechanism for the establishment and pro- liferation of CDC activities but does not become a source of income. Income bonds would be issued to the public to provide additional equity and debt capitalization. CDB net earnings would be first applied to make up any bad debts and restore any impaired capital. The payment of stock dividends is a lessor priority. Loans are made to the following individuals and busi- nesses: 1) cbDC shareholders for normal consumer credit; 2) a small business, 75 per cent of which is owned by resident CDC shareholders; 3) a small business, less than 75 per cent of which is owned by CDC shareholders, so long as the CDC in whose area the business is located is given the right of first refusal when the business is sold; 4) a subsidiary of a CDC, 51 per cent of which is owned by CDC shareholders; 5) outside corporations with turnkey contracts with a CDC; 6) cooperatives, 75 per cent of whose members are CDC shareholders; and 7) nonprofit housing sponsors operating within the community serviced by the CDB. An applicant for a business loan must have a minimum level of business experience and expertise, or have contracted with a company or service to obtain the necessary business training. Loans of up to 90 per cent of the required capital may be made on terms of up to 20 years for repayment. Housing sponsors can receive money for "front-money" or construction loans, Unorthodox and high risk ventures are encouraged as long as they would yield significant community benefits. Participation loans are encouraged. The primary purpose of a CDB is to channel capital to business ventures. Its secondary purpose is to provide normal banking services to people in impoverished areas. Title III Title III creates a United States Community Development Bank, which would serve as a secondary financial institution and as a source of technical, financial, and managerial expertise to CDB's. It would serve also to promote economic development in those poverty-stricken areas where no CDB's exist. The USCDB would have the same relationship to CDB's as a federal inter- mediate credit bank has to local commercial banks. The USCDB would have the same relationship to those areas not serviced by CDB's as the World Bank has to underdeveloped countries. Although not an instrumentaility of the Federal Government, the President would initially appoint the incorporators and first directors of the USCDB. Eventually CDB's holding stock in the USCDB would name some of the directors. Capitalization would be provided through stock sales. The Secretary of the Treasury would hold nonvoting, non- paying, Class A stock purchased through funds provided by a Congressional appropriation. Class B stock would be held by anyone other than the Federal Government, CDB's being eligible to purchase such stock. The USCDB is authorized to issue bonds, debentures, and other certificates of debt up to 5 times its paid-in capital and surplus. Its primary functions are to provide secondary banking services to CDB's through discounts, loans, notes, advances, and so forth, and to make loans for business and community facilities or public development facilities in low-income "investment areas," designated by the Secretary of Labor. It provides interim construction financing for facilities which it may also plan, initiate, own, and manage until such time as the facilities are purchased. It provides management assistance to CDB's as well as other borrowers and generally creates new investment opportunities by bringing together facilities, capital, and management. A CDB may establish branches. USCDB earnings are to be applied in the following order: 1) restoration of any capital impairment, 2) creation and maintenance of a surplus account, 3) payment of a franchise tax with reference to the amount of Class A stock held by the Secretary of the Treasury, 4) establishment of contingency reserves, -6- 5) dividends on Class B stock up to 6 per cent of earnings, and 6) retirement of Class A stock held by the Treasury. Title IV Title IV authorizes certain Federal tax advantages for CDC and turnkey corporations. All tax advantages granted to CDC's are applicable until the Development Index for the designated CDC area reaches the national average for five years. Title IV would amend the Internal Revenue Code to permit each corporation in a group of CDC subsidiary corpora- tions to retain its individual surtax exemption and pay its regular corporate tax on anything over the $25,000 at a 22 per cent rate rather than 28 per cent. Tax rates and surtax exemptions are liberalized depending upon the area's Development Index, with provisions for greater tax advantages to those CDC's operating in areas with the lowest Development Index. In addition, the Internal Revenue Code is amended to attract turnkey companies into the CDC area. Turnkey companies can take advantage of rapid amortization schedules for its facilities. Again, the rate of amortization depends on the rate of the Development Index with the shorter periods of amortization being made available to those companies which invest in the poorest areas. A 10 per cent tax credit on wages and salaries of CDC shareholders employed in the turnkey facility is granted to the turnkey company. This is called a human investment tax credit. The 10 per cent figure compares with the 7 per cent investment credit on machinery investment, though is higher because of the impermanence of the investment in human skills. It is argued that the credit must be higher to induce the turnkey corporation to involve itself in impoverished areas. The turnkey company is not required to pay capital gains tax on the sale of a turnkey facility if the sale profits are reinvested in another turnkey operation or in Class B stock of a CDB. A turnkey corporation would be entitled to a sustained profitability tax credit equal to 15 per cent of the profits generated from turnkey operations for five years after the sale of a facility to a cDC. This latter provision presumably guarantees the development of the strongest financial operation the turnkey company can encourage. faitle V If a CDC is not a dividend-paying corporation, it can be treated as a CAP agency under the Economic Opportunity Act. The Small Business Administration is authorized to make grants to CDC's of up to 90 per cent of the cost of technical and management assistance and training programs. The grants may be made for a number of programs, some of which are as follows: 1) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) aT the identification and development of new business opportunities, joint ventures, and turnkey agreements; Marketing surveys; planning and research for business development; plant design, layout, and operation; marketing and promotional assistance; business counseling, management training, and legal and other related services with specific emphasis on management training, using the resources of private business; encouragement of subcontracting to CDC's for establishing business and cooperative efforts to train and upgrade CDC personnel. APPENDIX S. 3875 Sponsors: Senators Nelson (Wis.), Bayh (Ind.), Harris (Okla.), Hartke (Ind.), Church (Idaho), Mondale (Minn.), Hart (Mich.), Magnuson (Wash.), Metcalf (Mont.), Moss (Utah), Pell (R. I.), Randolph (W. Va.), Ribicoff (Conn.), Williams (N.J.), Young (Ohio), Muskie (Me.), Tydings (Md.) and McGovern (S. D.). S. 3876 Sponsors: Senetors Percy (Ill.), Baker (Tenn.), Boggs (Del.), Brooke (Mass.), Case (N.J.), Fong (Hawaii), Griffin (Mich.), Javits (N.Y.), Jordan (Idaho), Kuchel (Calif.), Pearson (Kans.), Prouty (Vt.), Scott (Pa.) and Tower (Tex.) H. R. 18976 Sponsor: Rep. Fraser (Minn.) H. R. 18460 Sponsors: Reps. Goodell (N.Y.), Curtis (Mo.), Widnall (N.J.) and Taft (Ohio) Although there are at least three versions of the Community Self-Determination Act, the differences are in form only. Whatever structural differences are found in the bills are primarily because of political reasons. In short, familiarity with the concepts and proposals of any one bill will be equivalent to an examination of all of the bills.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 36

