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Box 7, Folder 18, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_018_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 3
  • Text: eis y RR; Mr. Irving K. Kaler,/Chairmaa, : Community Relations Commission, City of Atlanta, E Fultoa National Baak Bldg., Atlanta, Ga, 30303. / Dear Irving, § I have accepted the Senior Editorship of Pace Magazise, published ia Los Amgeles, aad I will be moviag to the weat Coast duriag the summer. This, of eourse, makea it aecessary for me to resign as a member of the Commusity Relatioas Compissioan, While it will be several weeka before I make thia move, I am tex¢ering my resignation at this tims, to be accepted at your pleasure, so that you may be free to ehoose s replacement whea you see fit. Phe short associetioa I have had with thie Commission leaves m with very high hopes that it wiil be succeasful in solving some of the bagie problems ia this city. I have never s¢en a group of people -- all of them busy at Many taske -~ go devoted to the purposes and work of an agency ae are the members of thie body. i have also been extremely impressed with the quality of leaéeréhip you have exerted es chairman, With thie reluctazt resignatioa go my prayers and best wishes for this work so robly begus. why ; jie, ec: The Hom. Ivan Allea
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 6

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_018_006.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 6
  • Text: June 12, 1967 Mrs. Eliza K. Paschall Executive Director Community Relations Commission 1203 City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mrs. Paschall: This is to acknowledge receipt of your letter of June 7, 1967. The meeting you referred to on the morning of June 6th was a meeting called for the heads of the various operating departments of the City Government. It has never been our practice to include the executive directors of the various government agencies such as Civil Defense, Metropolitan Planning Commission, the Atlanta Youth Council, etc. at these meetings. However, they are not closed meetings, and we would be happy to have you attend future meetings if you so desire. Iam sure that Mr. Collier Gladin, head of the Planning Depart- ment, will be happy to furnish you with any and all information submitted to the department heads at the meeting on June 6th. Sincerely yours, R. Earl Landers Administrative Assistant REL:ip CC: Mr. Irving Kaler
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 29

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_018_029.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 29
  • Text: COMMUNITY RELATIONS CAMMISSJON .1203, CITY HALL. ATLANTA, GEORGIA. DILEMMAS OF THE CITY September, 1967 The Community Relaticns Commission, since February, 1967 has held 29 meetings and has heard from more than 350 private citizens and officials, including the Superintendent of schools, City Director of parks and Director of recreation, The Atlanta Housing Authority, and spokesman for the Independent Food Dealerc, The President of the Atlanta branch of NAACP, The President of the affiliate of the SCLC. These meetings have been well reported in the press and have resulted in some changes which were within the limits of auth®rity and resources of the officials. We find, however, that many wrongs are beyond the legal and financial limits of present public sclicies and it is the dilemmas created by these limitations thst the following reports illustrate. For convenience, they are divided inlo separate topics, but they illustrate the interplay of each on the others and again and again point up that the unit of con- cern is a human being. Dilemmas in City Services: There is cantinuous call far more of all services --- streets paved, sidewalks paved, trash picked up, garbage collected, police assignec to street beats, houses inspected ------- 7 Trash and garbage collections -- the sanitary department is about 100 workers short. Why? Some say the salary scale, beginning at $276 or »jJ00 a month is not a drawing card for a family man. Another difficulty is that the pay period is two weeks, (the first check sometimes takes longer to be processed) and a head of a family looking for work often cannot afford to wait two or three weeks to pay rent, buy food, clothes, bus tokens. He does better standing on the corner of Decatur street and working by the day, doine the same job at the same rate of pay. Irresponsible? Shiftless. But would we as citizens condone the sani-~ tary department paying hi- two weeks wages in advance? Another problem for the sanitary department is that many have listened and heeded lectures on self-respect and ambition and are not content to collect trash as a permanent career. Fringe benefits are not much inducement for city employment. The city Civil service is not under social security, and under the city's plan of benefits, not until an employee has worked for 10 years is his family entitled to any pension provisions comparable to social security in case of his death. Another problem is the child labor laws, designed to prevent exploit- ation of child labor, but there are jobs which 14 to 18 year olds might like to do as a temporary measure which they are prohibited by law from doing. Streets: Priority is given by the Construction Department to thoro- fares, but this little help to people who have few streets in their neighborhoods that go through to those thorofares, particularly those dependent on public transportation. How would you set priority ina street construction program? Sewers: The building boom of which we are all so proud has increased the areas which are paved, which in turn has increased the need for storm sewers to the point it is estimated that it would cost $30,000,000 to meet the needs. This is bad enough where cars drive though the water, but, again where where there are many residents who do not have cars and must walk to bus staps, where children must walk to school or rely on public transportation, the problem is intensified. How should we balance emergency and long-term systematic improvement? Parks & Recreation: Atlanta spends about 6 per person per year on parks and recreation, slightly lower than the Georgia State average. Delton, Georgia and Statesboro, Georgia spend about ¥8, per person. Parks and facilities of the city are used and enjoyed by residents of Metropolitan Atlanta and beyond, who contribute nothing to their cost. A well equipped community center, without the land, costs over $200,000 The Decatur-DeKalb YMCA in 1960 cost a total of 656,000 plus $50,000 for the land. for the past 2 summers, the city hus received additional operating funds from O£0 and EQOA. In both cases, the appropriations were not approved until June, and people were hired to start work on Page 2 Dilemmas faith. Those programs closed the end of August, with the opening of school, Given funds to spend, the Parks and Recreation cepartment is confronted with a choice of buying land, developing land already owned, or hiring people ta staff the developments. For example, to have a softball league of neighborhood teams in a community park, instead of 1 community team as a part of a city league, requires more workers, either paid or volun- teers, and in the areas that need valunteers most, there are fewer adults with free time and energy to help. Same goes for Boy Scouts, Gray Y and the rest. Do we plan for what we can pay for? Do we count on volunteers? Bo we re-think the jobs and hire younger people, instigate training pro- grams? Who would pay for those? Police: Not enough police to prevent things from happening, too many when things do happen. That's the opinion most often expressed at CAC meetings. The success of officers assigned to the EQOA Centers emphasizes the repeated requests for "a beat policeman", a person "who will know’ us". Presently Atlanta police are assigned to large areas, to patrol in cars, which make the force more mobile. Charges of police brutality are taken up by the Police Committee of the Board of Aldermen, who some claim will "naturally" support the police. But isn't it natural for a department’ to support its own staff? And yet how does the public protect itself against the mutual protection of members of a bureauracy?, whether it be a police force, a school staff, a public housing staff or what? On the other hand, how can a single police officer, etc., be reassured of lack of reprisal if he raises questions? How do we get sympathy and understanding, protection and fairness on both sides? In all these cases, money may not cure all ills, but it seems necessary to cure any. The CRC is scheduling a meeting with the Fulton County legislative delegation to put before them the case of the need for add- itional sources of revenue for the city's general operating budget. HHKKPERE KEE BHT Dilemmas in Public Housing: Four facts immediately contribute to di- lemmas in public housing, 1. The Atlanta Housing Authority must obtain enough from rents to operate the projects. The City & U. S, Governments participate in fihancing the building but there are no subsidies for operating the projects. 2, Some rent must be paid by every tenant. Therefore those in need, who have no income whatsoever, cannot be served by public housing, under present policies, 3. Public housing is no resource for emergency housing. The only such resource in Atlanta is the Salvation Army, which houses and takes individuals for a brief time in extreme emergencies, but does not house families together. Women and children under 12 go tao one center, men to another. 4. Housing policies exclude same in greatest need for help, such as families of prisoners, serving felony sentences and mothers with illegitimate children under 1 year old. Misconceptions about these on the part of the general public often result in criticism of the Housing Authority Staff, who must operate within these policies. Other limiting policies are those requiring “security deposits" and a month's rent in advance and charges for repairs. Since rent is based on family income, increase in income means increase in rent. This is particularly self-defeating when a new member of the family goes to work and his added income, often sought to pay for education or other improvements, results in rent increases, This reflects not the opinion of the housing staff but a public policy. Another policy, which is within the jurisdiction of the Atlanta Housing Authority, is that of excluding from public housing families of prison inmates and women with illegitimate children under one year old. [he policy does not remove from the community the problems of illegitimacy Page 3 D:.lemmas or providing decent, sanitary housing for the persons involved. It does reflect a realistic concern for public opinion about public housing and what the community will stand for. If we do not agree with such restrictions on public housing, then it is up to us, the community to have them changed. But even with restrictions, in 1966 there was a back-log of 1500 applications for public housing in Atlanta. As of September 25, 1967 in a11 Atlanta Housing Authority projects there was a total of 17 vacancies( and these must be filled by the proper size family for the size of the unit), Dilemmas in Non-public Housing: In spite of code requirements and inspections, in 1960, 163,405 (10% of all city housing units) were in the slum category. In the first place, inspections are part of a process. When inspectors find code violations, the owner is contacted and given time (30 days? 60 days?) to make repairs. If not, the case is reported ta the Better Housing Commission and the Housing Court. The owner must make repairs with a stated time or pay a fine. What is “reasonable time” te find a contractor, let the contract, make repairs? What protection is there against an increase in rent when repairs are made? What protection is there against eviction because of complaints? If repairs are not made and rent is withheld, the renter can be evicted. If repairs are not made and rent is paid, what protection does the renter have? Move. "He can move" is the usual answer. There is a shortage of low and middle cost housing for sale and for rent in the city, and those available to Negroes are fewer than those available overall. It.costs money to pay for moving. There are specialized restrictions on various property. Some places won't take children, some places won't take un- married women, some places won't take divorcees, and some places won't take 9 children --- even for $90.00 a month. So if you have 3 rooms for your 9 children for 990.00 a month, you're likely to stay there even if they are cold and ratty. No steady job, no credit references, and on welfare. Husband in jail. There's little choice for such families. Race is an important factor still, no matter what the inccme. In one part of town, apartments close to a Negro neighborhood were asked if they would take Negroes as tenants, and none said yes. High rents for substandard housiny: This often turns out to be public housing in that the rent money in many cases comes from welfare allot-— ments, so that we the public are subsidizing the slums, The Department of Family & Children Services, whose clients, many of these clients are, cannot produce homes. The allotment for rent must come out of the total family allotment, the maximum for which is 0154.00 in Georgia, regardless of how many children there are. This is with no father at home. If he is present, the family is not eligible for Aid ta dependant children, mo matter how little he earns (unless he qualifies as physically disabled). The Georgia legislature could enact lagislation to implement the Unemployed Parent provisions of the federal law. This would use primarily federal money but would require some additianal and county money. The State Board of Family & Childrens Services, appointed by the Govenor, and the legislature would have to authorize the program and appropriate the money, which would permit men looking for work to stay at home with their families. The EGA has no money to pay moving costs and rent. Its resources are limited to existing public housing and other housing for rent from private owners. Why are people allowed ta live in these substandard houses? Aren't the landlords and the tenants both violating the law? Some of the worst areas are in that sort of limbo between "planning" and "having something done”. the planning may be for urban renewal, model neighborhood, etc,., but these are long involved processes, and meanwhile things are left pretty much as they are, waiting, waiting and deteriorating. For example, in one slum area which has been approved by the City Planning Department and the Aldermanic Board for urban renewal, everybody is wait~ ing now for the next phase, for the U. S. Department of HUD to approve the actual plans, appropriate the money, etc. -----~ Once this has been done, tenant-residents will receive grants for their property. So it appears to be to their advantage to wait. The Inspection Department requires minimum compliance since most of the buildings will be bought by the city and demolished. But UR office in the area says the earliest possibly for the Urban Renewal program to begin to move people out of ve ma: : ; oF y es . Ste : 4 3/2 Ww ie Serie iG an me Page 4 Dilemmas these slums will be 6 months. So they face another winter, with little heat, no hot waiter, leaks, utterly miserable living conditions. If they move now, they do it on their own ------- and where are there vacancies they can afford or where will they be accepted as tenants or buyers (because of income, family, race, etc.) ? Dilemmas in Evictions: Other families just a little higher in income face rents higher than their incomes warrant for new, cheaply Constructed, poorly maintained apartments, where eviction is an automatic process when rents are not paid on time. Few of these units (many with hundreds of families) have resident managers, and it is difficult to find someone to whom to make complaints or pay back-rent. Substandard conditions and lack of repairs are not legal grounds for withholding rent in Georgia. You complain, and nothing happens except that you maybe given notice to leave. The frustration of trying to deal with nameless, faceless landlords, often just a street address, adds to the overall despair. It takes energy, know-how, time and courage to pierce the anonymity of a corporation and someone who can speak and is wiliing to speak, even toa listen. Neighborhood Stabilization: In efferts for "neighborhood stabilization", we are conironted with more dilemmas and paradoxes. By neighborhood stabilization we mean achieving and maintaining a viable balance between white and Negro residents. So this means if the neighborhood is all white or all Negro, some moving should take place, but at a certain point (what point?) the moving and selling should stop. How do Negroes get "started" in 8 new neighborhood? What is the part of real estate dealeys? At what point do we eicourege Negroes ta move in and what point do we discourage them? What does it take to make whites stay? (Reassurance about schools, as much as anything, we are told.) How do we relieve pressure on the area now “in transition'? It is evident that any area concerned cannot "save itself". I+ is also evident that it cannot be “saved" by isolated, localized action. If any area, and in this case, southwest Atlanta, is ta become and remain racial- ly integrated, there must be choices of comparable housing values in other areas available to Negroes, buyers and renters so they do nat all end up in ane spot. There is no law requiring segregation but under present practices, Negroes are not free to choose from the entire metro area as whites are. They have trouvle finding a real estate agent to show them property outside present Negro neighborhoods. The real estate agent has trouble getting “white” property to show. The Negro buyer has trouble getting financing of such property. Some predict that open occupancy legislation for Atlanta would scare whites to move sutside of the city linits even faster than they are now. What are the prospects of getting Open occupancy legislatisn or practices in the metro area? What short of national legislation will help Atlanta from being a Negro city Surrounded by white suburbs? What would be tne results if it were? Dilemmas in Jobs - Treini.g & Employment: Most discussions of urban problems end with a statement to the erfect that "the important thing is jobs". Jobs keep people busy. Jobs give people money. Jobs give people stability. Jobs keep families together. Jobs give people a stake in the community. How does Atlanta Stand: In the first place, it must be clearly under- stood that there are no new public programs designed primarily to put people to work. The new programs ere designed either to train people ar to give social services, sa individuals can care for children, take jobs, etc., but once the training has been given and the social services have been provided, the fact of whether there is a job is up to the normal system of ongoing public and private programs which hire people. Either private industry or ongoing public programs thust produce the jobs. Many of the new public programs provide additional jobs, but moze for professional or skilled persons than for the "jobless". EQOA cannot produce jobs, except for those employed by "the program". The Georgia State Employment Service cannot produce jobs. There is much talk about “job development", about the need for lowering pro- fessional standards, for giving on-the-job training, but the persons who advocate such changes seldom adopt them themselves, and there are few examples of success. How realistic are our admonitions (usually to others) to make the job fit the person who is looking for employment. One dilemma is that ell the surveys and all comments by job counselors confirm the fact, that . * Fage 5 Dtlemmas the majority of thuse looking for work are female, the majority of those are Negro, either very young with no experience, or 30 or 40, with per- haps @ high schecl diploma but no "marketable skills", On the other hand, in spite of federal laws against discrininaticn based on sex, the great majority of job orders are for males, males with experience and males with skills. To what extent Negroes an Atlanta are denied jobs because they ere Necrozs needs to be determined, but it is a fact that 8 higher percestege af these looking for jobs are Nejro, and that of those persuns with johs, a higher percentage of whites have good jobs (professicnal, “anagerial, etc.). Years of discripination because of race have resulted in Negroes being less qualified according to standards set by whites for whites. Jo we continue to apply quelifications which exclude Neoroes (such as experience which they have been unable to get) or do we hire "qualifiable" Negroes and give them a chance to qualify on the job? The August list of vacancies for the City of Atlanta Personnel department, for example, lists only 6 out of 29 categories which require no experience, Are there enough hobs to go around? Are there more people than jobs or more jobs than people? The Georgia State Employment Officies in Metro Atlanta as of July 31, 1967 had 649 job orders ("a slack season" a spokes- man said). At the sane time, there were 11,324 "active applicants" (5,874 female), Negroes who are working earn less than whites. When the head of the household. male cr female, makes a marginal salary, teenage children, Or yourger chilcren, must go to work to provide for themselves and/or to contvicutie te the family income. An increase in adult incomes might ease the cc for teenage jobs. There are, for example, approximately 1000 families in one Atlanta public housing project being supported by women who cai\) their families’ living at domestic service, for which the average rats is (8.00 6 day with no prospect of promotion, no future, no fringe benefits, lucky if social security is paid. Employment to a teen- age member of such a family becomes a necessity unless somehow the family income is increased. Men and women with families work for us, the public, at full time, permanent jobs at the "poverty" level (e.g., maids at Grady hospital at $1.08 an hour; male nursing assistants at $1.29 an hour, increases within the last few years). further increases will re- quire increased public funds. Whom do we encourage to take these jobs? Whom should we encourage to take these jobs? Dilemmas in Training: What about taining programs? Some cost; others pay trainees. How closely does the vocational education program (as re- flected in the new $9,000,000 Atlanta Trade School) reflect present and future job markets? All courses there do not require high school education but they require aptitude tests and fees, though small, and costs of materials, small enough if you have it, but to a family with no margin, it might as well be 1000. Some training programs are specifically for young peaple. The Neigh- borhood Youth Corps gives “training jobs" both in and ont of school, but the record of post-NYC employment quantity-wise is nat impressive. From October '66 through July '67, of 620 out-of-school NYC trainees in Atlanta, 98 were placed in fWflltime jobs {most of which were train- ing releted). Often the job pays little more than the "training" did (v1.50 an hour). Furthermore, the training allowance does not count on family income, etc., whereas “earned income" does. (A side effect of training allowances, which give self-respect and dignity and inde- pendence to the young, is the resentment on the partof some adult worker such as custodians and cooks at seeing an NYC trainee "earn" about as much as they are paid straight wages. This could destroy rather than strengthen a family.) Again, the vocational education department nor the NYC can produce permanent jobs. How realistic is the training? What about the family? Shoulc all young people be encouraged to work? Should all mothers be encouraged to work? The MDTA programs also have suffered from lack af jobs into which trainees could move. Here race plus sex has compounded the problem again, with most jobs calling for males with experience, and skills still uncommon among Negroes. As of August, 1967, the Atlanta office GSES had no MOTA training programs to which applicants could bs asaigned. = Page 6 Dilemmas . The new $4,570,793 Atianta Concentrated Employment Program (ACEP) is another caneetunaes for training, restricted to low-income areas af the city. The first group of 252 beyan August 14, 1967. It is expected to enroll 10U ever, 2 weeks for a training period of 6 ~ 16 weeks. To be eligible you must live in one of the 5 areas (Price, Pittsburg, Summerhill-Mechanicsville, Nash-Washington, or West-End), be 16 or older and presently "below the poverty level", 98% of the farst 200 are females. The living allowance for a head of ‘household is $35.00 to 056.0U a week and for a non-head of household, 20,00 a week, Like other training programs it includes pre-vocatianal, orientation, and other supporting social services. It is designed to train for existing or new jobs, but it cannot guarantee a job or produce one, Dilemmas in Education: School buildings in one part of town converted to special pregrams as the school population moves out. School build~ ings in other parts of town with double enrollment as the school pop- ulation moves in. tffect on schools of zoning changes -- apartments bring many new children for school. Cumbersome and lengthy process of bond issues to finance new buildings. Pre-kindergarten "headstert" programs with low pupil-teacher ratio feeding pupils into schools with large classes and double sessions. Double session, which” means z school ‘ day, doing away with lunch for, children to whom lunch is the best meal of the day and for many a free meal. >. day for some 8th graders in high school (those credits do.not figues. an graduation requirements), but 13 and 14 year olds can't work -- it's against the law in many in- stances. (When school opened in August more than 7000 pupils, all of whom.are Negro, were on what is Soe described as "double: session", dith school day-cut in he Lf nee does a lst ees: énd grader, /th grader, 8th grader, 11th grader-do the rest of the day? There's no room at school to stay. There is likely to be little room at home’ and even less likely to be an adult at home to supervise, to chauffeur, to “play, to guide, to help with studies, .to encourage, to listen, . ee REPKE HHEREREHHE These are some af the Dilemmas of the City. We cannot hold a welfare worker responsible for inadequate housing of welfare clients when we limit her resources to $154.00 a month. We cannot hold a public housing ‘manager responsible for keeping tenants who cannot pay even minimum rent when we do not give him public money to operate on. We cannot hold training supervisors responsible for lack of jobs. Agreed we need new innovative programs, but programs that spend more money, not.less and programs that provide actual economic opportunity, 1.e., jobs. A few basic misconceptions stand in the way of innovative “programs. One misconception is that our current social services, even with the additional "new programs" are adequate. A second misconception is that when "even more money” has not solved the problems, that "money is not the answer", More money may not insure successes, but there is little likelihood of success without it. The most effective uses of public money may be debated but the needs are enormous, widespread and urgent and can be met only by massive, similtaneous programs. - Teachers, doctors, dentist, recreation workers, planners and the like spend money. If we are to have. enough of the kinds of services they “provide, we must be prepared to spend more money, much more. Some of this will create jobs but that is not the prime purpose nor the crit- erion of success of ‘social service paogeens or training programs. The other misconception is that social services and training guarantee jobs and income, and/or guarantee access to capitol.- -You can have - everybody healthy, all the babies in a day care center, the would-be. workers traied, but unless there is a productive job available, none: -of this brings in family income. Anti-poverty programs: today train some people. They take care of some children. They take some to the hospital, t& the employment office. But they do not produce jobs - (nor-+do they produce houses). They do not produce the opportunity to make a man, 4 woman, ° ‘a young person self=supporting,’ unless he is fortunate enough to be hired as a staff member of ane of the "programs". They can ready him to: take advantage of the opportunity, . but. until the Sqmmunity provides at, he will have to waits There were in ‘Atlanta 2 : pie a) iis 2 seis wows aa Faget Sune Abs oo ; fe er “he: a “ay fs i wt nV i = oe = Page 7 Dilemmas during the month uf July more than 11,000 waiting, registered for jobs with the Employment Services. Sself-helping is not the same as self-generating. Self-help programs require something to start with, something to help. A credit union is not much help if each member needs to borrow £50.00 and can hardly put in $9.00 (if you work by the day and miss two days and don't have money for rent and food, borrowing from a loan shark at high interest and "Service" charges may not be good business, but what is the alternative?) A civic association with no members who own property or have any margin of income cannot come up with "seed money", loans or fees for technical assistance. Indeed it is hard for them to produce the minimum amount to get the help necessary to apply for grants, etd. Training, counsel, sympathy, recreation, social services all have their places but in our money economy, nene of these is a substitute for money. Indeed a minimum income is necessary to take advantage even of "free" services. As has been said, one has to have a boot before he can have a boot strap. Dazens of people with no bocts still comes out no boot straps. Zero multiplied by "infinity" is still zero. Another notion which is misleading is thet the problems can be “taken one at a time". Chances are a child growing up in a good house in a good neighborhood will go to a good school and get a good job; chances are a poor house in a poor neighborhood will go to a poor school and get a poor job. Hause, school, neighborhood, family conditions, health are all parts of a wholes, and the whole is a human being. HERR ERKEREREEK ‘The decisions which resuit in school and houses and jobs, or no schools and no houses and no jobs are matters of public policy. The fact that the decisions are complex and difficult does not alter the fact that they must be made, and that we are all helping to make them, like it or not. The democratic process is still the same. The burden of responsible citizenship is not likely to become lighter. EKER KKKREEEKERE Detailed Reports of the meetings which have pointed up these dilemmas provide an interesting Diary of Atlanta. These, and other information such as questions and answers on Housing are available from the CRC office. The record from February, 1968 through August, 1967, is: Neighborhood Meetings Number Approx Attendance App. Spoke 11 1000 250 Special CRE "Hearings" at City Hall 1 650 100 Special CRC Meetings 4 60 Regular CRC Meetings i 250 Vistors 30 299 1. 1960 380 Approximately 800 requests have been processed through the office. Detailed minutes. of all meetings and 10 Neighborhood Profiles have been widely circulated, plus special reports such as Dixie Hills, Housing, etc. The Community Relations Commission of the City af Atlanta, appointed by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen, meets the 4th Friday of each month, at 1:30 P.M., in Committee Room #2, City Hall. The public is invited and citizens are urged to bring to the attention of the Commission matters pertaining to its functions and duties, which outlined in the Ordinance, include: "To foster mutual understanding, tolerance, and respect among all economic, social religious, and ethnic groups in the City. To help make it possible for each citizen, regardless of race, color, ereed, religion, national origin or ancestry, to develop his talents: and abilities without limitation. To aid in permitting the City of Atlanta to benefit from the full- est realization of its human resources. To investigate, discourage and seek to prevent discriminatory practices against any individual because of race, color, creed, religion, national origin or ancestry. Jo attempt to act as conciliator in controversies involving human relations." In between meetings, individuals and groups are invited to visit or telephone the Commission office (522-4463, Ext 433) to report matters of interest and to obtain information and assistance on specific sub- jects. Community Relations Commission 1203 City Hall Non = Profit 68 Mitchell Street, Sw . Organization Atlanta, Georgia 30303 U. S. Postage PUA IsD Atlanta, Georgia Permit No./1l Mr. R. Earl Landers Adm. Asst. to Mayor | 68 Mitchell St., sw Atlanta, Ga. 30303
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 21

