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Box 8, Folder 18, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_004.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 4
  • Text: ‘den: sate "e . ‘ae % Form Approved Budget Bureau No, 63-R-1211 ' Attachment 3a ' U,S, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT _ Budget Justification This form is to be attached to each budget for a capital project, activity and to the Program Administration Budget — 1. NAME OF CDA Atlanta City Demonstration Agency 2. BRIEF DESCRIPTIVE TITLE OF CAPITAL PROJECT OR ACTIVITY Model Cities Resident Organization 3. NAME, ADDRESS AND ZIP CODE OF OPERATING ENTITY Model Cities Mass Convention, Inc. 673 Capitol Avenue S.W. Atlanta, Ga. AMOUNT OR VALUE Ce * 4. . DESCRIPTION OF ITEM” AND BASIS FOR VALUATION OF ITEM 2. Public Information $10,000.00 3. Travel -- $50.00 per month x 12 , 600.00 5. Consumable supplies -- Office supplies @$200.00 ; per month. 2,400.00 6. Rental, Lease, or purchase of equipment - office furniture. 2,300.00 7. Other Costs: Mass Convention Development $27000 Assistance to Neighborhood Advisory Councils-6 @$1,000 $6,000 Matching funds. for grant from OEO . = <$-.. 3,600 Telephones, Utilities and janitorial services @ $200 per month. _ 2,400 $14,000, 00 (Justification for supplemental funds Only) © * For personnel costs use Personnel justification form. #* Describe the item in sufficient detail to insure that it is adequately identified and indicate the basis for determining or computing its value. For example, office space rental for two professionals; 150 square feet at $2.00 per square foot, including utilities and janitorial services.
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 3
  • Text: Cilia ntsn Labi eee Signature and Title of Authorised HUD Official = * Or HUD-7041 (10-68) 8. BUDGET C, MCA SHARE: (If cost is being sheared A. COST CATEGORY B. ESTIMATED COST with others) (1) PERSONNEL $ 58,080.00 $ 58,080.00 (2) CONSULTANTS AND CONTRACT SERVICES 10,000.00 10,000.00 (3) TRAVEL 600.00 600.00 ~ (4) SPACE ‘ . (5) CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES 2,400.00 2,400.00 (6) RENTAL, LEASE, OR PURCHASE OF EQUIPMENT 2,300.00 2,300.00 OTHER: | (7) 86 ,000.00* 14,000.00 TOTAL 159,380.00 87,380.00 * 0. E. O./HUD Grant $74,000.00 9. APPROVAL A. | =f; Pate
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 12

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_012.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 12
  • Text: MODEL CITIES TRAINING PROGRAM University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Chattanooga, Tennessee The Model Cities Training Program, one of the first of its kind in the country, is a ten session course to be conducted in seminar form under the direction of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. The major objective of the Model Cities Training Program is the enablement of the fifty members of the C.D.A. Board of Directors to function as a Bohesive policy-making body while simultaneously encouraging the attainment or retention of individual identity with those various sponsoring groups whom it is the board members' responsibility to’‘représent. This objective can best be achieved by enabling the participants to: (1) acquire knowledge of the. actual structure of the Model Cities opganizatson and the objectives of the program; (2) develop an awareness of the decision~making process in terms of selecting acceptable alterna- tives ia recognized problems confronting the CDA Board; and, (3) establishing and maintaining an seuaaibacaonss esprit' de corps' which ah one hand will enable each CDA Board participant to Aenea his identity and ties within his own sphere of the community, and yet permit him to make decisions based on a total committment to an overall achievement of the organizational goals. (2) This series of seminars utilizing consultants, applying dynamic and innovative educational techniques, and involving expertise from as many pertinent sources as are available is, like the Model. Cities..Program itsel£, a demonstration project. . Because there is little national experience in training programs such as the one described, the emphasis in the Chattanooga program will be on experimentation and innovation. As might be expected of an experimental undertaking, it will be subject to regular observation, monitoring, and evaluation of its effectiveness in terms of the goals it seeks to fulfill. It should be understood that this continuous evaluative process is a testing process of the training program and its staff, as well as of the participants. The first session of the spogeeh will meet Saturday, August 9, 1969, at the campus of U.T.C. as will the following nine sessions on the following nine consecutive Saturdays. A suggested structure and content of each session is found in Appendices I thru X. Each consultant, however, may modify or restructure the seminar to achieve the objectives as outlined. Funding for eis training program has been secured under the provisions of Title 1 of the Higher Education Act from the Department of Health, Education and Welfare; Institutional monies of U.T.C.; and funds from the Model Cities Planning Grant. (3) The expectation is that the experience and information derived from the program will contribute significantly to the effectiveness of the CDA Board as a decisive administrative body « It is hoped, alzo,. that from thie Model eis Training pena) there will emerge a body of knowledge and experience which will be of. value not only in Chattanooga, but in other cities as well. (4) OBJECTIVES The success of the Model Cities Program to a large degree depends upon the ability and willingness of the CDA alo. Bi acts Seccctiveiy its responsibility as chief policy-making body of the Chattanooga Model Cities Program. As administrators who. are responsible for the planning and implementation of the total Model Cities Program, CDA Board members must be sufficiently equipped (1) with the necessary skills, tools, and information related ne a aspects of the Model Cities Program; : (2) with an understanding of the Model Cities Program and its relationship to city government and Sune agencies in the urban are--both private and public; and (3) with methodology and dynamics of decision- making. TG this ae the Model Cities Training and Orientation Seminar Program is designed: 1. To. insure that. the CDA Board members will be aware of their roles in the Model Cities Program 2s!) “TO provide CDA Board members with sufficient and rele- vant information concerning the Model Cities concept and method. 3, To insure that CDA Board members are familiar with the. Model Cities structure, both nationally and locally. (5) 4, To provide CDA Board members with pertinent data concerning the HUD guidelines as related to the Model Cities Program. : 5. To provide CDA Board members with relevant information concerning epuckete problems and program areas to be dealt with in the Model Neighborhood area. Further, this program is designed to foster competency and sound judgment on the part of the Board members by providing them with training exercises and experiences in problem-solving and meta tiar ine No Board with a membership so varied as that of the CDA Board can effectively discharge its duties and responsi- bilities unless its members develop a oneness SE mind and purpose, It is the intent of this program to provide structured experiences for the fifty participating CDA Board members-—-members with varied backgrounds, wide ranges of experiences, different Levels GE educational attainment, and diverse i keke siolomicion will enable the Board to function as a cohesive unit with mutual interests and common goals; one dedicated to solving the problems of the Model Neighborhood and its people.
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 8
  • Text: SAUNT OF -MAYOR BENDER ON MODEL CITIES PROGRAM August 1, 1969 The Model Cities Program is a cooperative effort among the Federal Government, Shave a w ZR S { hd nN (WILCOX _gLvd)_—— T(NKER ST. AVONDALE CoMMeNiTyY LEN TER OISTRIGT og MILNE - wr MM. OC HAIZO a YONCE IKE, DISTRIC ae ‘ I CSFICO ALE, VY 2 s STRICT W. HIGHLAND 3 D “ PARK AVE. x 7 CARVER a CommuniTY » CENTER ® ny CLEVELAND ST ORCHARD ANOG = * UUATOR AIGA lex DISTRICT — sctoor I Tt ORCHARD KNB Vil BX ELEMENTARY S =u ' & DISTRICT Ss VI oS 1s ch "A Ss s BE CALLIE AVE) LAST ffREA NEIH BOR HOOD SERVICE CENTER
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 23
  • Text: MODEL CITIES EXECUTIVE BOARD REVIEW COMMITTEE July 15, 1969 MINUTES The Model Cities Executive Board Review Committee met Tuesday, July 15, at 10:00 a.m. in City Hall, Committee Room #2. fhe following members were present: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., Chairman Mes. Mattie Ansley Mr. John Hood Algderinan Everett Millican Mr. Walter Mitchell Mr. J. BD. Newberry Rr. C. Miles Smith Mr. Bill C. Wainwright Mrs. Martha Weems The Chairman, Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. presided over the meeting. The following projects were discussed and approved: Project Numbers Agency Amount HR-OOSN Urban East Housing $ 119,000 Consultants HE~-O19N Atlante Association of 9,000 Mental Retardation HE~-OLILN Planned Parenthood, Inc. 5,000 It was moved and seconded that action on the following projects be withheld until further investigation can be made. The Chairman appointed Dr. ¢. Miles Smith to head a committee to look into the Health Component and te report at the next meeting. Mr. Hood and Mc. Newberry were appointed to the Committee. The projects involved are: HE-GO2N Better Health, Ine. LL3, 000 HE-009N 100,000 HE-O1LAIN 5,000 HE-OO7N 4,000 Mr. Wainwright moved that the two (2) deletions recommended by the staff be approved. Mis. Weems seconded the motion. The deletions were: HE-OO8N Health Screening $ 45,000 HE-O18SN Mental Health Planner 20,000 A discussion was opened concerning Project Expand. After a brief discussion, Mrs. Ansley moved to temporarily delete Project Expand so the balance of the ECA projects can be sent back to the Board of Aldermen. The motion was seconded and approved. The meeting was adjourned. APPROVED: Mayor ivan Allen, Jr., Chairman Model Cities Executive Board
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 5
  • Text: ‘ ‘a7 CITY OF ATLANTA Le): jes “eer OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM 673 Capitol Avenue, S.W. Atlanta, Ga. 30315 404-524-8876 Ivan Allen Jr., Mayor J. C. Johnson, Director ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES FOR OPERATING AGENCIES AND CITIZENS PARTICIPATION ORGANIZATIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS Page PuLpose and Accounting « « « @ 225.6 she Sere Rome © Oe Soe AL Enternal Control «is: «ww we eR we ew Se te GS we ee wee Books of Account and Records 4 « s © «.8 wes «© © « «6 « «= « 5 Brief Description of Account Classification. . «4s .ss«#+s«#+ee«s 7 Disbubschent Procedure: ats Gaw «@ Sie 7 eS is) eS; ue eee oe oo ee Sa ee eo Eligible and Ineligvble ‘Costs. % 2s Gite swim 2 woe - eee © 10 Instructions for Completion of Monthly Administering Agency Project Reports . . .. +. « « « « « e 13 PURPOSE These instructions prescribe the accounting procedures and related fiscal requirements to be followed by agencies which are awarded contracts with the Comprehensive Demonstration Agency to administer projects or activities as approved by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The classification and description of accounts are the minimum required by the Comprehensive Demonstration Agency. If the agency desires to establish accounts other than these prescribed herein, such accounts shall be established as subdivisions of the prescribed accounts and should be maintained in such a way that they can be readily combined into the prescribed classifi- cations for uniform reporting purposes. ACCOUNTING The operating agency shall establish and maintain on a current basis an adequate accounting system on an accural basis in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and standards. The accounting system, among other things, must be adequate to enable the preparation of a statement of financial condition and a cost control statement for submission to the Comprehensive Demonstration Agency on a current and timely basis. All such reports must be received by the Comprehensive Demonstration Agency time to permit the data contained therein to be incorporated into the CDA's records prior to the preparation and submission of its reports to HUD. INTERNAL CONTROL The operating agency shall maintain an adequate system of internal control. Internal control comprises the plan of organization and all of the coordinate methods and measures adopted within an organization to safeguard its assets, check the adequacy and the reliability of its accounting data, promote operating efficiency, and encourage adherence to prescribed menagement policies. The characteristics of an adequate system of internal control include: Os A plan of organization which provides appropriate segregation of functional responsibilities. A system of authorization and record procedures adequate to provide reasonable accounting control over assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses. Sound practices to be followed in performance of duties and functions of each of the organizational units. A degree of personnel competence commensurate with responsibilities. An adequate system of internal control contains the following features: Ae No person should have complete control over all phases of any significant transaction. The flow of work should be from one employee to another so that the work of the second, without duplicating that of the first, provides a check upon it. - Record keeping should be seperated from operations or the handling and custody of assets, such as: (1) The function of receiving cash should be cen- tralized in one person, who should not be con- cerned in any way with approving or certifying vouchers, acting as imprest fund cashier, pre- paring deposits, making disbursements, or keeping accounting records. In this connection, the person who prepares or makes deposits, approves or certifies vouchers, or disburses cash should have no access to the accounting records. =? = =a (2) (3) At as early a point as possible in the mail handling, preferably at the point where the envelopes are opened immediately upon receipt, all checks and negotiable instruments should be stamped with a restrictive endorsement, all cash items should be listed in duplicate, and a copy of the listing delivered to the person responsible for making bank reconciliations. Periodic examination and count or other review of cash balances should be made by employees who do not handle or record cash or sign checks. Physical and mechanical facilities should be used to the fullest extent possible to insure security and accuracy, such as using security vaults or safe cabinets and check writing machines. Responsibilities should be clearly established and then accounted for as close as possible. Where feasible, employees are rotated to various assign- ments. Other control features pertaining to cash include: (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) All cash receipts shall be deposited as soon as possible, preferably the day received. All cash receipts shall be deposited intact and for the full amount received. Collections and all other funds held within an office, whether pending regular deposit or in imprest funds, shall be, where possible, - restrictively endorsed and kept under complete control and under proper safeguards, prefer- ably ina fire resistant combination safe or safe-cabinet. Uncollectible items and the related documents shall not be handled by the person making up deposits or by the person handling accounts receivable. Persons preparing payrolls or time reporting records should not handle the related pay checks. (6) The number of bank accounts and inter-bank transfers should be kept to a minimum. A single bank account for the agency is pre- ferred. BOOKS OF ACCOUNT AND RECORDS The following is a brief description of the books of accounts and records considered to be the minimum required for record- ing transactions relating to the project or activity. However, the agency may establish any additional accounting records it considers necessary to provide adequate financial control of its assets and liabilities and to account for project or activity cost. A. General ledger shall be maintained in which to record a summarization of all accounting trans- actions relating to the project or activity and to classify such transactions according to the accounts listed in the project or activity budget. A cash receipt and disbursement register shall be maintained for the recording of funds received in connection with theproject or activity and for recording checks issued for the withdrawel of funds from the project or activity bank account. All disbursements shall be made by prenumbered checks used in numerical sequence and must be supported by appropriate documentation such as payrolls, invoices, contracts, travel vouchers, etc., evidencing the nature and propriety of each payment, and showing the approval of the project or activity director or - other authorized official. If the volume of receipts and disbursements justify the seperation of the cash receipts and disbursement registers, then the two should be kept seperate. Journal vouchers (or the agency's suitable substitute therefor) shall be used to document and record trans- actions in the general ledger which are not recorded from the cash receipts and disbursement registers. Each journal voucher shall contain a complete explan- ation of the transaction being recorded and references to the related documents or other sources of infor- mation, if applicable. Journal vouchers shall be numbered consecutively and filed in numerical sequence. All journal vouchers shall be approved by an authorized official of the agency. Basic payroll records shall be maintained to accumulate the payroll data required by Federal, State or local law with respect to each employee, such as gross earnings, Federal income tax withheld, State or local income tax withheld, FICA withholdings, etc. The record shall also include data relating to other =a So 5 deductions as may be required by the agency's personnel policies, including the employer's contribution to retirement plans, health insurance plans, etc. A record shall be maintained for each item of non-expendable property acquired for the project or activity. Non-expendable property is property which will not be consumed or lose its identity by being incorporated into another item of pro- perty, which cost $100 or more per unit and is expected to have a useful life of one year or more. Grouping of like items, such as chairs, with an aggre- gate cost in excess of $100 shall also be controlled and accounted for as non-expendable property even though the cost of a single item is less than $100. The record shall include: (1) Description of the item of property, including model and serial number, if applicable. (2) Date of acquisition (3) The acquisition cost or assigned value to the project or activity. (4) Information as to whether the property was new or used at time of acquisition. The aggregate of the individual costs shown on the record cards shall equal the balance in the subsidiary cost account for non-expendable property. A physical inventory shall be taken and reconciled with the record card annually or as frequent as required by the Model Cities Program, City of Atlanta. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF ACCOUNT CLASSIFICATION ACTIVITY COST Personnel Includes the cost of staff and support staff of the operating agency as spelled out in latest approved budget. Consultant and Contract Services Includes the cost of services contracted to other agencies, firms or individuals according to a written contract with the operating agency. All contracts must be in writing and must have prior approval of the CDA. Travel a- Auto allowance paid on the basis of actual mileage as spelled out in latest approved budget. b. Staff travel and expenses according to latest approved budget. Space Cost a. Monthly office rental. b. Telephone and telegraph expense if not included in Activity Cost (7) and contained in latest approved budget. c. Fire and extended coverage insurance on building and contents if not included in activity cost (7) and contained in latest approved budget. d. Utility cost if not included in activity cost (7). e. Building maintenance, if not included in Activity Cost (7) and contained in latest approved budget. Consumable Supplies Includes the costs of blue prints, drafting materials, charts, graphics, maps, stationery and all small items of non-expendable property, the total cost of which does not exceed $100. Rental, lease or Purchase of Equipment © ae Includes rental or lease cost of equipment not on loan or not purchased. b. Total cost of equipment purchased. Other Costs Costs not specifically covered in the above budget categories’ according to latest approved budget. ¥ PROJECT COST Property Acquisition The cost incident to the acquiring of land and structures and the cost of demolition if necessary. Land Improvement The cost of improving site to neee the qualifications for the (12) (13) type construction anticipated. Construction The cost of construction, rehabilitation, alteration and repair. Professional Services The cost of professional services rendered by individuals or organization including legal, accounting and architectual ' services. Carrying Charges The cost of items such as types, interest and insurance premiums incurred during construction. Other Costs not included in the above budget categories for capital projects according to the latest approved budget. The description of the budget categories listed above is by no means exhaustive and in instances where there are questions as to the proper classification of a transaction, the latest approved budget and budget justification break down should govern. DISBURSEMENT PROCEDURE Disbursements (other than from Petty Cash) for goods, and for services of persons or firms not payrolled by the Opera- ting Agency shall be supported by executed purchase orders or contracts. Purchase and contract procedures should follow CDA practice and policy. Such policies and procedures shall be approved by the CDA prior to implementation. Disbursements must be supported by invoices or requisitions which can readily be traced to the contract or purchase order for the services, supplies, or equipment (except as noted in Four (4) below). Disbursements shall be made by pre-numbered checks counter- signed by two officers unless the amount of the individual disbursement is small (under $10) that payment from a Petty Cash Fund is more economical. ; A Petty Cash Fund may be established for use in making pay- ment of minor items of expense whenever it is not practicable to issue a check. An authorized official of the Operating Agency shall approve the establishment and the amount of the Petty Cash Fund. Each disbursement from the Petty Cash Fund shall be supported by a receipted bill or invoice. However, if a receipted bill or invoice is not obtainable, the dis- bursement shall be supported by an itemized list of the items purchased and the list shall be approved by an official of the Operating Agency other than the custodian of the fund. The Petty Cash fund shall be replenished at the end of each calen- dar quarter or as frequently as may otherwise be required. wa ELIGIBLE AND INELIGIBLE COSTS All cost must be reasonable and of a nature which clearly relates to the specific purposes and end product of the contract under which the services are being performed. Care must be exercised by all concerned in incurring costs to assure that expenditures conform to these general standards and the following criteria for eligibility of costs. l. To be eligible for inclusion in the program, cost must: a. Be necessary and reasonable for proper and efficient execution of the contractual requirements and in accordance with the approved budget. b. Not. be a general expense required to carry out regular responsibilities of the operating agency. c. Be in conformance with any limitations or ex- clusions in these instructions, federal laws, city ordinances, or other governing limitations. d. Be no more liberal than policies, procedures, and practices applied uniformly to both federally assisted and other activities of the operating agency. e. Be accorded consistent treatment through application of accounting policy and procedures approved and/or prescribed herein. £.. Not be allocable to or included as a cost of any other federally financed program in either prior or current periods. E g.- Be net of all applicable credits such as purchase discounts, rebates or allowances, sales of publication or materials, or other income or refunds. h. Be in accordance with budgetary or other restriction of expenses established by the comprehensive Demonstration Agency (City of Atlanta) and approved by the Department of Housing and Urban Department. i. Be fully documented. =a -10=— Comply with policies governing administrative practices, including policies with respect to employment, salary and wage rates, working hours, and holidays, fringe benefits (health and hopitalization insurance, retire- ment, etc.) vacation and sick leave privileges, and travel. The policies relating to the above must be in writing and approved by the governing body of the Agency, or Director, as authorized, as well as by the City. Such policies and practices should take account of situations where theoperating agency is a temporary, non-governmental entity composes primarily of part-time staff which may have full-time employment elsewhere. 