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_036.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 36
  • Text: THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL JOHN W. GARDNER CHAIRMAN 1819 H STREET, N. W. October 4 - 196 8 WASHINGTON, D.C, 20006 WEEKLY LEGISLATIVE REPORT Education, Labor-~and Antipoverty Funds. Congress has cleared the final appropriations for the HEW and Labor Departments and the Office of Economic Opportunity, the antipoverty agency. The antipoverty appropriation was the largest Congress has ever approved, but funds for schools attended by educationally deprived children were below last year's appropriation. The House narrowly defeated a Southern-bhacked provision that would have encouraged resistance to desegregation of schools. The Urban Coalition Action Council joined other organizations and HEW in working for defeat of the segre- gation provision. Program Budget House Senate Final Below Budget (in millions of dollars) Title. =z Education Php 200. Pi OTS $1,200. ‘$2,123, 8 .+77. Teacher Corps Sle 2 ee S12 20.9 =1'0 53 Dropout Prevention 30. 0 20. 54 ~25. Bilingual Education 30. 0 10: aD 22529 OEO Antipoverty 2; £80. 1 873% 2,088. 1,948. =232'. Manpower Training, Labor Department 223% 400. 400. 400. vi33 The Title I funds for schools teaching educationally de- prived children -- an important program for schools in big cities -- were $68 million less than last year's appropriation and allowed the schools only 2?2% of the amounts they received for the past school year. Congress also gave advance authority for appropriations in fiscal 1970 but limited the funds to 90% of the amount received this year. This was intended to help TELEPHONE: 202 293-1530
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 33

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  • Text: APPENDIX B November 7, 1968 MEMORANDUM TO : Steering Committee FROM : Local Coalition Task Force SUBJECT: Report on the Organization and Hotablisnnent of Local Urban Coalitions In the national statement of goals, principles and commitments adopted by the Emergency Convocation, the Steering Committee called for the establishment of local urban coalitions through- out the country. The Task Force on Local Boal itious has been assigned the responsibility of overseeing developments and progress of these local coalitions. | At its meeting on October 17, the Task Force heard reports from ne Local Coalition Division staff on its activities. While most of the staff has been on board little more than three months, visits have been made to all of the cities where coalitions were reported to have been re some state of organiza- tion or existence. In addition, the staff has been to 72 cities where interest has been expressed by one element or another in establishing a coalition. The staff reported the status of coali- tions as follows: a. Applying the tough new standards established by the Task Force, one-third of the original coalitions (11 of 34) failed to meet the latina eel seeds b, The remaining 23 coalitions are proceeding with staff Report on the vgundeati oh ahd Establishment of Local Urban Coalitions 3 ; 3 2 assistance to organize task forces, develop programs and engage in fund-raising. C. Sixteen strong new coalitions, meeting Task Force standards, have been established giving us a total of 39. ad. Thirty-two additional priority cities have been identified and are the focus of staff organizing efforts. | The staff is moving forward steadily establishing new coalitions and strengthening those we already have. However, the staff is encountering significant impediments to their organization efforts. De There has been a clear and noticeable shift in national public opinion. The sense of urgency concerning the urban crisis which existed in 1967 and early 1968 has diminished. There is greater reluctance to engage public and private resources at the local level in a coalition movement, particularly at this time. A quiet summer has contributed to this shift of ipinion, but so bac has the political campaign. 2 There is occasional lack of support from the top leadership necessary to form a coalition. While business, labor and mayors in many communities are providing leadership and support, the staff has been encountering reluctance by key individuals of one or more of these elements to the establishment of coalitions in some cities. Report on the Organization and Establishment of Local Urban Coalitions 3 The Seeeeniistinent of quality coalitions takes on special importance Since the national credibility of the Urban Coalition in part will be determined by the role, image and status of the local urban coalitions. To be effective, local coalitions must have as their active members the most influential and highly regarded leaders of each of the various elements. | Despite the best efforts of the staff, it is not always possible to engage the attention and support of these key individuals without the direct, personal involvement of Steering Committee members. Where national Steering Committee members have become involved whether by a telephone call, letter, visit, or the convening of a meeting, the organizing effort has moved far more rapidly and has attracted key leaders. RECOMMENDATION: For these reasons we wish to recommend with the denoet urgency that the Steering Committee adopt a resolution calling on each member to accept increased responsibility for the organization of focal coalitions and when called upon to do so to be of gegbevones in the following ways: a. Advise the staff of key leaders in priority cities who are known to Steering Committee meiieere and who could be instrumental in the establishment of a coalition. b. At the request of the staff, write or telephone individuals urging their support of a coalition. a Report on the Organization and Establishment of Local Urban Coalitions 4 Cc. Accept speaking engagements in local communities on behalf of the organizing effort. d. Advise the staff on general strategies to be followéd in particularly difficult situations. | e. In public appearances and speaking engagements, identify with the Urban Coalition and urge support for the local coalition movement. In order to help meet immediate organizing needs of the coalition, Steering Committee members are requested to list on the attached list the names of one or two key individuals in the cities who are known to Steering Committee: members and: who could be instru- mental in the establishment of a coalition. The staff will call on these individuals to enlist their support and cooperation. Steering Committee members may leave the attached form following the meeting. Attachment
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 10, Document 37