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_018_021.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 21
  • Text: JOMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVSUBER, 1068 1208 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA s0s03 TELEPHONE 522-4463 EXT. 488 Mr. Invinc K. Kater, Chairman Tae Hononante Sast Masseui, JR» Ze-Ofielo = WT CHANICSVILLE~PITTSBURGH AREAS MEETING, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5, 1967 at ZION HILL BAPTIST CHURCH, 666 McDANIEL ST. COMMISSION MEMBERS Mr. T. M. ALEXANDER, Sr. Mr. R. BYRON ATTRIDGE eee en cakes Miss Helen Bullard, Chairman, called the meeting to order at Mx. R. J. Bureae 7:45 P.M. Forty-seven attendance cards were returned. Members Mr. Ronert Doras pr esent : Mr. Hamitton Douctas, JR. Mr. C. G. Ezzarp Most Reverend et J. HALLINAN Mr. Rolland Maxwell Archbishop of Atlanta ss Te : Mr. Josern HaAAs Dr. sam Wil i ams . Mr. AL KuETrNER Rabbi Jacob Rothschild Dr. Ropert E. Lee i o 7 Se Rats as wea Mr. Clarence G. Ezzard ; Mr. F. W. PaTTEnson Mrs. Eliza K. Paschall, Executive Director Raset Jacos M, RoTHscHILp Mr. M. O. “Buzz" Ryan Mr. Jack SELLS Observers: Mrs. Many STEPHENS THE REVEREND SAMUEL WILLIAMS uve. Jacob Rothschild ee a eee Mrs. Marilyn Baldwin Executive Director Mr. Joseph Amisano Rep. John Hood Miss Bullard remarked that the CRC was appointed by the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen to try to help to deal with the problems of living together. She asked the group what it considered No. 1 problem in all Atlanta. Group answered: “Money..money..money. The next problem: "Clean up...clean up. The yards, the streets.""' Individuals spoke out mentioning crime; housing...not enough and what there is, inadequate. At this point, Miss Bullard invited people to get up and speak out. l. MR. MARVIN K. MACDOWELL, 781 Hubbard St. S.W.: Speaking for SCLC, Operation Breadbasket. They are having meetings in the different neighborhoods, Mechanicsville, Pittsburgh, Grant Park, to get something done regarding housing and second, the streets...the majority are dirt streets which need to be paved. Said the people will have to get up and speak. Miss Bullard asked if the complaint had been made to the city formally or informally. He said they have been to EOA centers in the neighborhoods. 2. MR. RUDOLPH HINES, 65 Harlan Rd. S.W.: “One of the problems in Atlanta is lack of concern that the people of Atlanta have about somebody else...For 11 months I was assistant director for John Hope Homes. I know how these people live...Hines continued. "I don't represent any group but my concern is .. for ail the Negroes in Atlanta....the evils can be pinpointed in this one...it is inhuman... it is beyond the law....a lady called me tonight...she said last month I paid $46 rent...in April I pay $86.." On questioning from Miss Bullard, he said this is the way rents are adjusted and computed in public housing...that Mr. Satterfield and Mr. Boggs are little gods in this town. He told of an incident where a person was seen at the car stop and since he was then presumably working, his rent was adjusted so that he owed back rent of $490. Mr. Hines commented Page 2 of Minutes of Mechanicsville-Pittsburgh Meeting, April 5, 1967 that the tenant organization was not effective since Paragraph S in the lease says the manager of any individual housing project in Atlanta can evict any family without written notice for the reason of the eviction. Mrs. Paschall said she uncerstocd that readjusted rents were not retroactive. Myr. Hines said that if a person calis the central office the call is sent back to the area management office...a vicious circle... the mere fact that the tenant calls downtown makes that tenant next in line for eviction. : Mrs. Paschall asked for location of specific streets that needed repairing to pass on to Mr. Nixon. Group: "McDaniel Street...it is a hazard. Bass Street...from Cooper to McDaniel. Pryor...Minora Street to the stadium." In the group's opinion, formal complaints on these streets have probably gone into the wastebasket. A woman remarked that on the weekends, teenagers tear them (the roads) up. 3. REV. Le. C. CLACK, 591 Pulliam St. SW.: He objects to Collier Street being zoned for commercial use. Thinks it unnecessary...commercial district already out to Fulton Industrial Boulevard. Advised he had been to one Zoning meeting. Said he was making a statement right then requesting it be kept residential. Told Dr. Williams he thought they should attend the zoning meetings. Dr. Williams skeptical about the effectiveness of zoning hearings. Miss Bullard to next speaker: “Are you Speaking as an individual?" 4.MR. EDWIN MOODY, 241 Doane St. S.W. "For once in my life!" Said he agreed with Dr. Williams about zoning committee. Has several recommendations for Commission to present to “city fathers" as follows: a. “Top issue is appointees...most of problems bloom from people appointed that know or care very little for the problems...how can a well- fed person know actually how a hungry person feels..how can a person in a mansion know how a person in a ragged, substandard house lives? b. "Tax dollars - start to spend fund to labor where it has been neglected.. in Mechanicsville, Summerhill, Pittsburgh. c. "Hire us on a qualified man-to-man basis...in the Georgia State Employment Service, it hasn't stopped... d. "Laws voted by legislature..almost any tax increase is helping poverty.. Atlanta's sewage tax falls on the tenants...our representatives voted themselves raises..this means more tax for the poor man to pay. I will not vote for a single person offering for re-election next time and I hope you Will follow the same example. e. "I will conclude with planning, zoning and housing..to get a house you have to get it zoned from a to z, to get conmercial you have to get it zoned from a to z, same for schools...when you go before the zoning committee, you don’t make A, you-done Lost out...these departments should be one and an allowance should be made for elderly homeowners...members, 2° c 4. "i : = : pore don't come out and listen and place it in file 13--come out here and do something about this...there is a long hot summer coming...I got Page 3 of Minutes of Mechanicsville-Pittsburgh Meeting, April 5, 1967 kids in the schools and those two-for-a-quarter rides come dear for me... (he mentioned meeting at State Capitol re increase)...the Commission (Public Service) will hold a hearing...the more of us get there the less chance they will get to raise...Sommerville will get mad but I have got to pay Mr, Sommerville. Remarked that not voting for those presently in office might let the next one know not to vote himself a raise. On questioning by a reporter, remarked that the Georgia State Employment Service still goes by a color line. 5. MRS. ETHEL SHAW, 592 Whitehall Terrace. Complained of surrounding apartment buildings having no janitors. "Have called City Hall five times, written to Ivan Allen, Jr. ...the inspector came out and went around and cleaned up one time...been no one Since. Don't know who the landlords of buildings are......apartment at 600 Whitehall Terrace is ridiculous." (Discussion between Mrs. Shaw and person in group re contacting her area block chairman for corrective action.) 6. REP. JOHN HOOD, 124 District, 802% Pryor St. S.W. In checking, he found that motels are going in this area. Pryor St. area sewer problem is a hazard...on a rainy day your car will almost drown out. Commission should recommend to City Hall something be done. Need a school to go along with 650 apartment units planned for construction on McDaniel St. Construction (of the school) has not started and if it is to be finished within the allotted time, they will have to get on the ball (they being the Bd. of Education) to get property in this area. Mr. Hood advised he had voted for salary increase. One person reported a river when it rains on Ira Street where he lives and a horrible mess afterwards. 7. MRS. ROSA BROWN, Chairman of Area Block 42, EOA. Adressing Mr. Hood; "The people on Garbaldi Street have been asking for a light." Cited dangers of dark area. Sewer too small on Stevens and Sanders St...stays stopped up all the time. (Light on Garibaldi between Bass & Stephens.) Mrs. Paschall advised that the city is beginning a lighting modernization plan - asked that she be advised of special places where lights are needed - takes six to eight weeks because the Board of Aldermen has to pass a resolution for each location. Group: "We have asked for a light at Rockwell and McDaniel. 396 Baker is broke up." Mr. Moody speaking again asked why the planners and the zoning committee don't get together on the Model City plan - work in places going to be wasted - office building was to be built on Richardson and Central - neighborhood protested - protested on I-20. If commercial comes into neighborhood, residents might as well pick up and leave. Mrs. Paschall reported what Mr. Gladin told her about the Model City program - the application from City of Atlanta to Federal Government is for $500,000 to pay for a year of planning and at the end of the year would come a grant to put the plans into effect .. if grant is approved, they will want to meet with the people in the community to talk about what kind of neighborhood the people want - the more prepared the people are to talk about what they want, the stronger the plan will be when it gets going. Page 4 of Minutes of Mechanicsville-Pittsburgh Meeting, April 5, 1967. Mr. Hood speaking again: “Mr. Hazzard and I are in a peculiar situation because the last two meetings I have found myself with the Commission in the neighborhood in which I live ... and I have been trying to keep up with it as much as possible." Thinks a strong organization will be needed in Atlanta if it gets the grant. Thinks one and a half million dollars is a small sum. Mr. Blackwell and Mr. Thompson (congressmen from 4th and 5th Districts) have got a lot of correspondence against it - doubts if 5 of present group have written two congressmen to support the project. Need to get ball rolling for model city. if turned down, will apply to private source. Thinks the stadium has helped south side a lot. Regarding bare apartments, thinks Commission could recommend that there be some liaison person to visit apartment developments to-make sure people keep them up - they are unsanitary on Commerce Street...Primrose.... Journal reporter asked: "With the interstate system and the stadium, it makes slum areas prime business sites in the future and is it the Commission's objective to keep this residential area and keep out businesses andwhat is the overall objective in this area?" Dr. Williams referred him to the ordinance setting up the Commission. Business of Commission is to see that there is peace and harmony in the community and justice done where people Live. Moody and Ezzard and other people have said that the people in the city will have something to say about what happens re the model city and we have no position .. the people who live there must be taken into account .. our concern is what happens to people .. would that satisfy you? Reporter: The economic factors mean that this would be a tremendous business area. Dr. Williams: "One of the things wrong with this town..we place economic opportunity before the interest of people.. I don't know if he wants these notes or not because these aren't what you want to put in the newspaper...I am offended about America on this..America offends: me at this point...theee things matter in America..that is profit, profits and property and then we say to hell with people..we have got to correct that...people have been living here for a long time and..our (early) pastor here had to carry on a fight to keep people from being evicted here...now because of the stadium we have come to see what prime property this...is..young man, I hope you get a little conversion here and see that people are more important than property..and when we do we will see that America is a great place and if we don't people are going to be doomed.... There waS a question regarding whether or not to go ahead and improve property on Windsor St. Miss Bullard suggested calling City Planning Department, Ir. Hood was critical of the application for the Model City. It shows on the policy making level the mayor, two aldermen (Alderedge and Cook) and one private member (business community representative) but no representatives from the community. There was a consensus of the group that they have representa- tives from the community. Discussion revealed that action is expected on the model city program in May. And that Mr. Gladin of the City Planning Department does anticipate involving the neighborhood people, Mrs. Paschall pointed out, the more organized and ready the community is the better. She suggested a Page 5 of Minutes of Mechanicsville-Pititsburgch Meeting, April 5, 1967. G by all groups and have Stions re housing. Maybe a ization. joint meeting of all model city areaS Sponsore J gz t Gladin, Buchanan and Wofford come to answer au 3 good idea to form a permanent joint group orga A woman in the group stated that she had written President Johnson and was referred to some people in Atlanta who say it will be one year before the model city plan is effective and she was unhappy with just waiting which is what they had been doing for a long time. Nr. Hood remarked that the application was in and the city administration was getting ready and now the people had to get involved. Rev. L. Terrill: Made a plea to set up a joint meeting of all groups involved in model city application to talk with City Planning Department staff. Mr. Hood advised that a meeting was held in Summerhill Last week and they had agreed at that meeting to try to arrange a joint meeting in 3 weeks and everybody would be advised. On a motion made by Rev. Terrill and seconded, a resolution that a meeting of all the people in Peoplestown, Summerhill, Mechanicsville, etc., be heid in April was passed. Mr. Moody: shouldn't say what he is trving to tell me.. the mayor came out with two meetings before with more people and said what do you want?..when that thing got to Washington what was in there was what the mayor wanted and not us..if you don't argue about it now just save your breath child because the mayor done got it that thick and you haven't said the word. Before adjourning, Miss Bullard explained the Commission has no policy making powers and its purpose is to take back to the city administration expressions of what the groups consider their problems. When asked if they felt they had had their say, the group replied Yes, Yes, thank you. One last comment from an in group re buses coming down West Avenue: "I think that if the transit could ask for more money I think we could ask for more transportation...” Miss Bullard thanked the people for coming and told them if they wanted to ask a personal question, to come down front. The Meeting was adjourned at 10:30 approximately.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 22