2- In addition to costs ineligible under the above ceriteria, the following costs are specifically ineligible: a. Accounting- Costs of maintaining central accounting records necessary for overall agency purposes, such as appropriation of fund accounts by the treasurer or similar official, are considered to be a general expense of the agency and are unallowable. However, the cost of establishing and maintaining accounting or other information systems required for the manage- ment of the contract is allowable. This includes costs incurred by central service agencies for these purposes. Bad Debts- Any losses arising from uncollectable accounts and other claims, and related costs. Contingencies. Contributions to a contingency reserve or any similar provision for unforseen events. Contributions and Donations. : Entertainment. Costs of amusements, social activities, and incidental costs, such as meals beverages, lodgings, and gratuities, relating to entertainment. Fines and Penalties. Costs resulting from violation of or failure to comply with federal, state, and local laws and regulations. Interest and other Financial Costs. Interest on borrowing (however represented), cost of financing and refinancing operations, and legal and professional fees paid in connection therewith. =-l1= Legal _ expenses. Legal expenses for the prosecution of claims against the Federal Government. However, the costs of legal expenses required directly for the administration of the program are allowable. Membership Expenses. Cost of membership in an organization which devotes a substantial part of its activities to influencing legislation. Travel. Costs in excess of those allowed by the City of Atlanta for its equivalent employees. In a case, the difference in cost between first-class air accomodations and less-than-first-class air accomodations is not allowed expect when less-than-first-class air accomodations are not available and is so documented. Meeting Attendance. Costs of attending meetings which are not open for attendance on a non-segreated basis. Executive Expenses. The salary and expenses of the chief executive officer of the agency are considered a cost of the agency and are not allocable in any way to the project or activity. -12- INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETION OF MONTHLY ADMINISTERING AGENCY PROJECT REPORTS This report is to be delivered to Model Cities prior to the fifth day of the month following the reporting month. This deadline is imperative in order to report expenditures to HUD. The heading of this report includes lines for Agency Name and Address, Project Name, and Project Number. The Reporting Period item should reflect beginning and ending dates (usually first to last of month) of the report. The Cum. Supplemental Expenditures item should contain a total of all funds designated supplemental which have been expended on the project to date. The Cash Received item refers to supplemental funds that have been deposited to your agency. The Balance item should reflect the amount of supplemental funds expended but not yet received by your agency. The Cost Statement section of the report is a breakdown of expenditures by line item and by source of funds. For projects which receive supplemental funds, costs for each line item for the Current Period should be listed. These should be broken down between Supplemental funds and Other funds if the project or activity is jointly funded. For projects that do not involve the use of Model Cities supple- mental funds, it is requested that a total amount expended on the project for the current period be entered by line item 13 (non-con= tracted agency). Under the Cummulative Total column, funds expended to date on the project should be broken down in the same manner as current period expenditures. The Work Program Status section of the Administering Agency Project Report is designed to report against the Project Work Program which was..formulated by your agency in cooperation with Model Cities Personnel. Each month the various tasks listed on the work program should be analyzed to determine if they are being started and com- pleted in the planned time frame. Any tasks which will have different start and complete dates should be listed under the "Description of Task" column of the agency project report. The applicable revised start and complete dates should then be entered in the reporting month, that task should be entered under the "Description of Task" column and the actual com- plete date shown. =-13-< Start or complete dates for a task will be considered on schedule if they are within three weeks of the originally planned time frame. A variance of more than three weeks in a task should be reported as described above. Every effort should be made to report time revisions as soon as they become evident. For example, if it becomes apparent that some operational phase of a project will be delayed due to problems in acquiring equipment, this should be re- ported as soon as it is known rather than at the time the operational phase is to begin. The Project Highlights section of the report should be used to briefly summarize project activity for the month and to list any unusual cirsumstances concerning the project. Amplifying information about revised start or complete dates should also be given in this section. An example of a completed Administering Agency Project Report follows these instructions. -~14— ae ADMINISTERING AGENCY PROJECT REPORT AGENCY__Georgia State Employment Service projECT__Employer Services ADDRESS No. 1 Peachtree Room 408 Atlanta, Georgia 30301 NUMBER lo [2] ol2 | REPORTING PERIOD: CUM. SUPPLEMENTAL CASH RECEIVED BALANCE EXPENDITURES FROM 8/1/69 TO 8/31/69 $30,000 $25,000 $5,000 COST STATEMENT CURRENT PERIOD CUMMULATIVE TOTAL COST CATEGORY CODE | SUPPLEMENTAL OTHER SUPPLEMENTAL OTHER PERSONNEL 91 10,000 "5,000 20,000 10,000 CONSULTANTS, CONT SERV 02 == 1,000 2,000 1,000 TRAVEL 03 SPACE 04 1,500 3,000 CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES 05 300 1,000 RENT, LEASE, PURCH EQP 06 500 1,000 4,000 2,000 OTHER 07 PROPERTY ACQUISITION 08 LAND IMPROVEMENTS 09 CONSTRUCTION 10 PROFESSIONAL SERV 11 CARRYING CHARGES 12 NON-CONTRACTED AGENCY 13. Bees ca Reet oo eee TOTAL 7,000 30,000 13,000 WORK PROGRAM STATUS ACTUAL REVISED REVISED DESCRIPTION OF TASK COMPLETE START COMPLETE Occupy temporary facility 9/8/69 9/19/69 Establish contact with 66 employers in MNA 10/6/69 4/30/70 Acquire supplies 8/15/69 Personnel orientation 8/20/69 PROJECT HIGHLIGHTS: During the month of August project personnel were given orienta+ tion sessions concerning project tasks and objectives. All supplies have been purchased, but occupation of the temporary facility is being delayed due to a carpenter's strike. This delay will also delay establishing contacts with employers. Sample inquiries to employers have produced enthusiastic responses and it appears that the project will exceed its objective of developing 200 jobs. (USE REVERSE, IF REQUIRED) THE UNDERSIGNED CERTIFIES THAT THE ABOVE INFORMATION IS CORRECT. ve / oO 4 ¢ j afl ‘ siGNatuRE AND Tite_Jetun (2&1 fh, Likoc bey DATE_Sept. 2, 196%° -(FORM MOD. 9) fi -15-
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 11

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_011.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 11
  • Text: (1) ADT™NDIX I 8:30-9:15 CDA Borrd mests Special Area Consultant, 2:5-10:30 MNA and Consultant, sO 9:)5-10:30 Non-MNA members’ and Gongoteanit. Sach group will elect leader to act as chairman and momber to cerve as recorder and/or reporter, Sessions will be taped, both MITA and Non-?itA eroups til] be discussion seminars with two-fold purpose: 1. To enable participants to participate in some decision making process in terns of organizabion-election of chairman and recorder, 2. To discuss the implication of the consultant's morning presentation ‘in terms of the "50" and what effect the group could have on the Greater Chattanooga~"Think Tank" for what could take place throvzh 1975. 10:30-20:!; Wa Coffee Break, i 10:),0411:15 Simulation Exercise based on weekly format-i.es, a pictorial representation of a philisophy expressing opposition to the need for a Nodel Cities Pro;ram in Chattanooga. This will also be structured to serve as a catalyst for a sensitivity exercise, 13:15-12:30 Five small discussion groups will be formed-leaders and recorders will be elected by each group, Tapes provided for some--Video Tapes of others. Discussion will proceed on the basis of attempting to formulate an accestable decision concerning the nature of the pictorial presentation, Membership will remain the same for first five session-then random selection 0° five new groups, Board members will reform as- CDA Board during last 20 minutes of the program, Brief report from each group chairman or recorder, Remainder Awmst 9 of period spent i taini sONSUS . : Be of perio vent in obtaining the consensus of the "SO" in terms of decision(s) aceeptable Lo the ;roupe (3) APPENDIX TI August 1¢ 8330-93): CDA Board and Consultant, 9:),5-10:30 NA Board and Consultant, 93!):6-10:30 Non-NMA Board aha Consultant, Two groups meel. independently, clect chairmen and pecordeses discuss their unique role as individuals in the total dedision-making structure of the CDA Board. Reports of chairmen of the two groups, Discussion and critiqve of the reports in terms of total interaction of the participants, 10:30-10:l15 Coffee Break, 10:45-11:15 Simulation Exercise. Role llaying--Sxercise designed to enhance the authoritorive structure of an orsanization in terms of decision-making. 11:15+12:30 Five Reports--CDA Board structures a model for interaction based on principles acceptable to the total Board. - (1) APPMADIX IIL . 8330-9:)5 CDA Board meets Special Consultant. 19:30 BNA and Consultant, 9:45-10:30 Non-HNA members, Election of chairman and vacordene Discussion seminars for toth groups. _Two-fold purpose: 1. To participate in decision making process by electiny .chairman, 2. To discuss an issue as unique to the sroups,i.e.; the MNA members and the effort of non-participation in decision-making in the Chattanooga City Government--the Non-MNA members and the desirability of beins in a position to effect a decision with the city governnens. 10:30-10:15 Coffee Break. 10:l5-11:15 Simulation Exercise. Role playing by selected group. "}iilitant Citizens"--a confrontation between a group of citizens and inadequate police protection or an inadequate schodl curriculum, eeheh: based on Sconomics--How to cope with securing employment, ~11:15-12:30 Five discussion groups--elect leader and recorder, Discuss Recentabie solution to the problem presented, Sjnulavers available for question period. Report of the recorders to the full CDA Board. dn atbempt will be made to obtain a consensus of opinion as to the better solution, Use Video Tape Recorder to record the decision-making process. Use last 15 “minutes for self-evaluation of problem, APPENDIX IV August 30 8:30-9:)5 CDA Board.meets Special Area Consultant, 9:)5-10:30 MNA and Consultant. 9:15-10:30 Non-Members NMA, Ray Sebub dieots enatonen and recorder, Gasniona tepede Senne discussion concerning each groups! uniqueness in terms of the consultant's presentation. Two-fold purpose: 1. To strenghten total participation of all members of the group, 2. To discuss the decision-making process as related to NMA and Non-NMA. 10:30-10:45 Coffee Break, 10:5-11:15 Simulation Exercise. 35 mm pictorial presentation of a "Citizen's Participation Structure" which does not reflect the goals of the Nodel City Program, Problem of making acceptable decision by the group is presented to the CDA Board, 11:15-12:30 .Small group discussion of simulation exercise=s5 leaders and recorders are elected, Diadicaten will proceed a the basis of: 1. How could the structure of the board be changed to make the board more effective? 2. what alternatives are available to the group in terms of making an acceptable decision as posed by the problem, Brief report from Chairman--Remainder of time spent by CDA Board making a decision based on data presented in problem. (6) APPENDIX V September 6 8:30-9:45 CDA Board mects Special Consultant, 0:);5-10:30 MNA and Gonsuleaites 9:h5~10:30 Non-MNA and Consultant. - Each group-elect leader and recorder, Each group will decide the ‘most serious problem confronting the CDA Board in terms of the consultant's discussion. 10:30-10:):5 Coffee Break. 10:))5-11:15 Simulation Exercise "Conflicting Priorities" a pictorial representation of priorities being established with adequate participation . of the area citizenry. 11:15-12:30 Small group seminars, Elect chairmen and recorders, Zach group establish priorities, CDA group meets, Chairmen report briefly. CDA attempts to establish priorities acceptable to total Board, * (7) APPENDIX VI September 13 8:30-9:45 CDA Reoard neets Special Area Consvitant,. 9:))5-10:30 MA and Consultant, 9:1:5-19:30 Non-MNA and Consultant, Two-Lold purpose: 7 1. Each group elect chairman and recorder. 26 Bach group discuss the role of the total CDA Board and "Subtantive Impost" with specific reference to (a) physical problems; (0) economic problems; (c) social problems, (Use Video if available) 10:30-10:h5 Coffee Break, 10:;5-12 :18 Simulation Exercise--Hypothetical Problem presented to CDA participants, Short skit developed for purposes of dramatizing a specific rroblem arising within the Model Area, 11:15-12:30 Small group discussion of problem ‘and solutions. CDA Board meets as unit. Brief reports from recorders, An Anaya of the problem by total group and an.acceptance or rejection of the five solutions--a consensus of the group is formed in terms of articulating a decision by the total group. (taped) (6) APUWNDIA VIL Septeniber 20 8:30-0:25 CDA Board anaie Special kee Consulbant, 9 sha 230 NMA and Consultant, 2 9:],0-10:30 Non-MNA and Consultant. Two-fold purpose; 1. Election of shit cme and recorder. oe Group discussion implement the discussion of the CDA to the three specific areas as seen by the two groups~-city government, nei:shbor- hood, and Model City Staff. 10:30-10:):5 Coffee Break. | 10:)5-11:15 Simlation Exercise, Mxercise-pictorial will present .a problem (5) which will involve a high decree of polarization of three areas of interest groups~~governnental officials, neithborhood organization, and Model: City Staff, 11:15-12:30 Small group (5) discussion with leader and recorder, An analysis of the problem(s) ana alternatives available to the total CDA group as seen by the small group. Report of five chairmen: An analysis by the CDA group as a committee of the whole--What is acceptable in terms of a decision to the pictorial problem, Our os : | APPENDIX VIII Sepiember 27 8: 30-9 hf CDA Board meets Special Area Consultant, 9;);5419:30 NMA and Consultant. - 93):5-10:30 Non-NMA and Consultant. Wach group mects: a 1. To elect chairman and recorder, 2s To discuss specific questions arising out of the consultant's presentation with an emphasis on the uniqueness of interactions as applicable to each group. 10:30-10:L5 Coffee Break, 10:hS-11:15 Siimilation Exercise. - Pictorial eresentation of problems which set the stage for problem-solving in the area of technical assistance, 11:16-12:30 Five groups discuss and formulate ‘action program based on technical assistance. CDA Board meets as a group. Five chairmen report to CDA Board, Discussion of conclusion by total Board, (10) APPENDIX IX October |): 8:30-0:))— CDA Board meets Special Area Consultant, 2).6210:30 NA Board members and Consultant. te) ‘9 ::5-10:30 Non-MNA Roard members and Consultant. “de Riect leader..and raceenen, 2. Implementation of discussion by consultant with emphasis on relationship and coordination. | 10:30-10:);5 Coffee Break, 10:45~-11:15 Simlation Activity. Pictorial presentation of a hypothetical case of the inability of a board to make a decision because of an inadequate corrdination and information structure within Bhs total organization, (another Meaney es) within the Model Neighborhood Area) 11:15-12:30 Small digestion groups, Elect chairman and recorder, Tape discussion groups. Purpose of group is to analysis the problem presented in the eimitated experience and attempt to select alternate solutions in terms of a value determinent, Comparison of solutions by group presentation, A solution of a better solution by the CDA Board, (11) APPENDIX | x October 11 8:30-9:15 CDA Board and Consultant, 9:'6.70:30 NMA and Consultant. 9:1)5-10:30 Non-Members and Consultant, 1. election of Leader, 2. Gokesmation of Consultant's theme in terms ot: (1) Sensitivity to needs of all members of the CNA Board, (2) An examination of the group's responsibility in setting group foils and making progress. 10:30-10:45 Coffee Break, 10:15-11:1© Simvlation Exercise, Selected group portraying a group of repre- sentative young people of the Model Neighborhood Area Theme of sirmlation exercise is a direct confrontation between one segment of the MNA and the CDA Board, Implications for authoritari.on decision-makin; and participatory decision-makinz are pictorially portrayed tb the group, 11:15-12:30 Small group discussion, Election of sroup leader and recorder, ‘rn analysis of the types of decision-making as portrayed with an attempt to stricture a more seceptabé process for arriving at a decision, Tape. CDA eroup report to the CNA group by chairmen, The CDA, acting as a unit, is pressured to, formulate definitive goals for the group with negative stirulation “being constantly provided by external force--Consultant or member of the Model Cities Team, Reaction of group in terms of cohesiveness as a decision-makinz body. Video tape,
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_009.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 9
  • Text: HI a Cong Fl ohens on S/ech#o~ @ p./e blog espous L, Ah 3 ra wht be pv fomet awe foot pe sea terre i \ 4 U ge fotwewd Peek ft VA sho— Grif Nee lysi's | , i ‘ Desc be pttartels tuotert -plemey - pol 73 haste £44 1_/¢ on QC, p proactel hs Cee a pore 19 oe o= The pad ote genteel: (Cee as oe 3- Oesels pnt The bes S#“y Zhe leon Ala . po few Bada shaterK © a
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 18

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_018.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 18
  • Text: Model Cities Mass Convention Pryor Street School July 20, 1969 The Model Cities Mass Convention met in its regular session, on the above date at the designated time and place. The meeting was called to order by the Chairman, Deacon Lewis Peters; the invocation was given by Mr. N. A. Scott III. Upon the adoption. of the proposed agenda, the meeting was put in progress. The minutes of the previous meeting were read by the Secretary, Mrs. C. B. Wright. They were accepted.as read with one suggested change by the city attorney. (The suggestion is attached). The secretary motioned that the suggestion of name change be accepted as read, it was seconded by Dr. Cox, motion carried. Deacon Peters made a plea for greater community participation. Model Cities Staff Report: Mrs. Xernona Clayton A one stop service building is being built. News letters will be sent every Wednesday. All committees need to be made stronger. Help from the communities is needed. See that your community is represented in all meetings. Thanks for cooperation that has been given. 2 ® 2 wud WNP A-preliminary report of Credentials Committee was given by the Chairman, Rev. Calvin Houston. Grant Park 32 Pittsburgh ai Mechanicsville at Adair Park 10 Summerhill 9 Peoplestown _4 5 Steering Committee Dr. Charles McClain Reviewed the minutes of the Steering Committee. Constitution and By-Laws: Mr. Willis Weems read the Constitution and By-Laws No Discussion or vote was taken. PAGE @ MODEL CITIES MASS CONVENTION At this point the city attorney, Jim Pilcher was asked to speak, he stated he would read a statement and Dr. McClain would put it in the form of a motion (Statement Attached). Motion: That the Chairman and secretary and the Steering Committee of Atlanta Model Cities Mass Convention Inc. be authorized to execute a contract with the Model Neighborhood Program of the City of Atlanta to receive the funds in the approximate Sum of $135 Thousand ($727 63 ) This motion was seconded by Dr. Cox motion carried. Mr. Allison (William) Executive of EOA was asked to give a description of O.E.0O. funds, after a lengthy discussion the name EOA not to e de- leated from the contract was carried 27 to 23. Mr. C. Craig motioned that the secretary of Model Cities give an attendance report of each Steering Committee member to the Mass Convention, seconded by Mr. Whitley motioned carried. (motion attached) Mr. Howard Kline a candidate for the Board of Education was introduced by Mr. Craig. Mx. Craig asked for law and order in our communities the percent of Lk juvinile delinquency was too high and suggested that the citizens must want lew and order in the community. Final report of the Credentials Committee -- Rev. C. Hustan Grant Park 38 Pittsburgh 23 Adair Park 11 Mechanicsville 11 S Summerhill 9 Peoplestown 5 Total 97 The following persons were requested by Deacon Peters to meet on Tuesday to work on a work proposal and would be paid $35.00 for each meeting. Mrs. Mattie Ansley Mrs. Rosa Burney Mrs. Martha Weems, Mrs. Beatrice Garland Mr. Calvin Craig Dr. Cox Mrs. Lacey principal of Pryor Street School was introduced, she gave a very warm welcome and words of commendation. There being no more business the meeting adjourned. Deacon Lewis Peters Dr. Chas. McClain Mrs. C. B. Wright, Sec. Mrs. Rosa Burney Asst. Sec. MASS CONVENTION MINUTES PAGE 8 RESOLUTION SUBMITTED TO MASS CONVENTION BY CALVIN F. CRAIG 7-28-69 That the Model Cities Mass Convention Secretary at each Mass Convention give a report as to the attendance at Steering Committee meeting by the elected members of this body. MOTTON : "That the chairman and secretary of Atlanta Model Cities Mass Convention Inc. be authorized to execute a contract with the Model Neighborhood Program of the City of Atlanta to receive funds in the approximately sum of $83,000 for citizen participation in the Model Cities Program." That the corporation serve asagent of the Mass Convention until the completion of corporate formalities.
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 13
  • Text: Resident Involvement During Planning Process In December 1967 the residents of the Model Neighborhood Area selected the structure that they. felt would be the most work- able and representative of the six neighborhoods that make up the Atlanta Model Cities Program. (see figure on community, structure). Mass Convention The Mass Convention is open to all Model Neighborhood Area resi- dents. Here the citizens have an opportunity to hear the pro- gress made to improve their community and to voice their views on the Model Cities Program. The Mass Convention also guaran- tees to every Model Neighborhood Area resident that all elec- tions that relate to the organization of the Model Neighborhood Area will be conducted in an orderly and democratic manner. The Mass Convention also symbolizes the idea that the Model Neighborhood Area is a unified community with many similar “assets and liabilities in each of the six concerned neighbor- hoods, Executive Board The 14 member Executive Board is the policy making body in the Model Cities organization. It is composed of six neighborhood residents. (One elected representative from each of six - © neighborhoods within the Model Neighborhood Area). In addition to the six citizens, it includes the following: Mayor of the City of Atlanta, one citizen representing the Atlanta Negro community, one citizen from the general Atlanta Community, one representative from the Atlanta Board of Education, one repre- sentative from the State of Georgia, two Aldermen from the City of Atlanta, and the Fulton County Commission Chairman. Steering Committee The 16 member citizen's Steering Committee serves as the Mass Convention when it is not in session. It accepts recommenda- tions and proposals from each of the six neighborhoods. It Will bring thesc recommendations and proposals to the Mass Convention and the Executive Board. The Steering Committee is also responsible for developing an effective citizen organi- zation in each of the six neighborhoods. It is composed of the four Mass Convention officers, six neighborhood vice chairmen (one elected from each of the six neighborhoods) and six residents who serve on the Executive Board. Neighborhood Advisory Councils The Neighborhood Advisory Council structure is designed to organize citizens at the neighborhood level..The residents decided to use three basic structures of organization. Adair Park elected its representatives on an area-wide basis. Grant Park and Peoplestown elected their representatives on a district basis. Mechanicsville, Pittsburgh, and Summerhill elected its representatives through the block structure. The basic function of the councils is to coordinate all acti- vity in the neighborhood and to be sure that all operating and standing committees are functioning at maximum efficiency. Operating Committees Each of the six neighborhoods has 11 operating committees for the following program areas: Health, Education, Welfare and Social Services, Housing, Relocation, Design and Preservation Physical Improvements, Public Facilities, Emplcyment, Crime Prevention and Recreation. These committees played a valuable role in the planning phase of Model Cities Programs through working with planners in identifying problems and suggesting solutions to solve these problems. The Operating Committees work closely with the Neighborhood Advisory Council so that all proposals from the community. will be coordinated through the council. Membership on the Opera- ting Committees is open to any resident of the neighborhood. Standing Committees ‘The Standing Committees serve as the organizational arm for the Mass Convention and the six neighborhoods within Atlanta’s fodel Neighborhood Area. There are seven committees (Boundary, Credentials, Nominations, Program, Or@nization, Resolutions, and Constitution and By-Laws). Each neighborhood has three representatives on each committee. Technical Adviscry Board The purpose of the Technical Advisory Board is to review the plans of the residents and planners, and to offer technical advice. Members are representatives of various community organizations. Total membership is open-ended, allowing the Model Cities Program Director to appoint anyone who might aid the program.