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  • Text: THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL JOHN W. GARDNER CHAIRMAN 1819 H STREET, N. W. September 27, 1968 WASHINGTON, D.C. 20006 WEEKLY LEGISLATIVE REPORT Housing. Final action on appropriations for the HUD Department was taken September 25 when the Senate agreed to the disappointingly low figures for key housing programs Without dissent. (For figures, see September 20 Legislative Report. ) HUD Under Secretary Robert C. Wood September 25 said decisions would be made within a week on whether to make across-the-board reductions or selective cuts in HUD pro- grams. Congress cut the Department's requested funds by one-third -- from $3.1 billion to $2.1 billion. Wood, in an interview with editors of Housing and Urban Affairs Daily, singled out four programs where the Congressional cuts especially hurt. These were: Urban renewal grants. As these are for the next fiscal year, fiscal 1970, more funds may be sought next year. Model Cities, for which $625 million instead of $1 billion was approved. Urban information and technical assistance -- a small program to help states and cities carry out urban projects. Congress refused to grant any of the $5 million requested for the program. Fair housing enforcement, for which all funds were denied on grounds HUD already had sufficient personnel working in the civil rights field. The $9 million the Senate had provided would have enabled HUD to hire about 690 investigators across the country to enforce the new fair housing requirements written into law in April. Several organizations have protested the denial of funds to enforce the fair housing act and there is a possibility that HUD will ask Congress to reconsider its action. This . hinges, however, on a decision the Administration must make soon on whether to.send requests for supplemental appropri- TELEPHONE: 202 293-1530 2 S>@ ations to Congress this fall. Although that is the usual procedure late in the session, the economy mood in Congress May be so strong just before elections that the Administration will not ask for additional money. The major new programs in the 1968 housing law will be delayed at least six months if no supplemental appropriations are requested from or voted by Congress. HUD Personnel. Another factor that might delay the new housing programs is the Congressional directive in June that HUD, and all other federal agencies, cut back on their per- . sonnel. HUD had hoped to add 1,600 employees this year. Instead, it will have to reduce its staff by 900 -- not by firing employees but by filling only 7 out of 10 vacancies that develop as employees resign or retire. Senator John Sparkman (D Ala.), chairman of the Senate's Housing Subcommittee, tried unsuccessfully September 23 to win Senate approval of an exemption for HUD from the personnel cutback. Unfortunately, exemptions for other agencies were tacked onto Sparkman's amendment and the major sponsor of the personnel cutback, Senator John Williams (R Del.), fought the amendment bitterly. It was defeated, 23-37. = It is anticipated that another attempt will be made to exempt HUD from the severe personnel limitations before Congress adjourns. Education, Labor and Antipoverty Funds. Final appropri- ations for education, manpower training and antipoverty pro- grams will be announced September 30. Members of the House and Senate Appropriations Committees compromised their differ- ences in a September 26 meeting but withheld announcement of the sums agreed upon. The differences in key appropriations were listed in Appendix B of the September 13 Legislative Report. Head Start. Members of the House and Senate education committees, meeting in conference on the vocational education bill, have agreed to drop an amendment by Senator Peter Dominick (R Colo.) that would have transferred the Head Start program to HEW's Office of Education. The program will con- tinue to be run by the independent antipoverty agency, the Office of Economic Opportunity. Under the final version of the vocational education bill, the President is asked to have a study made of how Head Start can best be administered and to report to Congress next spring.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 10, Document 28

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  • Text: Mi _» WESTERN UNION fe" A TxYg318 22 = TxZ2_- POB TX WASHINGTON DC 20 NFT THE HON IVAN ALLEN JR MAYOR OF CITY OF ATLA CITY HALL ATLA AT ITS NOVEMBEC4S MEETING, THE MEMBERS OF THE STEERING COM“ITTES @GREED THAT THEY SHOULD SEEK AN EARLY OPPORTUNITY TO TAL® @ITH THE PRESIDENT-€LECT. INITIAL CONTACT HAS NOW REEN MADE arr: MR NTXONS AIDES HAVE STRONGLY URGED THAT WE LIMIT OUR DELE*. TION TO 10 PEOPLE. AS A MATTER OF COURTESY, WE HAVE AGREED To 02 ‘SO. ACCORDINGLY, UNLESS ANYONE ORJECT, I SHALL TRY TC PUT TOGETHER A 10-MAN DELEGATION THAT FAIRLY REPRESENTS ALL ELEMENTS WITHIN THE STEERING COMMITTEE. I HOPE THIS MEETS WITH YOUR APPROVAL. | JOHN W@ GARDNER CHAIRMAN THE URBAN COALITION. = iyi R2-s+. al . -_- ooo | ( 1270 (1-51)
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 10, Document 43

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  • Text: a a Crisis in our a a Cities A Public Service Campaign of THE ADVERTISING COUNCIL Side 2 ; \ 1968 W4LH-1503 a 3343 ' \ J t 1. Time “. _ __-30 Seconds 2. Here, Kitty =~ +30 Seconds 3. Split Level 30 Seconds 4, 1930's 20 Seconds 5. Rats 20 Seconds Volunteer Agency ~CHUM, MacLEOD & GROVE, INC oN Py Urban Ce | Crisis in our Cities A Public Service Campaign of THE ADVERTISING COUNCIL Side 1 _. W4LH-1502 A 1. Father 60 Seconds 2. Mother 60 Seconds 3. Veteran 60 Seconds 4. Year 2000 60 Seconds 5.-Affluent Society 60 Seconds Volunteer Agency KETCHUM, MacLEOD & GROVE, INC. Urban Amernca ee ee a a Crisis in our B_G Cities A Public Service Campaign of THE ADVERTISING COUNCIL Side 2 W4LH-1503 f 3 \ , f 1. Time men 30 Seconds 2. Here, Kitty 30 Seconds 3. Split Level 30 Seconds 4. 1930's 20 Seconds 5. Rats 20 Seconds Volunteer Agency KETCHUM, MacLEOD & GROVE, INC. airs oes. Urban = c America ¢ te Inc Sune
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 10, Document 17

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  • Text: The Urban Coalition sei eee: Washington, D. C. 20006 Telephone: (202) 223-9500 CHAIRMAN: John W. Gardner CO-CHAIRMEN: Andrew Heiskell / A. Philip Randolph March 11, 1969 Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Ivan: On behalf of Joseph Keenan, Walter Reuther, and David Rockefeller, I wish to thank you for sending your repre- sentative to the February 26 meeting of community development officials called by the Urban Coalition Task Force on Housing, Reconstruction and Investment. The meeting explored the potential for increasing the volume of construction of low- and moderate-income housing through the pooling of a portion of low-income housing starts by several cities -- the pooled market to be supplied by large-scale, efficient developers and builders. The discussion was very productive, and the consensus of the meeting was that the Housing Task Force should move rapidly in concert with mayors, governors, and the Depart- ment of Housing and Urban Development to refine the concept into a specific working proposal. We- are now proceeding with this task and Messrs. Keenan, Reuther, and Rockefeller will be taking an opportunity to present the proposal to you in the near future. Sincerely, Ar John W. Gardner Chairman JWG:be
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 10, Document 14

