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Box 9, Folder 1, Document 37

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_037.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 37
  • Text: June 16, 1969 RESOLUTION BY FINANCE COMMITTEE AND BUDGET COMMISSION WHEREAS, The Atlanta Urban Corps Project is a project developed and initiated by College Students for the purpose of introducing young people to the problems of the modern urban environment; and WHEREAS, the Program anticipated the employment of approximately 200 students for work in city government, other local governmental units and other local nonprofit agencies to which students may be assigned; and WHEREAS, the total city contribution to the program can be financed from accumulated savings in the funds already appropriated for salaries in the various departments of city government to which students may be assigned and, due to the Federal grants available, the City can receive the services of the students in various City functions for approximately $50 per student for the summer. NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE MAYOR AND BOARD OF ALDERMEN that the 1969 (General Fund) Budget be and is hereby amended as follows: ADD TO ANTICIPATIONS Account No, : ° G-16-764£0 Grants, Non-Profit Agencies G-16-76 4S" G-16-7659 Grants, Private Contribution ADD TO APPROPRIATIONS Account No, G-25-62-570U Partitions, Auditorium Offices 760U Postage 761U Printing and Reproduction 714U Telephone 770U Office Supplies and Expense 810U Rentals 830U Salaries "TRANSFER FROM: Account No, G-9-62-830A Salaries, Department of Finance G-11-62-830A Salaries, Department of Public Works 830F Salaries, Sanitary Division, Garbage Collection : G-12-62-830 Salaries, Libraries G-23-62-830 Salaries, Department of Law G-25-62-830 Salaries, Department of Mayor G-29-62-830 Salaries, Department of Purchasing G-30-62-830 Salaries, Department of Planning G-34-62-830C - Salaries, Department of Parks G-46-62-830 Salaries, Traffic Engineering Grants, College Work Study Program $15,280.00 77,856.00 oO 9cn NN Wg eve vu $121, 386,00 $ 646.00 150.00 500.00 600.00 1,500.00 400,00 117,590.00 ~ $121,386.00 6,500,00 1,500,00 11,605.00 8,500.00 750.00 7,500.00 750,00 2,500.00 10,000,00 _3,000,00__ $52,605.00 TRANSFER TO Account No, G-25-62-830U Salaries $52,605.00 The purpose of this resolution is to establish the budget of the 1969 Urban Corps Project within the Office of the Mayor by anticipating and appropriating grants to be received and by transferring certain existing appropriations, APPROVED BY: ae OLA Lay | z ¥- SA. sa oS Chetraan of Finance Committee ae ee ae a iS 4 gi 8e le “TION BY | “SE COMMITTEE AND BUDGET COMMISSION ‘ishing the budget of the 1969 Urban Project within the Office Of Mayor -icipating and appropriating “86 in grants to be received and “erring $52,604 in existing appropriat- 4 eeet} oe jim apr k IS : re = ame batt i Rin . a are ry é f i Z SL pes “} a ed “Te ann (Ce MIRE . i} — 5 > Hi 4. © «ner os
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 36

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_036.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 36
  • Text: cus, OP ey mabe fom eons Hae in LM Nae teci ER eet 4 : 2 Seats uk i * fades eae RN Sn an Tal me me ae eRe iN a aL le ali 3 ces im Aa aay SESSA aA todas ON ta ipa Medel eet, rt May 19, 1969 ORDINANCE BY FINANCE COMMITTEE: WHEREAS, the City of Atlanta has decided that it is in its best interest to foster interest in municipal government within the college comnunity; and : : i WHEREAS, the City believes that this goal can be enhanced through the extensive use of a college internship program; and WHEREAS, the City is desirous of establishing within its present organizational framework an agency to control end implement this pro- posed internship program; and ~ - WHEREAS, this egency is to be placed within the Department of the Mayor and to be given the title Atlanta Urban Corps; BE IT THERETORE ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND BOARD OF ALDERMEN OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA that Article III, Volume II of the City Code is amended by adding a new section thereto appropriately numbered as follows: "Section 2-63; There is tiereby created iu the Gifice of the Mayor, a division known as the Atlanta Urban Corps. The Mayor or his duly appointed representative has the duties and respon- sibilities for maintaining and adiwinistrating this division and the interns employed therein. The Mayor shall have authority and responsibility for entering into contracts with universities for College Work Study Program positions; non-profit organiza- tions, other governmental units, and nongovernmental organizations _for the cmployment of interns, Said contracts shall be ratified ” by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen.” ( j | 1 \ 1 i i | Ta aay a eeprom ae —— iit ee, see ioe — | CERTIFIED “MAY 19 1369 \ = Nea ad ots, ‘ J ewewee eee Prosident Board of Aldermen aad sy ee sect opladespetess _ ORDINANCE DY oA Oy oe cos MMITTEE C3e = ANENDING ARTICLE Lif, VOLE LL, OF THE CITY COBE BY ADDING A NEW SECTION i 2- 63 CREATING IN THE OFFICE OF MAYOR A DIVISION KXOWN AS THE ATLANTA URBAN CORPS Clean naa, Finance Corin ikea ne
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 18