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 22
  • Text: Community Relations Commission 1203 City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Northwest Area Neighborhood Hearing, Wednesday, April 19, 1967 at Allen Temple AME Church, 7:30 P.M. Mr. Charles Hart, chairman of the EOA CNAC, who had arranged for the meeting, had served on the Human Relations Committee appointed by the Board of Aldermen, which preceded the Commission. He ex- plained the formation of the Commission, and said it was "designed to find out needs and problems of the city". Commission members present - Mr. Robert Dobbs, Chairman; Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, Mr. Byron Attridge, Mr. R. S. Butler, and Mrs. Eliza Paschall, Executive Director. Ll. Mr. William Brown, 847 Gertrude Place. Polluted stream between Gertrude Place, and Hortense Place; offensive odors, have to close windows. Had contacted Mr. Respress, who had replied that he needed a bond issue for new sewers; wrote Mayor; Health Department said to write city; nothing done. 2. Mrs. Gaynelle Byrd, 1894 Tremont Drive, N. W. Street paving problems on Anderson and Simpson; Dixie Hills Circle too narrow; need turnaround paved; area confusing and street signs confusing, almost impossible to give directions. 3. Mrs. Mary Williams, 2041 Morehouse Drive, N. W., 799-8001. Dixie Hills Civic Club: need cross walk at Newberry Chapel, at Spelman and Simpson Road; need "Slow School" sign on west side of Simpson Road from Dixie Hills Circle to protect children going to W. White School; Parks Department promised 2 years ago to fix Recreation Center at Anderson Park; need police protection at Dixie Hills Plaza against teenagers who gang up against people trying to get through the area. Rothschild, etc. asked if they have tried to solve the problem; Attridge asked if they are local teenagers; Mrs. Williams said they don't know. Mr. Dobbs said it takes police 15 minutes to arrive when they are called, “why so long?" 4. Mr. John Howard, 2105 Baker Road. Teenagers in park near his home throw trash in his yard; urges play- lot at Baker and North Avenue. | . 5. Mrs. Judge Barlow, 60 Edwin Place, N. W., 794-1224. Put trash on streets, stays 2 to 3 weeks, wants schedule; teenagers siphon gas out of car, takes police “an hour to comet; big boys at Perry Homes run off small children from playlots. 6. Mr. Andrew Hill, 1623 Westview Drive, S. W., 753-0132. Former Manager of apartments, dismissed because he checked the buildings; agents don't care, just so they get their money; people should not be “afraid to the truth." 7. Mr. Robert Baldwin, 264 Richardson, N. W., 794-7901. Turner High PTA; understands Turner High going on double session. Dr. Bowen says they will know about it. This would mean 1000 children in the streets. Mr. Davis says 330 seniors, 370 llth graders, 320 LOth graders dismissed at 12; 500 8th graders, 490 9th graders in streets until noon. Teenagers do not have enough constructive things to do. 300 girls did not finish at one high school on double session last year because of pregnancy. With LO portable units could avoid double sessions. Mr. Dobbs said Archer will go on double session in September too. ‘Rabbi Rothschild asked if there were objections to portable units. Group agreed would prefer portable units to double session. 8. Mrs. D. Shaw, 2232 Verbena Street, #10, Dixie Hills Apt., 794-9065. Complained of rats, has called Rodent Control, still bad. 9. Mr. Otis Montgomery, 730 Hortense Place, N. W. (Hortense Community Club). Steel cable tower in middle of street; city owns land, Ga. Power owns tower, can't get anybody to take it down; sewerage inadequate, can't walk in street when it rains; Hortense and Florence Streets . heed resurfacing; dogs run Loose. (Commission members Jack Sells and T. M. Alexander arrived; also Alderman 0. V. Williamson). 10. Mrs. Ed. W. Hall, 1999 Baker Road, N. W. 794-3949, Blind curve, children playing in streets; vacant house, yard grown up, abandoned station wagon on Arlington Circle; her son, along with other teenagers, gets out of school at 12:20 (Fulton High), “used to know a child was out of schoo. when you saw him in the streets, now you don't know if he is coming or going to school; nothing to do but break windows. ll. Mrs. Daisy B. Stinson, 2056 Arlington Circle, N. W. Need trees trimmed and Light in middle of street, would help women coming home from work. 12. Mr. Sidney T. Dennis, 645 S. Evelyn Place, S. W. 794-1236. Has 4 children in school, refused to sign school assignment form for next year; no use for parent and child to make request if area Supt. and Principal can make assignment too late for an appeal; should be notified of assignments in time to request another one, not just bb sent back to present school; when school goes on double session (extended day''), should have supervised recreation program. Mrs. English, assistant Principal at West Fulton, explained that the school assignment form “is part of the law; ask to return forms as soon as possible; those requesting transfers sent to area Supt.; if request transfer to another area, sent to Supt. of that area; noti- fied "as soon as processed". | | Mr. Dobbs asked if other area Supt. has authority to decide. Mr. Williamson asked if decision may be appealed to Supt. Mrs. English said she did not know. 13. Mrs. Pearlina Jones, 1153 Wilkes Circle, N. W., #176. Pipes burst on Wilkes Circle, sewerage odor bad; need light behind apartments; are all projects costs the same? Prices for screen doors vary, some $1.50, some $3.50; she has reported to the manager. Mr. Attridge asked if she was satisfied with public housing? Mrs. Jones said she is interested in other people, particularly older people; is it possible to have copies of rules and regulations? 14. Mrs. Lewis Johnson, 1193 Wilkes Circle, #148. Rent has increased twice within a year; income has stayed the same. 15. Mrs. Margaret Phillips, 1193 Wilkes Circle, #143, 792-8742. Charged $12.50 for % a screen door; cashier said should have had correct change for paying rent. 16. Mrs. Blanche Matthews, 1275 Wilkes Circle, N. W. #81. $2517.70 income, manager says it is $3,598; says it is “anticipated income''-how does he know how much to anticipate? 17. Mr. Wesley J. Mapp, 1240 Wilkes Circle, N. W. New rent charges are more than he makes a month, moved into public housing fairly recently; will move out as soon as he can. 18. Mrs. Mary E. Peek, 1165 Wilkes Circle, #164. Husband disabled, Live on social security and her salary as a Nurse's Aide; income same in April as last September, rent went up. 19. Mrs. Frankie M. Deans, 1207 Walden Street, #432. As supply in school cafeteria, makes $37.50 a week. Husband started driving cab (?); rent increased from $37 to $80; has 2 teenage daughters. "Go to bed early, nothing to do; if I can't take care of them, I wish somebody would take them and give them a good home." 20. Mrs. Ernestine Price, 1056 Chivers Street, 799-8317. Husband died; charged back rent; present rent “couldn't base it a what she is making"; asked manager about it and he said "I still have authority to put you out." 21. Mr. Edward Young, 2279 Hill Street,-N. W. Center Hill area, transition area for 2 years; "new people but old houses, owners are "chisleing", 3 houses in area were condemned, came out and did little bit of repairs, after they were "fixed", tenants spent "their time emptying basins when it rains." 22. Mrs. Bobbie Mathis, 1140 Wilkes Circle, #204. Rent increased, she does not understand why. 23. Mrs. Daley, Bowen Homes. Works at Hillhaven Homes, had 3 different notices of income, none of which she says is right. 24. Mrs. Ernestine Pope, 99 Chivers Street, 3282. Says she was charged for paper on grass; excess gas bills but she doesn't see how it could be that much. oO” Mr. Hart then read a long list of additional requests drawn up by re- sidents, which he said he would turn off to the Commission office.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 28