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  • Text: xecutive Sysrems, Inc. ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 606 STATE ST.- LAWRENCEVILLE. ILL. G2439 - TEL, 943-33) Management. Actuarial and Pension Consuliants 24 SOUTH DEARBORN + 372-4646 CHICAGO. ILLINOIS Wp Lud Sek Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of Atlanta = City Hall Vf Atlanta, Georgia OW é Mr. Mayor, March 17, -1969 I would like to call your personal attention to the seminar described in the enclosed brochure. In view of your involvement with THE URBAN COALITION, I believe you will want to attend or send someone to report to you on the conference. I'm tired of going to conferences on Negroes and youth where all we have is white adult speakers and a couple of name Negroes. I want to hear about youth from youth . . . and about Negroes from Negroes. The rules for this conference were that it had to provide direct interaction between adults and white youth and black youth. It is the youth that make the program good. For the first time, business and educators and students will be in one program omthis subject. ig I~ =) . Patrick Rooney President ES:mt Enc.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 10, Document 34

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  • Text: STEERING COMMITTEE MEMBERS ARE eee ae, TO LIST LEADERS IN THE FOLLOWING CITIES: Buffalo, New York . Cincinnati, Ohio Corpus Christi, Texas Forth Worth, Texas Kansas City, Missouri/Kansas Little Rock, Arkansas Madison, Wisconsin Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania St. Louis, Missouri San Antonio, Texas Seattle, Washington Utica, New York a 2. 1. 2s l. 2. l. 2. a 2. Li 2% L. Ze l. 2. l. 2. l. 2. l. Signature - Steering Committee Membex r 3
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 10, Document 1

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  • Text: a a ee eG ee er oe eee ee oe eee ee April 28, 1969 MEMORANDUM To; Col, Malcolm Jones’. | From; Dan sve | Attached is a copy of a draft position paper establishing the National Urban Coalition's role in housing. I would appreciate any comments you may have. |
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 10, Document 5

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  • Text: Community Sua Pati JOHN IZARD. i fee Cheveniirt Council of the Hn THOMAE hy SIMKON, Sime Atlanta Area inc. DUANE W, BECK. ficult: Dyn ONE THOUSAND CLENN BUILDING, 120 MARIETTA ST., N. WwW. ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30203 TELEPHONE G7Yr-2250 May 6, 1969 Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Director of Governmental Liaison Office of the Mayor City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Dan: The draft position paper on health by the National Urban Coalition is, in general, excellently put together. The statistics, insofar as we are specifically familiar with them, are accurate, The list— ing of problems affecting the poor in different ways or in different degrees as compared to the non-poor, is essentially the listing our Comprehensive Health Planning Project has been gathering together. The listing of possible solutions or ameliorations is quite compre— hensive. However, several such solutions are presented as though their efficacy had already been established, such as the use of neighborhood health centers, the extension of group practice, etc. These must be, in fact, the objects of careful study, in which both objective and subjective factors need to be included. A small quibble would seem in order for the first few pages which seem to equate being black with being poor. I realize this is because statistics are more readily available comparing the health conditions of Negroes and whites than comparing the poor and non-poor, but this could be remedied in the final edition of the paper, In the concluding sections, the emphasis is clearly on the poor in general, as is most proper and effective, The authors of this paper obviously know how to marshal their evidence and how to present it effectively to make points. There is little doubt that this is a valuable resource document, and the promised "Ex for Action'' should be even more useful, ecutive Director DWB: j
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 10, Document 26

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  • Text: Office of the Mayor FROM: Ivan Allen, Jr. LC) For your information |_| Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the necessary reply. (_] Advise me the status of the attached. FORM 25-4
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 10, Document 9

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  • Text: Statement by J. Irwin Miller, President, Cummins Engine Company and Member, Policy Council, Urban Coalition Action Council before the Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty Committee on Labor and Public Welfare U.S. Senate April 23, 1969 Mr. Chairman: I appreciate the opportunity to appear with Mr. Gardner on behalf of the Urban Coalition Action Council in support of extension and adequate funding of the Economic Opportunity Act. I endorse Mr. Gardner's statement, particularly his conclusions and proposed Congressional action. There are two points made by Mr. Gardner to which I wish to call special attention. The first concerns the fact that we -- business, labor, mayors, religion, minority and civic groups -- represent a broad-based national coalition of normally divergent interests. The Urban Coalition Action Council was formed because of our concern with the future of this increasingly urbanized society, and the legislation needed to meet the challenges of such a society. The Economic Opportunity Act is one of the legislative tools meeting those challenges. Notwithstanding our diversity of views on many issues we recognize the role the Economic Opportunity Act has played not only in materially improving, but in giving substances to the lives of many of the poor and disadvantaged citizens in our society. There should be no thought given to cutting back, retrenching or limiting the assistance the Federal government can provide through legislation such as this. Instead, the Federal government. should be genuinely concerned to make certain the funding is enough to do the job within reasonable time. The second point I wish to make, and again one Mr. Gardner developed in his testimony, concerns the role of community action in the overall antipoverty effort. It seems to me essential that the Congress give full support in this problem to local community involvement. The poor and disadvantaged are more concerned eda than ever before in gaining an effective role in determining their own destiny. They no longer see themselves as helpless and powerless before the unyielding and unchanging institutional forces of our society. They now have a direct and significant impact on these institutions. Although not all view this impact in the same way, I personally believe that greater involvement by the disadvantaged in social action programs is necessary, and that results to date have been favorable. Expansion of this concept should be encouraged. There is also no question in my mind but that community action programs, fostered and nurtured by community action agamicbes’, will turn out to have been the forerunners of a much wider range of community involvement by the poor. For this we have the Economic Opportunity Act largely to thank. I join Mr. Gardner in urging Congress to continue its support of this legislation by giving it not only the extended life it deserves, but the funds, in the form of appropriations, it needs to prosper.
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Box 7, Folder 10, Document 4

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  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 10, Document 12