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Complete Folder

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Complete Folder
  • Text: J I l / November 3, 1969 MEMORANDUM TO: Mr . Johnny Johnson FROM : Dan E . Sweat, Jr . SUBJECT: Model Cities Mass Convention, Inc . , and QED Consulting F irm I appreciate your m mo on this subject dated October 30, 1969 . A I understand your po ition, you tate that the expenditure to employ thi · consultant will be from the proceed of an EOA , Inc . gr nt to Model Cities Ma e Convention, Incorpor ted (MCMC , Inc .) and, con equently, the city is in no position to exerci e ny control over which firm that MCMC, Inc . employ for this work. I will defer to your judgement as to the technical operations of thi procedur and l und ratand that the city do not exercise ny direct control ov r the action of MCMC, Inc . , when city funds are not involv d . My only inter t i that the city, · nd more p cific lly th Model Cities Program, do not uffer ny emb rra sm nt re ulting from the rd of contr cts by ny Model City Agency or contractor . To preclude thi pos ibUtty, Ir it r t my reque t of October 28 , 1969, that a compl te dos ier be pr par d on QED prior to a deci•ion bein mad on the award of the contract to th m . Thi do sier hould includ the com• plet 1i t of the princip l with r um.es of th ir educ tion nd xp ri nee; r view of their pre nt position o that ny conflict of inter st can be d termined; some exampl or r f renc s of eimil r work perform d; compl te review of th xp ri ne nd q lification of th firm to do thh work: b udg t nd progr m d igned to accompl h th work d sired, and ny other Worm tion n c •• ry to make a w 11-inform d d ciaio on th ca bility of thia firm to ucc ••fully ccompli h thi• wo rk. �! ' This request should be made to MCMC, Inc . , recognizing that the city does not have the authority to require it but feels that good administrative practices demand it. When thi information is prepared, a good case can supposedly be made for awarding this contract to this firm instead of anQther . Should the1·e be any later question, the city wHl be in a m~ch better position to defend the action. You may be a13sured that the general public will not di tinguish betwe n MCMC , Inc . , and the larger Model City Program in the event charges of impropriety or c onflict of interest are mad against the corporation. My only interest in this project is the well being of our Model City Program . If the fact upport the contention that QED is qualified and able to do this wot-k at competitive prices , I will fully support the award to them . By the aame token, if the facts indicate that they are not qualified to accomplish this work, I feel that the award should not be made . In any ev nt, I w nt us to be in a position to defend the action of MCMC , •no. , even if we are not dbectly respon ible for the management of the organization. DESJr : m �- -I r .I / CITY OF A.TLANTA October 30, 1969 OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM 673 Capitol Avenue, S.W. Atlanta, Ga. 30315 (404) 577 - 5200 Ivan Allen Jr., Mayor J. C. Johnson, Director MEMORANDUM - - TO Dan E. Sweat, Chief Administrative Officer FROM Johnny C. Johnson, Executive Director Model Cities Program SUBJECT: Model Cities Mass Convention, Inc., and QED Consulting Firm In response to your memorandum of October 28, an investigation has been made into your inquiry and the following is submitted for your consideration. It has been determined that Model Cities Mass Convention, Inc. requested bids from three consulta nts that would provide management and personnel guidelines for their operation of the corporation. It appears that the low bidder for these services was a firm known as QED. It seems that the firm of Quod Erat Demonstradum was organi zed in February of 1964 and that the general purpose of the organization was to provide consultant services in the areas of marketing, management studies, and public relations . The firm has performed services for Radio Station WAOK and is involved in a project with several Emory University professors. Upon examination of the contract between the City of Atlanta and Model Cities Mass Convention , Inc., it has been determined that under the allocation of funds, no provisions were made for consultant and contract services with third parties e xc ept for public information purposes. (See attached budget justifications) . However, when combining the budget for HUD and OEO funds, all monies for training and technical assistance is to be paid out of the OEO grant and not out of the Model Cities supplemental funds. The �Memo to: Dan E. Sweat Page Two October 30, 1969 hiring of a management consultant firm appears to be a legitimate expenditure out of the OEO funds since these funds are provided especially to assist in the development of greater management capabilities on the part of the directors of the corporation. Further inquiry reveals that EOA had requested of the officers of the corporation to submit personnel and administrative policies as a requirement of their contract. It appears that EOA, and not Model Cities, would be the final determinant agency with regards to the sufficiency and qualifications of the consultants. Item 14 of the contract between the City and Model Cities Ma s s Convention, Inc., stipulates that all services sub-contracted to third parties must have prior approval by this office. Our Program Management Division was knowledgeable of the negotiations and had informed the proper officer that these services were eligible only under the OEO grant. I assure you that the staff is fully cognizant of its responsibility to assure that all monies which flow through the Model Cities Program are spent wisely and effectively, thus are comitted to fulfilling that obligation Attached for your perusal is a copy of our manual on accounting and fiscal management procedures. This manual is furnished all operating agenci es as a guide. I hope that the above information has been of some benefit to you. JCJ:vlc Attachme nts �:, ,i . • I ,•. I.._ .... ·_~~·- . ;.'o-- a"··,; ;. , •+ ti:aa n f ·,a ·'tv -. · ;;;;,,• . ..,... :~;.k::> s .. · ' ~tlr..~~ .. ..- ., I •. J-~. •+0t J > \~ ,. "· w •)· ,e:i"t;' :f:s:i,,- . -;}~··· ·4, · (i,;c}, ft1+.,i ;f:1 ·, ' is 'riG "' t ' d ? f hl s "";.,,,.;,, ,,. - ~ • /: I •• . I: 1:_' ' I 2 8. BUOOET l i I '], l I I ,, ' . ' i I\ 1.· I B. ESTI~'l'f:~L- .A-.:.....9QST_ CATIY.rORY (l) -(2) . i . Ii. i ' (3) ( 1~) ~- · j I'ERSONNEL .. I i I SF~RVICES I ~'.PAVEL I SPACE -- CONTRACT 10,000.00 600.00 600.00 ' I1·: I i I· . l. j ' 1: I· -(6) (7) - i CONSUMARLE SUPl:i:LIES I I· i- .t ',,'. ' i: I 2,300.00 - TOTAL -·* o. I 1' 86,000.00* I, 14,0Q0.00 !. .. ..__ . 159,380.00 87,380.00 I E. o./HUD Grant $74',000.00 APPROVAL j . A. -S-ign _ a_tur __e_a_n_d_ T_l _t _le_ o_f Authoriz ed. liUD Officie.l B. Data I· I I I J HUD- 7041 U0-68) ! '. - - -2,300.00 - ... 1. 'I ' 2,400.00 - I I . OTHER: · . '· .. 0 RE!lTAL, LEA.SE, OR P'JRC11ASt; OF EQUIPME1i'T . - 9, 0 2,400.00 - 1 i I I I I - 10,000.00 (5) $ 58,080.00 ~ .I J · MCA SHAf-:E : (If coat is baing shared : with o;;hers) • 58,080.00 $ COUSUL1'A1iTS .Alfil I c. ' I I • I · i I . ' I �t --,, • J - ' C:. ...... .· I Form !Approved Budg~t Bureau No. 63-R-1211 ' .· · Attachment 3a U. s. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Budget Justification ,, This form is to be attached to each budget for a capital project, activity and to the Program Administration Budget .........---· I I NAME OF CDA 1. I Atlanta City Demonstration Agency 2. I .. BRIEF DESCRIP'.rIVE TITLE OF CAPITAL PROJECT OR ACTIVITY I Model Cities Resident Organ i z a tion I 3, NAME• ADDRESS AND ZIP CODE OF OPERATING ENTITY Model Cities Mass Convention, Inc~ I 1: , 673 Capitol Avenue S.W. Atlanta, Ga. AMOUNT OR VALUE 4. · DESCRIP'.rIOJ.IT OF ITEM* AND BASIS FOR VALUATION** 2. Public Information 3. Travel -- $50.00 per month x 12 OF ITEM I I I ii I $10,000.00 600.00 1 5. '\· I 1 · Consumable supplies -- Office supplies @$200.00 per month. 2,400.00 Rental, Lease, or purchase of equipment - off ic furniture. 2,300.00 I. I 6. Mass Convention Development Assistance to Neighborhood Advisory Councils-6 @$1,000 $6 , 00 Matching funds . for gr\mt from OEO , : · 3 , 60 . .• :, · Teleph one s, Ut~ l i t i es and jan itor ial services@ $200 p er month. 2 , 40 (Jus tificatio n fo r supp l eme nt al f unds Only ) - Other Costs: . L 'I 1: $14, 0 00,00 For persairel costs use Personnel justification form . I>escribe the item in sufficient detail ~o insure that it is adequately identified indicate the basis for determining or computing its va.lue. For example , office r.pace rental for two professionals: 150 square feet at $2.00 per square foot, i.ncluding utilities and janitorial services. Ellld I �• - .4 • ·CITY OF .ATL OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM 673 Capitol Avenue, S.W. Atlanta, Ga. 30315 404-524-8876 Ivan Allen Jr., Mayor J. C. Johnson, Director ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES FOR OPERATING AGENCIES AND CITIZENS PARTICIPATION ORGANIZATIONS ..... I ::" �---·--·- 7 TABLE OF CONTENTS . . . Purpose and Accounting Page 1 Internal Control Books of Account and Records • 2 . . . . . . . . . 5 Brief Description of Account Classification. 7 Disbursement Procedure • • • 9 Eligible and Ineligible Costs • • . • • 10 Instructions for Completion of Monthly Administering Agency Project Reports • • • • • • • . • • • 13 ..... �J ,. ' PURPOSE These instructions prescribe the accounting procedures and related fiscal requirements to be followed by agencies which are awarded contracts with the Comprehensive Demonstration Agency to administer projects or activities as approved by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The classification and description of - accounts are the minimum required by the Comprehensive Demonstration Agency. If the agency desires to establish accounts other than these prescribed herein, such accounts shall be established as subdivisions of the prescribed accounts and should be maintained in such a way that they can be readily combined into the prescribed classifications for uniform reporting purposes. ACCOUNTING The operating agency shall establish and maintain on a current basis an adequate accounting system on an accural basis in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and standards. The accounting system, among other things, must be adequate to enable the preparation of a statement of financial condition and a cost control statement for submission to the Comprehensive Demonstration Agency on a current and timely basis. All such reports must be received by the Comprehensive Demonstration Agency time to permit the data contained therein to be incorporated into the CDA's records prior to the preparation and submission of its reports to HUD. - 1- �... •, INTERNAL CONTROL The operating agency shall .maintain an adequate system of internal control. Internal control comprises the plan of organization and all of the coordinate methods and measures adopted within an organization to safeguard its assets, check the adequacy and the reliability of its accounting data, promote operating efficiency, and encourage adherence to prescribed menagement policies . The characteristics of an adequate system of internal control include: a. A plan of organization which provides appropriate segregation of functional responsibilities. b. A system of authorization and record procedures adequate to provide reasonable accounting control over assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses. c. Sound practices to be followed in performance of duties and functions of each of the organizational units. d. A degree of personnel competence commensurate with responsibilities. An adequate system of internal control contains the following features: a. No person should have complete control over all phases of any significant transaction. b. The flow of work should be from one employee to another so that the work of the second, without duplicating that of the first, provides a check upon it. c. Record keeping should be seperated from OP,erations or the handling and custody of assets, such as: (1) The function of receiving cash should be centrali z ed in one pe r son , who should not be conce rn ed in a ny wa y wi th approvin g or cer t i f ying vo u cher s, a cting a s imp rest fund c ash i er, pr e pa ring dep os it s , making disbur sements , o r k eeping ac c o un ting re cor ds . I n t h is conne ction, the p ers on who p r epar es ormakes depos i ts , appr oves o r c ertif ies vouche r s , o r di s bur ses cash s hould h ave n o acce ss to the ac c o un t ing recor ds . - 2- .. �(2) At as early a point as possible in the mail handling, preferably at the point where the envelopes are opened immediately upon receipt, all checks and negotiable instruments should be stamped with a restrictive endorsement, ail cash items should be listed in duplicate, and a c9py of the listing delivered to the person responsible for making bank reconciliations. (3) Periodic examination and count or other review of cash balances should be made by employees who do not handle or record cash or sign checks. d. Physical and mechanical facilities should be used to the fullest extent possible to insure security and accuracy, such as using security vaults or safe cabinets and check writing machines. e. Responsibilities should be clearly established and then accounted for as close as possible. f. Where feasible, employees are rotated to various assignments. g. Other control features pertaining to cash include: (1) All cash receipts shall be deposited as soon as possible, preferably the day received. (2) All cash receipts shall be deposited intact and for the full amount received. (3) Collections and all other funds held within an office , whether pending regular deposit or in imprest funds, shall be, where possible, restrictively endorsed and kept under complete control and under proper safeguards, preferably in a fire r es istant combination safe or safe-cabinet. (4) Uncollectible items and the related documents shall not be handled by the person making up d eposits or by the person h a ndling accounts receivable. (5) Persons preparing payrolls or time reporting records should not handle the related pay checks. - 3- �(6) The number of bank accounts and inter-bank transfers ~hould be kept to a minimum. A single bank account for the agency is preferred. ~- �BOOKS OF ACCOUNT AND RECORDS The following is a brief description of the books of accounts and records considered to be the minimum required for recording transactions relating to the project or activity. However, the agency may establish any additional accounting records it considers necessary to provide adequate financial control of its assets and liabilities and to account for project or activity cost. i A. General ledger shall be maintained in which to record a summarization of all accounting transactions relat i ng to the project or activity and to classify such transact i ons according to the accounts l i sted i n the project or activity budget. B. A cash receipt and disbursement register shall be maintained for the recording of funds received in connection with theproject or activity and for recording checks i ssued f or the withdrawel of funds from the project or a ctivity b a nk a ccount. All disbursements shall be made by prenumbered checks used in numerical sequence and must be supported by appropri a te documen t ation such a s payrolls, i nvoices , cont r a ct s , ~r a vel vouche rs, etc., evidencing t he n atu re a nd propriety o f e ach p a yment , a nd s howing the approval o f t h e p roj ect or activit y d ire c tor or other authorized official. If the volume of receipts and disbursements justify the seperation of the cash r e c e ipts and di s bursement r egisters, then the two should b e kept sep e r a t e . C. Jour n al v o u ch ers (or the a gency ' s s u itable s ub s t i tute therefor) shal l be used to docume n t and recor d tra nsactions i n t h e ge n e r a l l e dger wh i ch a re not r e corded . fr om t h e c ash rece ipts and di s bursement r e g ister s . Each j ourn a l v ouche r shal l c ontain a complete e x planatio n o f the tra n saction b e ing r e cor ded a nd re fer e nces t o the re l a t e d docu me nt s or othe r s ource s o f info rma t i on, i f app l icable . Journal v oucher s shall be numbe red c o ns e cutiv ely and fi l e d i n numerica l sequence. All j o urnal vouche rs shall b e approve d by an a u t hor ized official of t he a g e ncy . D. Basic payroll reco rds shall b e maintained to accumulate the p ayr oll d a t a r equir ed by Federa l , · State o r loc a l l aw wi t h r e spect t o e a ch employee, such a s g ross earnings, Federa l i n c ome tax withheld, State or local income tax withheld, · FICA withholdings, etc. The '.... record shall also include data relating to other I. - 5- . �deductions as may be required by the agency's personnel policies, including the employer's contribution to retirement plans, health insurance plans, etc. E. A record shall be maintained for each item of non-expendable property acquired for the project or activity. Non-expendable property is property which will not be consumed or lose its identity by being incorporated into another item of property, which cost $100 or more per unit and is expected to have a useful life of one year or more. Grouping of like items, such as chairs, with an aggregate cost in excess of $100 shall also be controlled and accounted for as non-expendable property even though the cost of a single item is less than $100. The record shall include: (1) Description of the item of property, including model and serial number, if applicable. (2) Date of acquisition (3) The acquisition cost or assigned value to the project or activity. (4) Information as to whether the property was new or used at time of acquisition. The a ggre gate of the individual costs shown on the r e cord c a rds s h a ll equa l the b a l a nce in the subs idiary cost account for non-expendable property. A physical inve ntory shall be taken and reconciled with the record card annually or as frequent as r e quired by t h e Mode l Cit ies Progra m, City of Atlanta. - 6(. �BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF ACCOUNT CLASSIFICATION ACTIVITY COST (1) Personnel Includes the cost of staff and support staff of the operating agency as spelled out in latest approved budget. (2) Consultant and Contract Services Includes the cost of services contracted to other agencies, firms or individuals according to a written contract with the operating agency. All contracts must be in writing and must have prior approval of the CDA. (3) Travel a. Auto allowance paid on the basis of actual mileage as spelled out in latest approved budget. b. Staff travel and e x penses according to latest approved budget. (4) Space Cost a. Monthly office rental. b. Telephone a nd telegraph expense if not included in Activity Cost (7) and contained in latest approved budget. c. Fire and e x t e nded coverage in s urance on building and contents if not inc l uded in activity cost (7) and contained in latest approved budget. 1 d. Utility cost if not included in activity coot (7). e. Building maintenance, if not included in Activity Cost (7) and contained in latest approved budget. (5) Consumable Supplies Includes the costs of blue prints, draf t ing materials, charts, graphics, maps, stationery and all small items of non-ex pendable property, the total cost of which does not e x ceed $100. (6) Renta l , lease or Purcha s e of Equipment a. Includes rental or l e ase cost of equipment not on loan or not purchas ed. b . Total cos t of equipment purcha sed. (7) Other Costs Costs n ot s p e c i ficall y covered in the above budget catego rie s · a c c ording to l ates t a p pr ove d budget . I .-----.. . , ._ PROJECT COST (8) (9) Property Acquisition The cost incident to the acquiring of land and structures and the cost of demolition if necessary. Land Improvement The cost .. of improving site to meet the qualifications for the - 7- ... �type construction anticipated. (10) Construction The cost of construction, rehabilitation, alteration and repair. (11) Professional Services The cost of professional services rendered by individuals or organization including legal, accounting and architectual ' services. (12) Carrying Charges The cost of items such as types, interest and insurance premiums incurred during construction. (13) Other Costs not included in the above budget categories for capital projects according to the latest approved budget. The description of the budget categories listed above is by no means exhaustive and in instances where there are questions as to the proper classification of a transaction, the latest approved budget and budget justification break down should govern. - 8- �DISBURSEMENT PROCEDURE 1. Disbursements (other than from Petty Cash) for goods, and for services of persons or firms not payrolled by the Operating Agency shall be supported by executed purchase orders or contracts. Purchase and contract procedures should follow CDA practice and policy. Such policies and procedures shall be approved by the CDA prior to implementation. 2. Disbursements must be supported by invoices or requisitions which can readily be traced to the contract or purchase order for the s e rvices, supplies, or e quipment (except as noted in Four (4) helow). 3. Disbursements shall be made by pre-numbered checks countersigned by two officers unless the amount of the individual disbursement is small (under $10) that payment from a Petty Cash Fund is more economical. 