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 28
  • Text: NEWSLETTER OF THE J OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1060 1208 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA 80303 TELEPHONE -408 EXT. 488 JOB CONFERENCE: October 26, 1967 10 A.ii. 12 Noon 2 <4 Poms City Hall To hear from all the segments of the community concerned with employment -- employees looking for workers; those looking for jobs; those giving training for jobs; employment service and labor representatives; public and private agencies with employment programs. If you are interested, con- tact the CRC office. KEKKKHHHHHHEHHHEHE SOME FACTS ON ATLANTA EMPLOYMENT: Le Georgia State Employment Service, Atlanta offices in July had 659 job orders (described as a "slack season") and 11,324 active applicants (5,847, females). 2s All EOA Centers referred total of 1,811 clients to Manpower counsel- ors in July. Jt Majority of "hardcore unemployed" interviewed in Labor Department EQOA Human Resources Survey, 1966 were Atlanta natives or 10 year residents or more. 4. 1350 Atlanta establishments reported to U.S. Equal Employment Oppor- tunity Commission, 1966 employed a total of 103,798 Negroes were 17% of the total employed, 1.8% of the total white collar workers and 4% of the total craftsmen employed. Of the 17,641 Negroes, 5.45% were white collar, 4.7% craftsmen. EHEKKKEKKEEREEK HOUSING MEETINGS: Second Friday each month, 10 A.M.) City Hall of Organi- zations and agencies with programs in housing. Sub-committees on equal housing opportunity, legal housing problems, tenant-landlord relations, and military housing was held on October 13th. : aes KEHKEKEKREKKHHEEH SOME FACTS ON ATLANTA HUUSING: From Relocation Study of the Community Improvement Program (CIP) for the City. 1. Displaced by governmental action, 1964 - 27 whites, 1108 non-whites. 2. Relocated in substandard dwellings - O whites; non-whites 5.2% as Estimated displacement of all urban renewal families as of July, white - 426, -fAdn-swhite -~5;'044. (92%) HEEKKEEEHEKEEEE OBSERVERS INVITED: Organizations, agencies and individuals in Metro- Atlanta are invited to serve as observers at the Atlanta Community Relations Commission regular monthly meeting (4th Fridays, 1:30 P.... City Hall) and any special meetings (as called) of the Commission. Planned but not yet scheduled: Meetings of the CRC with the Atlanta Board of Education and the Board of the Atlanta Housing Authority, also the Office of Economic Opportunity. Dates being arranged. HE HHHKHERRHEHE EQUAL GPPORTUNITY EMPLOYMENT CLAUSE FOR CITY CONTRACTS: Will be re- quired under an ordinance passed by the Board of Aldermen on September 18th upon the recommendation of the CRC, Vice-Mayor Sam Massell, the Summit Leadership Conference and others. This is required of Housing Authority contracts, by federal regulations. CRC has recommended that School Board contracts also require it. KEHKHKEKHEREKEE DIXIE HILLS: The CRC Executive Committee met at the Mayor's request to hear from the residents of the area, following the incidents of June 19-21. Reports of the meeting and follow-up reports are available from CRC office. Page 2 News SCHOOLS: On September 14th the CRC called a special emergency meet- ing with the Atlanta Board of Education, Superintendent Letson and the representatives of the Atlanta Summit Leadership Conference, to obtain facts about the school situation. (The Commission had met with Dr, Letson «n July 12th and asked the School Board for a joint meeting to discuss matters of policy. President Ed Cook of the School Board had agreed to such a meeting, but had not set a time). The School Board had already scheduled a special meeting to discuss a disciplinary matter for Septrmber 14th. The Commission met and heard the grievances of parents and organizations and telegraphed another request for a joint meeting with the School Board, stressing the urgency of the situation. KKEEKKEKKEREREHE NETGHBORHOOD TEAMS & ADVISORY COUNCILS: The original 5 Teams of the Commission members to keep in touch with specific areas have been ex- panded to 10. Teams.and Advisory Councils are being appointed for each. The Teams are for Edgewood-Kirkwood; Summerhill-Peoplestown; Mechanics- ville-Pittsburgh; Vine City-Lightning; Northwest-Dixie Hills; Northwest- Perry Homes Area; Houlevard-Parkway; Capitol Avenue and Blair Village- Poole Creek. Any neighborhood or organization can call for a meeting of the Community Relations Commission. YOUTH MEETING: When much of the nation was trying to keep young people from meeting, the CRC voted to held a special meeting and invite the young people of Atlanta to the City Hall to give their views on their ‘own 'problems. On August 9th, more than 150 packed the Aldermanic Chamber and spoke, from all parts of town. The views of all of their problems were pretty well summed up "nothing to do and nowhere to go", YOUTH CENTER FOR PITTSSURGH AREA: Inspired by what he heard at the Youth Hearing on August 9th, Michael Forkner of the Pittsburgh area went back’ and hunted up a’ building which could be used as a youth center. With the help of the EOA Center, community groups and individuals, a place was located which the owner agreed to lease for this purpose. The City Parks and Recreation Department is nenovating the building and will staff it, and for the first time the young people of the Pittsburgh area, will have a place of their own. Congratulations to all who have worked on this. KREEKEEKREKREREREE MR. JOSEPH WYANT: Mr. Wyant has been appointed to replace Mr. Al Keuttner who resigned from the Commission when he moved to Los Angeles to join the staff of "Pace", Mr. Keuttner's services as an original member of the Commission was appreciated by all. Dr. C*’eveldnd Dennard, another original ember of the Commissian who resigned last’ winter (ee ah when he left Atlanta to accept appointment by New York City Mayor John Lindsey as Department Commissioner for Human Resources. Dr. Dennard has now Eecome Director of the new Technical Institute of the District of Columbia in Washington. Our congratulations to both. COMMISSION MEMBER T. M. ALEXSNDER, SR. attended the Washington meeting of the newly formed Urban Coalition, the Steering Committee of which includes Mayor Allen. COMMISSTON CHAIRMAN IRVING K. KALER was invited to Dallas, Texas to meet with the Citizens Committee interested in establishing a Community Relations Commission. HEKEKAEKHREKERE MRS. VELMA STRODE: Mrs. Strode, officer in charge of liasion with local agencies for the Community Relations Service of the U.S. Depart- ment of Justice, visited the CRC at our request last month. Mrs. Strode is the sister of the Reverend Homer McKewen, Atlanta pastor, and we want to thank her publicly for her assistance while she was here and at other times.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
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  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 16

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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 16
  • Text: of ft = ae z FOR YOUR INFORMATION be ¢ b OFFICE OF CLERK OF BOARD OF ALDERME pr CITY OF ATLANTA GEORGIA A RESOLUTION BY: ALDERMEN WILLIAMSON, COOK, COTSAKIS, FREEMAN, LEFTWICH AND SUMMERS WHEREAS, investigation and survey of various areas of the City of Atlanta show that many of said areas are sub- standard and lacking in certain essential facilities, many of which are provided and furnished by the City of Atlanta, and WHEREAS, it is the desire and goal of the City of Atlanta to see that all areas of the City are furnished standard service and facilities which are under the supervision and control of the City of Atlanta, NOW, TEEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta, as follows: 1, That the President of the Board of Aldermen appoint a committee of the members of the Board of Aldermen to be composed of the chairmen of the following committees; Finance, Parks, Police, Public Werks I, Public Works II, Urban Renewal Policy and Zoning to work in cooperation with a committee to be selected and designated by the Atlanta Summit Conference, ! 2. That said committee shall visit and survey the services and facilities which are furnished in the areas of the City known as Blué Heaven, Vine City, Mechanicsville, Summer Hill, Cabbage Town and such other areas as may be determined by the committee and to make recommendations to the Mayor and Board of Aldermen for the furnishing of necessary aeeeEEeS ane facilities within the control of the city of Atlanta which will standardize the services furnished in the above-mentioned areas with all other areas of the City of Atlanta. 3. That said committee further be authorized to formulate and present recommendations to the Board of Aldermen for the membership and formation of a Human Relations Commission for the City of Atlanta together with an estimated financial statement as to the required sum of money to commence the operation of a Human Relations Commission for the City of Atlanta as soon as funds can be made available, but not 1Sker HR January 1, 1967, ADOPTED BY BOARD OF ALDERMEN August 1, 1955 APPROVED August 3, 1966 A True Copy, Clerk of Aldermen
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
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Box 7, Folder 18, Document 31

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_018_031.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 31
  • Text: AO Met Crm FOR YOUR INFORMATION COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION 1203 CITY HALL ATLANTA, GEORGIA Report on Meeting with Staff of Bethlehem Center (located near Carver School) and Wesley House Centers (Southeast and Southwest): op April 24, 1967 The staff who work with young people in these areas expressed the following concerns: w" That Police don't come" when you call them, or take so long that they are too late to help when they do arrive. That Police need special training to handle young people. That there should be some registration and/or regulations concerning the possession of firearms and weapons. They spoke of increasing incidences of use of knives, etc. That laws relating to the sale of whiskey to minors should be more stringently enforced, That no more liquor licenses be approved for the area close to Bethlehem Center. They have opposed it at hearings which they known about, but wonder where the hearings are advertised. That more rehabilitative work be done through the Juvenile Court. Tendency to send clients home without much work = either attitude that nothing is wrong or that nothing can be done. That people in the neighborhood are afraid to report some of the older youth, for fear of reprisals - both adults and younger people. are afraid. They have made various contacts with Police Department, Juvenile Court, etc. They are still worried about what they feel to be a growing "lawlessness" and use of weapons, which they feel to be a problem of "Community Relations", How can community protect itself against people who intimidate by threats, which are not basis enough for legal action or people who have residents scared to swear out warrant against them?
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 37

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 37
  • Text: OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1966 1208 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA 30308 TELEPHONE 522-5468 EXT. 483 May 11, 1967 Mr. Herbert Jenkins Chief of Police 165 Decatur Street, S. E, Atlanta, Georgia Dear Chief Jenkins: I hesitate even to report to you a situation of which I am Sure you are well aware. I do feel an obligation, however, to have it on the record that at each Neighborhood Hearing which we have held, there have been requests for increased police protection. The comaon complaint is, when police is needed, by the time the call is put in and the police arrives it is almost too late to do any good. There were also general statements about the need for regular patroling throughout the I am aware of the great shortage of personnel in the Police Department, but I felt sure that you would want to have this reported to you. The areas in which we have held meetings includes, Edgewood, Kirkwood, Stimmerhill, Peoplestown, Vine City, Lightning, Mechanicsville, Pittsburgh, Dixie Hills, Bolton Hills, Perry Homes, Scott Cfossing, Center Hill, Carey Park, Grove Park Bowen Homes, Hunter Hills, Almond Park, and Simpson=-Troy Street. We would be glad to provide you with the names of the individual: residents who presented these requests if this would be of any help to you. Sincerely, (Mys.) Eliza K. Paschall Executive Director EKP smt cc: Mayor Ivan Allen Mr. Irving K. Kaler, Chairman Mr. Richard Freeman, Chairman of Police Committee
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 40

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 40
  • Text: OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1966 1203 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA $0303 TELEPHONE 522-5468 EXT. 433 Mr. Irvine K. Kater, Chairman THE HONORABLE SAM MASSELL, JR., Ex-Officio President, Board of Aldermen May 5, 1967 COMMISSION MEMBERS Mr. T. M. ALEXANDER, SR. Mr. R. BYRON ATTRIDGE Mrs. Sarna BAKER Miss HELEN BULLARD Mr. R. J. BUTLER Mr. Rosert Dosss Mr. HAMILTON Douc.as, JR. Mr. C. G. Ezzarp Most REVEREND Paut J. HALLINAN Archbishop of Atlanta Mr. JoserpH Haas Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Mr. AL KuetrNer City of Atlanta Dr. Rosert E. Lee * Mr. RoLLAND MAXWELL City Hall Mr. F. W.’ PATTERSON Atlanta, Georgia Rast JAcos M. RoTHSCHILD Mr. M. O. “Buzz” Rvan Mr. Jack SELLS Dear Mayor Allen: Mrs. Mary STEPHENS THE REVEREND SAMUEL WILLIAMS . . : - . Mr. Irving K. Kaler, chairman of the Community Relations Commission has asked me to write on behalf of the Commission to accept the resolution concerning the "Hebrew Benevolent Congregation Award", and to express appreciation for the opportunity to act on behalf of the city. Mas. Eviza K. PASCHALL, Executive Director The chairman will name a committee to work out plans for implementing the resolution, and I am sure those persons will be in touch with you as soon as they are named. Sincerely, [;. a (C. Pyame (Mrs.) Eliza K. Paschall Executive Director EKP/mt cc: Mr, Irving K. Kaler
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 10

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 10
  • Text: = 2eroject Director | ‘Senior Stenographer | Eadget Officer Technical V/riter | Typist Clerk | | Typist Clerk | nae | _ Physical Planning Coordinator vocio-economic a Community Relations Coordinator }. Coordinator + Stenographer -| stenographer -| Steno;,rapher | Supporting »hysical Supportiny socio-economic Neighborhood Involvement Planning on loan Planning Staff on loan frorm Specialists (4) from participation agencies participating arencies | eupportin: Community Development Aides (12) PROPOSED ORGANIZATION - ivic DEL. NEIGHBORHOCD PRUJECT STAFF CITY CF ATLANTA, GEORGIA ee eee oe eo ott
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 47

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 47
  • Text: COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION, 1203 City Hall, Atlanta, Ga. 30303. Requests for Help ~ Feb, 16 - April 15, 1967 EK s-P MP VC-L NW City Hearing General 20 19 16 23 34 1 5 4 3 1 4 K wo Number Speaking Housing. - Low-rent Housing code Real Estate companies Atlanta-DeKalb Health-sanitation Parking signs Traffic Traffic Lights Sewers Sidewalks Street lights Streets-caondition Recreation Trash collection Police protection FF EF mw wo NM & WwW FEF i hm & WwW NHN WwW NW Mm FP FF Ow Schools Vocational Rehab. wer & Nw Nw ON BN FP FP NY FP YY NYP DH Zoning General housing planning 1l Public Housing 1 2 1l 3 4 Jobs Bus Service - ol 2 1 1 Youth participation a Interpretation of Problems Food Stamps Health - Nursing Homes Police - courts Housing -— integration City Employment Practices Police "brutalityW Public Hazards FN eF FP NFP NB Civil Defense policy Loans, collections Grady Hospital Public Health coordination Public Facilities Aw Pe b Wages & Hours Vey to column headings: E-K Edgewood-Kirkwood VC-L Vine City-Lightning S-P Summerhill-Peoplestown NW Northwest Area including Bowen Homes & Dixie M-P Mechanicsville-—Pittsburg City Hearing - Public hearing (Hills General - Individual requests These numbers do not necessarily reflect the degree of concern in each area. For instance, one request might represent the wishes of a civic Jeague. EP:dwa 4/28/67
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 43

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 43
  • Text: a DEPARTMENT OF LAW ; ie As hat ild WHLLIAM- OLIVER BUILDING anal Ailantla, Georgia 30303 February 22, 1967 HENRY L. SOWDEN CUry ATTOMAMLY FERRIN Yo MATHEWS ASSISTANT CITY ATTORNEY Mr. Joe Akin 2107 Oak View Road, S. E. Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Akin: Miss Evelyn Dewberry of our office gave me the sub- stance of her telephone conversation with you last Saturday regarding the property located at 2104 Oak View Road, S. E. I have referred this matter to Mr. J. H. Buchanan, Chief Housing Code Inspector of the City of Atlanta, since this is entirely within his area of responsibility. I have asked Mr. Buchanan to have one of his field inspectors to get in touch with you in order to see if something could be worked out in regard to the property. Be recent State law, five property owners can bring a complaint against a property, have a hearing, and if the property is in bad enough shape, have the Building Official of the City of Atlanta to demolish the property or .to close it. Possibly, this would be the best approach. If we can be of further assistance to you in this matter, please let us know. Yours very truly, \, 1 7 + \ i Van at5 4 i Va —A = 4 a James B. Pilcher JBP2at bay
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Complete Folder