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  • Text: House Will Act Soon on Bill Continuing Urban School Aid A bill extending for five years the most important federal program for urban schools -- the Elementary and Secondary Education Act -- is ready for debate in the House. ~The Education and Labor Committee of the House approved the bill (HR 514) March 18. The cities look to Title I of the Act for money to support com- pensatory programs for their dis- advantaged children. Title I dis- tributes federal appropriations directly to school districts that have large numbers of children from low-income families, urban and rural. In reporting the bill to the House the Education Committee over rode the request of HEW Secretary Robert H. Finch for only a two- year extension of the Act. He said the Nixon Administration needed time to study proposed changes in the Act and in the meantime, a two-year extension through June 1972 would provide adequate continuity for present programs. Most committee Repub- licans supported Finch's request and promised to fight the five- year extension when the bill is debated in the House. Two changes affecting urban schools were recommended by the committee. One would make about $300 million more a year available to school districts in which there is considerable public housing. The other amendment calls for par- ticipation by parents and communi- ty groups in the planning of Title I school projects. Inadequate Funding Throughout the committee hearings on HR 514, the bill's sponsor, Committee Chairman Carl D. Perkins (D Ky.), pointed out the need for larger appropriations for Title I of the Act. His com- Continued on Page 2 OE UT LETTER LEGISLATIVE BULLETIN OF THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL March 25, 1969 -- Vol. I, No. 3 States Hold Back Anti-Crime Funds from Cities, Report Says Where are crime problems the most serious? Under the Omnibus Crime Control Act of 1968, Ameri- can Samoa gets $3.54 per capita and Vermont 31¢ per capita, while New York and California receive 7¢ per citizen. Similarly, a rural Georgia county gets 14¢ per capita while the metropolitan Atlanta re- gion receives less than 3¢. These are figures produced in a study of the Crime Control Act in operation, released by the Na- tional League of Cities March 18. When Congress passed the Act last year, it directed that most of the funds go to the states in block grants, to be distributed according to plans drawn up by a State agency. Urban groups urged in vain that most of the money go directly to the 370 cities with population over 50,000, where crime is the most prevalent. The League of Cities report says that instead of focusing dol- lars on the problems of crime in the streets, planning funds are thinly spread among rural and ur- ban areas and "dissipated" among three levels of bureaucracy. The Action Council Letter reports legislative developments in the urban field. |t is published by the Urban Coalition Action Council, which seeks needed urban legislation Continued from Page 1 mittee is responsible for author- izing the education programs, but the amount of money that actually goes out to the schools is deter- mined primarily by the separate Appropriations Committees of the House and Senate. Under the present law about $2.5 billion a year is authorized for Title I grants but Congress has appropriated only $1.1 billion. In fact, last year's appropriation was $68 million less than the pre- vious year's, while the number of children eligible for the programs was increasing, and so were educa- tion costs. Rep. Perkins has pointed out that in the first three years of Title I, the appropriations per child have decreased from $210 to $170. Some school superintendents told the House committee that an effective, comprehensive program for disadvantaged children would Rep. Carl D. Perkins (D Ky.) and his Education and Labor need $600 per child. Committee are moving ahead with elementary education, school lunch and poverty legislation. A new federal program to help local school districts pre- , vent teenagers from dropping out Bill to Improve School Lunch of school has proved popular. In fact, 356 proposals have been Program Is Passed by House submitted to the Office of Edu- cation, of which only 5 can be For the second year in a row, funded. ang: the House is trying to increase ‘There is $30 million au- the number of needy children who thorized for drop-out preven- _ get free or reduced-price lunches tion programs, but Congress has through the school lunch program. appropriated only $5 million. As it did last year, the House The funds will be granted for passed without opposition March 20 innovative plans that show un- a bill (HR 515) to require all usual promise of success in pre- states to put some of their tax venting drop-outs. — money into school lunches. Pre- _The budget submitted by sently, some states contribute President Johnson before leav- nothing to the program, requiring ing office proposes $24 million the children and local schools to for the program in the next fis- put up all of the money needed to cal year. The 356 proposals match Faderal @uaas oa : submitted to the Office of Edu- beecie. nds on a 3 to l cation would cost $68 million. Last year, spurred by publi- _. HEW estimates that of cation of a report by the private children who entered 9th grade Committee on School Lunch Partici- in, 1967s, 23%, Of 900,000, will pation showing that less than 2 drop out before graduating from million of some 6 million needy high school. school children got reduced-price lunches (see chart), the House Free School Lunches free or reduced-price lunches Needy children 2 (Syeteese) exe Alabama 77,000 165,522 Alaska 7,000 976 Arizona 25,423 39,348 Arkansas 70,213 146,219 California 0 0 Colorado 13,533 51,833 Connecticut 4,914 34,129 Delaware 2,180 4,368 District of Columbia 16,759 0 Florida 117,550 105,249 Georgia 107,847 230,273 Hawaii 4,752 9,583 idaho 1,880 12,764 Ilinois 29,285 230,757 Indiana 15,939 134,061 lowa 