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_018.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 18
  • Text: Office of lhe’ Mayor ROUTE SLIP TO: FROM: George Berry (_] For your information [_] Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the necessary reply. Advise me the status of the attached. U FORM 25-19
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 6

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_006.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 6
  • Text: TELEPHONE MESSAGE Name Telephone No. [_] Wants you to call [-] Is here to see you {_] Returned your call [_] Came by to see you [_] Left the following message: Date: Time a.m./ p.m. By FORM 25-5
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_019.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 19
  • Text: Memo DATE 7-11-69 From GEORGE BERRY iy Unda, Corps Pit \ Note: This contract was superceded by a later agreemat per Inmond Deen.
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 3
  • Text: ATLANTA VRBAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND ST., N.E. / ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Office of the Mayor City Hall Atlanta, Georgia
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 12

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_012.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 12
  • Text: ATLANTA URBAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND ST., N.E. / ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 17

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_017.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 17
  • Text: 3 At of “Wy 7-tl-kf
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_009.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 9
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 47

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_047.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 47
  • Text: December 18, 1969 Mr. Maynard Jackson Vice-Mayor Elect #5 Forsyth Street, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Jackson: As you know, the Atlanta Urban Corps is a student program now operating through the Mayor's office. The program is designed to offer students an avenue for constructive com- munity service while expanding the relevance of their col- lege education. The program has operated successfully since June, but is now facing a very uncertain future. The Atlanta Urban Corps is being caught in the squeeze of the change of City Administrations. For six and one-half months, (since June 16, 1969), the City of Atlanta allocated $76,000 for the operation of the Urban Corps. This money helped pay the compensation of City interns plus administra- tion costs. In total, the program involved 300 students in 1969. We were asked to plan and document an expanded and improved program for fiscal year 1970. Of a total budget of $650,000, the City was asked to allocate $139,000 for administration and City interns. The total program was de- signed to include 660 students, of which 220 will work for City departments. Mr. Milton Farris has decided to allocate $40,000 to pay both matching costs and administration. The matching costs alone will amount to some $38,000, if our plans develop as they should. Obviously, this will leave little to operate an effective program. Unfortunately, Mr. Farris is viewing the program only in dol- lar terms. I feel he has overlooked some important consider- ations concerning the Urban Corps. He has failed to grasp the importance of a meaningful relationship between the needs of the City and the potentials of the student community. It is wasteful to disregard the motivations, energies and abilities of the area students. We have plans and procedures to produce an effective 1970 program to build upon the documented success of our 1969 efforts. However, this serious budget cut, which represents only 28.5% of our original request and merely 6% of the total program cost, threatens to destroy the possibilities of the Urban Corps. Mr. Maynard Jackson December 18, 1969 Page 2 In real terms, the Urban Corps needs at least $50,000 for program administration. I am asking for your personal intervention before the budget is passed to correct this situation. Mr. Dan Sweat will be glad to discuss the pro- gram with you, and is able to illustrate the benefits of the Atlanta Urban Corps. Of course, I am available and welcome the opportunity to discuss the matter with you at any time. Sincerely, Ken Millwood Director KM: sz
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 53

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_053.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 53
  • Text: October 28, 1969 Mr. Jay Fountain Deputy Director of Finance City of Atlanta : City Hall 68 Mitchell Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia Dear Jay: Please make the following deposits: ACCOUNT NUMBER DRAWN BY G-16-7640 Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc, G-16-7645 West Georgia College G-16-7645 Indiana University Acknowledgement of receipt will be appreciated. Sincerely, Hugh H. Saxon, Jr. Director of Finance HHSjr:sz Enclosures ce: Mr. George Berry 4 AMOUNT $ 138. 80 $ 3,078. 40 $ 197. 12 or Corps
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 7
  • Text: Mn. Ce . hw QL 3 Cartend To Saw Wriellann
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 5
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 28