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Complete Folder
  • Text: OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1966 1£09 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA 90303 MR. IRVING K. KALER, Chairman THEl HONORABLE SAM MASSELL, JR., TELEPHONE 6H•U63 EXT. 433 June 23, 1967 Ez-Ofjicio President, Board of Aldermen COMMISSION MEMBERS MR. T . M. ALEXANDER, SR. MR. R. BYRON ATTRIDGE MRS. SARA BAKER M ISS H ELEN BULLARD MR. R. J . BUTLER MR. ROBERT DOBBS Mn. HAMILTON DOUGLAS, JR, MR. C. G. EZZARD MOST REVEREND PAUL J, HALLINAN Archbishop of Atlanta MR. JOSEPH HAAS MR. AL KUETTN ER Dn. RoBERT E . LEE MR. ROLLAND MAXWELL MR. F. W."PATTERSON RABBI J ACOB M. ROTHSCHILD MR. M . 0. "Buzz" RYAN MR. JACK S ELLS MRS. MARY STEPHENS THEl REVEREND SAMUEL WILLIAMS MRS. ELIZA K. PASCHALL, Executive Director Office of The Mayor City Hall At l anta, Georgia Dear Sir: We are requesting the use of two (2) buses, to be provided by the Third Army, Fort McPherson , Atlanta, Georgia, t o transp ort seventy- five ( 75) teen-agers to a ba seball game to be held at the Atla nta Braves Stad ium on Sat urday , June 24, 1967 . The t e en-a gers live in the Boulevard section of Atlant a ; a n a r ea which we f eel tension i s develop i n g . They will have adequ a te super vision, seven (7) adults to be exact , that will a ccompan y t hem. Most of these teen - agers are members of, or fre quent, the At l anta Yout h Develo pment Center, a socia l agency in the community which will be res po nsible for this outing. If this request is 0gra nte d , we are asking that the buses meet the group Saturday, J une 24th at 12:15 PM at 666 Parkway Drive, NE, Atlanta, Georgia. ~:~=rsi.:IJ O t'i.t\ttt-. rr- t PicK E.iT, E.r:Ct:it i t c ser;t11t1ry Emcntm e· OUN\¥/. B\!\\~ l .·~·1:, : fr~~ 1S,•cr8.:1) , GrtnrnT1 f · ~ l "TT ' Cr :': ,ui.:n "• ' H r=. ' RY 1 �-2- Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz recently observed t h at the r a te of Negro unemployment will rise as busine ss a nd in du str y move awa y from forme r locations to new situa tions in a cce ssible to Ne g roes unless and until e q ual opportunity of residence is ava il~ a ble to all employees alike. Simply stated, unequal a ccess to job sites h ampe rs and i n increasing instance s de feats equal emp loyment opportunity . We a r e aware t hat limitations impo s e d up on the Atlanta Commu n ity Re l ations Commi ss ion by politic a l boundaries restrict fa i r h ousing ordin a nces which t h e Commission mi ght r e conm,end to t h e corporate limits of the City of Atl a nta . We are also aware that othe r u rgencie s such as sewage disp o sal, a ir p ollution and rap i d tra nsit, to mention only a few conspicuous ins t an c es , must e v e ntu a lly be dea lt wi th as Me trop oli tan Area pro l;, l ems. Howev e r, a beginning must b e made s omewhe r e by an e nligh t ened and progre ssive community . We q u es tion whe t he r At lant a c an a fford to sit i d ly b y awaiting p o s sib l e f utu r e federa l legi s l ation wh ile t h e h ous ing d ile mma i ntens i f i es with e a ch pass i ng month . Req ues ts pre s ented to Atl an t a f or fa ir housing l eg i s l a ti on hav e been par ried with the tri t e a rgume nt t h a t s uch l egis l a tion will on l y a cce l e rat e " f light to s ub u rb i a ". Th i s i s a n e asy a n swer a nd may h ave s ome e l e me n t o f fa ct. Bu t at l eas t such an o r d i n a nce wou l d t e n d t o s t a bili ze r es i denti a l areas in tra nsiti on withi n t he city limits , by e nco u ragi n g city-wi de d i spe rsal o f mi n o r ity families s e eki ng sui tab l e and d ecent homes with i n t he i r means. ~.n o pen o c cupancy ordinan c e would i n addition, recog ni ze t he rig hts o f f irst c l a ss c iti zen s h ip f o r a ll At lanta n s a like, irrespective o f race o r re ligion, -· �-3- by permitting every famil y to live in a neighborhood of its choice and compat ib le with its means and finances. We encoura ge further persuasion on the p art of the Commission directe d toward the enactment of a fair housing ordinance as a necessary concomitant of the "Forward Atlanta" movement. N~:z-~:::- Res p ectfully y ours, P r ogram Director jac:nc cc: Ma y or Ivan Allen, Jr. Cecil Al e x ander Dr. Benjamin Ma y s . Dr. Sanford Atwood Encl. ~ (.;,/~-(/ cf'7~ ernona Clay ton Housing Director �AMERICAN FR IENDS SERVICE COM MITTEE CO MM UNITY RELATIO NS PROGRA M Rm, 501, 41 Exchange Pl,, S. E., Atlanta, Georgia 30:J In the major citie s of the United States, tenements swarm with children, schools are overcrowded and understaffed, and people are out of work. Apathy overcomes many. For others, frustration erupts into violence. The heart of the city' s problems is the isolation of the people of its slums from the benefits of the rest of the metropolitan area. Discrimination in employment, zoning restrictions, discriminatory real estate practices, local tax structures, political boundaries all protect the affluent from the claims of the impoverished. . ·-·-:~ 1 • · --: - , ••.•'...CO . " • .·~-;- l 1 1 \\".~· , , ~~ jt- , • ...-::· • ... i·· I I t..~-< ·.. II All~ ~" -·· ·· Iii ii 'iii f' . ;~ Y{'f ._,· . ~ , ' __··. . . • • .& • • ~ ~~ . ,jj/A ·~ .. - ,. i ..... -- . I . ._#. I -.:,..., ...;, The s lum ' s pr oblems are pe rpetuated by powerlessne ss. Negro le ader s r ecogniz e that fr eedom cannot exist without equality and that political and e conomic power are e ssential p arts of equality. They are appealing to their pe ople to t ake pride in bl acknes s and unite in effective ac tion. The challenge to Negroe s to ove rcome fe ar and pa ralysis is accompanied by a challenge t o the white c ommunity to overcome its fear and int r ans igence. These chal lenges m us t be met . The Ame rican F r iends Service Com mittee str uggle s against exc lus ion of any minority from the mainstream of Americ an soc iety. Its programs in the c ities concentrate on getting people to recognize their own problems and t ake initiative in de aling with them. The programs search for new ways both to break down barriers and to build s elfreliance - ways that can be copied and adapted by other groups in other c it ies. ,CITIES, JOBS& HOUSES LANDLORDS AND TENANTS WORK TOGETHER In Boston, concerned with the problems of welfare tenants, the Service Committee is bringing together tenants, small landlords, and the welfare department to find solutions to the problems of apartments without heat, garbage that stands uncolle cted, falling plaster, rats, and roaches. In Chicago the Service Committee's staff has been working with the Chicago Freedom Movement beaded by Martin Luther King. Block clubs organized by the Service Committee have been conve rted to locals of the Union To End Slums. Contracts are negotiated between landlords and tenants, specifying the r e sponsibilitie s of each. If negotiation fails, the tenants may resort to a rent strike in which r ent is held in e s crow by the bargaining agent. Working in a depre ssed community in Pasadena, California, the Se rvice Committee has helped organiz e a businessme n's council, which is working on upgrading busine sse s and supplying new jobs. The staff has started youth programs for drop-outs and has helped form a young adult group to work on recreational programs and activities for young people. It has started an interfamily visiting program with churc hes in the area to give familie s a chance to know pe ople and places outside their own neighborhoods. A new program in We st Oakland is trying to e stablish communication among groups in the c ommunity, and b etween them and groups outside the are a. Distrust of the s urrounding world is so high that any m e aningful communic ation is difficult. Seminars ar e be ing planned to bring We st Oakland r e sidents and outside rs together in a neutral atmospher e wher e they c an explore mutual problems. The final emphasis of the program will be to stimulate the inte r e st and effo r ts of the wider community !n the problems of the people of We st Oakland. In a dense ly populated area of San Francisc o, the Se r vice Committee got togethe r p arents who had c omplaints about the elem entary school, and this group bec ame known a s the School Com mittee . They decided the logical place to wor k for changes was the PTA, but the princ ipal had repeatedly re fus ed to allow PT A meetings at night when working parents could attend. School offic i als cont inued t o discourage them . They petitioned the s uperintendent, with copies t o the press. Now, for the fir s t t ime in the history of the s chool , there are P TA meetings at night , and a parent has even been e lected trea s urer. PROGRAMS OF THE AMERICAN FRIENDS SERVICE COMMITTEE �EMPLOYMENT LINKED TO HOUSING Programs in San Francisco; Richmond, Indiana; and a new program to sta rt in Atlanta link two of the Se rvice Committ ee' s concerns- equal employment and fai r housing. A man's ability to find a job, and an employer's ability to hire him, may depend on his being able to live in the vicinity of the plant. The Committee feels that it is not enough to make employment open to all r egardl e s s of race , but that housing must be made available as well, and close to the job. Staff members found one government bureau in the suburbs of Washington that must s end a bus into the city eve ry day to pick up twenty secretarie s because r acial discrimination prevents them from living near the bureau. Many firms with government contracts have equal employment polic ie s . The Service Committee works with personnel people and executive s of the s e c ompanie s to help them s ecure housing in the community for qualified applic ants of a minority group . MANY PATHS TO FAIR HOUSING TRIED In 1951 the Se r vice Committee responded to a crisis that developed in Cicero, Illinois, following t he move of a Negro family into a p reviously all-white area. Since then the Committee has been increasingly involved in the drive to bring about equal opportunity in housing, believing that members of any group should be able to freely rent or buy in the neighborhood in which they want to live. In New York; Philadelphia; Chicago; Xenia, Ohio; and Muncie, Indiana, the staff of the Committee's housing program works with buyers, sellers, builders, the real estate industry, government agencies, concerned citizens and organizations, and members of the nonwhite community to open more areas for nonsegregated living and to create a receptive atmosphere for minorities moving into all-white communities. Staff members sponsor housing discussions on TV and radio, set up listing services to bring together the minority buyer and the will ing seller. They escort families to local brokers to assure equal service , initiate community education campaigns, organiz e "good neighbor" pledge dr ives, and hold buyers' confer enc es to inform minority families of their legal rights and to provide them with homebuying information and enc ouragement. The Committe e has helped fo r m fair housing coi,mcils, organiz e d sur veys of comm unity attitude s , and supported nondisc r iminatory housing legislation. It is now mobilizing Negro buyers and renters to take advantage of new openings and to confront real estate brokers with the need to change discriminatory practices. The Philadelphia Metropolitan Housing Program works with the Federal Housing Administration and the Veterans Administration in developing an affirmative policy of nondiscrimination. The present practices of these agencies and others are tested. Information is obtained on new developments built with FHA money and on foreclosures of FHA and VA mortgages. A range of approaches to the Negro community is tested, so that home s eeke rs can le arn of housing opportunities throughout the metropolitan area. AMERICAN FRIENDS SERVICE COMMITTEE NATIONAL OFFICE: 160 NORTH 15th STREET PHILADELPHIA , PENNSYVANIA 19102 4M- 11 / 66-AFSC �June 12, 1967 Mrs. Eliza K. Paschall Executive Director Community Relations Commission 1203 City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dea.r Mrs . Paschall: This is to acknowledge receipt of your letter of June 7, 1967. Th.e meeting you referred to on the morning of Jun 6th w a me ting call d for th h ads of the vaJ"iou op r ting departments of the City Government. It has never been our pr ctice to include th x cutive director of th variou gove,:nment agencies uch as Civil Def n e, Metropolitan Planning Commie ion, the Atlanta Youth Councii, etc. - t th m etings. How v r, they re not closed me ting _ , nd w · would b happy to _ v you ttend future meeting if you o desir • I am sur th.at Mr. Collier Gladin, h ad o! the Pl nning D rtm nt, wUl be happy to furnish you with ny nd . 11 inform tion submitt d to th d rtm nt bead at th m ting on June 6th. Sine r · 1y your , R. E rl Land t Admini tr tiv .Aa i tant REL:lp CC: Mr. Irving Kaler �OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1968 If09 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA 90303 MR. IRVIN G K. KALER, TELEPHONE 5U-.U83 EXT. 433 Chairman THE HONORABLE SAM MASSELL, JR., Ex-Officio President, Board of Aldermen June 7, 1967 COMMISSION MEMBERS MR. T. M. ALEXANDER, SR. MR. R. BYRON ATTRIDGE Mns. SARA BAKER Mrss HELEN BULLARD MR. R. J. BUTLER MR. ROBERT DOBBS MR. HAMILTON DOUGLAS, JR. MR. C. G. E ZZARD MOST REVEREN D PAUL J. HALLINAN Ar chbishop of Atlanta MR. JOSEPH H AAS MR. AL K UETTN ER DR. ROBERT E . L EE M R. ROLLAND M AXWELL M R. F . W."PATTERSON RABBI JACOB M. ROTHSCHILD M R. M. 0 . "Buzz" RYAN Mn. JACK SELLS MRS. MARY STEPHENS THE R EVEREND SAMUEL WILLIAMS Mr . R. Earl Lan ders Admin i st r at iv e Ass i s tant May o r ' s Office Ci ty Hall Atlant a , Geo rg ia Dear Mr . Landers: MRS . ELIZA K. PASCHALL, Executive Director I fa il ed t o r ece i v e n o ti ce o f the me e ting o f yeste rd a y mo rn in g , a re po rt o f whic h I saw on l a s t News . I won d er if i t would b e po ss i b le f o r me t o whi c h wa s re po rt ed at t he me et in g , and wh at s teps make sure that my n a me i s on the l i st f o r f u rther kind. De p a rt men t Hea d s nigh t ' s Te l ev i s ion o bt ain i nfo rmat ion I s hould take t o meeti n gs o f t hi s Sinc er e l y , ) l; c J< p~ ( Mrs . ) El iza K. Pa s c ha l l Exec u ti v e Dire ct o r EKP : mt �OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1968 1£03 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA 30303 TELEPHONE Sfl!-4463 EXT. 433 June 2, 1967 Mr . D n E. Sw t Director of Gov mm nt 1 Liaison City of Atl City Hall Atlanta, Georgi 30303 D r Mr . S t: Thi 1 in r ard to your 1 t t r r garding the VISTA proj ct a it ppli to the propo d Model N ighborhood Progr in At nta, 11 tanca from Mr . c. G. Ez ard, Pr id nt , S rhill Civic League , and m-~fter of the Atlanta Coamunity lationa Coamiaaion. A copy is att c d . In vi of hi request and your lett r of May 24, ar in gr nt that this r u t hould be part of your coordinating progr • Eit r 1 tter from you or conf r nc with Mr. Ezs rd would b greatly ppreciated. Our lghborhood e tinge v convinc d us of th int ns interest oft citisens 1n having additional information about th Model City, d v will le your sugg tiona a to wher thee inquirl.. uld b forward for information. The r qua t for Perhaps it would be help ul if you could meet with the --auia ion and ~ p lfie outline• of where the C • ion can be of at u iatance in this progr • �Page Two Mr. . Dan E. Sweat June 2, 1967 It goes without saying that .s ince our aims are identic land p :rallel that there will be overlapping responsibilities. While we feel a deep obligation to fulfill our functions as outlined by the Mayor and the Bo rd of Aldermen,, I am sure you know we do not · nt to duplicate services. W look forward to hearing from you. -sincerely, ~ -- db cc:,-/Mayol:' Iv n Allen~ .Jr. Mr. liza · .Pac 11 - 1, / ~ ler,. Chairman �-, C ITY OF .ATLAN,.T.A CITY HALL ATLANTA. GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison May 26, 1967 Mr. Irving K. Kaler, Chairman Community Relations Commission 1203 City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Kaler: j ' I I was very surprised to learn that the Community Relations Commission had filed a Vista Project Proposal with the Office of Economic Opportunity for the purpose of providing a "reliable source of information on the various programs having to do with the proposed Model Neighborhood Program in Atlanta." As you know, the Model Neighborhood Program is a project of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta. A planning grant application was approved by the Board and Mayor on March 6th requesting funds to plan a Model Neighborhood rmder the Demonstration Cities and Metropolitan Development Act of 1966. A key part of this application provides for a Community Relations Coordinator, four Neighborhood Involvement Specialists and twelve Supporting Community Development Aides { citizen planners who will be employed from among the residents of the neighborhood.) A copy of the proposed organization chart is attached. --·1il. The wording of the Community Relations Commission application to OEO ( copy attached) implies: 1 ,, 1. That information provid e d through the Model City organiz ation might not be "r e liable" . 2. T hat groups must plan "independently" of the City o r M odel City ag e ncy. �May 24, 1967 Mr. Irving K. Kaler, Chairman Community Relations Commission Page Two The Model City proposal was developed with the cooperation of many groups, agencies and individual citizens of the Model City Neighborhood. Citizens of both races were involved. The Mayor's Office and all the agencies and groups involved in the preparation of the application have acted in good faith with all involved. We have attempted to provide reliable, intelligent and honest information on all phases of the program as we have progressed to this stage. We feel that the Model Cities organizational structure as proposed will be able to provide for full involvement and participation for all citizens and groups interested in being a part of the project. It is my opinion that any information group i:1-S proposed, using temporary outside residents such as Vista Volunteers, would tend to increase the confusion and anxiety which might exist in the community. Since the Model Neighborhood Program is being coordinated from the Mayor's Office, it would be helpful if any proposals which might affect the Model Neighborhood Program were discussed with . this office. If we are ever to hope to achieve full communications and coordination among our deprived citizens, we certainly must first be able to have cooperation and understanding among those of us who have been assigned to help. · ' ___P! Please be assured that the Community Relations Commission has the full cooperation of this office at all times . Since r ely your s , Da n E. Sweat Directo r of G o vernmental L i aison DES:lp . / CC: M a yor Ivan A llen» J r . ~ Mrs • .E:liz a P a schall �I . L ! r 1------j; ·.Senio1· Stenographer I B 1lannin;;;j C oor0.fr1a tor Community R elations C:001·dinator !· .. H:.::;teuoerapher 3tenographe1· -t Steno 0 raJ?her ·1 -Supportin 0 :,.=>hysical Planninc .)ll loan from partici2 ation acenci~s Suppa rtirq Gocio-economic i:::>lanni·11~ :::itaff on loan fron'l 1)articipating a[encies Neichborhooci Involvement S 1)ecialist,s ( 4) . . 3up.i::,ortinL Community Development Aides (12) PROPOSED ORGANIZATivN - i',~lDEL NEIGHDORHOC·D PROJECT STAFF CITY CF 11 TLANTA, GEORGIA - �---o·· -- -·-- . ·-· . . - ... - -- ? Appro1·a/ , xpirt1 Du,mbtr JI, I 966 (1, 2). Off ICE Of . ECOMOMIC OPPO ~T UNITY (FO:t VISTA VISTA PROJECT PROPOSAL om,1 us. ONLY) (3-1 CJ 41 SPONSOR INfO!tMATIO~ S~CTION I ~3 2. N O . AND STRE ET la . NAME Of SPONSO~ OR OTH:R PA~TICIPATING AGENCY . • · Comm unity Re 1 at ions Comm1ss 1or 3. CITY ~ TOWN 36-43 ~- COUNTY 5. STATE O 52-56 7. CODE ,. CONG~i:S57, SIONAL DIST. 5a 8. 4th & 5th 30303 Fulton Atlanta 12-35 6S Mitchell St., S. W. Room 1203 City Hall I Gsponsor Other parcici2 pacing agency 6 . ZIP Card No. 42 Ti:LEPHONE (Arta codt and ,rumbtr) l 404 !522-4L163 433,434 1Ext. THIS SECTION TO BE COMPLETED ONLY BY PARTICIPATING OR COOPERATING AGc:NCIES A. NAM! · OF SPONSOR WITH WH:CH THE AGENCY IS PA rn Cl?ATING OR COOP1:RATION l 0 (Chtet) Co-sponsor jointly and equally responsible for conduct of :,reject rnd supervision and support of volunteers 2 0 Will provide general !~p~rvisibn of the project Cord No. 4-3j12-36 11. NUM3ER ANO ST~EET (If dijftrml fro;,, 10. O FFICIAL REPRESENTING THE SPONSOR OR ~ARTICl?A TING @._ 9. RELATIONSHIP TO SPONSOR AND E:CTENT OF PARTICIPATION 3 0 Will undertak e conduct of proje=t and su~rvis i~ n 1!"!~ sup pore of vo l un · teers on default of primary sponsor 1) /t,111 AG.ENCY a, Name: b. Title: ,,, zi, cooe 13. STATE 12. CITY, TOWN, OR COUNTY u. TELEF'Ho,-..,: ( Arta cod, a,r,I ,rumb,r) .. I i' E 16. TY/>f o, l'roP05AL (Chtd) l of previously approved . project 3 0 17. TYPE 01' f>:IOJECT (Ch«.i.) O Rural communiry c!evelopment 0 lnJum-on reservation 3 0 Indians-off reservation ,4 0 Migrants , 0 Job corps-conservat ion 6 0 Ru ral-Appalachian 7 0 Other rural poor ... - Q:9 Initial proposal O Amendment or extension l ' Other/Sptrif,J ~ l 30 0 TNst Ter/y 2 31 e) 1:/rban community ~ •!· 18 . NO. 0, VOlUN TEERS O!JESTE0 2 0 Mentally ill O Job Corps -urhan 34 0 Justice n O Mencally r<"urdeJ 36 0 Ocher urban PN0RAB LE SA~ MASSELL, JR., Ez:-OJ;i.eio Presidcr.t, Boa.rd of Aldermen CO:'tI:'IIISSION M!<. T. pg. 2 of 6 MEMBERS II!. ALEXANDER, S R. 23. MR. R. BYRON ATTRIDGE MRS. SARA BAKER Relation to other Economic Opportunit§ ·Programs MISS HO.EN B t:t.LARD How will the activities of the proposed project be coordinated with·the community action program? llR. R . J . BUTLER llR. Rosr..u DOBBS llR. HA:lf!LTON DO UGLAS, llR. C. G. EZZAP.D JR. l!0ST REVEREN D PAUL J. HALLP. ?