8,656 113,650 Kansas 8,564 85,640 ___Kentucky 80,000 201,945 Louisiana 69,260 131,830 Maine 6,480 38,520 Maryland 10,294 44,711 Massachusetts 24,911 52,581 Michigan 60,000 129,900 Minnesota 10,000 124,111 Mississippi 34,671 220,232 Missouri 30,000 95,159 Montana? (3) “(3) Nebraska 8,180 54,456 Nevada 1,750 4,750 New Hampshire 3,245 4,969 New Jersey 7,010 52,835 New Mexico 32,432 30,281 New York 400,000 200,000 North Carolina 163,607 324,068 North Dakota 3,185 22,901 Ohio 33,486 91,571 Oklahoma 25,000 72,779 Oregon 3,614 42,714 Pennsylvania 8,781 247,49) Rhode Island 3,488 16,886 South Carolina 117,382 179,174 South Dakota 7,200 25,656 Tennessee 71,100 154,129 Texas 88,000 315,216 Utah 14,641 3,559 Vermont 2,600 12,696 Virginia 6,787 182,213 Washington 10,000 40,000 West Virginia 30,525 72,547 Wisconsin 11,000 114,922 Wyoming 752 5,317 Total 1,890,876 4,674,491 1 Number of free or reduced-price lunches 2 Needy children were those of ages 5 to 17, fram homes with less than $3,000 annual income. a°No figures were available from state school lunch authorities, who supplied information for the survey. However, a citizens Committee on School Lunch Participation April 16 reported that Montana had 16.978 school-age children fram families earning $2,000 a vear or receiving welfare aid, Only 6,160 rec eived SOURCE: House Education and Labor Committee survey (H Rept 1590), June 26, 1968. passed a bill similar to HR 515. More importantly, the House also passed a bill to add $100 mil- lion a year for meals for needy children. The Senate passed nei- ther bill, but it did agree to appropriate an extra $45 million for free lunches. This year, the House Educa- tion and Labor Committee, which sent HR 515 to the House floor, also expects to approve again the $100 million free-lunch bill (HR 516). What will be done by the Senate Agriculture Committee, which has jurisdiction over the school lunch program, remains to be seen. Congressional Hearings Poverty -- The House Educa- tion and Labor Committee has be- gun hearings on the Office of Economic Opportunity and its anti- poverty programs. Chairman Carl D. Perkins (D Ky.) has introduced HR 513, to extend the programs for five years and authorize $2,180, 000,000 for them in the fiscal year that begins July 1. For the current year Congress appropriated $1,948,000,000. Hospitals -- Hearings on the Hill-Burton Act, held by the Pub- lic Health Subcommittee of the House Interstate and Foreign Com- merce Committee, are beginning. Two main bills are before the Sub- committee. HR 6797, introduced by Committee Chairman Harley O. Stag- gers (D W.Va.), proposes major in- creases in funds for hospital con- struction and modernization, with priority to be given, in part, to outpatient facilities in low-in- come metropolitan areas. The oth- er bill, HR 7059, sponsored by high-ranking members of the Health Subcommittee, authorizes less money than Staggers' bill and does not single out urban medical needs. Medicaid, WIN Regulations -- Chairman Russell B. Long (D La.) of the Senate Finance Committee has said his committee intends to take "a good hard look" at regu- lations issued in January concern- ing Medicaid, welfare eligibility, the work incentive program (WIN) and others. Some of these, Long said, "run counter to Congression- al intent." No plans for hearings have been announced. The regulations were issued by the Administrator of HEW's Social and Rehabilitation Service, Mary E. Switzer. Long made his statement in introducing a bill to make the next Adminis- trator's appointment subject to confirmation by the Senate. The Senate passed the bill (S 1022) March 4 and sent it to the House Ways and Means Committee. Hearings Available Congressional hearings on two subjects of growing importance in the urban field -- income main- tenance and the role of financial institutions -- were held late in —~ the last session of Congress. Summaries of these hearings, as well as the Action Council's pam- phlet briefly reviewing Urban Af- fairs Legislation in the 90th Congress, are available without charge to anyone who wishes to write for them to the Action Council. The summarized hearings are: Financial Institutions and the Urban Crisis. Hearings by the Senate Banking and Currency Com- mittee. Income Maintenance. by the Joint Economic Committee. Hearings ~ Minority Business Enterprise Coordination Is Established President Nixon signed an executive order March 5 that established an Office of Minority Business Enterprise in the Depart- ment of Commerce. The office is to stimulate business ownership by minority groups and coordinate -- but not take over -- existing government programs. Secretary of Commerce Maurice H. Stans estimated there were 116 programs in 20 govern- ment agencies concerned in one way or another with helping minority enterprise. Directors of the new office were named March 13. The director is Thomas F. Roeser, who has been director of public affairs for the Quaker Oats Co. and before that, press secretary for Rep. Albert H. Quie (R Minn.). The deputy direc- tor is Abraham S. Venable, a grad- uate of Howard University and formerly a conciliation specialist in black-white relations for the Community Relations Service, which was a Commerce Department agency until moved to the Justice Depart- ment. In announcing the new office, .President Nixon said: "Black, Mexican-American, Puerto Ricans, Indians and others must be in- creasingly encouraged to enter the field of business, both in the areas where they now live and in the larger commercial community -- and not only as workers but also as managers and owners." The Urban Coalition Action Council 1819 H St., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006 Tel: 202 293-1530 Chairman: John W. Gardner Co-Chairmen: Andrew Heiskell A. Philip Randolph Executive Director: Lowell R. Beck Legislative Associates: John P. Lagomarcino Ronald J. James Assistant for Legislative Information: Georgianna F. Rathbun ofS 23)
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 20