4. .A Petty Cash Fund may be established for use in making payment of minor items of expense whenever it is not practicable to issue a check. An authoriz e d official of the Operating Age ncy shall approve the establishment and the amount of the Petty Cash Fund. Each d isbur s e me nt from the Petty Cash Fund shall b e s upporte d by a rec e ipted bill or invoice . Howe ver, i f a r e c e i pte d b i ll or i nvoic e is not obtaina b le , the disbursement shall be supported by an itemized list of the items purchased and the list shall be approve d by an official o f the Ope rating Age ncy other than the custodian of the fund. Th e Pe tty Cash fund shall b e repl e nishe d at the end of each calendar quar ter or as f r e que ntly a s may othe rwise b e requir e d. - 9- �ELIGIBLE AND INELIGIBLE COSTS All cost must be reasonable and of a nature which clearly relates to the specific purposes and end product of the contract under which the . services are being performed. Care must be exercised by all concerned in incurring costs to assure that expenditures conform to these general standards and the following criteria for eligibility of costs. 1. To be eligible for inclusion in the program, cost must: a. Be necessary and reasonable for proper and efficient execution of the contractual requirements and in accordance with the approved budget. b. Not. be a general expense required to carry out regular responsibilities of the operating agency. c. B.e in conformance with any limitations or exclusions in these instructions, federal laws, city ordinances, or other governing limitations. d. Be no more liberal than policies, procedures, and practices applied uniformly to both federally assisted and other activities of the operating agency. e. Be accorded consistent treatment through application of accounting policy and procedures approved and/or prescribed herein. f. Not be allocable to or included as a cost of any other federally financed program in either prior or current periods. g. Be net of all applicable credits such as purchase discounts, rebates or allowances, sales of publication or materials , or other income or refunds. h. Be in accordance with budgetary or other restriction of e x penses established by the comprehensive Demonstration Agency (City of Atlanta) and approved by the Department of Housing and Urban Department. i. Be fully documented. .. - 10- �j. 2. Comply with polic i es governing administrative practices, including po l ic i es with respect to employment, salary and wage r a t e s, working hours, and hol idays, f r inge benefits (health and hopitalization insurance, retirement, etc.) vacation and sick leave privileges, and travel. The policies relating to the above must be in writing and appr oved by the governing body of the Agency, or Director, as authorized, as well as by the City. Such pol i cies and pra ctice s should t a ke account of situations where theoperating agency is a temporary, non-governmental entity composes primarily of part-time staff wh i ch may have full-time employment elsewhere. In add i tion to costs inel i gible under the above ceriteria, t he follow i ng costs a re speci fic a lly ine ligible: a. Accounting- Costs of maintaining central accounting records necessary for overall agency purposes, such as appropriat ion of f und a ccounts by the tre asurer or similar o ff icia l, are cons i d ered to be a general exp e n se of the a ge ncy a nd a re una llowable. However, the cost of esta blishing and mainta ining accounting or other informa tion sys tems required for the management of the contract is al l owable. This includes cos ts incurred b y c e ntral service agenc i e s f or t h ese purpo se s. b. Bad Debts- Any losses arising from uncollectable accounts and other claims, and related costs. c. Contin genc ies. Contribu tions t o a con tingency reserv e or any simi l ar provision for un f o rseen e v ents . d. Contribut i ons and Donations . e. Entertainmen t. Cos t s o f amus e me nt s , s ocia l activities, and incidental c o sts, such as meals beverages, lodgings, and gratuities, relating to enter t a inment. f. F i nes and Penalties. Costs resu lting fr om vio lation o f or fai l ure to c omply with federal, state, and l o cal laws and regulations. g. I nte r es t a nd o t h e r F i n a n c i a l Costs . Interes t on borrowing (h owe ver represented ) , cost of financing and refinancing operations, and legal and professional fees p a id in conne ction therewith. - 11- �h. Legal expenses. Legal expenses for the prosecution of claims against the Federal Government. However, the costs of legal expenses required directly for the administration of the program are allowable. i. Membership Expenses. Cost of membership in an organization which devotes a substantial part of its activities to influencing legislation. j. Travel. Costs in excess .of those allowed by the City of Atlanta for its equivalent employees. In a case, the difference in cost between first-class air accomodations and less-than-first-class air accomodations is not allowed expect when less-than-first-class air accomodations are not available and is so documented. k. Meeting Attendance. Costs of attending meetings which are not open for attendance on a non-segreated basis. 1. Executive Expenses~ The salary and expenses of the chief executive officer of the agency are considered a cost of the agency and are not allocable in any way to the project or activity. - 12 - �.' INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETION OF .MONTHLY AD.MINISTERING AGENCY PROJECT REPORTS This report is to be delivered to .Model Cities prior to the fifth day of the month following the reporting month. This deadline is imperative in order to report expenditures to HUD. J. The heading of this report includes lines for Agency Name and Address, Project Name, and .P roject Number. The Reporting Period i tern should reflect beginning and ending dates (usually first to last of month) of the report. The Cum. Supplemental Expenditures item should contain a total of all funds designated supplemental which have been expended 9n the project to date. The Cash Received item refers to supplemental funds that have been deposited to. your agency. The Balance item should reflect the amount of supplemental funds expended but not yet received by your agency. The Cost Statement section of the report is a breakdown of expenditures by line item and by source of funds. For projects which receive supplemental funds, costs for each line item for the Current Period should be listed. These should be broken down between Supplemental funds and Other funds if the project or activity is jointly funded. For projects t hat do not involve the use o f .Model Cities supplemental funds, it is requested ~hat a total amount e x pended on the p r oject for the curr e nt period be entered by line item 13 (non-con= tracted agency). Under the Cumrnulative Total column, funds expended to date on the project should be broken down in the same manner as current period e x penditures. The Wo r k Program Status section of the Administerin g Agency Pr oject Report is d e signed to report ag a inst the Project Work Program whi ch was-.. f ormul a t e d by y our a gency in cooperation with Mode l Citie s Pe rsonnel . Each month the various task s listed on the wo r k program should be a n a lyzed to determine if they are being started and comp leted in the planne d time frame . Any t asks which will have different s t a r t and complete dates s h oul d be lis ted u n der the "Description of Task " c olumn o f t h e a g ency p r oj e ct report. Th e applic able r e v ised sta r t a n d c ompl e te dat es s h ould t h e n be e n t e red i n the r epo r ting month , t hat t ask s houl d be entered under th e "De sc r iption of Task" col umn an d the actual complete date shown . - 13- �Start or complete dates for a task wili be considered on schedule if they are within three weeks of the originally planned time frame. A variance of more than three weeks in a task should be reported as described above. Every effort should be made to report time revisions as soon as they become evident. For example, if it becomes apparent that some operational phase of a project will be delayed due to problems in acquiring equipment, this should be reported as soon as it is known rather than at the time the operational phase is to begin. The Project Highlights section of the report should be used to briefly summarize project activity for the month and to list any unusual cirsumstances concerning the project. Amplifying information about revised start or complete dates should also be given in this section. An example of a completed Administering Agency Project Report follows these instructions. ( - 14- �ADMINISTERI NG AGENCY PROJECT RE'PORT \ Georgia State Em2loyment S~;i;:vic!; PROJECT_ Emplo¥er Ser~d ces No. 1 Peachtree Room 4 08 Atlantat Georgia 30301 NUMBER IQ 2 2 AGENCY ADDRESS I I ol I CUM . SUPPLEMENT AL EXPENDITURES REPORT I NG PERIOD: FROM 8/1/69 TO 8/31/69 $30,000 CODE PERSONNEL 01 I CONSULT ANTS, CONT SERV 02 TRAVEL 03 SPACE · 04· CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES 05 RENT, LEASE, PURCH EQP 06 OTHER 07 PROPERTY ACQUISITION 08 LAND IMPROVEMENTS 09 CONSTRUCTION 10 PROFESSIONAL SERV 11 CARRYING CHARGES 12 NON-CONTRACTED AGENCY 13 SUPPLEMENTAL OTHER ·s. ooo 10 000 -0- 1,000 1,500 300 500 $ 5. 1,000 CUMMULATIVE TOTAL . SUPPLEMENT Al 20.000 2,000 OTHER 1o onn 1 000 4,000 2 ·: 000 ~~'": ;r~- · :·...~ -~ ~..-;~::;;::->' " .--~"~:-::~: "~~• ~::- . '.". 12,300 7,000 ( WORK PROGRAM STATUS DESCRIPTION OF TASK 000 3.L 000 l 000 ... • TOTAL BALANCE $25,000 CURRENT PERIOD COST ST ATEMENT COST CATEGORY CASH RECEIVED ACTUAL COMPLETE Occupy temporary facility 06 30,000 13,000 REVISED COMPLETE REVISED START 9/8/69 Establish contact with 66 employers in MNA 10/6/69 Acquire supplies 8/15/69 Personnel o rienta tion 8/20/69 9/19/69 4/30/70 - PROJECT HIGHLIGH'rS: Dur ing the month o f August project personnel were given orienta tion sessions concerning project tasks and obj ectives. All supplies have been purchased, but oc cupation of the temporary fa cility is being delay ed due to a carpenter's strike . This delay will als o delay establishing contacts with employers. Sample inquiries to emplo yers have produced enthusiastic responses a n d it appears that the project will e x ceed its objective of develo ping 2 00 jobs . (USE REVERSE, IF REQUIRED) THE UND ERSI GNED CERl lF IES THAT TH E ABOVE INFORMATION IS CORRECT . SIGNATU RE AND TI TLE · (FORM MOD. 9) r/4_,n (; <,f ,n:11f f-J tJ. //J C. C. ~2 I J/ - 1 5- DATE SeEt • 2, 1969-" �c T _T o_~ /{· .- October 7, 1969 OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM 673 Capitol Avenue, S.W. Atlanta, Ga . 30315 (404) 577 -5200 Ivan Allen Jr., Mayor J. C. Johnson, Director Dr. John W. Letson Superintendent Atlanta Public Schools 224 Central Avenue, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 RE: Requested Contract Revisions and Disposition Dear Dr. Letson: The contract betwe e n the Atlanta Board of Education (Agency) and the City of Atlanta (CDA) state s that the Agency must have prior approval by the CDA on any shift of funds that significantly changes the approved program and/or exceeds 10% of the line item total from which the funds are being removed or to which added. The following state ments _indic ~te the action taken by the CDA with regards to the revisions requested by the Atlanta Board of Education. The CDA does not ~pprove the proposed changes in projects ED-005N and ED-041C. It was proposed that $30,000 be shifted from ED-005N to ED-041C. The approved original budgets are attached herein. We are happy to know that only t wo temporary units will be required thereby reflecting a savings of $30,000. The CDA approves the proposed changes on project ED-020C, but with some modification. Th e shi ft of funds proposed b y the Agency involved $4;ooo being shifted from personnel, with $3,000 added to consumable supplies and $1,000 added to equipment. Inasmuch as this proposed change could not be adequate to meet present equipment expenditures (as indicated by Age ncy's August Project Report), CDA proposes that $1,374 be shifted to equipment with $2,626 going to consumable supplies. This change does not effect the total cost of the project. This approved budget is included herein. �Dr. John W. Letson Page Two October 7, 1969 The CDA approves the proposed c hanges in project ED-021C. This involves removing $5,978 fro m personn el and adding $4,738 for instructional equipment costs, $40 0 for office equipment, and $840 for mileage. Also, the number of lead teachers is reduced from eight to seven in order to create the position of Model Cities Coordinator. These changes do not affect the total cost of the project. The approved budget is included herein. With rega.rds to the proposed changes in project ED-022C, the CDA app:c oves the additi·on of three · teacher aides. However, the CDA does not approve the adding of $1,620 to travel. The funds are to :remain in personnel. The CDA appr9ves the adding of $396 for tel ,=phone service. Telephone service is included in the space cost line item. These changes do not affect the overall total the total cost of the project. The approved budget is included her1=in. The CDA approves the changes in project ED-024N. The number of Extended Day Programs is reduced from five to four, and consultants and contract services will be covered by In-Service Training funds. These changes allows $49,287 to be removed and to be allocated as follows: $16,500 added to food; $12,543 added for labor; $6,649 added for custodial services; $2,000 added for consumable s upplies; $4,000 added for equipment; $6,768 added for three additional teachers aid e s; $584 for telephone services; and $243 added to trave l. The approved budget with costs in the appropriate line items is includ ed here in. The CDA approves the changes in pr oj ect ED-025N. It was proposed to r educe the number of pre-school progr ams from nine to eight. This allows additional fund s to be used for food, labor for food preparation, equipment, custodi a l serv ices, field trips, and substitute teacher aides. These changes only involve the shifting of funds and does not a l ter the total cost of the project. The approved budget with costs i n the appropriate line items is included herein. The CDA approves the proposed changes in project ED-039N. These changes include removing $14,813 from personnel, and distributed as follows: Consultants and Contract Services, $3,000; Travel, $2,000; Consumable Supplies, $3,500; Rental, Lease, Purchase of Equipment, $6,000; Custodia l Services, $813. The approved budget with costs in the appropriate line items is included herein. �Dr. John w. Letson Page Three October 7, 1969 The attached budgets control al l future authorized revisions. expenditures specified as We a.re encouraged to k now t hat m-ny staff p ositions were overbudgeted and will reflect considerable savings. ~'--:,:°'-v'<::d'-""= Jo __,i{t ,. C. Exe cutive vlc cc: / Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Model Cities Executive Board Members ( �I !/ .,-,ii,. ! ,, MODEL CITIES BOARD TRAINING PROGRAM University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Guerry Center August 9, 1969 Welcome Dr. William H. Masterson, Chancellor University of Tennessee at Chattanoog a Introduction of Guests Mr. Roy Batchelor, Dir e ctor Urban Affairs University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Overview-Model Cities Training Program Dr. Charles Hyder, Dir ector Model Citie s Training Program Dr. Rob e rt W e lch Model Cities Training Prog ram Int roduction of Consultant Dr. John Dye r Fed er al Pro g r am C o ordinator and Acting Dire c tor Chattan o o ga Model Cities Addre ss M r . Dan S weatt Chief A d minis t rative Officer City o f Atlanta AGENDA 9:45. . Model Neighborhood Area Representatives ... Betty Blocker Lounge 9 : 45 .. Non - Mode l N e ighborhood Area R e presenta tives .. Conference Room 10: 30 . ...•• . . . . . . . . . .. Coffee Break ... . ..•. . . . ...•.... Snack Bar 10:45 ..•......•.... Simulation Exercise ......•.... Conference Room #1 �STATEMENT OF ·MAYOR BENDER ON MODEL CITIES PROGRAM August 1, 1969 The Model cities Program is a cooperative effort among the Federal Government, State Government, the City Government and the residents who live in the Model Neighborhood Area. As such, the specific program designed to correct the problems in the Model Neighborhood Area will be a product of the cooperative effort of all those involved. On August 2nd, the 25 members of the CDA Board who will represent the citizens of the Model Neighborhood Area will be· elected. Every resident of the Area should plan to vote in his district at one of the polling places listed below. ( Never has ' an election been held in this Area which affe~ted the liv~s of its residents more directly and significantly than will this one. In order to vote in the election, residents must be registered with the Model Cities Program. Registration has been conducted (1) house-to - house in the Model Neighborhood, · (2) at the centers listed below during Ju_ly and, (3) at the Moclel Cities Office, 1418 Mccallie Avenue between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5 : 00 p . m. for the past month. As of July 30, 1969, the following numbers of people had registered. �., PAGE TWO DISTRICT I 655 DISTRICT II 592 DISTRICT III 1302 DISTRICT IV 380 DISTRICT V 564 ...... .·.• ·--· DISTRICT VI 537 I DISTRICT VII 1066 TOTAL REGISTERED VOTERS 5096 It is estimated t h a t is registered to vot e ~ 70% o f the MNA population o ver 18 In other Model Citie s around the country the leve l of r es i dent p articipa tion h as ave r a ged 10% to 15%. ( Votin g will b e on Augu st 2, 196 9 f r om 9 :00 a .m . u nt il 9:00 p.m. at the following place s which a re shown on the a tt a che d ma p .0 District District District ·Dist ri c t Distr i ct District District 1 11 111 lV V Vl Vll East Area Neighborhood Service Center Bo one-Hysinge r Community Center Avonda le Community Center Carv er Commun i ty Ce n ter Carv er Commun ity Center Orch ard Knob El ementary School Orch ard Knob Jr. High School One key to the success of the Model cities Program is the direct participation of the citi zen s of the Mode l Ne ighborhood Ar e a. The f a ct is that the Mode l Citie s Program c a nnot succeed without the p articipa tion of a significant numbe r of the r e sidents o f the MNA. I wa n t t o u rge e a c h a nd e v e ry v oter reg i s t ered to p artic i pate i n �PAGE THREE the Modelcities Program to vote on August 2, 1969 at the appropriat~ voting place. ( -- �' ell5T // R1:/f X ~ ,1,"E;Ht.3Vf-i'/{C> 01J APh:.. 1NG. Sr. sc1-;/1'1CC CENTt:k C-f!STl?ICT I I~ , IC) .l>!5T/?ICT' :i:, ~ . ~ ~ JI. ~ !~ I · I I(w1Lcox r!NKER St. /'11/L,VE . IV clli'<: J'-f/lli'L> k,vc tj /IV'": sr ___ 2_ ~!STRICT 1 /II. ,,- ti / Oit. 4NJ) P1~1?1< A 1·'£ . ];);STRICT yr . L ~ ~ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _A_1_=...;C __ /?_'-_L_1_£_-___ A_V._=L-- - - - - - - - - -_j �----o-r-J Ile~.J,., U}p.JI riJrvl J,u ,-1<. (!) ~(e 0 -f L 7i ~,.JS. L , /.'i., · vC 5 c- t y- .,, v-J,i! ke i,,.r/o~ i)e 5 ev,. Z.,__ I - -r-re> /;---11143.215.248.55,,J.J..,;., .,. /t + t c.,A-c/ s Q I jJ ,-ye .A~ ~ fl<..143.215.248.55 15:39, 29 December 2017 (EST) _; - Q._,, eCo J,.,.J-- -Ct_1 7 - /J t '-~) Jhw u.f .. ·w'-<--f1cf.'Y I~ _:.,-,-~ p.rr- I 5 r IV v o rv<'_r CvJ tv' ( _ ~ ~~<7 . ,,,,/ - cl~~ 41, ks<# n:._Q,--s\ /',,_,-'7 ~ - "·r/> 0 ~ - ) ~~ ( - Jy0 / ov-4' ~ ?-- Ct s -- /iv w L~ 5 Jv cd c/--.T_ ~ ~cJ;) + ~ o _,,Ju c1 ; 1 ( (; ,, __[~ (er-- < r-- h,.,-* ~ / - J1-e r-- J,u s S/o,Al ~ rJ ( '/- 0 ,-J Ii- cJ ~ . 1-- Je,tl Bctrc1: 5/--ec-lr- ~ ____ .--,/ /Yv fr-1 )-) ' �V(' l) '~L GJ.'P[ 1~3 T fi 'i IJ,,lJ 1·c l'l"lOGl·{Af: Tile 1-J, ,d.P.l CH,j0s 'I'r.cJ.inin _: Progr am - Thr-: fir st of :its kind in the country is , Lf"n ( l Cl) scs:d. l,r i )Jl c n1 1:·si" to be conduct e d in sc ,n:i.n:ir fo_rm undP. r th() dircc tion l:r llnb1c1·si Ly o f Ten nessee at Cb.:iLto.noo L:.:i . Th e m:.1jor objc,cl.ivP. of the Mode l Ci.ties Tr;)fn::n ~~ l'rc1:_1;r:1in is the en:1b l em8nt of the fifty mr:imb r~ rs of t :1 c C.D.A. i.~0:1~'G or- 11:;__r ect1"rs b-0 -f -L111,Jtion c1s a cohes ive arlminlstrat ive body ,1h:i.l~ s imnlt=meous ly · c1:c , 11r·1,::;i: :.:; t h e dtt.ci.i.n.,1.ent'. nr r':)t ~ntion of indiviciu.1.l .i.dentity w~th t ho se va rious spo rw0rin r,; :~rL;u r--c Fh0m :i.t is the board mc;1'.1bers I r e sponsi.hlity to repr1:;scnt. This objed:ive can best be ach i.. eved by en.J.b line :,h e participants to: 1. acquire knowJ.erl Ge of the actual structur e of thA Model Cities organization and the objectives of the progr am . 2. ·deve lop an aw3.reness of the decision-makini::; proces s in tr:-rms of s e l e ct i r.G acc eptable alternativ ~s to recogni zed problems confronti~c the CDA Board. 3. Establish.i.ng and . maint,ainin g an orga nizationc1l esprit I de corps' which on one hand wil l enable each CDA H.oard. par t i cipant t o mafot3.in his id entity and . t ies wit9i.n _his own spher e of the community , and yet permit hj~'ll to Inr'.lke decisi:ms b ased on a tot-3. l committ me nt to an Jv erall achievement of the organizatiana l goals o · Th i.s s eries of s eminars uti liz in_, c onsult::i.nts , applyin1:; dynamic a;1d inno 1i:1.ti.v~ ed ctcati on'l l techniqu~s , and jnvolving expertise from as many perti :-1':=nt s nJ rc r.:; 3.s a r e availab l e is, like th e Mode l Cj_ t,ies Program i t se l f , a de;--:onstr 3.ti0n rroj ect. !lec.1.use thP. re i s l ittl,~ nat ·l on;:i. l experie nce in train iri;:; prograns Sllch as the onr:; d esc!"ibed, the emphasis in th e Chattanooca progr,:11,1 wi l l be on experi.r:,ent ati:rn anrl i:'1.:10vati,, n. As mie ht be expected of an expe rimenta l undert.1kin~ , it :vill be subjcc ~ to reiular ob servati on, monitorine, and evaluation of its effectiveness in terr.;s of the goals it seeks to fulfill. It should be understood that this �{2) co:1 ti :n:nu[, ev:tlu-:itivc p' oces" is o. tcsLin;; proc:<'ss or thP. tr;i:i.,dn _~ pr0:.:;r·1m and it.s shfr, a~ 1,e ll i .c; of th0 p:1rti.r.ip,1. n~s . 