~ _er co_ s 11 1 met Robcl't o. Lowery, Fire Comm i.scity s summer a coo 1 Mayor Lindsay yes terday ap- i are ge tting the maximum value j ac,i vittes ~ needed. sioner. · T k F . If h d O11 t and th at 1 The chairma n of the coor- Robcl'l Shrank. Mrs. J ohnson anrl . pointed a Summer as orce , or eac ar spe_n . clinatin"' task force will be Fmnlt Espada of the Huma n ' of top city officia ls to coo'.di· tl~ese fu nd s are go_mg mtore~l: IBany Gottehrer, an assistant Resources Adn:tinistrallon .. n t recrea tion and comm u111ty- . a.eas where the:c I S the _g to the Mayor Mr. Gottchrer Wa lter E. Wa_shmgton , c_ha1rma n ; . -es t need," Mr. Lindsay said. I . . '> • • or the Housing Autho'.1ty. . a e development progra ms m deA ther ssi"nment of the . who ts 3~ y~ars old, has se1:ved Willi am H. Booth , chairma n of j I no · 11b I od 5 a : 0 t. t ' on lhc Antipoverty Operat10ns the Human Rights Commission. · . Ipressed ·neig ono ' task force Wlll be to 'l.t tac : Boa rd a nd the Special Summer Sidney Davidoff, assistant to t he ; I The 22-member group, winch Federal fund s to support the i 1966 Subcommittee. Mayor for Neighborhood P1·0- : includes nine Negroes and one program. LaSt year, New york A form er reporter Mr Gotte- grams. , . i 1 ' • . c·ty re ceived nearly $12-milhon Robe,·t M. Blum . .assistant to the ! Puerto Rican, will supervise I tl F d 1 G . ~rnnlent !hrer was a trouble shooter for Mayor for Neighborhood Little ie er a , ofov,. . c1·t Y ne1g . hb or h oo d s. c,ty . Httll ~. activities that range from the for h th c Off' E conomic' tl1e Mayor m . throug . e ice ~ . . this winter. Peter Aschk cnasy. deputy execu- , p_lacement of play streets and Opportumty, for s umm.z1 ac- , The Summ er T a sk Force is tlve directol', Dcpartmen.t or l fire-hydrant sp:11ys to tllc tivities. scheduled to hold week! meet- P a rks. . · · . spending of antipoverty fund s But the prospec ts fo r another !: t·I th ht Y ti John Foley, executive d1recto1, 1 . a t f wa lk· . d t . mgs un 1 e o wea 1er Police Athletic League. , d th '.1" e arian.,emen su ch allocation o no appear •s LarL,;, After that it 'will meet Dttvld L. Garth, special consultant ! mg lours by Mayor Lindsay bright at the moment, the , as often as is necessary. Its · to the Mayor. . through ghettos. May01· said. It was hoped that firs t meetin"' will be held Lillian Lampkin, executive direc- , In a statement announcing i a well-developed plan, prepared , Wednesday a°fternoon at City tor of the Youth Boapdj· D the appointm ent of the gro1;1p , i beforehand , might influence Hall. · Represen~lng ~e o ice C· 1Mr. Lindsay noted that the city I Congress t o appropriate money Thpoke of the problem e!lcou.ntered by U:. ir area being in the City of .Atlanta., yet in D kalb County. Hr .. Dou~lan., on behalf of the Co;ll!ll.,sion prol:lised our h lp in referring these co::iplainta to the proper city depart.!l~nt. Mrs. Ba!-:er sueE;ested thnt the telll.l ta ~e a gddcd tour of tl:e ar-so. . the civic leaders present offerred mll be worked out later~ -zhcnever to work up mi itinerary .. S ieral of' Plans for this our e can determine a ::mtu.:ill7 convenient tir.:e,. ¥.r. Ezzard spoke to the group asro? bled on t.ryinr; to esta l:!.sh good reln.tio "hips with the white ~ sidents rell"'.aining in the cor--.r.unity to onco'.lragc the., to rcr..nin.. told of the work t.be.t hnd been dooo in his own cor;,:,rmnity in this lineo .. . --/.2, • , ~ . , c , ( ~ This meeting chowotl that r!oSt of these proble!r.>$ arc tr.e rceult 0.1.. 14ck He 1-.,, ~A,":t. or comprehension on what_!! e.nd is not city respon~ibility and lac~ of know-hew as to -what city depart?r.ent to contact -whe:i-e or the need for city ucrvices erises. ·:e see here n ooed for our services in better infornrl.nb and clem-ing up this 1.:onf 1sion. �Edgewood-Kirkwood A ea Our suggestions ere h at 1 six residents of t he Comm those per sons who e appoint ru--1 ityo dv::...,o:..~y Cormni·::.te - , c ITI;)osed f e's c coir.2 i t tce ~r.3,. ers t o be p i eke from ttended t he me ting on .,. ,E:b ., 1 . Also, it is suggested that the E ' :rei:-:rood team rnake arrangements with Hr o . Long and Mro Yota to take us on a guided tour of the area o \,\ .... \\·., ', . \ "\ �-IDR YOUR INFORMATIOll COMMUNITY RELAT I ONS COMMISS ION 1203 CITY HALL ATLANTA, GEORGIA Report on Meeting with Staff of Bethle hem Ce nter (located near Carver School) and Wesley House Centers (Southea s t and Southwest): on April 24, 1967 The sta f f who work with young people in these areas expressed the following conce r ns: II That Police don I t come" when you call them , or take so l _ong that they are too late to help wh e n they do a r r ive. Th a t Police need special training to h a ndle young people. Th a t there s hould be some r e gis tra tion a nd/o r re g ulat i o ns concerning the possession of firearms and weapons. They spoke' of increasing inc i dences of use of knives' etc. That laws r e lating to the sale of whiskey to minors should be mo re stri n g ently enforced. Th at n o more l i quor licen ses b e appro v e d f o r t he area c lo se t o Bethlehem Center. They h a ve opposed it at hearings wh ich they known about, but wonder wher e the he a rin g s a re advertised. Th at more r e ha bili ta tiv e wo r k b e do ne th r o u g h t he Ju ven i le Co u r t . Te n den c y to se nd clie n ts home wi t ho u t muc h wo r k - either at ti t ude that n ot h i n g is wrong o r tha t n ot h i n g c a n b e d one . That peop le in the nei g hborhood are afr aid to report some of t h e old er yo u t h , , fo r fea r o f r ep ri sa ls - bo t h adults a nd yo un g e r p e ople . a r e a f ra i d . Th ey ha v e ma de v a rio u s cont act s with Pol ice Depa rt me n t, Juv e nile Court, etc . They are still worried a bout wha t th ey fee l to be a gro wing "law l es sness" and u se of weapons, wh ich they fee l to be a problem of " Co mmu n i t y Rela tio n s", Ho w c a n commun i ty p rotec t its elf against peop l e who i n t im i d ate b y t hreats, which are not ba sis e nou g h fo r l ega l action or pe o ple who h a v e reside n t s scared t o swea r out warra n t agai n st them? ·' �OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1968 TELEPHONE 5!!-4463 EXT. 433 1203 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA 30303 DY 11 , 197 r .• Herbert Jenki ns Chief of Police 165 Decatur Street , S . E~ Atlant ,. Georgia Der Chief J enkins : I hesit te even to repo t to you~ situation of which I m sure you are well aware . I do feel nn oblig3 t ion , ho· ver , to have it on the record th tat each Neighborhood Hearing which we have 1eld , there have been requests for incre sed police prot ction . The co™ion complaint is , when police i s needed , by the timo the call is put in and tho police arrives it is almost too late to do any good . Ther ere also gener 1 statements about the need for regul r patroling throu bout t h night . lam ware of the gre t shortage of personnel in the Police Dep rtment , but I felt sure that you ould w nt to have tbi report d to you . The res in which we h ve.hald meetings includes , Edg wood , Kirkw od , um erbill ; oplesto n ; Vine City , Li btning , eeh nicsville ., Pittsburgh , Dixie Hills , Bolton Bills , P rr Ho es , Scott C ossing , C nter Hill , Corey P rk , Grov rk , Bo en Ho s , Hunter 11111 , Almond Park , nd Simpson-Troy Str t. W ould be gl d to provide you with the namos of th individu 1 r sidents who presented these requests if this vould b of ny b"elp to you . inc roly , ( rs ,) Eliz K. xecutive Dir ctor KP : co ~ : yor Ivan All n / Mr . Irving K. Kaler , Ch ir ich rd r n , Ch ir Mr . n n of Polle sch 11 Co itt �OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION·._ \ ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1966 1f03 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA 30303 ' TELEPHONE 5l1l1·4463 EXT. 433 lay 11 , 1967 anger Hof 'br u Restaurant 2581 Piedmont Rod Atl nt , Georgia Dear Sir : ~h s b en reported to this office th t sever 1 Negroes who went to your rest ur nt last eek s denied service bee use of r ce . I t lephoned the Bof _'br u Tuesd y around noon nd eked to peak to the person in ch rge , I did not get his n me . hen I report d this incident , I w s told "yes , th tis right we do not serve Negroes" . en I tried to continu the conversation , I s told "I h ven ' t tie tot lk bout this" . eh v check d ith the office of tb u • • District Attorney nd it h s been confir ed that such o refu al of service would constitute viol tion of the Civil Right ct. e c 11 this to your attention in the hops th t no on in the futur would be r fused s rvic in viol tion of th Civil Rights Act , with its ccompanying unpleas ntn ss . Slncer ly , ( rs.) Eliz K. sch 11 x cutiv Director lCP : t cc: F d r 1 Bur au of Inv tig tion Mayor l v n Allen ~ Chi f rb rt T. J nk1n Mr. Irving K. X 1 r u• • D p rt nt of Ju tioe �- -1 I I OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1966 1£03 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA 30303 TELEPHONE 511-4,l63 EXT. 433 ay 9 , 1967 r . Sterrs Johnson For the past to years or s0 0 I have been familiar 1th r . Sterrs Johnson ' s efforts to obtain employment in the Civil Defense OJ;'ganization of Met ropol i t an Atl anta . When I orked as ecut ive Direct or of the Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta , r . Johnson asked for our assistance . Mr . Johnson ha ~ documen s from his Commanding Officers in the Army Reserves attesting to his training and experiences in Civil Defense , and recommending him highly for work in this area . Mr . Johnson states that upon his early reques t s bout e ployment hews not notified th t such ppl i c tions should b sub itted to th St te Merit System, he then took the Merit System ex min tion nd passed it . He th n preced d 1th the hel p of the Council office to cont ct , in turn t he Dep rtment of the N vy , Equ 1 Opportunit y tl nta , the Dep rt ent of Defense , the qu 1 Employment Opportunity Co ission and the city of Atl nt • He · s tol d in ach case th t the gency involved did not h v jurisdiction over this . Th Dep rtment of Defense ckno led that the Atl nt Metropolit n Civil Def nse Org niz tion r c iv s Fed r 1 on y , but dvis d him that e ployment is through the St te M rit yst m, which put hi b c here be st rtod . the St t M rit Sy t m r 1st r had xpir d nd it r . Johnson tot ke the ex in tion gin . ving und r consid r bl about this tter , llr . Johnson did not p s the ex ination th t ti but shortly th r ft r took it ag in nd did pass it . (Mr . Johnson point out th t th r ppears to be no N gro x min r t th t orit Syst m and th th kno of no way to find out if t he r ports o f th x in rs r ithout pr judic) In Febru ry upon the tablish ent of this Co 1ss1on, r . Johnson gin a k d for h lp in hi effort to oot in plo ent in th Civil Def n Org niz tion . Gen r 1 Wood rd ur d us th t ploye r 1 cted ithout r gard to rac ltbough w kno of no ro ploy s in th prof ion 1 or oftic st ff of th c ntral Civil Def Organi• zation . Th n Mr . Johnson r qu about hi th t hi po ition r ind d that thi e xamination and cc: Mr. Eugen t I inquir th ev r 1 No . 1 on the r any tia if so on th n Kr . Johnson . tt rson , Atl nta Constitution rit Syst told th t t I r, but I was 1 took th �OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1968 1209 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA 90303 TELEPHONE 5U-4,f63 EXT. 433 MR. IRVING K. KALER, Chairman. THE HON ORABLE SAM MASSELL, JR., Ex-Officio President , Board of Aldermen. Ma y 5, 1967 COMMISSION MEMBERS MR. T. M. ALEXANDER, SR. MR. R. BYRON ATTRIDGE MRS. SARA B AKER MIS S HELEN BULLARD MR. R. J. BUTLER MR. ROBERT DOBBS MR. HAMILTON DOUGLAS, JR. MR. C. G. EZZARD MOS T REVEREND PAUL J . HALLINAN A r chbishop of Atlanta MR. J OSEPH HAAS MR. AL KUETTNER DR. ROBERT E . L EE MR. ROLLA ND M AXWELL MR. F . W .' PATTERSON Ma y o r Iva n Allen, Jr. Ci ty o f Atl a nta Ci ty Ha ll At l a n ta , Ge o rg i a RABBI JACOB M. ROTHSCHILD MR. M. 0. "Buzz" RYAN MR. JACK SELLS Dear Mayor Allen: MRS. MARY STEPHENS THE REVEREND SAMUEL WILLIAMS MRS . ELIZA K. PASCHALL, Executive Director Mr . I rvi n g K. Ka l er , c h a i r ma n o f the Communi ty Rel at ions Comm i ss ion has asked me t o write on be h a l f o f t h e Commission t o accept th e resoluti o n c o ncerning the "H ebrew Benevol ent Congregatio n Award ", and t o express a p preciation f o r t he op p o rt unity t o act on b ehal f o f t he ci ty . Th e chairman will name a c ommi ttee t o wo rk o ut pla n s f o r i mplement i ng the res olu t ion , and I a m s u re th o se p ers on s wil l be i n t ou ch wit h you as s o on as t h ey are named . S in cerel y , ~M(!}~/~-K. ~~l Exec u tive Director EKP/mt cc: Mr. I rv i ng K. Ka l er �OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1988 1f03 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA 30303 MR. IRVING K. KALER, TELEPHONE 5U-U83 EXT. 433 Chairman THE HONORABLE SAM MASSELL, JR., Ex-Officio President, Boa.rd of Aldermen May 4, 1967 COMMISSION MEMBERS MR. T. M. ALEXANDER, SR. MR. R. BYRON ATTRIDGE MRS. SARA BAKER MISS HELEN BULLARD MR. R. J. BUTLER MR. ROBERT DOBBS MR. HAMILTON DOUGLAS, JR, MR. C. G. EZZARD MOS T REVEREND PAUL J. HALLINAN Archbishop of Atlanta, MR. JOS EPH HAAS MR. AL KUETTNER DR. ROBERT E . LEE Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. City Hall Atlanta , Georgia MR. ROLLAND MAXWELL Mn. F . W.'PATTERSON RABBI JACOB M. ROTHSCHILD Mn. M. Dear May or Allen: 0. "Buzz" RYAN MR. JACK SELLS MRS. MARY STEPHENS THE REVEREND SAMUEL WILLIAMS K. p ASCHALL, E xecutive Director Mns. ELIZA Than k yo u for arrangi n g f or Mr. Kaler and me to meet with the Department Heads. With the d emands on eve r ybody's time we particularly appreciate havin g had this o pportunity, and i t wa s a pl eas u re for me to see ma ny old fr i e nd s a nd meet ma ny p e opl e I ha v e ha d c on tact wi t h bu t ha ve no t ha d t he pleasure of meeting before. Sinc e rel y , ( 1i ( Mrs .) ~ - Pa sc h a ll Exe cutiv e Direc t or EK P/ mt cc : Mr . Earl La nders Mro I r vi n g K. Ka l er �2107 oakv i ew :·ioad , .SE ' • Atlant a , Georg i a 30317 Ivia rch 21, 19 67 Community Relations Commission City Hall, Room 1 203 68 Mitchell S treet, S W Atlanta, Geor g ia 30303 Attn: Mrs. Paschall Dear Mrs. Paschall, We, the unde rsigned homeowners, have been informed by the City Attorney's office t hat five property owners can bring action wh ich can bring ab out t he closing of a pub lic nuisance. This pr oper ty is loc ated at 2104 Oakview Road, SE and is owne d by Pa ir and Maico Rea lty. It is known a s 11 h ouse on muddy hill rr. Th is company has owne d this pr ope rty for appr ox i mately 2. years and for this time it has been operated as a h ouse of business. ve have information that the house is unfit for human occupancy. T~e house, wh ich is located several humdred yard s fr om nearest street ligh t, is occupied by various tr ans ients with no evidence of moving in or out. One re gular, Loue lla Wh itting , has apparently occupied some p ortion of d ownstair s f or about 8 mont hs . We have obse r ved activities which dete ctives fr om Atlanta and DeKalb County have inf ormed us is evidence of lottery, bootlegg ing, prostitution, shoplifting and fencing. We do not mean to i mply that all of these businesses are conducted at the same time . The most annoying characteristic o f this house is the para de of ta xi s that arrive ,blow their h orns and depart all through the nig ht. A more entertaining feature is the· drunken brawls which occur i nside and out usually at night. �our re por ts to the police dep t. are i gnor e d , howe ve r, t he polic e do come to th is address whe n ther e is no disturbance, s pe ci f ic all y , February 18,1967 at 2:00 .AIVI uniformed, heavy-set wh ite ma le driving Atla nta Police car stayed about 10 minut e s. And Ma rch 17,1967 8:45Fl\ uniforme d, well-built, 6' white male driving Atla nta Police car stayed inside more than 15 minutes. ~his h ouse is a dangerous threat t o the city because Octob er: 14 , 1966 a mob c ong regated at this addr e ss and by 10 : 00 PM the street as far as the eye could see w~s blocked to traffic, bec ause stre et and lawn s were f illed with sever a l hundred drunken couples , many in their early teens. We we re told they were from the 4th Ward area. Many h omeowne rs in this area called many times for protection. We know of a t least 30 calls that were made. We were inf or med by Capt. Little at 11:15 PM that they were changing wat chs and it would be 1 h our before we could expe ct an officer to arrive . The first assistance to arri ve was in the form of Rev. Daniel Bryan of Kirkwood Christian Cente r at ab out 12:30 AM . After this episo de , we circulated a petition requesting re lief from this situa tion a nd collected over 100 concerned homeowners and taxpayers signatures · f rom this i mmediate area . We have in our possession a lette r signed by May or Ivan Allen stat i ng that he had checked city rec ords and no arrests have ever been made at 2104 Oakview Road, SE. We , t he undersigned hereby petition that this public nuisance and threat to the safety of the community be closed . �' ' . :1 ' fi ,, I !I /1 II ., ' •, 11 ., . · II ,, . ,., .· 't , •. ,, , .. 'j/'  :· I -r - ~. -; ' t , ... r, • • . ·p "I °' ..~: . . 1·:: ,: . 11 l ,1 '-'III _Ll i\/A- O LIVER r.U II. DltlG . 'I . ·" t• . .•·- ." J DE?A R TMENT OF LAW ·.t . ·, II ' ..  ! ' .! , .,. , ,.,) ., ; '.\' ,. .- . I, {, i, . . . :·.;;:;; Ado I\,._, , P ~ ~- - ~. 'a , G e o rg i a 1 0303 ~e. Feb ruar y 22, 1967 ,,i ,-,;:J-1 · , ',' :. ~  :, ,, ' • ; H C rmY 1_ . qo wo c 11 CITY n r, L;:, A T 1 0 1, r1 1.Y -\~L:... r;o J-:-~:-, : ;:::: • J'- · 1I"" , ,· : s J C1 1t . r-: . ~jUC:-i r" R TY .: 1 1~\ • L::.=',\, ~ .J K E Y F Enn t N Y . MI\ T l i t l'I ~ A S!; I ST /. rJT C I TY 1.. '- · IH C ',t :\ s.:. . C •i1.." ""C E J ,; •,• ~.": :3 . ~ ~:-C:::R / ,TTO f lt JCY ,'.::roe: :. · t c · -, .--.. -,P'\.lE'iS R0:':~~T .\. H·\R R IS HENRY M. '.1lJR.F F C" L ,\ ! ' . ! '.> I\ - - Mr . Jo e Akin 210 7 Orik View Roa d, S. E. Atlcinta, Georgia J R,. l E VS Dear Mr . Ak in: Miss Evely n Dewb e rry o f our o ff ice gave me t he substanc e o f her t elephone conv ersation with y ou l as t Sa t ur d ay regarding the pro per t y l oc a t e d at 21 0/~ Oa k Vi ew Road, S . E . I hav e re ferre d t hi s matter to Mr . J. H . Buch a n a n, Chief Housi n g Cod e I n specto r o f the City of Atl a nt a , s in ce t his is entirely within his area o f resp o nsibil i ty. I have asked Mr . Bu chanan t o h a v e o ne of hi s f i eld inspectors to get in touc h with you in order to see if some t hing cou ld be worked out in regard to t h e property. Be re c ent State law, five property owne r s c an bring a compla int against a property, have a hearing , and i f the property is in bad e nough shape, have the Building Official of the Cit y of Atlnnta to demolish the property or .to close it. Possibly, this would be the best ~ppr oach. If we can be o f further assistance to you in this matter, please let us know. Yours very truly, (\ \ \ ,. / . ,/ . IC" !~ '. .-; .... :· - .. ·; ·: . '.~·.. :: ,. :: 1 , ( , \ \ • " , . . -:) - I , ·, \. ) // . _, .: -.. • \ . , -" James B. Pilcher I JBP:at I ,,,,-- . ... , . ,, ···:· ·1~-:: =~ • ' ·' ....,, �,~1 \.., 'l . :.. .:.1 :--v l. ~.; ~·, , ' V ,_! l : ,~t l.JH. ,_ 0 ~;cur ··,:L ...1 0 v...!.J ~.::1yo:r :i vun , ..J.lcn (i ~3 ;. itcl1cll l..-~-~ o:~:,·} IJ .. tJ.r.lTltn , c:0.r 1;iu .-G~, :.c .··: Gyor ,,lJo n? · o i n ·J i tc ~oi1 to co ~-:i t o ·:1~-1 ol·:v5.~ ·. , ·,0 :1 .: ,,~ : a ;,.:.: o ,lt ot t>(; :10. .lo t: v,:·: ic ~t :.:; :1rrou:-1f1 , r;2~, ;·1 ublic ho~ ,..2 c:·:,:1c :i b;-' .cni'"' encl :.·_,dco .ic:.. ltyo ::er ',1or,) Jc ,:,n ,., yc:n ;·,c un '} c·.~: n:; ~ ;_,l;:)~S 0 1 bnvc '... ,1t U:) uH, h t':..::E1 t:on nrnl ~.1 :111 lwL1.r ~- o : t.li\°' r: i.'_')i:; ,,;-hi n:·..o:r o u o o ·c!10:r il1.c1:cl :;c;:,.'L vi-::.ic ~ r,L .. c : 1 yo ..ir fL,l .i Cd .!. V CD.i' ,·:c .r, l')(iGo , (1 :-: t:1 .l't:c (i -~·:ro 11nl: t ·o: ,.' C :.:n ?t.e l :·; ~..l 1,ct:lt,:i.. )il 1 ,_,Ct'l/_! '.t l") ~" [l':-J .. : () -~ i~.l'L J_(},, ,r ~ ·~c ~r~; .. ~cn11..::s #~ :i.1~·~. ~c- J.iof f:::0 :.1 tl!;i_o ::,:l. "c t.Ti:.J.o _ o · 'h~ n 1~() .... J_ ··· :i.on ,·.:.,s .1'!'0,,:: ·'.c· by c, o ;-;1!.lll ,;l 0 -~t:;.' tc1nco{ J,Pli:'o:· 0 30) d rud~::;) cc ..1::lc'...0 ,--:l t l1 C!J. l .foo ·~u~'C .'.J o f -~ ;ic ·;-;u:c.mo .r nU.l nffoil'o ,·: c r1ltm c. ~·:~tL n,:r r.e;i,"'.,h 'Jo:>· s plc...1i.i 0 :1 ·,1 itl1 '~l1C ,,;:, lnnt: . , o1J. c c '. o p"t. o up t.o o n·· .i.r.cl-..:.,! ir1r; · Ch0Lrr:1.:.1 n F.rG O:.10.~ f O:i:' ; _; !tOU'.':: ~J to c.e~ pl' 1t0ct.ic-no If t~·~ ex(: UT \ ! cc .r~t1in n.1.e~1~~ of ~;x ~.1:.~.rt~s ~,1vc. l~tlc.i:"lt::t ,·.~:er e cri,1.,; on,:. lor;lcssnc,-: s i G i, :: r:c ~:i.on c·,1, t i, ')71 :t1y o1 ., llC'!i ~ '::.:'~Ir.~ \"~ oulC. y on c u,;,~oDt t .: :.it we r.1c,v8') 1 ·1 .. I ~ ~3int.;G rely 0 ,Josu [)J, -I' ,,. ., ... ~ l) o i .1< in �C IT Y M A - LA TA Februa ry 15, 1967 A LLEN . JR . ! VAN OF AYO R Mr. Jo se ph B. Akin 2107 Oakview Road, S. E . Atlanta, G e 01· g i a ' D e ar M r. Akin: Upon r e c eipt of your lette r I have checked th e r e cords of the Atlanta P olic e Department and find that there have been no a rr ests made at 2104 Oakview Roa d , S. E. May I a s sur e you that this area will r e c eive p r ope r protection. Sincerely yours, IAJr / br '\" "l , • 1 ' : ' 'lj' I 'l , I · • j1 . .. . c, ···11·' • ,' • • j I 1~ .. • ,. ' •' r �II COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION 1203 C!TY HALL ATLANTA, GEORGIA April 28, 1967 FOR IMMEDIATE REL .EASE At the request of residents of the Perry Homes, Scott Crossing areas, a Neighborhood Hearing has been scheduled by the Community Relations Commission for Thursday, May 4, 1967 at 8:00 p.m. at Wilkes Chapel, 2251 Perry Boulevard, NW. Individual citizens and groups in these areas are invited to come and bring to the Commission any individual problems or needs of the whole community. The duties of the Commission, which is appointed by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen include working to make sure that all areas of Atlanta have adequate public services and to prevent discrimination based on race, creed, color or sex in any part of the life of Atlanta. For further information, contact Community Relations Commission, 1203 City Hall, or JA 2-4463, EXT. 433. Chairman of the Commission is Mr. Irving K. Kaler. Executive Director . Mrs. Eliza K. Paschall is �COMMUNITY RELA TIONS COMM ISSION, 1203 City Hall, Atlanta, Ga . 30303. Requ e sts for Help - Feb. 16 - April 15 1 1967 E-K .§.::.E M-P VC-L NtrJ City Hearing 19 20 19 16 23 34 3 l 4 Numb e r Speakin g Hou s i ng, - Low- rent 4 Ho using code 6 Real Estate companies 1 Atl a nta - DeKalb 2 Heal th -sanitation 3 Parki ng s igns l Traf f i c 2 2 Tr a ffic Li gh t s l l l l Sewe r s l 3 2 3 Sidewalks 2 2 Street lights 7 2 l Streets-condition 2 9 4 Recreation 3 6 Trash collection 2 1 Police protection 2 Schools 4 Vocational Rehab. l Zoning 3 General housing planning l 5 4 l l l 7 4 l 3 2 l 2 2 6 3 6 l 2 l l l 3 l l l 9 4 2 l 3 4 11 4 11 3 4 l l Public Housing Jobs Bus Service General 1 l 2 l 4 2 Youth pBrticipation 1 Interpretation of Problems l Food Stamps l Heal t h - Nursing Homes 2 Police - courts l Housing - integration 2 City Employment Practices l Police "brutali tyvJ l Public Hazards 2 Civil Defen s e policy 1 4 Loans, collections l Grady Ho s pital l Publ i c Health coordination l Public Facilities 3 \;Jages &. Hours 6 VP- y to column headings: E-K S-P M-P VC-L Vine City-Ligh t ning Edyewood-Kirk wood NW Northwest Area including Bowen HomesSummerhill-Peoples t own City Hearing - Public hearing Mechanicsville-Pittsburg General - Individual requests & n.; xi c: (Hills Th e se numbers do not necessarily reflect the degree of concern in e8ch Drea. For i nst ance, one r e quest might represent the wishes of a , civic }Pa gu e . EP:dwa 4/ 28/ 67 �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 18