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 20
  • Text: Kerner Commission Findings After One Year Reviewed "One Year Later," a review of what has been done, and not done, to meet the urban crisis since the Kerner Commission report of March, 1968, has been issued. The spon- sors are two private, nonprofit organizations, the Urban Coalition and Urban America Inc. After presenting up-to-date data on social and environmental problems in the nation's inner cities, the review concludes that "we are a year closer to being two societies, black and white, in- creasingly separate and scarcely less unequal." Copies of "One Year Later" may be ordered, for a small charge, from the Communications Division of the Urban Coalition, 1819 H St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006. THE BUILT-IN BOMB Reprinted fram “The Herblock Gallery.” Simon and Schuster, 1968. LU aT BS LEGISLATIVE BULLETIN OF THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL March 7, 1969 -- Vol. I, No. 2 Funds for Low Income Housing Head Action Council Agenda Supplemental appropriations for the low-income homeownership and rental programs of the 1968 Housing Act, and for administra- tion of the fair housing law, are a priority goal of the Action Council. The two laws were en- acted by Congress last summer but received only partial funding -- far less than was needed for a good start. The new programs for low- income families are known, in housing law jargon, as Section 235 and Section 236. Private financing, buttressed by federal interest subsidies, is the key to both the homeownership program, Section 235, and the rental program, Section 236. Low and moderate-income families will be able to buy houses for up to $15,000, spend 20% of their month- ly income on mortgage payments, and the FHA will pay the remaining mortgage costs. Similarly on Sec- tion 236 rental units, the Govern- ment will pay to the nonprofit sponsors the difference between the interest cost of a conven- tional mortgage and an interest rate of 1%. The first homeownership in- terest contracts were made in Oc- tober. On the average, they were for houses costing $12,152. The average interest subsidy was $33.88 a month, for owners with monthly income of $430. The Housing Act authorized FHA to sign contracts for $75 mil- lion under Section 235 this year. Congress, however, allowed only $25 million. The same figures al- so were set for the Section 236 rental program. A House Appropriations Sub- committee is now considering bud- get proposals submitted by former President Johnson requesting an additional $50 million contract authority for each of the two pro- grams. His request for the next fiscal year, starting July 1, was $100 million for each program. The fair housing law received an appropriation of only $2 mil- lion from Congress. The Johnson budget proposes a supplemental $2 million for administration of the law plus $14.5 million for the next year. Sen. Ralph Yarborough Becomes Chairman of Labor Committee The Senate Labor and Public Welfare Committee, which handles manpower, antipoverty, education and health legislation, is under new leadership this year. Retire- ments and election defeats have produced new chairmen for the full committee and for its eight sub- committees. Democrats remain in the majority on the committee but the Republicans have one addition- al seat this year. Sen. Ralph Yarborough of Tex- as is the new committee chairman. He also has taken over as head of the Subcommittee on Health. Other key subcommittee chair- men include: Claiborne Pell (D -- R.I.), Education; Gaylord Nelson (D Wis.), Subcommittee on Employ- ment, Manpower and Poverty; Har- rison A. Williams (D N.J.), Labor; Senator Ralph Yarborough and Walter F. Mondale (D Minn.), Migratory Labor. Sen. Jacob K. Javits (R N.Y.) remains the top-ranking Republican on the committee. The new GOP members, all freshmen, are William B. Saxbe (Ohio), Richard S. Sch- weiker (Pa.) and Henry Bellmon (Okla.). The new Democrats are fresh- men Thomas F. Eagleton (Mo.), Alan Cranston (Calif.) and Harold E. Hughes (Iowa). CONGRESSIONAL HEARINGS Relocation and Land Acgquisi- tion -- Senate subcommittee hear- ings have been completed on the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Land Acquisition bill (S 1). The Action Council supports the bill, which would provide re- location payments and other as- Sistance to persons displaced by any federal program or any feder- ally aided state or local program. The last Congress approved this kind of aid on federal highway and housing projects and the new bill would extend this to other pro- grams on a uniform basis. Post offices and other federal build- ings and federally aided projects such as hospitals and college Continued on Page 4 Congressmen Take City Tours To Learn of Urban Programs Small groups of Congressmen are making two-day trips to major cities to learn at first hand of urban problems and programs. The tours are sponsored by the U.S. Conference of Mayors for the bene- fit of Congressmen from rural areas and small cities. Members of the Urban Coalition Action Council staff are participating in the tours. Visiting Atlanta, Ga., Jan. 31 and Feb. 1 were five Represen- tatives -- Wendell Wyatt (R) of Astoria, Ore., James F. Hastings (R) of Allegany, N.Y., W. S. Stuckey (D) of Eastman, Ga., James R. Mann (D) of Greenville, S.C., and Paul McCloskey (R) of San Mateo, Calif. The five were given an intro- duction to Atlanta's problems by Mayor Ivan Allen, who is on the Action Council's board. Allen told the group that the city's progress in urban development was due in large part to funds appro- priated by Congress. After hearing other city of- ficials discuss their programs the Congressmen toured the Model Cities and urban renewal areas and visited antipoverty agencies. Afterwards, Rep. Wyatt commented that there is no domestic problem "more urgent than that of the American city." A similar trip was made to Dayton, Ohio, Feb. 21-22. The city's Congressman, Charles W. Whalen (R), was host to the group, which included Rep. Mann and three others -- Rep. Bill Alexander (D) of Osceola, Ark., Robert C. McEwen (R) of Ogdensburg, N.Y., and Wil- liam L. Hungate (D) of Troy, Mo. Among the programs the Con- gressmen studied was the coordi- nated manpower programs operated by the federally funded local CEP office. CEP stands for Concen- trated Employment Plan. It tries to concentrate available job re- sources within areas of high un- employment and poverty. In both cities the Congress- men got a glimpse of crime prob- lems by riding in police cars for a night-time tour of potential trouble spots. Later trips are planned for New York and Boston. In Atlanta City Hall, Rep. McCloskey takes notes as Rep. Hastings, on the far left, listens. Clockwise, facing the camera, are Rep. Wyatt, Vice Mayor Sam Massell, Reps. Mann and Stuckey, Action Council executive director Lowell Beck and Janet Kohn of the Conference of Mayors. Continued from Page 2 buildings are examples of programs that often displace inner city residents and businesses who badly need help in relocating. Provisions similar to those in S 1 were passed by the Senate, but not by the House, in the last Congress. The House Public Works Committee held hearings late last year on similar relocation bills but took no action on them. As yet, the House committee has not scheduled further hearings for this session. Senate passage probably will come first. Urban Coalition Action Council Adds 21 New Members to Board An expanded Policy Council, the policy body for the Urban Coalition Action Council, met for the first time February 26. Twenty-one new members joined the Council, bringing the total mem- bership to 59. John W. Gardner is the chairman. Of the new members, six are women -- the first to serve on the Council. They are Mrs. Bruce B. Benson, president of the League of Women Voters of the U.S.; Mrs. Amalia V. Betanzos, executive di- rector of the Puerto Rican Com- munity Development Project in New York City; Mrs. Fred R. Harris, chairman of the Women's Council on Poverty, OEO; Mrs. Patricia R. Harris, Howard University School of Law; Miss Dorothy I. Height, president of the National Council of Negro Women; and Mrs. Aileen C. Hernandez of San Francisco, former The Urban Coalition Action Council 1819 H St., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006 Tel: 202 293-1530 Chairman: John W. Gardner Co-Chairmen: Andrew Heiskell A. Philip Randolph Executive Director: Lowell R. Beck Legislative Associates: John P. Lagomarcino Ronald J. James Assistant for Legislative Information: Georgianna F. Rathbun member of the Equal Employment Op- portunity Commission. The 15 other new members are Julian Bond, Georgia state legis- lator; Paul W. Briggs, superin- tendent of schools for Cleveland, Ohio; Daniel J. Evans, Governor of the State of Washington; Herman E. Gallegos, executive director of the Southwest Council of LaRaza; Ernest Green, director of the Joint Apprenticeship Program in Brooklyn, N.Y.; Richard G. Hatcher, Mayor of Gary, Indiana; Dr. Vivian W. Henderson, president of Clark College, Atlanta, Georgia. Also, Richard J. Hughes, Gov- ernor of the State of New Jersey; Roy Innis, national director of CORE; Dr. Howard Johnson, presi- dent of MIT; Edgar J. Kaiser, chairman of the board of Kaiser Industries; Robert S. Powell Jr., president of the National Student Association; Carl B. Stokes, Mayor of Cleveland, Ohio; Rev. Andrew J. Young Jr., executive director of SCLC; and Dr. Mark Shedd, superin- tendent of schools for Philadel- phia. Before adding the new members the policy group consisted of 13 businessmen, 6 union officials, and 19 mayors, civil rights and religious leaders. On the left, new Policy Council members Mrs. Benson of the League of Women Voters and Mrs. Betanzos of the Puerto Rican Community Development Project, with Mayor Cavanagh of Detroit. On the right, Rev. Andrew Young of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, also a new Council member. ao 31
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 10