'fl1c: l':i.rsL :.;cs s i on or. the program will lllf':'ct Saturchy, J\uc11st 9, 19(.9, ~t the camp1s- 0r ll.T.C. rts • • ~ n.1.ne c onsccut,1.v c ,;;,. , tur,:.1.i ;_ws. w:i.11 the followin 1~ n:he sessi,Jn:::\ 'm the follo','l' i nG A suJ~estnd strucLure and cont e nt of e~ch se ss i on is found :in Appendices I thru X. s t,1·t1c t\ire the E·.J.ch consult:i.nt, however, may modiry or re- seminar to achieve the objectives as outlined. F11nd:Ln 6 .f0r th i.s t.rainini proi;ram has been secured under thP. · provisions of Ti.t.lP. 1 of the B:i_::her Education Act from the Department of He;iltn, Eduea tion .inrl '.·!9 1f,1 r? ; Ins t.i. Lu l;ional monies of U. T .c.; and funds from the 1fodel Cities Phnnir![; '}rant. The cxpectat.i.on is th at t.he e ~~pe rience and inf.'ormation derived fro;,1 the pro ~ram will c 0nt.ribute siz;nific.:i.ntly to the effectiveness of the C.D. A. B02 ::--d as a de cis i ve administrative body. It is hoped, · also , that from this .ModP.l Citi e s Training Pro ~ram th e re will emer;:;e a ,body of knowledge and experi ence which will be of value not only in Chatta nooga, but. in other cities ·, as v:e ll. �(J) t.lic- .:it,n:t.." .:ind HiJli.n:~ness of the C.D.A. Doard to disc har;;c e ffccL:i.v ely its res ~,0n s:i.bil i ty as chi.8 f ar.lriiin:i.Rt.ra t. i.ve body of th<: Ch-1t k rno 0,;a Model Citie s Progran. As adrninistrator:s who are. responsibJ.e for the pl;:i.nnin;:; and jm;_;l~rirmt:i.tion of th e L;it1l Model Ci. ti.es Pro,:;ram, CDA Board · rneinbe:rs must be sufficientl:-{ eci1J:i.pped · ( 1) ~d.th the necess,'.lr,Y ski lls, tools, and informati.on r c J..citP.d to all aspects of the l~d~l Cities Program; ( 2) with 3n understanding of the Mod el CitieR Pro~r a m and its rebt. ions li:i.p to city i;overnment ;ind other agencies in the urban are --both privc1te and pubhc; and (3 ) with methodoke;y anr.l dynamics of decision-mak inr:;. To this enrl, thP. Mod e l Cities Tra inj_n~ and Orienta ti:m Seminar Proc;ra.~ is d8si_:;ned.: 1. To insure th a t the C.D.A. Board members will be a1-1are of - their roles in the Model CiL:i.es Proir a m. 2. To provide C.D. A. Board mPmbe r s wi t-,h si.1fficient and relevant information c oncerni nc th~ Mod el Ci.ties conc ept a nd m~thort . 3. To insure tha t C.D.A. Board members a re fami liar with the ~:odcl Citi,;,s structure , bo t h na tiona lly and loca l ly o L. To provide C.D.A. Board members witA pertinent data concerning the Hud ~ui?eli ne s as related to the Model Cities Program. 5. To provide G.D.~. Board mP.~bers with r e l evant informaL ion concernine s peci fi c problAms rind program areas t o b e dealt with in the :fod el Neighborhood area. Furtr1P.r, this · proc;ram is de sir;ned to foster competency and sound judgement on the part. of the Board member.s by provirHng them with training cxcercises ar.d experiences i n problem-solv ing _and d ec ision-makin~. No Board wi th a members hip so v~ried as that of the C.D.Ao Board ~an effectively discharge its duties and �t.he inLcnt of t hi s pr o 1;ram Lo provide structured experiences for the fifty partici- r'.::l.t:in,; CDA Boal'd mE'n:be rs- - memhe rs with va r:i. P-d backcrounds, w5.de r a ng e s · of e xperiences, di.ff erent lev e ls or· edllcational attainme nt, anri diverse interc sts --wh ich ·t1ill P 1nble the iJo.Jrcl to function as a colwsive nnit with mutual interests and c or.,r:i.o n t~rnls; on P dedicated. to . salving the problems of the Model Nei~hborhood and its r0. op l e e �'.vlii lr t.he1'f' is 11,:i st.:ip('tir-l or othr-r Corm of' comr, 0 nsaLion for ~ tt, cnd jn~ thc:.;e l r :1in; i\~ ~rn tl •:iric-rnt:i.t,i ., n sctnin:1rs , U1r.rc i : =, ovailablc -for all members [':inon ci':11 as :..ds k1nr.c jn \.11 0. f' orm wlri 18 ,U.cnd itt :'; L} 1e0 r or r :1y 1~cnts or r .e iinb1ir seme nLs for all f'Xpcnses iw~1 1rrPd ·- c, 10 sessi.,1rn:i. , If you spencJ · or ne0 d any m.-rni..es for ci1ilr:l-c-:1.r t.r:111s rort.-1 t.i,, n, f :1od , or los e money Cor be.ing. off your j o b, you n.1ay qua lify for fjn =i.nc:i al assj_st-,nr.0 . As a memb er of the C.D.A. Board y ou are r e nde rir. 3 to the ci tizcns or Lllis comnnmi ty a V;) lu.:i. hle s e rv i ce; thus you should not be pena lize d f:ir..1.ncially in connP.c tion with your services on the C.D .A. Board. A simple voucher will be provid ed at each s ession. Simply list the expenses ir.c urr~d by Y·"ll. a nd bring, send, or mail to the Mode l Cities· Office at ll.il8 Mccallie Avenue . �If (0 Cl'f'J :3·;- t.! i '/\l/'l' 1 C 1 1'f\Tf 1)t! •\N D T~CIWJCJ\L /\SSTS'i'llf.JGii.: 1nrl thC:' as:~11 r t, inn which c,ntrihuLcG rnosL Lo jJ,s · uniciue chri.r::1ct0r is th0 uc1i.cf l.!~:..t ;11.1 .xi 1:w,11 hrr10ril·, c.1n be rlr.rived nn1;y ,,lien thrr P. :ls m;:i_;d.rnum p1.rticipaU.0n in pl·rnnin,~, rolicy fn.rnnVinn, :.nrl i.mplemental.ion by those v1l1ose li.vcs a:vj fut1iros ,d 11 b e 1 r· r Pctr.d I,~, t.lJP· pro;;ro.m. One of t.hc b-,sic el8m0ntc.; ot' an honest invit:ition for citizen particip-1.ti.::>n is th0. orfer 0·f t0.ch1Yic:1l astdRtance to the citiz e ns; the failure to provide s uch ~:.3s :l s L:t:-:c c ,-101,l i r~nrler th r: concept or genu1ne nei 2:hborhood involvement mea n i n;; l-=ss, since ther0. c~n he no partner~l1ir, ~r inv olvement, wh~n one of the parties l ack s the t? chn ic1l ~xpertis e to make informed judgements. In City Dein:-ins t,ration Asency Letter No. 3, October JO, 1967, the :!:lep3.rtment of :{ousi n_; an ci Urban D~velopme nt established performance standards for citiz en p~rt ic i pat i0n in the Mod~l Cities Program . Amon~ the major points contained in these standard s is that of technical assistance: ••••• The structure must ha ve the technical capacity for n,3.kin 0 kno1,,ledGeahle decisions~ ••• Some form of professional tech nical asEistnnc·e in a m;:inner agre e d to by neiehborhood resid e nts shall be provided." ) .... - �I (7) ,",1) ~) ~'.L CJT1 r,:.s C:lf'lr :U.'l .l 'l'Y Dl~l/l~Lij l'Nfi:N T ADIUi·JIS'l'iL'\'T'JON 130!\itD UflJ". NThTJ UN S,•~['JJNI\R. 1. An Ovrrview of Mode l Citi0s A. · Ilistory of Hodel Cities Proera m, ~J:iti.nnal and Local B. Phil6sopl)y of Moclcl Cities !'roGram C. llud guidelines ,1 ncl pcrfor 11:.:ince st0ndards D. The D~r1 ·nstr;1 t,ion CiLies .cind i"lctropolitan Develo pment Act of Aur,ust 16 1. Bo3.rd Decision Ha kine - Theory and Pr,ictice A~ Value a nd fact in decision making B H.esprinsibility, Res ponsivene s s, and Autl;ority 0 C. Au gust 23 1. A. Role . of loc~l Go vern ment B. Role of CDA Board D. 1. "The Hidden Agenda" Organiz a tion of the Nodel City' Program in Chatt;} r.ooga ·c. August JO 1966, as amended Role of nthPr agenctes Role of citi ze ns The Model Cities Planning Year A. Plan submission r equ ir ement.a B. Role of Model Citi8s sta ff Co 1/.ole of CD/\ Board Do Role of Citiz ~n part i eiration structure ~- Problem ana l ysis Fo Goals ci.nd obj ectives G. Priorities Ho Bud get in~ �( H) J.. i:,,1Jc l City 1'l:u111j n~ G0nccyt.s ,md Approaches B. Proc0.rl11r.:i.l l.'lann:in:_'; C. Fxe cu tory l'l .1 nni"ri[: 11. P lnn n:i.n s .'mr.l rPv:i. ew in the pr ') r,ess of c )n: posite d0c:i.sion-ma kin e 3c-;:itcmber 13 1. T!Je I'-'!i:H:lcl Citfos Five Year fimrncinl Plan A. The "Uem'. mstr;:i Li ·,n 11 concr-pt B. What is rneri.nt ~JY the s t nt ement: "The pro[:;r&rn f,h01Jld 1r.ake a substantial imp1 ct on L he _:h~rsical, P.conornic, and s ocial problems in the Viodel Nei~h bo.rhood /\rea." C ThP role of D. The role .•f the CDA Bo:,rd ~. Technic a l assist~nce arr~r.ir~ents F. Pos: ible st:r;-uct 1:rir.g ar:ranger.cn ts 0 Se ~t ember 20 1. the Model Cititts staff R')le nf Boa rd, St;:iPf, Citizens ~articipaLion Street ·re, and Te chnic-31 '\ssi.stance in Model CHies Se t·tei nber 27 I • 1. .q,. 1'\ r ..- as in which ::i Esist.:Jnce riay be called B. K; nds ':->.f a['SistP.nce av;:i ih ble c. Mechanics of r e:L nburs ement of te~hn ic:a l assis t2nt s D. R.c>as m f o r r rovision of assist'Jnce 0 Tr1e Firc- t YPar Acti ..,n Pro,::;ram A. l·'roe;ram De velo_p]llenL B. Prrigr-'.lm rfa n::t ~€' ment c. Progn.01 fvionitorinG D. i'ro 1:ra m 'Sva l1iaU. .- :i n �(?) C. It(-'] a t-,i 'llship r,f each ;_ ,rogram to Morl e l Ci tj_es .0.., .~.Tlie me r. h.'.:l ni cs of f8r:l rc: ra 1 ,::irograms - plo nnin 'i, progri1rnmin~, fundinc, iniplcrnent.:iti·m 1. l'robJ.em .Solvin:; and Group Interaction A. Hr.spect for the or;inion of others D. Se>nsitivi ty t,o the needs anr:l lim:i.tati0ns o.f otters c. Str.er technic;:,.l o.s::: istanceo For each S.J.tt:rday ' s seminars a special are cor.sult=1.nt ~;ill h e r e ta ine cl and he ui 11 be at l ·Jb er Ly to aria.pt the format t o J-;j s r.E'cis s i.n~~ !'-11:' ~·rill be in char::;e of tha t day I s pro Gram. �(J J.) pro,~rarn, a bta:i.kci ., ct.iv.tty Gche dulc 1vi 11 br: wrjttr:-n f or tr:c rlJ.y c:.ncl s1.11-J'ri:i.tted to bo.'.l.rd !:;01111':~rs .'.l. t. lo,::i.s t. a week in arlvancc for their c oncurrci:c:e o �(12) EV/\LU/\.TION An es, ent.bl clc11:ent of the or:i.0ntation pro 0 rarn i.s the process by · 1-:l:frh :i.t. j_[.; cv:tlt1~ted 0 Apart from the obvious 1.Jener.its •J I: such an evJ.luative i-=rt)c~ss t o tl:8 .r-rog r :un itself and to. its participo.nts, is th~it Gu.ch a i='l' )cess will driubt,l.0ss be a dck·rn-inin 0 factor in th0 .fc.J.sibility of thA 11s"' of sur.!i 3 prot;1'<1lll cls 0.•-1!-iPre. Arsas tn bo cvciluatPd :i.re: (1 ) attitnclinal change s amone ' the rar ticip~~ts ; (2) r0tention and scope of factual materials presented ; and (J ) procress in the arc~s of d~cision-making and problem- solvinG• It, is f8lt that cv.il113.tions .sh-,uld tc1.ke place at_ the beginning of the pro~ra!1, a t, the t~rmina tion of the pro::;rn.m and as often durinc the pro~ram as is felt necessary. �(l) Al '1 -~~ ~1DIX I 8: JO-S1: .15 CD/1 ;Jo1r:.l me -•l:,s Special Are a ConsuHant. 9:L15-ll) : J0 Vil'JA ::irid Cnnsultc1nt. 9: L5-10: JO Non-t·:IJA rnembers · and ConsuJ.tanto Sach e: roup u:i.11 0.lect le.:ide:r to act as chair;nan and member to ;:crve as r e cor i:kr and/or fcp,YrLcro Sessions will be !:,aped , both HW\ ,1.nri Non-rZ·:A _:1·oups ·d ll he rli.scus sion seminar s 1. th t1-1 0-f0ld purpose: To enablr. part tcipants to partic:i.pa te in some: dee Lsi0n 1::ak:i.n; or proc?f>s in terms 2. wj orcanizati on- ·:>.10.cti,)n o: chairman and recnr rter. To discuss t.he implica ti.on of the consultant I s morn:~n~ present:itinn ·in terms of the 11 50 11 and what eff8ct the croup could have on the Grea ter C}ic1U a noo:;a- 11 Thi.nk Tank" for what conld take place t.hrou;h 1975. · 10:J0-10:~5 Coffee Dreak. l0: L.::-11:15 .Simul:.il:,i :m ".:;;.;:crcisc basect on weekly format-Leo, a pic:torici.l . rep rese:nt,:d;i-)n of a philiso phy expressing opposition to th-3 need for a ~'.od:; l Cities Pro:·;ro.m i.ri Chattanooca o This will alss, be structl1red to s erve as a catal;;st for a sensitivity exercise. 1::.:15-12 :30 F'ive s ma ll discussion broups will be formed-leaders and recorders will be elP.cted by each group. Tapes provided fo r some --Vi deo Tapes of othe rs. Discussion will proceed on the basis of attcmptin::; to formu l ate 3.n acc e;:-ta~le decis t0n C'Jncernin;; the nature of the pictorial pres e ntation. .1 :ember shi;;-, wi ll rc r.1ain the same for first five session-then r ar. d0r:1 s e l e ction o: :ive n e ,v croups o Iloarr:l m~r.ibcrn will re :orm as- CDA Board duri;--i,; last 20 mi:,ut c~ of t h~ proJram o Brief report fro m each group chairman or record er. ' .e:r.a-5:icer �(2 ) I. L)f rc1·j :)Ll srcnt i11 olrl:,.:t:in:int; the co11scn0u s o.f the .'.lC'. l~cpt,tbl,~ t.o the :_;roup. 11 )0" in tcn.1::; of.' d cc isi:m(s) �(J) APl ';.i;NDI X JI CD!\ Doard and Cc111sultan~,. 8:JL)-9:.':; 9:)1S:-l'.J:J0 tJi ;A i3 oarcl ancl ConsuJ.ta nt. 9: 1_:~-' -10 :J0 Non-NtL\ Doani .cind Consultant. T1-10 _;rou~)S me e L independent-~,, ele ct chairmcm a nd recorder s , disc uss H:C'ir un:iq11e role as individuals in the total ctedision-makint_; structuri: ,v of th i::- CDA Bna1·d. cr i tique or Hep-'Jrts of chairmen of the tuo ~rou ps, Discussion and the reports in terms of total interaction of the participants. 10:J0-10 :L5 Coffee Dreak. 10:L5-ll:15 Sj_intilatbn Exercise. Role l'l;:iyjn 1_; --~rnrc1se designed to enhance the authoritorive structlcre of an or~anizatinn in terms of decision-making. ll:;15-12:J0 Five Reports--CDA. Boa rd structures a model for interactbn based on principles acceptable to the total Boardo · �8: J0-9: /15 CD/\ Doard meets Special Consult.:tnt. 9: !,5-l'.1: JO i'iJ.JA and Consult.ant. 9:LiS-l·J:J0 ~:on-l'-,NI\ me mbers. ElFcti•m of cliairm:in .:incl recorckr. Discussion seminar·s for Loth 2roups~ . . Two-fold purpose: 1. To participate in decision making process by clcctin.; .chair:nan. 2. To disc11ss an issue as unique to the 1;roups,ioe.; the l•l}JA mer.ibe rs and the effort of non-participation in decision-:n.aking in the Chattnnoo 0a City Goverrunent--the Non-MNA membGrs anr:1 the d (: sirability of bcin:.:; in a position to effect a decisi0n with the city goverruni:; nt. l0:JO-lO:)i5 Cof.fco Brea ko 10: L5-ll: 15 S:i.mulation Exercise. Role playin[; by selectccl r;r ciup. "i iilit::?.nt Citiz ens"--a confrontation between a' group of citiz e ns ;ind ' . i n~trl r->qua t P. police protection or n.n inadequa t") schoQl cur :-- .i.c 11lu..'n. Problem based on -Zcono:, ics--I-fow to cope wi"t.h sec11rine enployment. 11:15-12:JO Five discussion groups--ele ct leader and r e corder. Disc uss acceptable solution to the problPm pres e nted. ques tion pe r i od. wi ll b e mad e Simula tors ava ilable for Report of the r e c ord ers to the full CDA Board . An at tempt to obtain a cons e nsus of opinion as to the be tter solut ion. Vi deo Ta pe Re c orde r to r ecord the de ci s i on- making proce ss. mi nu t e s for self-eva l ua t ion of problemo Use l a s t 15 Use �('.:S ) /1YPENDIX IV Au:_;us L J() 8:J0-9:L ~ CDA GoarJ.mects Spec ial Area Consulta nt. ?: L5-:i.0:30 n~J.\. .:i.nd Consult:int. 9: L5-10: JO }\111-l\en:bcrs NHA. Each r,i~0up 0lP.cts chairrna n and record12r co:.c e r:1in G e:ich groups I o Sessions ta pedo Serni_nar discussi -Jn uni.queness in terms of the consultant 's presenta:.iono Two-fold purpose: 1. To strcn ghtcn total participation of all memb8rs of the group. 2. To disc 1--9 :li~: CDf\ 9:l15-10 :Ji1 2. Bl):ll'd (tnd Cn11s11ll,ant. J·!on-!'r~•lp r::, ,111°1 Cnnsult.ani.. Contj1111.·.lt:i.on of Consul tan l,'s theme in terms of: (1) Sensitivity to ncedG of all membrrs of the CDA Boarrl . (2) i\n ex1111:in.1t·Lon o f the group 's responsibility in s e ttin3 cr o.;p fi01ls anrl makini progress. 10:J0-10:L5 Cnffc e Br~~k. 10:l:5-11 :l;'. Sjmul"ltinn :T.xercis c . Selected croup portrayine; a 6 roup of r epr8- sen bt-~ve youn;: peop1€' of the Model Neighborhood Area Thmne of sir.rul::i.tion ~:-: r_, rcise is a rlir~ct confron t d ,i0n b2t1-reen one se;:;ment o~ the r-ItrA anr:l the C'..)A B,,ar <~. Impli.cati,..,:i.s for authorH'lri rm decision-riakin.; .1r.d p.1rticipa tory deci.si•Jn-m,:1. Jci.n:;; are pictoriA-lly portrayed tb the group. 11: 15-12 :30 Small 6 rciup disc 1tssion. Slection of 6 roup l eaner and r ecorde ro ." n J.n:ilysis of th8 ty I') cs or ctecision-ma ki.ng as portr3.yed witi1 an atte::i,,:Jt to $tri1ct.ure a mnre ae c eptab l0 procc2:=, . for arrivlnG at a dccisiono f_;rot:p rP~ort, to the cnA. group by chairmen. T.'lpe o CD.t.. The CDA, · q.ctin6 as a unit, is prF?ssured to. for mulate de finitivP. .:;oals for the c;roup with ne eative stirru l a t ion bdnc c011st," lntly p!'ovided by '::'Xtcrnal force --Consultant 0r member of the ?·:nd e l CiLies Teqm. body. RPaction of group in terms of cohesiveness as a decisi0n-rna k i n; Video t ape. �MODEL CITIES TRAINING PROGRAM University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Chattanooga, Tennessee .·.- . .... . ..... The Model Cities Training Program, one of the first of it."s kind in the country, i~. a ten session course to be conducted in seminar form under the direction of the University of Tennes·s ee at Chattanooga. Th e ma jor objective o f the Model Citie s Training Program is the enablement of the fifty members of the CoDoA. Board of Directors to function as a cohesive policy-making body while simult an e ously encoura ging the a t t ainme nt or ret e ntion of individual identity with those various sponsoring groups whom it is the board me mbe rs' r es p o n s ibility _to 're p resent. This obj e ctive c a n b es t b e a chie v e d by e n ab l ing t h e p articipa n ts t o: (1) acq uir e knowledge of the . actu~l structure of the Model Cities o r g a nizat~on and the obj ectives of the p r ogr a m; (2 ) d e v e lop an awaren ess of the d e cision- mak ing process in t e rms of se l e cting a cce ptabl e al tern a tives to r e cognize d problems confronting the CDA Board; and, (3) est a bli s hing and ma int ain i ng an o rga n i z a tiona l es p r it' d e cor ps' which on one h and will e n a ble each CDA Bo ard p art icipa nt to ma intain hi s i d entity a nd ties within h is own sphere o f the commu nity , and y e t p e r mit him to ma k e d e cis ions b ased o n a tota l c o mmit tme nt to an ove ra ll achieve me nt o f the o rgani z ation a l g oa l s o �l I (2) This series of seminars utilizing consultants, applying dynamic and innovative educational techniques, and involving expertise from as many pertinent sources as are available is, like the Model Cities--Program itself, a demonstration project •.. Because there is iittle national experience in training programs such as the one .described, the emphasis in the Chattanooga program will -be on experimentation and innovation. As might be e x pected of an experimental undertaking, it will be subject to regular observation, monitoring, and evaluation of its effectiveness in terms of the goals it seeks to fulfill. It should be understood that this continuous evaluative process is a testing process of the training program and its staff, as ~elL ~s of the participants. The first session of the program will meet Saturday, August 9, 1969, at th~ campus of UoToCo as will the following nine sessions on the following nine consecutive Saturd ay s. A suggested structure and content of each session is found in Appendic es I thru Xo Each consultant, however, may modify or restructure the seminar to achieve the objectives as outlinedo Funding for this training program has been secured under the provi sion s of Title 1 of the Higher Education Act from the Department of Health, Education and Welfare; Institution al monies of U T0C o; and funds from the Model Cities Planning Grant o 0 �l (3) The expectation is that the experience and information derived from the program will contribute signific~ntly to the effectiveness of the CDA Board as a decisive administrative bodyo It is hoped, also, _thi;lt from this Model Cities Training Program_ there will emerge a body of knowledge and exp~rience which will be of . value not only in Chattanooga, but in other cities as wello �(4) OBJECTIVES The succe-ss of the Model Cities Program to a large degree depend~ upon the~a~i~!ty and willingness of the CDA Board to discharge effectively its responsibility as chief policy-makirig . body of the Chattanoog·u. Model Cities Programo As administrators who are responsible for the planning and implementation of the total Model Cities Program, CDA Board members must be sufficiently equipped (1) with the necessary skills, tools, and information related to all aspects of the Model Cities Program; · (2) with an understanding of the Model cities Program and its relationship to city government and other agencies in the urban are--both private and public; and (3) with me thodology and dyna~i cs of d e cis ionmaking. To this end, t~e Mode l citie s Training· and Orientation Se minar Pr o gram i s d es i g n e d: . 1. To. insure that . the CDA Boa rd me mbers will be aware of the ir role s · in the Mode l Cities Program 2o To p r ovide CDA Bo ard me mbe rs with s u f fi cie nt and re l e vant informa tion c o nc erning the Mode l cities concept a nd me t h od . 