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_018_018.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 18
  • Text: From The Atlanta Journal Monday, April 24, 1967 The New Commission ATLANTA'S new and official Conimunity Re- lations Commission has made a fast start in its work to further communications across the city and in effect bring democratic proc- esses into fuller use by those who have been largely beyond them. The commission was created by the mayor and Board of Aldermen last November. Its 20 members, representing a wide range of community leadership, were appointed in De- cember. In January the commission chose as executive director Mrs. Eliza Paschall, a respected veteran of human relations work whose familiarity with the immediate prob- lems before the commission is deep and of long standing. The commission, despite the small size of its financial resources, has moved im- mediately (though cautiously and with cir- cumspection) into some of our most pressing problems. It consequently will annoy some of those who would rather not look at those problems at all, or who feel that they are the special property of standing bureaucracy. We are especially impressed by the out- come of the first hearings held by the com- mission in the slum areas. Through this open- ing of channels and this offering of a forum to people whose views otherwise might not be heard in the counsels of city government, the commission has increased the contact be- tween city government and a very large part of the population of the city. Already there is the kind of feedback that is badly needed. What the people in Vine City are thinking about recreational needs there, what the people of the Pittsburgh area need in the way of police protection, what Summer- hill’s people have to say about housing condi- tions—these are important feedbacks from the commission’s work so far. The commission also has a role to play, and is beginning to play it, in areas that have been in racial transition residentially and need a stabilizing ‘influence. We think the commission is off to a good start. It deserves strong support from the Board of Aldermen and the city at large.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_018_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 7
  • Text: OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1966 1203 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA 80303 TELEPHONE 522-4468 EXT. 483 Mr. Invinc K. Kater, Chairman THe Honoraste Sam MASSELL, Jr., Ex-Officio President, Board of Aldermen June 7 1 96 T ? COMMISSION MEMBERS Mr. T. M. ALEXANDER, Sr. Mr. R. Byron ATTRIDGE Mrs. SarA BAKER Miss HELEN BULLARD Mr. R. J. BUTLER Mr. Rosert Dosas Mr. HamILton Doucias, JR. Mr. C. G. Ezzanp Most REVEREND Pau J. HALLINAN Archbishop of Atlanta a rapeseed Mr. R. Earl Landers Dr. Rosert EB. Les Administrative Assistant Mr. RottAND MAxweELt 1 : Mr. F. W- Patterson Mayor's Office Rasat Jacos M. RoTHSCHILD City Hall Mr. M. O. “Buzz" Ryan 7 Me Siew Sette Atlanta, Georgia Mrs. Mary STEPHENS THE REVEREND SAMUEL WILLIAMS Dear Mr. Landers: Mrs. Eviza K. PAsScHALL, Executive Direct ; . ; . PERUE. ST ERe Or I failed to receive notice of the meeting of Department Heads yesterday morning, a report of which I saw on last night's Television News. I wonder if it would be possible for me to obtain information which was reported at the meeting, and what steps I should take to make sure that my name is on the list for further meetings of this kind. Sincerely, SS) K. Ae raletl ) (Mrs.) Eliza K. Paschall Executive Director EKP:mt
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_018_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 13
  • Text: 2hS Atlanta Avenue, S. &, Atlanta, Georgia 30315 May 18, 1967 - MAY 19 RECO Mrs. Eliza K, Paschall Executive Director 1203 City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mrs. Paschall: The Summerhill Civic League would like the help of the Commission in some way to enable the residents to get current information on the Model Neighbor- hood Program as develooment occur. The suggestion has been made that we might get one or two VISTA Volunteers ‘assigned *_. to this area to work with the Civic League as kind of "Information Aids", : We understand, however, that tne VISTA Volunteers would have to be formally assigned to some group with a staff member to supervise them. We wonder if the Commission could serve as this kind of nominal sponsor with us to help the Volunteers find out where to get information and how to keep current on it. The Civic League would decide what we need them to do, but we would need your helo in how to do it. As you know, it is important that peoole wno live here to be reassured that there is a way for them to keep un with what is going on. We believe that having this kind of service through the VISTA Volunteers would answer our needs, and I have reason to believe that some of the VISTA Volunteers would be very happy to do this, Very truly yours, CM Gp Go a C. G, Bzzard President, Summerhill Civic League CGE/jrt ec: Irving Kaler ill
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 15