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_010.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 10
  • Text: AN ADVERTISING COUNCIL CAMPAIGN IN SUPPORT OF THE URBAN COALITION Summary: The Urban Coalition proposes a national advertising campaign to promote better understanding of the problems of the cities and the people who live there, and also to go the next step toward causes and the possible solutions. The campaign would seek to maintain the momentum of the Advertising Council's massive "Crisis In Our Cities" campaign of 1968. (The Advertising Council estimates _ total space and time donated to this campaign was worth. approximately $12,000,000.) Importantly, however, the proposed 1969 campaign would indicate the potential for meaningful action by a concerned and informed citizenry. The campaign-would stress the many resources, federal, state and local, available to a community. However, on the presumption that an effective grass roots attack on local problems is not possible unless the important leadership elements in the community are together, the campaign would cite the potential of an Urban Coalition to help achieve coherent dialogue and to help set goals and priorities. The campaign would be timed to begin in the Summer of 1969 and would run one year. The Advertising Council would donate agency services and media time space. The Urban Coalition requests $128,000 for production costs and $22,000 for support material. , AN ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN As the year 1969 opened, discussion of the "urban crisis" had reached an almost unprecedented scale. Magazines, newspapers, radio and television devoted columns of editorial space and hours of prime time to the problems of the cities. Now, however, it is the position of the Urban Coalition that the time has come to lead the discussion to a new plateau and to begin the process of education toward a larger citizen involvement, or at least understanding of the solutions of that crisis. A national advertising campaign must be a major part of this educational effort. Progress has been made in some areas. In almost no areas is that progress enough or has it come fast enough to lead any informed |: person to believe that the crisis is anything but heightening. The crisis must be met at all levels--federal, state, and local, and it must be met both nationally and locally increasingly by the private sector as well as the public sector. It is the mobilization of the private sector, particularly at the local level, that is the special concern of the Urban Coalition and urban coalitions already established in 42 U. S. cities. The Urban Coalition, at this point in our nation's history, seems to be the single organization or movement dedicated to assisting in the re-establishment of coherent local communities. Today the typical American community is split into a variety of different worlds that are often wholly out of touch with one another. The suburbs are out of touch with the central city. Business, labor, and the universities are three wholly separate worlds. City Hall is usually out of touch with the ghetto and often out of touch with the ablest and most influential people in the city. The most ominous rifts, of course, are the rifts involving various Minority communities, most commonly the black community, but in some parts of the country the American Indians or Mexican-American community. Nothing is more clear than that no major city can or will solve its problems without first repairing some of those devastating gaps in communication. Obviously, no single advertising campaign can accomplish this kind of repair. The reconstruction must be forged slowly and carefully by citizens working together to under- stand and solve their problems. But this proposed advertising campaign, we think, can increase public understanding of an impor- tant resource to help make a beginning. AN ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN The Urban Coalition was formed to re-establish communication. But to fulfill its potential, it must be used. And before it will be used, it must be understood. It is important to emphasize the importance of the coalition principle. Some people think of the Coalition as just another organization tackling the rough urban problems of the day. But it is unique. The distinction is that it brings together segments of American life that do not normally collaborate in the solution of public problems. Because of the need for such collaboration at the local level, the national organization has helped to form local coalitions. There are now local coalitions in 42 cities and organizational efforts are underway in approximately. 30 others. As.in the case of the national, each local organization includes. representatives from a variety of leaderwhip segments in the community--the mayor, business, labor, minority groups and religion. The participation of other relevant elements is encouraged--the universities, the schools, the press, the professions. There are many substantive problems of the cities--fiscal and governmental problems, housing, jobs, education, health services, economic development and.so on. The Urban Coalition is interested in all those problems, but it is not free to choose the particular problems to which it must give its attention. There are priorities which are thrust upon us all. There are issues so explosive that if they are ignored, we shall be overtaken by events--and then every problem on the list will be infinitely harder to solve. The goal that takes precedence over all others is to begin to heal those rifts that are now making many American cities quite incapable of any kind of healthy problem solving. Those rifts can be healed. , We can heal them through the process of coalition, if the most influential citizens in the community will lend their strength and their presence, if all significant elements in the community are fairly represented and if all concerned are unsparingly honest in facing the toughest issues. In a number of American cities today those conditions are being met in local urban coalitions--the most influential citizens have stepped forward, all significant elements in the community are represented and the toughest issues are being faced. * * * * The Proposed 1969-70 Urban Coalition Advertising Campaign The foregoing has been an attempt to demonstrate the need and the potential of the Urban Coalition. What follows is a description of a specific multi-media advertising campaign designed to make the Coalition known and understood by a significant segment of ‘the American public so that it will be used. - AN ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN OBJECTIVES The first and foremost objective of the 1969-70 campaign is to establish the Urban Coalition as the focal point of effort by local business and community groups in solving the crisis in the cities. The main thrust of the campaign will be to tell in detail the Urban Coalition story: the coalition principle of collaboration of all concerned groups in tackling specific problems; its stress on local initiative and effort; its record of success. A second, and equally important, objective is to convince both business and community leaders--as well as the general public-- that the problems don't stop just because the riots are dispersed or contained; that is, we must counter any idea that the crisis has passed, or any let-City-Hall-do-it attitude. The third objective is to create the advertising materials in such a way that, in addition to their use by the Advertising Council in national media, they can also be used by Urban Coalition groups in local media to assist with the national campaign, for organization and support of new or existing Urban Coalitions. AUDIENCE The primary target audience includes the broad spectrum of opinion leaders--from corporation presidents to black student militants to garden club members--from whose ranks the Urban Coalition draws active participants. The second audience includes those among the general public whose understanding and support can assist the efforts of the Urban Coalition groups. MEDIA - Major mass audience magazines - Major market newspapers . Pacesetter publications (i.e., HARPERS, THE ATLANTIC, SATURDAY REVIEW, etc.) - Business press - Network TV and radio AN ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN CAMPAIGN - 3-b/w ads suitable for newspaper and magazines - 3-adaptations for use by local Urban Coalitions . 3-b/w ads special for Business Press campaign - i1-"car card" for transit advertising - 1-24 sheet billboard ad - 2-:60 TV commercials, with 230, :20, and :10 adaptations ; - 2-radio commercials cosTs* - Magazines and newspapers $18,000 - Company publications 2,000 . Business Press . ~ 13,000 - 24 sheet billboard ads 9,000 - car card transit ad | 11,000 - Television spots 70,000 - Radio spots 5,000 - All purpose support kit for use by 12,000 local organizations and coalitions to stimulate placement - Response booklet "What Can I Do?" 10,000 *Estimated by staff of the Advertising Council Those of us involved in the formation and operation of the Urban Coalition believe it represents a great resource for the American city. We believe it is a resource which should be understood by as many concerned citizens in as many American communities as possible. It is for this reason that we propose this advertising campaign and ask your support in providing funds for operating and support costs. The Advertising Council estimates that these costs will amount to $150,000. The Council estimates that this investment will result in the donation of $20,000,000 worth of time and space by the media. Attachments: Advertising Council reprint on Crisis in Cities List of local coalitions and officers Annual Report of the Urban Coalition
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021