3o To ins u r e th a t CDA Board me mb ers are familiar wi th the Mode l Cities st r u ctu re, both n a t ion a lly and l oca l ly. �(5) 4o To provide CDA Board members with pertinent data concerning the HUD guidelines as related to the Model Cities Programu So To provide CDA Board members with relevant information concerning speciti6 problems and program areas to be dealt wi.th in the Model Neighborhood area o Further, this program is designed to foster competency and sound judgment on the part of the Board members by providing them with training exercises and experiences in problem-solving and decision - makingo No Board with a ·membership so varied as that of the CDA Board can effectively discharge its duties and responsibilities unless its members develop a oneness of mind and purpose. It is the intent of this program to provid·e s~ructured experiences for the fifty participating CDA Board members--members with varied backgrounds, wide ranges of e x periences, diffeient levels 6f educational attainment, and diverse interests--which will enable ·the Board to .function as a cohesive unit ·w ith mutual interests and common goals; one dedicated to solving the problems of the Model Neighborhood and its people. �Re sident Involvement During Planni nq Proce ~s In December 1967 the residents of the Mod~ l Ne ighborhood Area selected the s tructure tha t they_ felt would be the most workable and repre sentat i ve o f the s i ~ ne ighborhoods that make up the Atlanta Model Cities Program. ( see figure on community structure) . l•Iass Convent:!.0.1 The Mass Convention is open t o a ll Mode l Neighborhood Area residents. Here the cit:i.zen·s .have an op portunity to hear the progress made to improve their coromunity and to voice their views on the Model Cities Pro gram. The Mass Convention also guarantees to every Mode l Neighbcrhood Area res ident that all elections that relate_ to the organizatio n o f the Mode l Neighborhood Area will be conducted in an orderly and democrati c manner. The Mass Conventio n also symbolizes the idea that the Model Neighborhood Area is a unified c ommunity with many similar · as·s ets and liabilities in each of the six concerned neighborhoods. Executive Board The 14 me mbe r Executive Board i s the policy making body in the Model cities organization. It is c omposed o f six neighborhood residents . (One elected representative fr om each of s ix · · neighborhoods _within the Model Neighborhood Area). In addition to the six citizens , it includes the f ollowing: Mayor of the City o f At l anta , one citi zen repr esenting the Atlanta Negro community, one citizen from the genera l Atlanta Community, one repr esentative from the Atlanta Board o f Education , one repres e ntat i'.,e from the Stai.:e of G~orgia , two Aldermen from the City of Atlanta , and ~he Fulto n County Commissi on chairma n. Steering Committee The 16 merri::)er citizen ' s Steering Committee serves as the Mass Co nvention when i t is not in session . It ac c epts recommendation s a nd proposa ls from each o f the six n eighborhoods. It wi ll bring th~s~ recommenda~ions and propo sals to the Mas s Conventio r:. and t h e Executive Board. The Steering Committee is also responsible for deve loping a n effective citizen organization in each of the s i x neighborhoods. It is compo sed of the f our Mass Convention officers, six neighborhood vice chairmen (one elect e d fr om each of the s ix neighborhoods) ·a nd six residents who serve on the Executive Board. Neighborhood Advisor y Councils The Neighborhood Advisory council structure is designed to organize citizens at the neighborhood level •. The residents decided to use thr ee basic structures of organization. Adair Park elected it s repr,2sentatives on an area-wide basis. Grant Park and Peoplestown elected their representatives on a district basis. Mecr.anicsville, Pitt sbm·gh, and Summerhill elected its representatives through the block structure. �The basic function of the councils is to coordinat e all activity in the neighborho0d and to be sure that all operating and standing committees are functioning at maximum efficiency. Operating committees Each of the six neighborhoods has 11 operating commj tt ees for the following program areas: Health, Ed1_tcation, Welfare and Social Services, Hou sing, Relocation, De s i .gn and Preservation Physical Improve ments, Public Facilities, Ernplcyment, Crime Prevention and Re creation. These commit.tees played a valuable role in the planning phase of Model Cities Programs through working with pl a nners in identifying problems ti.nd s uggesting solutions to solve these problems. The Operating Committee s work closely with thE: .:leighborhood Advisory Council so that all proposals from the community will be coordinated through the council. Membership on th-J Operating Committees is open to any resident of the-neighborhood. Standing Commi ttees 'J~he St anding Comm.i.t.tees serve a s th e o rga nizational arm for the Mass Con ve ntion and the s i x nei ghborhoods within Atlar.ta's Model Ne ighbo rhood Area . There are seven committe e s (Boundary, credenti als, Nor.ti n.at ions, Pr ogram, Org3 ni zation, Resolutions, and Con sti tution and By-Laws ) . Each neighborhood has three representatives on each committee. Techni8 a l Adviscry Bo ar d The purpose of the Technical Advisory Boa rd is to 1:eview the pl ans of the re s idents and planners, and to offer technical advice. Members ar e r.epr e se ntatives of various community organiz a tion s . Total membership is open - ended, allowing the Model Cities Prog r am Director to appoint anyone who might aid the program. �Small-Group Work for Sessi on I of Model Cities Training Program Elect group l e ader or spokesman Make list of names of participants Yt'\ t, ~-ff,~ l>~N Our work in groups of ten (10) has three purposes: 1) to help the participants to get better acquainted with each other; 2) to help them examine their own thoughts and feelings about the Model Cities program and their role as board members; 3) · to provide us as planners of the training program with information about the participants' knowledge, n e eds and attitudes regarding the Model Cities pr,ogram and the training program itself. The content of each group session will consist of consideration of three questions: 1) " S uppo se someone stopp e d you on the str e e t or conf ronted you i n a meeting with the question, "What m a kes you think you're qualified to be on the Model Cities board? 1 What would be your answer?" 2) "Suppa se w e gave each of you a $1, 000 gr ant, to be u s ed in any way you choo se , to b e tt e r p rep a r e your self for p arti cip ation in the M od e l C ities boa rd. H ow would you u se the m on e y ? 11 1 3) "Suppose that you people a re. the Mod e l Cities Bo ar d, and th at y o u were o ffere d the answe r s . to t hre e (and only three ) questions about the M ode l N e ighborhood A rea. What three q u es tion s w ould you as a B o ard ask? " T h e firs t t w o ques ti ons are to be answered b y e a c h .member of the group individually. (Group disc u ssion could fo llow the individual answers if that seems natural. ) The answer to the third question should be arrived at by consensus of the group. Total time available for the group discussion is 10 0 minutes, allowing about 30 minutes for consideration of each question. This is a flexible standard, however, and if a lively discussion develops around one question or another, the leader need not cut it off for the sake of covering all three questions. �rJUL 1 8 REG"b DEPARTME NT OF LAW 2614 FI RST NATION AL BANK BU I LD I NG ATLAN TA , GEORGIA 30303 July 16 HEMRY L . BOW ! EN CITY ATTORN ,Y FERRIN Y. MA H · ,W S A SSIS':ANT CITY 1969 ROBERT S. WIGGIN S MA RT IN McFAR LAND EDW I N L . STERNE RA I_PH C. JENKINS JOHN E. DO U GHE RT Y CHAR L ES M . LOKEY T H O MAS F. CHOYC E J AME S EJ . · PILCHER ASSOC IA T E A T ' ORN !:.. Y CIT Y ATTORNEYS HORII.CE T . WA RD 01.cP UT Y CI T Y. A TTO RNEY ROBERT A . HA RRIS HENRY M . MURFF CLA IMS A TTORNEYS JAMES B . HEN D ERSO N Mr a J ohn 1y S. J0hns on, Dirsc to r Model ri:ies ?rog~t m 676 r-ap1· -.-, 1 '\ven""' S P!IV Atlanta , c ~orgia 30315 ,...., ... . .,.• • A. •-. \. ... ) .. SPECI Al. ASSOC I A 1"E C l TY AT "rO RNEY g Dear Mro Johnson: I have i~ hand your request fo r an opinion, dated July 14, 1969 9 In addi tion, I have in hand the minut es of the Model Neighborhood Executb e Board, dated July 1, 1969 . It contains, among other things, a request f or an opinion from t he Ci ty At torne y as to whe t her :) r not a proposed res olution prepa red by Mro Clarence Coleman is a "lega 1 document". Further, I have i n hand a copy of the proposed resolution, as well as a copy of Contr;,,ct No o ME-10-00 1 which, hereinafter, shall be ref erred to as the grant agreeme.nt o It is important to know what a grant is from a l egal standpoint o A grant has been judicially defined as the bestowing or conferring upon another of some thing, with or without compensation, particularly in answer to the request of the othero In this instance, that thing is money. One of the conditions of this grant is found in Section 502 of the grant agreement above referred too This section reads as follo~s: n~EC o 502 . Opportunities for Residents -- In all ,.;o -r i:< 11\1. de possible by or r esulting from t his / .grr~ 1;;1nen :.. :i the City and each employer wi 11 take • f f',' ~-·mE d v e ,qction to ensure that residents of �Mro Johnny C. Johnson, Director Model Cities Program Page 2 July 16, 1969 the mode l ne ighborhood are given maximum opportunities for training and employment and that bus iness concerns located in , or owned in substant:U1 l part by , residents of the model neigh-· borhocd are t o t h e gre atest extent fea sible awa. ·!Bd cont::ac ts. ' 1 This ~yr, .... r.f c c ~t:c: f.:ua:: ..,,..,.-.:-eement is authori zed under Section 42 USCA 3303 C:1 ):: 1 There.:-u :~...,, : · '1 8 r-i1y op1.n1.on that a gr ant, such a s we have here: may be c onditio· ed upon add i t i ona l performance by the donee , the recipien t of the grant . Th is type of add it i ona l performanc e is made manifes t by the s e ct i on of the grant a gr eement a bove r e fer red t o. The general requirements of law relat ing t o c ompetitive biddi ng are set forth in McQui l lan on Municipal Corporations, Vol 10, at PPs 321, wherein , i t states as f ol lows: "The provisions of statut es , charters and ordinances requiring competitive bidding in the letting of municipal contracts are for the purpose of invitin g competition, to guard against favoritism, improvidence, extravagance, fr aud and corruption, and to secure the best work or supplies at the lowest price practicable, and they are enacted for the benefit of property holders and taxpayers, and not for the benefit or enrichment of bidders, and should be so construed and administered as to accomplish such rrnrpose fai rly and reasonably with sole reference , .0 t· .c public interest o 11 (Emphasis added) The pr:- :,c :· ~ 1 .._ ._· c:;n ·.·~tion mu.s t now be compared with the verbage of the s ~ct.1, ~: u[ -.. .-~ "': ,...A.nt agreement above referred to and with the genera~ · ,., . _. -- - .~ . . . . .:it:::T.-Jing the resolution, I am of the opinion tha t :_, : . ·.::> , ..1.1-. J ,. OlJ ' · t.eJ resolution may be a "lega 1 document", none, i. · l · . · -' S -. i tl y wor.ded, it is more restrictive than the 1 �Mro Johnny C. Johnson, Director Model Cities Program Page 2 July 16, 1969 section of the grant agre ement above referred to in tha t it places more of a bur den on the donee than was origina lly envisaged in the grant a r:rE.ement o The n e x t qu,:-~r t i u t 1--a L ;:nu r t be answered is whether or not the l angua ge o f i.:.L;.:, :.~c'J;:,,~sr· ·, r~so lution is so restric t ive that it does not ful f i } 1 tb ,." ~ C!; L. ~-~: ·:. -.r e ri.1 f rements of law rela t ing to c ompetitive b i .::'ld · :.;_.'.,c °i:,' r• . , · ~,:. .. ,,. _, :. . is t oo r e stric t iveo The r e.:., s t r-"r. .. ,·. c ;· i.nl;;n i s that it is necessary f or t he donee , th e Ci t :~· r... , ~-- .. . . cc: OL·;:: ain the contra cts at t he lowe s t p ossible price c oP. s u r,;;: ,t: ·vLt.l; Lo t h the condi tion s o f the grant a g r e ement and the gene r a l. l -c:\v. Th i s obj ec t i ve, i n a l l p roba bilit y, c annot be ob ta ine d und er the l a n gua g e of the p r oposed r e s o lution und er con- s ideration. Therefore , we wou ld r e spec tful l y s uggest tha t the propos ed res olution be modified a lon g the l ine s of th,3 propos e d re s olution a t tach ed h ereto so that bo t h the pa.t i cular section o f the grant a greement ( SEC o 502) a nd the general l aw can be sat i sf i ed~ Shoul d you wish any addi tiona l pr oblem, please fee l f r ee to con tact me o HLB:cwh 1 with res pect to this �Southside pr oposal - 1 I. PrearnbJ.e .. Thi s proposal fo r a nursery program of day car e and child development activitiP.s is submitt ed to t he Model Cities Program for consideration of its merits for fun ding under 1969 appropriation s . Southside Day Care As sociation has found it necessary to request emergency funding for thi s phase of its progr am because of three recent developments: 1. Southside has recently acqui red the use of the school building previously occupi ed by Pryor Str eet Elementary School. This facility i s not only mor e substanti al and more adequat e for an eff ecti ve day program, ; it . als o increases the c apacity of the c ent er from ni nety- one (91) to over 135 chi l dr en. 2. Wi t hi n we eks of Souths i de's move into its new fac ilities , t he funding agency of its program ini tiated pol i cies which 1) phas ed out all s ervi ces to chi ldren under two years of age, and _2) pr oportlonate l y reduc ed enrollment quotas of all delegate agenci es operati ng day care centers; Sout hs ide ' s quot a was cut fr om ninety - one (91 ) to eighty (80) c hi ldren. Thus , ins tead of being able t o expand its s ervi c es to needy f amilies , Souths i de has had t o r educ e the number of chi ldren to mor e than fi fty bel ow i ts capac i t y. J. I n the two months Souths i de has occupied its new loc ation, i t has had to refus e chi l d c ar e to more t han sixty children f rom families that qual i f y for its servic e~ under t he E. admis sion policies. o. Ao ~over ty gui delines that govern I n mos t ins tances , t hese were chi ldren of mot hers who were s e_eki ng c hild care in order to be able to ac cept jobs and ra.i.se thei r living standards above we lf a:re subs i s t ance l evels. �Southside proposal ~ 2 < The proposal outlined in this document will maximize the use of Southside Is facilities. The center will be able t 'o care for fifty-two additional children of mothers needing its services in order to work and improve the economic and pP-rsonal wellbeing of family. Tte salaries these: mothers earn .- even at minimum wage levels , will return over $100,000.00 into the economy of the inner-city. The public schools will be open shortly. · Surveys have shown that 80% of the absenteeism in the schools results from older children having to stay , home and care for the little ones while mother works. and nursery programs are presently operational. Southside's preschool The new openings for day care services this proposal makes possible would be available in a matter of weeks. This . proposa.Lfor ·. the· nurser y pr ogram at Southside, if funded, will make it possible for Southside to continue to ser ve the ne eds of mothers wi t h an infant as well as an ol der preschool child needing care; t hes e mothers-- the ones wi t h the most chi ldren-- are_ usually the ones who need day care the most. There is no other major .center offering quality day care services, -oper a ting ' or proposed, withi n mile s of Southside t hat off ers day care services to mothers of children from infants t o· school age. Wit hout funding, the se mothers will have no day care s ervices available that wil l release them. for gainful employment. In addition to re cently acquiring more suitable and spacious facilities, Souths ide has entered upon a joint venture of cooperat i on with the School of Education at Georgia State College for the purpos e of developing the center into an experimental laborator y for the College's students in early childhood education. The coupling of t he professional'resourc e s of a major school of education with Southside 1 s four year s of cont inuous experienc e in educa- �Southside proposal - J tional day care has important implications: ma.,jor research findings indicate that educational stimulation during early childhood is the most promising antidote to educational deprivation brought on by the conditions of poverty. Research also indicates the importance of continuing the nursery program at Southside as a part of this project; it suggests that more than 50%of the intellectual potentials of the adult is determined by the kinds of learning experiences he had before he was two years old. In view of the foregoing facts, the spons ors of Southside Child Develop~ ment Center suggest that no public funds expended can benefit so many, so directly, so quickly, or so meaningfully, as funds invested in its plans . for the· .nurser y program outlined ~ this proposal. No money spent at thi s time has any greater promise of finding answers to the burden of poverty today, and to its alleviation tomorrow. �Southside proposal - 20 IX. budget Nursery Program Budget. - Southside Day Care Association 1. PERSONNEL - Classroom In-Kind 3 teachers @ 5,200 3 teacher trainees @ 4,200 3 child care trainees, 33 hr. wk. @2,746 2 part-time child care assistants@ 1, 900 1 practical nurse, 25 hr. wk. @ 3,250 $J.5, bOO -f2,b00 8,238 J,800 3,250 $43,488 PERSONNEL - Administrative and Program Director (4/11 of 8,000) · 2,909 Program Coordinator (4/11 of 6,00U) 2,182 Social Worker, JO hr. wk . (4/11 of 4,500) 1,637 Secretary (4/11 of 4,400) 1,600 Cook (4/11 of 4 , 800 ) 1,746 Maintenance, incl. supplies (4/11 of 7,000) 2, 536 Kitchen Assistant, 25 hr. wk.(4/11 of2,0c!O) , 756 Assist ant Cook (4/11 of 4,000) 1,l156 •.' } 1 '- · ·! , . ~~- J . :·, ·' : _:_ , ! ··:; ·. 1 ...., .. _ _;... ,,; ·. i 14,822 58,310 2,799 Total salaries FICA (4. 8%) Workman's Compensation (.25%) Total Personnel 146 $61,255 2. Consultants and Contract Services 150 600 3. Travel 150 450 4e Space - o- 4,500 5. Consumables children' s program mat erials office suppl ies (4/11 of 400) medical supplies, f irst aid clothing, bedding, laundry staff literature food @ .45 per child, 38 child.' ·2.50 ·days infant care@ per JO child. per week Total Consumables 350 150 145 36 100 150 400 75 25 5-98 3,677 2,800 6,933 6. Rental, Lease, and Purchase of Equipment 750 100 7. Others utilities (4/ 11 of 4,000) telephone (4/11 of 660 ) insurance equipment r epairs recreati on data processing Total Others 1,455 240 JOO 350 200 425 75 75 1,071 3, 216 TOTALS = classroom volunteer s and. · other volunteers •;. $72., 454'. · $14., 713 �Model Cities Mass Convention Pryor Street School July 20, 1969 The Model Cities Mass Convention met in its regular session, on the above date at the designated time and place. The meeting was called to order by the Chairman, Deacon Lewis Peters; the invocation was given by Mr. N. Ao Scott III. Upon the adoption, of the proposed agenda, the meeting was put in progress o The tminutes of the previous meeting were read by the Secretary, Mrso C. B. Wright. They were accepted . as read w~th one suggested change by the city attorney. (The suggestion is attached) . The secretary motioned that the suggestion of name change be accepted as read, it -was seconded by Dr. Cox, motion carried. De~con Peters made a plea for greater community participation. Model Cities Staff Reporti Mrs. Xernona Clayton 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. A one stop serv.ice building is being built. News letters will be sent every Wednesday. All committees need to be made stronger. Help from the communit±es is needed . See that· your community is represented in all meetings. Thanks for cooperation that has been given . A- preliminary report of Credentials Committee was given by the Chairman, Revo Calvin Houston. Grant Park Pittsburgh Mechanicsville Adair Park Summerhill . Peoplestown 32 21 11 10 9 4 85 Steering Committee l Dro Charles McClain Reviewed the minutes of the Steering Committee. Constitution and By-Laws i Mr. Willis Weems read the Constitution and By-Laws No Discussion or vote was taken. �-· PAGE~ MODEL CITIES MASS CONVENTION At this point the city attorney, Jim Pilcher was asked to speak, he stated he would read a statement and Dr. McClain would put it in the form of a motion (Statement Attached). Motion: That the Chairman and secretary and the Steering Committee of Atlanta Model Cities Mass Convention Inc. be authorized to execute a contract with the Model Neighborhood Program of the City of Atlanta to receive the funds in the approximate sum of $135 ~aousand ($727 63 ) This motion was seconded by or. Cox motion carried. Mr. Allison {William) Executive of EOA was asked to give a description of O.E.O. funds, after a lengthy discussion the name EOA not to e deleated from the contract was carried 27 to 23. Mr. C. Craig motioned that the secretary of Model Cities give an attendance report of each Steering Committee member to the Mass Convention, seconded by Mr. Whitley motioned carried. {motion attached) Mr.• Howard Kline a candidate for the Board of Education was introduced by Mr. Craig. ~- Craig asked for law and order in our communities the percent of juvinile delinquency was too high and suggested that the citizens must want law and order in the community. Final report of the Credentials Committee -- Rev. C. Huston s Grant Park Pittsburgh Adair Park Mechanicsville Summerhill Pe6plestown 38 23 11 11 9 Total 5 97 The foliowing persons were requested by Deacon Peters to meet on Tuesday to work on a work proposal and would be paid $35.00 for each me~ting. Mrs. Mattie Ansley Mrs. Rosa Burney Mrs. Martha Weems Mrs. Beatrice Garland Mr. Calvin Craig Dr. Cox 0 Mr$. Lacey principal of Pryor Street School was introduced a very warm welcome and words of commendation. 0 Th~re being no more business the meeting adjourned. Deacon Lewis Peters Dr. Chas. McClain Mrs. C. B. Wright Sec. Mrs. Rosa Burney Asst. Sec . 