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_018_015.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 15
  • Text: May 30, 1967 Mr. H. O. Hambrick 386 Patterson Avenue, S. E. Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Harabrick: This will acknowledge receipt of your letter of May 25th regarding the changes in your neighbor- hood. lam forwarding your letter to the Community Relations Commission as they have full informa- tion on this matter. Sincerely yours, Ivan Allen, Ir. Mayor 1tAsr/br CC: Mrs. Eliza Pascall
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 24

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_018_024.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 24
  • Text: Community Relations Commission 1203 City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Perry Homes, Scotts Crossing area, Neighborhood Hearing, Thursday, May 4, 1967 at Wilkes Chapel Church, 2251 Perry Boulevard. This meeting was arranged by and held at the request of the residents of the area. Mr. Dobbs and Mrs. Paschall explained the establishment of the Com- mission; asked for helpful suggestions as well as problems. 1. Mrs. Odessa Hill. Need recreation area; sewers inadequate for all water that runs down from Jackson Parkway; area needs a Jr. High; Archer going on double ee 2. Mrs. Frankie Simpson, 1721 Barrett Drive, N. W. Children need recreation area. Copy of petition to Mr. Delius with 159 signatures. Randall Street is becoming a car dump in the Bolton Hills area. 3. Mrs. Mary Sanford, President, Tenants Assn., Perry Homes. 1000 families in Perry Homes; 67% headed by working women; teen- agers need places to play and supervision; have asked various public agencies for help; 4000 children - the Community Center was not in the original plans and it is located in a dangerous and inconvenient place on (Proctor) Creek, no bus service to it and hard for children to get there. Need traffic light at Perry Boulevard and Kerry Drive; asked Mr. Pirkle at Transit Co. about bus service, not much help. Basements at project could be used for recreation but no toilet facilities. Community Center leased. to YMCA, which shows preference 2 to those who join YMCA; Tenants Assn. buys $200 worth of memberships but still many who can't join; women work mostly in domestic service, at $6.00 a day, plus carfare. Mr. Dobbs pointed out that this area is isolated from rest of the city. Plans to add 1500 more public housing units, but no plans £or additional school. 4. Mrs. Olivia Pullen, 2760 Marco Drive, N. W. Need Boys Club, YMCA, YWCA in that area. Mrs. Sanford said recreation dept. is developing a ball park and tennis courts at Gun Club Park, children can't afford tennis rackets, ‘would be better to let them play in the space. 5. Rev. David Middlebrooks, 1857 Spring Avenue, N. W. 355-6338, Forest Grove. Area isolated, need extended bus service, particularly so young girls will not have to walk so far going home, some have been molested. Street paving needed ~- on Spring Avenue, Francis Avenue; sewers there but not connected. 6. Mrs. Darthula Stanfield, 2535 Abner Place, N. W. 792-7441, Need sewers so bad you “can't eat your dinner."*' (Mr. Dobbs said Proctor Creek smells so bad at times people can't stay in their house.) Several vacant lots - need "no dumping" signs; old cars on Arno and Hollywood, told needed permit to get them moved. New Finch School - beautiful but no auditorium or gym, no place for meetings such as PTA (opened in Sept. 1966). 7. Mrs. Frances Strickland, 2598 Abner Place. No place to play, vacant lots could be cleaned off. Bus comes fast 2 down street, dangerous for children playing in street. She is sponsor for a little teenage club but “they have nothing to do; nowhere to go." 8. Mrs. Jessie Gaston, 2330 Perry Boulevard, #30. Lot, need equipment for children to play; mothers will take turns supervising. 9. Mrs. Glayds Palmer; Mrs. Arie Shelman, 1818 Hollywood Rd. N. W. Need police protection at night; need play area; should close pool room at Hollywood Plaza on Sundays. 10. Mrs. Frances Ghani, 2111 Clarissa Drive, Apt. 621. Need better bus service, need shelters for children.to wait for bus, have to stay from school if weather is bad; need police patrol at night; play area for smaller children; creek odor is bad. 1l. Mrs. Eddie Lee Dozier, 2417 Clarissa Drive, N. W. Proctor Creek has odor and mosquitoes; “went down to City Hall about sewers'', but nothing done. Need recreation area - Finch School grounds Locked as soon as school is out, would be good play area for children. 12. Mrs. Jeanette Trimble, 1370 Drew Drive. Closest Library on Jones Avenue, need Library; 24 hr. police pro- tection; traffic light on Kerry and Drew; speeding on Perry Boulevard; could use basements for recreation; dangerous to get to Community Center - dark, on creek; need to enforce school attendance Laws; more day care centers. Rev. Williams said all Negro schools are overcrowded; one way to deal with it is for "tyou people to raise hell about it," going to Ly have to sustain your protest; Board of Education needs to know you are not going to tolerate these conditions; should fill up some of the empty seats in other schools. Mrs. : we can't pay for bus service to other parts of town. 13. Mrs. Minnie Maidson, 2314 Abner Place. Sewers inadequate since all apartments have been built; sanitary dept. comes out once or twice a week but that isn't enough; open sewer at 2315 Abner Place, N. W., dangerous for children playing. 14, Mrs. O. Wheeler, 2436 Abner Place, N. W. Complained of discrimination against couple of Moslem religion who answered public appeal for additional Negro adoptive parents; were denied child because of religion; appealed to local agencies and State Department of Family and Children Service, but no help. Also said dog catchers come and "take dogs out of your yard; take the dog sleeping on front steps.'' They said a Sinclair service station at corner of Covington Highway near Conyers charges deposit for bottles and then refuses to return deposit when bottle is re- turned; mentioned discrimination against blind; need for night police patrols; too great a tax burden on homesteaders. 15. Mrs. Trimble. Trouble with public housing is with managers, not head office; Manager has last say; tenants are afraid to complain. Mrs. Pullen: 10 years in public housing; it is a good place; rules and regulations are given. 16. Mrs. Don Gates, 1488 Kerry Drive. Usually know of charges ahead of time. 5 17. Mrs. Carrie Smith, 54 Drew Drive. Need for recreation area. 18. Mrs. Reagan, Perry Homes. When teenager goes to work rent goes up too much; child has no chance to rise. 19. Mrs. Ruby Hawk. Charged for a new screen door without asking, one Little hole in it; different charges for same things; when she moved she was charged for things that were there, but she was told, when she asked if they would look again, they “don't check but one time; What are plans for Summer activities for children in Perry Homes? 20. Rev. C. A. Samples, Westmoreland Drive. Reminded the group of the court case re Josephine Williams, to be heard Tuesday in Superior Court. Said city could make Model Neigh~ borhood of Rockdale urban renewal area, vacant Land, demonstrate how to build homes, etc.; people need to be able to get ahead before the rent goes up. Need information on U.S. program that gives Cuban refugees $2000 loan for house, plus $25 a week while waiting for job. Robinson School built with no playground. 21. Mrs. RosaLee Miller, 2416 Clarissa Drive, N. W. She is paying sewer tax but no sewers connected.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_018_019.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 19
  • Text: By SETH 8. KING Acting early to keep the city’s summer a “cool” one, FOR YOUR INFORMATION THE NEW YORK TIMES, SUNDAY, APRIL 9, 1967 City Moves to Avert Summer Unrest | The task torece will he re ‘sponsible for the spending of ‘all funds that become available ‘for community projects. | “We want to be sure that we : { ‘member of the task foree, be-|Themas A. Van Sant of the Board cause, Mr. perience has shown that even) if Lindsay said, “ex-! of Education. James W, Smith, assistant to the reater control of a summer! Mayor for Community Relations. Mayor Lindsay yesterday ap-iare getting the maximum value] activities is needed.” pointed a Summer Task Force |for each dollar spent and that, ‘of top city officials to coordi- nate recreation and community- ‘development programs in de- pressed neighborhoods. The 22-member group, which includes nine Negroes and one ‘Puerto Rican, will supervise one that range from the placement of play streets and fire-hydrant sprays to the spending of antipoverty funds jand the arrangement of walk- jing tours by Mayor Lindsay through ghettos. In a statement announcing ithe appointment of the group, i Mr. Lindsay noted that the city ‘had gotten through the sum- mer of 1966 without any major racial disturbances. Summers are particularly touchy because ‘slum dwellers escaping from itheir stifling apartments gather jin the streets, where even a ‘small incident might lead to violence. The generally peaceful sum- mer of 1966 was due in part, jthese funds are going into the ‘areas where there is the great- est need,” Mr, Lindsay said. Another assignment of the task force will be to attract Federal funds to support the program. Last year, New York City received nearly $12-million for the Federal Government, through the Office of Economic Opportunity, for summer ac- tivities. But the prospects for another such allocation do not appear The chairman of the coor- dinating task force will be | Barry H. Gottehrer, an assistant ito the Mayor. Mr. Gottchrer, who is 32 years old, has served ‘on the Antipoverty Operations Board and the Special Summer +1966 Subcommittee, A former reporter, Mr. Gotte- ihrer was a trouble shooter for the Mayor in city neighborhoods ‘this winter. The Summer Task Force is tscheduled to hold weekly meet- ‘ings until the hot weather slarts. After that it will meet bright at the moment, the." ofion as is necessa Mayor said. It was hoped that ¢.4+ meeting will, be neta ja well-developed plan, prepared \woanes day attemnoon at City jbeforehand, might influence 5,,)) ones ph RReemarete money! ‘rhe members of the task o support it. . : . Finally, the task force wi|fOre, 2upreseat mune city de coordinate appeals to founda-\" the Mayor named Cyril D. tions and business groups for Tyson of the Human Resources ee to pay for summer pro-| Kdmininteation:. agp vice chairs Mr. Lindsay recalled the pri-| vately financed Rheingold Sum-: mer Concert Festival, which! attracted large audiences at jazz, folk music, and rock 'n’ man, Others appointed to the task force were: the Mayor said, to the “ex- roll performances in Central traordinary efforts” of scores of Park last year. He also cited icity officials and private volun- jteers. “From this experience we ‘learned many lessons,” the May- ‘or went on. “Most important, ‘we learned that coordination of ‘the work of key agencies—-the ‘police, fire, education, anti- \poverty, and the Mayor's office |—wags needed at the highest ‘level. This is the job the task force will do.” ! One of the first efforts of ithe task force will be to develop la citywide network of adults jand youngsters who are re- igarded as the leaders in their scommunities. ‘a sports festival for youths jsponsored by Old London Foods at Prospect Park and Randalls Island. Pisa Last summer the city's anti- poverty program reached into the communities fer the par- ticipation of “indigenous groups" in organizing day camps, voca~- tional-training courses, and trips to the country for slum children \who had never been out of ithcir own neighborhoods. These efforts were considered successful. But former Parks Commissioner Thomas P. F. \Hoving said afterward that lwhat was needed was a co- jordinating group, “headed by jone strong inan,” to steer these diverse efforts and utilize all leity agencies that could con- tribute to them. | Mr. Lindsay said that Mrs. 'Thelma Johnson, an official in ithe Human Resources Adminis- tration, would head a summer iantipoverty program. Mrs. |Johnson will also serve as a Robert O. Lowery, Fire Commis- sioner. Robert Shrank, Mrs, Johnson and Frank Espada of the Human Resources Administration, Walter E. Washington, chairman: of the Housing Authority. i William H. Booth, chairman of the Human Rights Commission. | Sidney Davidoff, assistant to the; Mayor for Neighborhood Pro-' prams, ; Robert M. Blum, assistant to the; Mayor for Neighborhood Little! City Halls. ; Peter Aschkenasy, deputy execu-| tive director, Department of: Parks. John Foley, executive director, ! 1 Police Athletic League. | David L. Garth, special consultant to the Mayor, Lillian Lampkin, executive direc-, tor of the Youth Board. Representing the Police De- partment will be: Sanford D. Garelik, chief inspec- tor, Franklin A. Thomas, deputy ' commissioner for legal matters, and Lloyd G. Sealy, assistant) chief inspector. A member from the Council Against Poverty and two mem- bers from other cily agencies will be named later.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021