0 she gave - ~ �MASS CONVENTION MINUTES PAGE 3 RESOLUTION SUBMITTED TO MASS CONVENTION BY CALVIN F. CRAIG 7-29-69 That the Model Cities Mass Convention Secretary at each Mass Convention give a report as to the attendance at Steering Committee meeting by the elected members of this body. MOTION : "That the chairman and secretary of Atlanta Model Cities Mass Convention Inc. be authorized to execute a contract with the Model Neighborhood Program of the City of Atlanta to receive funds in the approximately sum of $83,000 for citizen participation in the Model Cities Program." That the corporation serve asagent of the Mass Convention until the completion of corporate formalities. �- I A Rr: SOLUTION WHEREAS, the Mod 1 Cities Program wa s insti tuted for the purpose of improving the educationa l, socia l , emp l oyment, ax1d hous i ng of citizens in low-income area s; and, WHEREAS, one of t he pri,1e purp oses of t hi s program is to improvi; e-mployment opportunities of c i t izens living wi,:h i n t he Model Ci ties area; and , WHEREAS~ the City of Atlanta has rec eived t h e firs t year's grant a.moanting to more than 7 mil l ion dol lars and t his money will be used for many an and c los ing dates shal l be inc l uded, and that, if reas onably possib le , a.n a .r;1 plication offi ce be l oca ted within the Mode l Ci t i es area; A mini um of ren ( 10) da ys shal l be a l lowed fo r reeei ving 2o a pp licat i ons fr om Mode l Cities re sidents fo l l owing t he full i n i tia t i on of the a r ea~.vi.de information sys tern; 3. The Mode l Cit ies Program and i ts c ontrac t i ng agenc i es be. en- cour aged to develop c ompreh ens i ve sys t ems for progr es s ively t rain i ng and upgradi ng workers a t all leve l s through such p r oven met h ods at New Ca r a e r s, job l adde r s :, e t c i <=~n d tha t t hese sys tems should i.nclude s ubsidiz ed fo rmal educat ion at the gec ondary , techni cal , and / or col l ege lev e l s ; and , 4,, Th is Board sh.a l l give top consi.der:ition to prov idi ng a ddi tiona. l fund ing f o:;: agenc i es and pr ogr ams emphasizing t he deve l opment of Mod l Ci.ties a.rea res i dent s f or posit ions be i.ng c r eated by Mode l 0 Cities programming; BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the propos ed pers onnel proc edur e s a nd pr act i ces of al l c on t r ac ting agenc i. e s sha ll be s ubmitted a s pa r t of the .ir program proposals .:fn d shal l become a part of the f inal contrac t , grant , or agreement ~ upon t he app r oval of t h is Board, and tha t agenc i es wi th pr ogr ams a l r eady under c on t.r a ct sha l l be �strong ly urge d to establish procedures and practices in line with t hese guidelines wi t hi n the ex:isttng programs , and tha t their w:i.llingness and/or a bility to do so ·w i 11 be a major criteria in determining the renewal of ex isting cont:ra.cts , grants, or agreements ~ under this program; BE IT FURTliER RESOLVED that a copy of this · Res o l.utio·ci be f urnished to all exis t ing contract i ng agencies~ and to all agenc ies or organizations which in.di.cate in terest in s e eki ng Model Cities contracts, grants, or agreements a �Model Cities Mass Convention Pryor Street School July 20, 1969 on ~e Model Cities Mass Convention met in its regul~r sess1on, the above date at the designated time and place. The meeting was . called to o~der by the Chairman, Deacon Lewis Peters; the invocation was given 1 by Mr. N. A. Scott III . Upon the adoption, of th~ proposed agenda, t 'he meeting was put in progress. The tm.inutes of the ,tirevious meeting were read by the Secretary, Mrs . "C. B. Wright. They Jlre accepted as read with one suggested change by the city attorney . , (~he suggestion ·is attached) . The secretary motioned that the sugg~~tion of name change be accepted as read, it was seconded by Dr. Cox, motion carried. Deacon Peters made a plea for greater community participation. Moael Cities Staff Report g Mrs. Xernona Clayton 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. A one stop serv.t ce building is being built. News letters will be sent every Wednesday. All committees need to be made stronger. Help from the communit±es is needed. See that· your community is represented in all meetings. Thanks for cooperation that has been given . A·-preliminar y report of Credent ials · Committee was given by the Chairman , Rev. Calv i n Hous ton . Grant Park Pittsbur gh Mechani c s v ille Adair Park Summerhill Peoples town 32 21 11 10 9 4 85 S~eering Committee D~. Charles McClain Reviewed the minutes of the Steering Committee. Cqnstitution and By-Laws g Willie Weems read the Constitution and By-Laws No Discussion or vote was taken. Ml:l. �PAGE (2 MASS CONVENTION At this point the city attorney, Ji~ Pilcher was asked to speak, he stat~d he would read a statement and Dr. McClain would put it in the form of a motion (Statement Attached). Motion: That the Chairman and secretary and the Steering Committee of Atlanta Model Cities Mass Convention I~c. be authorized to execute a contract with the Model Neighborhood Program of the City of Atlanta to receive the funds in the approximate sum of $135 ~nousand ($727 63 ) This motion was seconded by Dr. Cox motion carried. MODEL CITms Mr. Allison (William) Executive of EOA was asked to give a description of O.E.O. funds, after a lerigthy discussion the name EOA not ~o e deleated from the contract was carried 27 to 23. Mr. C. Craig motioned that the secretary of Model Cities give an attendance report of each Steering Committee member to the Mass . Convention, seconded by Mr. Whitley motioned carried. (motion attached) Mr. Howard Kline a candidate for the Board of Education was introduced by Mr. Craig. ~- Craig asked for law and order in our communities the percent of juvinile delinquency was too high and suggested that the citizens must want law and order in the community. Final report of the Credentials Committee -- Rev. C. Huston s Grant Park Pittsburgh Adair Park Mechanicsville Summerhill Peoples town 38 23 11 11 9 5 Total 97 The foliowing persons were requested by Deacon Peters to meet on Tuesday to work on a work proposal and would be paid $35.00 for each meeting. Mrs. Mattie Ansley Mrs. Rosa Burney Mrs. Martha Weems Mrs. Beatrice Garland Mr~ Calvin Craig Dr. Cox 0 Mrs. Lacey principal of Pryor Street School was introduced, she gave a very warm welcome and words of commendation. There being no more business the meeting adjourned. Deacon Lewis Peters Dr. Chas . McClain Mrs. C. B. Wright Sec. Mrs. Rosa Burney Asst . Sec . 0 -~ �MASS CONVENTION MINUTES PAGE 3 RESOLUTION SUBMITTED TO MASS CONVENTION BY CALVIN F. CRAIG 7-29-69 That the Model Cities Mass Convention Secretary at each Mass Convention give a report as to the attendance at Steering Committee meeting by the elected members of this body. MOTION ~ "That the chairman and secretary of Atlanta Model Cities Mass Convention Inco be authorized to execute a contract with the Model Neighborhood Program of the City of Atlanta to receive funds in the approximately sum of $83.000 for citizen participation in the Model Cities Program." That the corporation serve asagent of the Mass Convention until the completion of corporate formalities. �PROPOSA f'O R 'l 'HE EVALUATION OF THE ATLANTA MODEL CI 1'IE S P ROGRAi."1 �.ATLANTA MODEL CITIES EVALUATION PLAN The plan f or evaluation o f t h e Model Cities p rogram wa s ·d e v eloped by t he Mode l Citie s P lan s and Eva.lua t ion s ta ff . The ob jecti ve o f th e plan i s to p r o v ide q u a n i tat i v e a.n a qua l i tat ive analysi s o f t h e program bot h f o r fi~ t u r e Mode l Ci t ie~:1 p l a n n i ng and as a d emon s trat i o n 0 £ this typ - of urba n impr o v eme nt ;,rogr a.rn . It i s v i t a l tha t we be aware of e xactly wha t ou r e ffo r t s a r e accompli sh i ng .in o r der t o lay e f f ecti ve plan s ¥o r f ut u r e upgr ~d i ng o f o ur c i ty. Residents 1i l l p lay a ma jor ro l e · n d e t e rmin i ng 1-1hat the mea su:cE> fl of p r ogram s uc ces s should be , i n inte r v i ewing , in mo ni t or i ng p r o jec t s, a n d i ~ as se ss i n g the e ff e c tiveness of p r o jects and t he ov erall p rogr am. The evaluat i on p l an h as t wo ma jor i nter.relate d compon e nts: A Residen t Se rvi c e In forma tion System a nd a Re s e arch Ana ly s is System. The Re~' ident Serv ice Information Sys tem (RSIS ) i s a computerized net.hod of monitor ing services p r ovidE .!d t o r e sident p rogrr-1.m . b y the Model Ci t i e s The Resea rch Anal ysis System wi l l pr ,.r i de a q ua l ita t i v e an alysis of t he progran based on t h e opinio ns a nd at titudes o f r e s iden ts . The RS I S is desi~J ned t o accomplish t h e foll owing: (1) Maintain records 0f al l services re n d~red to re s i de nts fo r statistical analysi s. (2) Provide s ervice agencies with stat i stica.1. report s t o rel iev e them of menial cl e rical work. (3) Provide random samples of participants in various pro jects f or survey in the Research Analysis System. (4·) Prepare profi le reports on char.acte~cistics on residents served by age, geographic location, occupation, race, etc. �-2- (5) Provide agencies with lists of residents in need of their services. (6·) Provide benefit unit reports for costjbenefi t analysis. (7) Prepare correlation reports to show influence on residents or families involved in combina t ions of projects. (8) Provide interface wi th a geographic ma pping program which will show areas of progra.111 weakness. (9 ) Provide information to research framework analysts to aid in the prepar a tion of their reports. (10) Provide various reports on reque st to service agencies, city depar tments, or the federal government. (11 , Prov ide baseline data estimates (e . g. unemployment rates, crime rates, bir t h rates). (12) Provide projections of numbers of people who will be involved in projec ts in future y ea rs. (13) Encourage i n tera gency cooperation and sh a ring of common data . The Research Analysis System is d esigned to accomplish the following: (1) Ga t h e r and asse ss opinions of part icipants about the qual i ty of Model Cit i ~s projects. (2) Secure follow-up data on project participants. (3) Gather data concerning control groups within and outside the Model Neighborhood. �-3- (4) Conduct attitud~ surveys concerning basic outlooks toward life of a sample of Mode l Neighborhood Area re sidents. (5) Assess attitudes and perception s o f insti tutional personnel employed to serve the Model Neighborhood residents . (6) Collect base-line data and formulate appropriate standards for future program planning . (7) Sel e ct and tra i n interviewers. (8) Develop appropriate attitude and opinion questionnaires. (9) Supe r vi s e the activities of resident obse rve r s who will furnish chronlc l e s on sign ificant change s that take place in the Model Neighborhood . �r " Opinion Surveys ttitude Survey s p Re search Analysis System '"""l Institut ion al Studies Random Re sident Samples Service tllllli~-------_,....,..,,_....,.,__,_ _ _-IInformation System Statistical Report s Residen t ServiceOb!3ervers · Needed . Report!:' ServiceRe n dered Reports Reside nt Profi le Repo rt s Quanti tativ e AJ. alysi s Qualitative Analysis Model Cities Program Evaluation Special Request Re p o rt s A9 ency Statistical Reports �I_,- .. 'J•1"_;, ' CITY ()1~ F· r\1-: ~- ,.,i.-·:;_.~ t . .. , . -, .. .:/· ~ ' • August 11, 1969 '~ I OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM 673 Copitol Avcnuo. S.W. Atlanta. Ga. 30315 404-524 -8876 Ivan Allen Jr., Mayor J. C. Johnson, Director MEMORANDUM TO: Model Cities Executive Board FROM: The Div ision of Plans and Evaluation SUBJECT: Approval of Evaluation Projects The Atlanta Model Cities staff recommends that the City of Atlanta enter into contract with Arthur Andersen and Co. for the design and implementation of the proposed Resident Serv ice Information System for a cost not to excee d $70,000. The staff furth e r r e comme nds t hat the City of Atlanta e nter into contract with the Urban Observatory of Ge orgia Sta t e College for the implementation of the proposed Research Analysis Sy stem for a c ost not to exceed $ 144 ,000. fa) 1/ ,::;ob:;--?(I) Jff.b / t0 �MODEL CITIE S EXECU.1-I'VE BOARD REVI EW COM.MJ:ni'I'BE Ju.L.y 1 5, 19 6 9 M I N U T E S ·rhe Model Citie s Exec ut i ve Bo a r d Rev i e•,1 Com_m i t. t ee met Tuesday~ ,Jul y 15 , at 1 0 : 00 a . m. i n City Hal l, Committee Ro o m #2 . The followinq me mbers \'7e r e p r esent: Mayo r I v a n All en , ,J r. , Chairman Mattie An sley Mr • Jo1 n Hood Alderman Ever ett Milli can 1.liX .. ~'7 al t er fvj,i t: c ·he l l Mr. J. D . Newberr7 Dr . C , Miles Smit,h Mr. Bi l l C . Wainwri9ht lfu: s . Mrs. Jllla r thci WP.ems 'I'he Chairman , Mayor Iva.n Al len, Jr . presided over the meeting. 'I'he f o l lowing proj ects wer e d i s.-:ussed a nd app·coved: Amou nt Pr 9..i_ect Numbers $11 9, 0 00 HR - 005N Urban East Housing Consul ta 1.ts HE-019N At l anta Assoc i a tion o f Mental Retardation 9,00 0 HE- 0.llN Planned P1.rer t 'l:10::x:!, 5,000 Inc . It '.tvas mo ved a.nd second ed that action on. the fo l o wing projects be withheld u ntil fuxi":1"l:... r investiga tion can be made. The Chairman appointed Dr . C . Mi les Smith to hi:.~ad a c ommit ~ee to look into t he Hea l t h Component a n d to r~port at the next me et ing. Mr. Hood a nd Mr . :t-Iewbe rry were appoint ed "-o the ,.,orrnnittee. The proje c ts invo l ved are: HE =0 02N HE-00 9N HE-014N HE-007N Better Health , Inc. 113,000 100,000 5 , 00 0 4,000 �2 Mr. Wainw.;· :iyht moved that t he two ( 2) deletions :ceconi.mended by the staff b-2. appr oved . ,lrs . We e n's :,::e condEd the motion. 'rhe deletions w~re : HE-008.N He a.:L th Scr. e ening HE-·018N Mm1tal Health Plann.e::: $ 45,000 20,000 A discussion. was open.ed concer ning Project E~rpand . After a brief di scussio, Mrs. Ansley moved to temporarily delete Project Expand so the balance of the EOA projects c a n be sent back to the Board of Aldermen . The mot.:i.on was secon ded and app roved. The meeting wa s adjourned. APPROVED: l ___,f/, r---, r-~ -c:,-=-"~:::;;_.c.-.-J-~ ~ c ~or - Cit ies Prog ro May· r Iva.n Allen, Jr . , Chairman Mode l Ci tie s Exec u tive Board �
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 6

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 6
  • Text: CNT RTS Ska ok RL October 7, 1969 OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM 673 Capitol Avenue, S.W. Atlanta, Ga. 30315 (404) 577-5200 Ivan Allen Jr., Mayor J. C, Johnson, Director ies 6 Lay Sweat Superintendent — Atlanta Public Schools 224 Central Avenue, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 RE: Requested Contract Revisions and Disposi- tion Dear Dr. Letson: The contract between the Atlanta Board of Education (Agency) and the City of Atlanta (CDA) states that the Agency must have prior approval by the CDA on any shift of funds that significantly changes the approved program and/or exceeds 10% of the line item total from which the funds are being removed or to which added. The following statements indicate the action taken by the CDA with regards to the revisions requested by the Atlanta Board of Education. The CDA does not approve the proposed changes in projects ED-OO5N and ED-041C. It was proposed that $30,000 be shifted from ED-OO5N to ED-041C. The approved original budgets are attached herein. We are happy to know that only two temporary units will be required thereby reflecting a savings of $30,000. The CDA approves the proposed changes on project ED-020C, but with some modification. The shift of funds proposed by the Agency involved $4,000 being shifted from personnel, with $3,000 added to consumable supplies and $1,000 added to equipment. Inasmuch as this proposed change could not be adequate to meet present equipment expenditures (as indicated by Agency's August Project Report), CDA proposes that $1,374 be shifted to equipment with $2,626 going to consumable supplies. This change does not effect the total cost of the project. This approved budget is included herein. Dr. John W. Letson Page Two October 7, 1969 The CDA approves the vroposed changes in project ED-0O21c. This involves removing $5,978 from personnel and adding $4,738 for instructional equipment costs, $400 for office equipment, and $840 for mileage. Also, the number of lead teachers is reduced from eight to seven in order to create the position of Model Cities Coordinator. These changes do not affect the total cost of the project. The approved budget is included herein. With regards to the proposed changes in project ED-O022C, the CDA approves the addition of three teacher aides. However, the CDA does not approve the adding of $1,620 to travel. The funds are to remain in personnel. The CDA approves the adding of $396 for telephone service. Telephone service is included in the space cost line item. These changes do not affect the overall total the total cost of the project. The approved budget is included herein. The CDA approves the changes in project ED-O24N. The number of Extended Day Programs is reduced from five to four, and consul- tants and contract services will be covered by In-Service Training funds. These changes allows $49,287 to be removed and to be allocated as follows: $16,500 added to food; $12,543 added for labor; $6,649 added for custodial services; $2,000 added for con- sumable supplies; $4,000 added for equipment; $6,768 added for three additional teachers aides; $584 for telephone services; and $243 added to travel. The approved budget with costs in the appropriate line items is included herein. The CDA approves the changes in project ED-O25N. It was proposed to reduce the number of pre-school programs from nine to eight. This allows additional funds to be used for food, labor for food preparation, equipment, custodial services, field trips, and substitute teacher aides. These changes only involve the shif- ting of funds and does not alter the total cost of the project. The approved budget with costs in the appropriate line items is included herein. The CDA approves the proposed changes in project ED-O39N. These changes include removing $14,813 from personnel, and distributed as follows: Consultants and Contract Services, $3,000; Travel, $2,000; Consumable Supplies, $3,500; Rental, Lease, Purchase of Equipment, $6,000; Custodial Services, $813. The approved bud- get with costs in the appropriate line items is included herein. Dr. John W. Letson Page Three October 7, 1969 The attached budgets control all future expenditures specified as authorized revisions. We are encouraged to know that many staff positions were over- budgeted and will reflect vic cc: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jz considerable savings. ey io Vas Se G, 2 ate sips q ue Kasay hh é er SS jOunny Gs Shen Executive Director 4 Model Cities Executive Board Members
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 20
  • Text: Model Cities Mass Convention Pryor Street School July 20, 1969 The Model Cities Mass Convention met in its regular session, on the above date at the designated time and place. The meeting was called to order by the Chairman, Deacon Lewis Peters; the invocation was given, by Mr. N. A. Scott III. Upon the adoption . of thé proposed agenda, the meeting was put in progress. The minutes of the previous meeting were read by the Secretary, Mrs. C. B. Wright. They wére accepted as read with one suggested change by the city attorney. (The suggestion is attached). The secretary motioned that the suggéStion of name change be accepted as read, it was seconded by Dr. Cox, thotion carried. Deacon Peters made a plea for greater community participation. Model Cities Staff Report: Mrs. Xernona Clayton 1. A one stop service building is being built. 2. News letters will be sent every Wednesday. 3. All committees need to be made stronger. Help from the communities is needed. 4. See that your community is represented in all meetings. 5. Thanks for cooperation that has been given. A-preliminary report of Credentials Committee was given by the Chairman, R,v- Calvin Houston. t Grant Park 32 Pittsburgh 21 Mechanicsville 11 Adair Park 10 Summerhill 9 Peoplestown _4 85 Steering Committee Dr. Charles McClain Reviewed the minutes of the Steering Committee. Constitution and By-Laws: My, Willis Weems read the Constitution and By-Laws No Discussion or vote was taken. PAGE @ MODEL CITIES MASS CONVENTION At this point the city attorney, Jim Pilcher was asked to speak, he stated he would read a statement and Dr. McClain would put it in the form of a motion (Statement Attached). Motion: That the Chairman and secretary and the Steering Committee of Atlanta Model Cities Mass Convention Inc. be authorized to execute a contract with the Model Neighborhood Program of the City of Atlanta to receive the funds in the approximate Sum of $135 fhousand ($727 63 ) This motion was seconded by Dr. Cox motion carried. Mr. Allison (William) Executive of EOA was asked to give a description of O.E.0. funds, after a lengthy discussion the name EOA not to e de- leated from the contract was carried 27 to 23. Mr. C. Craig motioned that the secretary of Model Cities give an attendance report of each Steering Committee member to the Mass . Convention, seconded by Mr. Whitley motioned carried. (motion attached) Mr. Howard Kline a candidate for the Board of Education was introduced by Mr. Craig. Mr. Craig asked for law and order in our communities the percent of 2,8 juvinile delinquency was too high and suggested that the citizens must want lew and order in the community. Final report of the Credentials Committee -- Rev. C. Huston Grant Park 38 Pittsburgh 23 Adair Park 11 Mechanicsville 11 s Summerhill 9 Peoplestown 5 Total 97 The following persons were requested by Deacon Peters to meet on Tuesday to work on a work proposal and would be paid $35.00 for each meeting. Mrs. Mattie Ansley Mrs. Rosa Burney Mrs. Martha Weems, Mrs. Beatrice Garland Mr. Calvin Craig Dr. Cox Mrs. Lacey principal of Pryor Street School was introduced, she gave a very warm welcome and words of commendation. There being no more business the meeting adjourned. Deacon Lewis Peters Dr. Chas. McClain Mrs. C. B. Wright, Sec. Mrs. Rosa Burney Asst. Sec. MASS CONVENTION MINUTES PAGE $ RESOLUTION SUBMITTED TO MASS CONVENTION BY CALVIN F. CRAIG 7-28-69 That the Model Cities Mass Convention Secretary at each Mass Convention give a report as to the attendance at Steering Committee meeting by the elected members of this body. MOTION : "That the chairman and secretary of Atlanta Model Cities Mass Convention Inc. be authorized to execute a contract with the Model Neighborhood Program of the City of Atlanta to receive funds in the approximately sum of $83,000 for citizen participation in the Model Cities Program." That the corporation serve asagent of the Mass Convention until the completion of corporate formalities.
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 1

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 1
  • Text: November 3, 1969 MEMORANDUM TO: Mr. Johnny Johnson FROM: Dan E. Sweat, Jr. SUBJECT: Model Cities Mass Convention, Inc., and QED Consulting Firm I appreciate your memo on this subject dated October 30, 1969. AslI understand your position, you state that the expenditure to employ this consultant will be from the proceeds of an EOA, Inc. grant to Model Cities Mass Convention, Incorporated (MCMC, Inc.) and, consequently, the city is in no position to exercise any control over which firm that MCMC, Inc, employs for this work. I will defer to your judgement as to the technical operations of this procedure and I understand that the city does not exercise any direct control over the ac- tions of MCMC, Inc., when city funds are not involved. My only interest is that the city, and more specifically the Model Cities Program, does not suffer any embarrassment resulting from the award of contracts by any Model City Agency or contractor. To preclude this possibility, I reiterate my request of October 28, 1969, that a complete dossier be prepared on QED prior to a decision being made on the award of the contract to them, This dossier should include the com- plete list of the principals with resumes of their education and experience; review of their present positions so that any conflict of interest can be de- termined; some examples or references of similar work performed; a complete review of the experience and qualifications of the firm to do this work; a budget and program designed to accomplish the work desired; and any other information necessary to make a well-informed decision on the capability of this firm to successfully accomplish this work. This request should be made to MCMC, Inc., recognizing that the city does not have the authority to require it but feels that good administrative practices demand it. When this information is prepared, a good case can supposedly be made for awarding this contract to this firm instead of ano- ther. Should there be any later question, the city will be in a much better position to defend the action. You may be assured that the general public will not distinguish between MCMC, Inc., and the larger Model City Pro- gram in the event charges of impropriety or conflict of interest are made against the corporation. My only interest in this project is the well being of our Model City Program. If the facts support the contention that QED is qualified and able to do this work at competitive prices, I will fully support the award to them. By the same token, if the facts indicate that they are not qualified to accomplish this work, I feel that the award should not be made. In any event, I want us to be in a position to defend the action of MCMC, Hinc., even if we are not directly responsible for the management of the organization. DESJrism
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 17

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_017.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 17
  • Text: Southside proposal = 20 Ix. budget Nursery Program Budget - Southside Day Care Association 1. PERSONNEL - Classroom « In-Kind 3 teachers @ 5,200 $15,600 3 teacher trainees @ 200 2,600 3 child care trainees, 33 hr. wk. @2,7))6 8,238 2 part-time child care assistants @ 1,900 3,800 1 practical nurse, 25 hr. wk. @ 3,250 3,250 ; $43,488 #62515 PERSONNEL - Administrative and Program Director (l/11 of 8,000) 2,909. “4; Program Coordinator (l/11 of 6,00U) 2,182 eo Social Worker, 30 hr. wk. (l/11 of ),500) 1,637 nef Secretary (l/11 of 4,400) 1,600 Lc Cook (/11 of 4,800) 1,746 sy Maintenance, incl. supplies (44/11 of 7,000) 2,536 = Kitchen Assistant, 25 hr. wk.(l/1l1 of2,080) ,756 E Assistant Cook (/11 of l,000) 1,156 1h, 822 Total salaries 58, 310 FICA (h.8%) 2,799 Workman's Compensation (.25%) 116 Total Personnel $61,255 2. Consultants and Contract Services 150 600 3. Travel . 150 450 he Space , -0- 4500 5. Consumables children's program materials 150 350 office supplies (l,/11 of 00) 15 medical supplies, first aid : 36 150 Glothing, bedding, laundry 100 4,00 staff literature 25° 75 food @ .l5 per child, 38 child., 250-days 3,677 598 infant care @ per 30 child. per week 2,800 Total Consumables 6,933 6. Rental, Lease, and Purchase of Equipment 750 100 7 e Others utilities (/11 of ),000) 1,455 telephone (l/11 of 660) 20 insurance 300 350 equipment repairs 75 200 recreation 75 hes data processing 1,071 Total Others ; 3,216 TOTALS $72,u5n; - $14,713 % = classroom volunteers and other volunteers ;
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 21

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_021.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 21
  • Text: PROPOSAL FOR THE EVALUATION OF THE ATLANTA MODEL CITIES PROGRAM ATLANTA MODEL CITIES EVALUATION PLAN The plan for evaluation of the Model Cities program was developed by the Model Cities Plans and Fvaluation staff. The objective of the pian 22 to provide quantitative and qualitative analysis of the pro- gram both for future Model Cities planning and as a demonstration of this type of urban improvement program. It is vital that we be aware of exactly what our efforts are accomplishing in order to lay effect- ive plans for future upgrading of our city. Residents will play a major role in determining what the measures of program success should be,in interviewing, in monitoring projects, and in assessing the effect- iveness Of projects and the overall program. The evaluation plan has two major interrelated components: A Resident Service Information System and a Research Analysis System. The Resident Service Information System (RSIS) is a computerized method of monitorince services provided to residents by the Model Cities program. The Research Analysis System will provide a qualitative analysis of the program based on the opinions and attitudes of residents. The RSIS is designed to accomplish the following: (1) Maintain records of all services rendered to residents for statistical analysis. (2) Provide service agencies with statistical reports to relieve them of menial clerical work. {3) Provide candom samples of participants in various projects for survey in the Research Analysis System. (4) Prepare profile reports on characteristics on residents served by age, gecgraphic location, occupation, race, etc. oie (5) Provide agencies with lists of residents in need of their services, (6) Provide benefit unit reports for cost/benefit analysis. (7) Prepare correlation reports to show influence on residents or families involved in combinations of projects. (8) Provide interface with a geographic mapping program which will show areas of program weakness. (9) Provide information to research framework analysts to aid in the preparation of their reports. (10) Provide various reports on request to service agencies, city departments, or the federal government. (11) Provide baseline data estimates (e.g. unemployment rates, crime rates, birth rates). (12) Provide projections of numbers of people who will be involved in projects in future years. (13) Encourage interagency cooperation and sharing of common data. The Research Analysis System is designed to accomplish the following: (1) Gather and assess opinions of participants about the quality of Model Citics projects. (2) Secure follow-up data on project participants. (3) Gather data concerning control groups within and outside the Model Neighborhood. (4) Conduct attitude surveys concerning basic outlooks toward life of a sample of Model Neighborhood Area residents. (5) Assess attitudes and perceptions of institutional personnel employed to serve the Model Neighborhood residents. (6) Collect base-line data and formulate appropriate standards for future program planning. (7) Select and train interviewers. (8) Develop appropriate attitude and opinion questionnaires. (9) Supervise the activities of resident observers who will furnish chronicles on significant changes that take place in the Model Neighborhood. Research Analysis << System Random Sanpee? Service information Statistical System Reports Resident Opinion Attitude Institution-f Resident Service- Service- Resident Special Agency , Surveys Surveys al Studies Observers Needed Rendered Profile Request Statistical Reports Reports Reports Reports Reports Qualitative Quantitative Analysis Analysis Model Cities Program Evaluation
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 15

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_015.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 15
  • Text: SUL 18 Reg DEPARTMENT OF LAW 2614 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 ROBERT S. WIGGINS July 16, 1969 MARTIN MCFARLAND EDWIN L. STERNE RALPH C. JENKINS JOHN E. DOUGHERTY HEHRY L. BOW! EN CHARLES M. LOKEY CcITy ATTORN t¥ THOMAS F.CHOYCE FERRIN Y. MATE tws JAMES 8. PILCHER ASSISTANT CITY AT ORNEY ASSOCIATE CITY ATTORNEYS HORACE T. WARD DEPUTY CITY ATTORNEY ROBERT A. HARRIS HENRY M. MURFF CLAIMS ATTORNEYS JAMES B. HENDERSON Mr, John } G Johnson Director SPECIAL ASSOCIATE CITY ATTORNEY 3 Model Cicries Program 676 Capi:ocl Avenue, S.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30315 Dear Mr. Johnson: I have ia hand your request for an opinion, dated July 14, 1969, In addition, I have in hand the minutes of the Model Neighborhood Executiye Board, dated July 1, 1969, It contains, among other things, a request for an opinion from the City Attorney as to whether or not a proposed resolution prepared by Mr. Clarence Coleman is a "legal document", Further, I have in hand a copy of the proposed resolution, as well as a copy of Contract No. ME-10-001 which, hereinafter, shall be referred to as the grant agreement. It is important to know what a grant is from a legal standpoint. A grant has been judicially defined as the bestowing or conferring upon another of some thing, with or without compensation, particu- larly in answer to the request of the other, In this instance, that thing is money. One of the conditions of this grant is found in Section 502 of the grant agreement above referred to. This section reads as follows: "SEC. 562. Opportunities for Residents -- In all werk made possible by or resulting from this rerecnent, the City and each employer will take “firme sive action to ensure that residents of Mr. Johnny C, Johnson, Director Model Cities Program Page 2 July 16, 1969 the model neighborhood are given maximum oppor- tunities for training and employment and that business concerns located in, or owned in sub- stantial part by, residents of the model neigh- borhocd are to the greatest extent feasible awarded contvacts." This type of ccctroetua’ cereement is authorized under Section 42 USCA 3303 fap i™® : Therefor v2, {i ts ay opinion that a grant, such as we have here, may be conditioned upon additional performance by the donee, the recipient of the grant. This type of additional performance is made manifest by the section of the grant agreement above referred to, The general requirements of law relating to competitive bidding are set forth in McQuillan on Municipal Corporations, Vol 10, at pp. 321, wherein, it states as follows: "The provisions of statutes, charters and ordi- nances requiring competitive bidding in the letting of municipal contracts are for the purpose of inviting competition, to guard against favoritism, improvidence, extravagance, fraud and corruption, and to secure the best work or supplies at the lowest price practicable, and they are enacted for the benefit of property holders and taxpayers, and not for the benefit or enrichment of bidders, and should be so con- strued and administered as to accomplish such nurpose fairly and reasonably with sole reference uO tie public interest." (Emphasis added) The prooe: .! .cselction must now be compared with the verbage of the sectic. of * © teant agreement above referred to and with the genera. "9 ..e% cowlewing the resolution, I am of the opinion that 4/)).9 ui. D.Upesed resolution may be a “legal document", monei* ‘e's «? . esectiy worded, it is more restrictive than the Mr, Johnny C. Johnson, Director Model Cities Program Page 2 July 16, 1969 section of the grant agreement above referred to in that it places more of a burden on the donee than was originally envisaged in the grant acreenent, The next queskic. thal must be answered is whether or not the language of tic Vcopcse' resolution is so restrictive that it does not fvilfiit the geru-u1 renuirements of law relating to competitive bidd':3. Ten’ ~anws., in is too restrictive. The reese for “+ cpinien is that it is necessary for the donee, the City ©. %.. 5... «is obtain the contracts at the lowest possible price consosu1ut wii. both the conditions of the grant agreement and the general law. This objective, in all probability, cannot be obtained under the language of the proposed resolution under con- sideration, Therefore, we would respectfully suggest that the proposed resolution be modified along the lines of tha proposed resolution attached hereto so that both the particular section of the grant agreement (SEC. 502) and the general law can be satisfied, Should you wish any additional: informa problem, please feel free to contact with respect to this Cify Attorney HLB: cwh
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 16

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_016.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 16
  • Text: Southside proposal - 1 I. Preamole This proposal for a nursery program of day care and child develop- ment satieiliee is submitted to the Model Cities Program for consideration of its merits for funding under 1969 appropriations. Southside Day Care Association has found it necessary to request emer- gency funding for this phase of its program because of three recent devel- opments: 1. Southside has recently acquired the use of the school building pre- viously occupied by Pryor Street Elementary School. This facility is not only more substantial and more adequate for an effective day program, it. also increases the capacity of the center from ninety-one (91) to over 135 children. 2. Within weeks of Southside's move into its new facilities, the fund- ing agency of its program initiated policies which 1) phased out all servi- ces to children under two years of age, and 2) proportionately reduced en= rollment quotas of all delegate agencies operating day care centers; South- side's quota was cut from ninety-one (91) to eighty (80) children. Thus, instead of being able to expand its services to needy families, Southside has had to reduce the number of children to more than fifty below its capacity. 3. In the two months Southside has occupied its new location, it has had to refuse child care to more than sixty children from families that qualify for its services under the E, 0. A. poverty guidelines that govern admission policies. In most instances, these were children of mothers who were seeking child care in order to be able to atcept jobs and raise their living stendards above welfare subsistance levels. Southside proposal - 2 The proposal outlined in this document will maximize the use of South- side's facilities. The center will be able to care for fifty-two additional children of mothers needing its services in order to work and improve the economic and personal wellbeing of family. The salaries these mothers earn. even at minimum wage levels, will return over $100,000.00 into the economy of the inner-city. The public schools will be open shortly. Surveys have shown that 80% of the absenteeism in the schools results Pro older children having to stay home and care for the little ones while mother works. Southside's preschool and nursery programs are presently operational. The new openings for day care services this proposal makes possible would be available in a matter of weeks. This proposal for the nursery program at Southside, if funded, will make it possible for Southside to continue to serve the needs of mothers with an infant as well as an older preschool child needing care; these mothers~-the ones with the most children--are usually the ones who need day care the most. There is no other major center offering quality day care services, operating or proposed, within miles of Southside that offers day care services to mothers of ehdidven from infants to school age. Without funding, these mothers will have no day care services available that will release them. for gainful employment. In addition to recently acquiring more suitable and spacious facilities, Southside has entered upon a joint venture of cooperation with the School of Education at Georgia State College for the purpose of developing the center into an experimental laboratory for the College's students in early child- hood education. The coupling of the professional’ resources of a major school of education with Southside's four years of continuous experience in educa- Southside proposal = 3 « tional day care has important implications: major research findings indicate that educational stimulation during early childhood is the most promising antidote to educational deprivation brought on by the conditions of poverty. Beane also indicates the importance of continuing the nursery program at Southside as a part of this project; it suggests that more than 50% of the intellectual potentials of the adult is determined by the kinds of learning experiences he had before he was two years old. In view of the foregoing facts, the eaneore of Southside Child Develop- ment Center suggest that no public funds expended can benefit so many, so directly, so quickly, or so meaningfully, as funds invested in its plans for the nursery program outlined in this proposal. No money spent at this time has any greater promise of finding answers to the burden of poverty to- day, and to its alleviation tomorrow.
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_019.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 19
  • Text: A RESOLUTION WHEREAS, the Model Cities Program was instituted for the purpose of improving the educational, social, empicyment, and housing of citizens in low-income areas; and, WHEREAS, one of the prime purposes of this program is to improve employment opportunities of citizens living within the Model Cities area; and, WHEREAS, the City of Atlanta has received the first year's grant amounting to more than 7 million dollars and this money will be used for many and varied projects; and, WHEREAS, these prejects will be put out under contract by the City of Atlanta upon recommendation of several groups, including individuals within the area, Model Cities Mass Convention, Model Cities staff, the Model Cities Review Board and the Model Cities Executive Committee, with final approval by the Board of Aldermen; and, WHEREAS, it is extremely desirable that as many jobs as possible covered by such contracts should be given to residents of the Model Cities area in furtherance of the purposes of the Act creating Model Cities, consonant with the proper use of funds to be expended under the Program by the City of Atlanta; THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the personnel policies and practices of the Model Cities Program and its contracting agencies shall provide that in all work wade possible by or resulting from the grant agreement above referred to, affirmative action be taken t® insure that residents of the model neighborhood area are given maximum opportunity for training and employment, as hereinafter set forth, consonant with the proper use of funds to be expended under the Program by the City of Atianta: 1. The Model Cities Program and its contracting agencies shall conjunctively or individually devise systems using all recegnized means of communications for those neighborhoods to adequately inform the area residents of all available positions funded by the Modei Cities Program, that information as to quaiifications, rate of pay, where to apply, and closing dates shall be included, and that, if reasonably possible, an application office be located within the Model Cities area; 2, A minimum of ten (10) days shall be allowed for receiving applications from Model Cities residents following the full initiation of the areawide information system; 3. The Model Cities Program and its contracting agencies be en- couraged to develop comprehensive systems for progressively training and upgrading workers at all levels through such proven methods at New Careers, job ladders, etc,, and that these systems sheuld include subsidized formal education at the secondary, technical, and/or college leveis; and, 4, This Board shall give top consideration to providing additional Funding for agencies and programs emphasizing the development of Model Cities area residents for positions being created by Model Cities programming; BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the proposed personnel pro- cedures and practices of ail contracting agencies shall be submitted as part of their program proposals and shall become a part of the final contract, grant, or agreement, upon the approval of this Board, and that agencies with programs already under contract shall be strongly urged to establish procedures and practices in line with these guidelines within the existing programs, and that their willing- ness and/or ability to de so will be a major criteria in determining the renewal of existing contracts, grants, or agreements, under this program; BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that a copy of this Resolution be furnished to all existing contracting agencies, end to all agencies or organizations which indicate interest in seeking Model Cities contracts, grants, or agreements,
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 18, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_018_002.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 18, Document 2
  • Text: October 30, 1969 OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM 673 Capitol Avenue, S.W. Atlanta, Ga. 30315 (404) 577-5200 Ivan Allen Jr., Mayor J. C. Johnson, Director MEMORANDUM TO : Dan E. Sweat, Chief Administrative Officer FROM : Johnny C. Johnson, Executive Director Model Cities Program SUBJECT: Model Cities Mass Convention, Inc., and QED Consulting Firm In response to your memorandum of October 28, an investigation has been made into your inquiry and the following is submitted for your consideration. It has been determined that Model Cities Mass Convention, Inc. requested bids from three consultants that would provide manage- ment and personnel guidelines for their operation of the corpora- tion. It appears that the low bidder for these services was a firm known as QED. It seems that the firm of Quod Erat Demonstradum was organized in February of 1964 and that the general purpose of the organization was to provide consultant services in the areas of marketing, management studies, and public relations. The firm has performed services for Radio Station WAOK and is involved in a project with several Emory University professors. Upon examination of the contract between the City of Atlanta and Model Cities Mass Convention, Inc., it has been determined that under the allocation of funds, no provisions were made for con- sultant and contract services with third parties except for public information purposes. (See attached budget justifications). However, when combining the budget for HUD and OEO funds, all monies for training and technical assistance is to be paid out of the OEO grant and not out of the Model Cities supplemental funds. The Memo to: Dan E. Sweat Page Two October 30, 1969 hiring of a management consultant firm appears to be a legitimate expenditure out of the OEO funds since these funds are provided especially to assist in the development of greater management capabilities on the part of the directors of the corporation. Further inquiry reveals that EOA had requested of the officers of the corporation to submit personnel and administrative policies as a reguirement of their contract. It appears that EOA, and not Model Cities, would be the final determinant agency with regards to the sufficiency and qualifications of the consultants. Item 14 of the contract between the City and Model Cities Mass Convention, Inc., stipulates that all services sub-contracted to third parties must have prior approval by this office. Our Pro- gram Management Division was knowledgeable of the negotiations and had informed the proper officer that these services were eligible only under the OEO grant. I assure you that the staff is fully cognizant of its responsi- bility to assure that all monies which flow through the Model Cities Program are spent wisely and effectively, thus are comitted to ful- filling that obligation Attached for your perusal is a copy of our manual on accounting and fiscal management procedures. This manual is furnished all operating agencies as a guide. I hope that the above information has been of some benefit to you. JCI:vic Attachments
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 18, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021