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_028.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 28
  • Text: FEDERAL REGISTER | la VOLUME 34 * NUMBER a1 3 Tuesday, May 13, 1969 o- Washington, D. es PART ce a ay * ao " Department of Health, Education, — | oa | a Aye Uae and Welfare ~- 2 ae 4 : (i el 7 xfs Office of Education _ i a yon Ven : =" COLLEGE WORK- STUDY PROGRAM. ee 7632 Title 45—PUBLIC WELFARE Chapter I—Office of Education, De- partment of Health, Education, and Welfare PART 175—COLLEGE WORK-STUDY PROGRAM Chapter I of Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations is hereby amended by adding a new part, Part 175. Federal financial assistance made available pursuant to the regulations set forth below is subject to the regulations in 45 CFR Part 80, issued by the Secre- tary of Health, Education, and Weliare, and approved by the President to effec- tuate the provisions of section 601 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Public Law _ 88-352). Bec. 175.1 Purpose and objectives. 175.2 Definitions. 175.3 Allotment of Federal funds to States. ~. 175.4 Program eligibility. — 175.5 Eligibility and selection of student participants. i 175.6 Limitations on the number of hours . of employment. 175.7 Use of funds. 175.8 lLimitations‘on Federal share of stu- dent compensation. 175.9 Minimum wage rate. f 175.10 Nature and source of institutional share of student compensation. 175.11 Maintenance of level of expenditures. 175.12 Coordination of student financial aid programs. 175.18 Institutional agreement and appli- cation for funds. 175.14. Criteria for approval of applications. 175.15 Payment and reallocation of grant funds. 175.16 Fiscal procedures, records, and reports. ¢ 175.17 Preceding provisions not exhaustive of jurisdiction of the Commis- sioner. AurHoriry: The provisions of this Part 175 issued under 82 Stat. 1014, 20 U.S.C. 1011, Public Law 89-329, Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, Title IV, Part C. § 175.1 Purpose and objectives. (a) The purpose of the College Work- Study Program is to stimulate and promote the part-time employment of _ students, particularly those from low- income families, who are in need of the earnings from such employment in order tO pursue courses of study at eligible institutions. (b) This purpose will be promoted through the development of student employment programs designed to meet the following objectives: (1) Encourage eligible institutions to expand their efforts to enroll needy stu- dents, particularly those from low- income families; (2) Increase the proportion of eligible high school graduates who continue their education in eligible institutions; (3) Provide financial aid for eligible students through combining the earn- ings from part-time employment with other forms of financial assistance to enable students to meet their educa- tional expenses without the necessity of / RULES AND REGULATIONS incurring an unduly heavy burden of indebtedness; and : (4) Broaden the range of worthwhile job opportunities for qualified students in employment for the institution itself or for public or private nonprofit organi- zations, especially those engaged in health, education, welfare, and related public service activities. § 175.2 Definitions. (a) “Act” means Title IV, Part C of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (Public Law 89-329, 79 Stat. 1219). e (b) “Administrative expenses” means those direct costs incurred by an eligible institution which are necessary for the proper ana efficient administration of a Work-Study Program. conducted pur- suant to an institutional agreement, but only to the extent that the items of cost are attributable to that portion of such program in which students are working for public or private nonprofit organiza- tions other than the institution itself, ineluding such items as salaries of staff, communications, supplies and printing, and travel; but exclusive of overhead, other indirect costs, and equipment. (c) “Area vocational school” means; (1) A specialized high school used exclusively or principally for the provi- sion of vocational education to persons who are available for full-time study in preparation for entering the labor mar- ket, or (2) The department of a high school exclusively or principally used for pro- viding vocational education in no less than five different occupational fields to persons who are available for full-time study in preparation for entering the labor market, or (3) A technical or vocational school used exclusively or principally for the provision. of vocational education to persons who have completed or left high school and who are available for full- time study in preparation for entering the labor market, or (4) The department or division of a junior college or community college or university which provides vocational edu- cation in no less than five different oc- cupational fields, under the supervision of the State board, leading to immediate employment but not leading to a bac- calaureate degree, if it is available to all residents of the State or an area of the State designated and approved by the State Board, and if, in the case of a school, department, or division described in subparagraph (3) or (4) of this paragraph, it admits as regular students both persons who have completed high school and persons who have left high school. The term “State Board” as used in this definition means the State board for vocational education designated or created pursuant to section 5 of the Smith-Hughes Act (that is the Act approved Feb. 23, 1917 (39 Stat. 929, ch, 114; 20 U.S.C. 11-15, 16-28)) to secure to the State the bene- fits of that Act. (d) “Commissioner” means the U.S. Commissioner of Education or his designee. (e). “Cooperative education” means a full-time course of study in an institu- tion, under which all students in the institution, or a major subdivision thereof, may alternate periods of full- time attendance with periods of related full-time employment, upon the comple- ~— tion of which course of study a degree or other certificate is normally awarded. (f) “Eligible institution” or “institu- tion” means an institution of higher. education or an area vocational school (as herein defined) , except that no insti- tution of the United States shall be eligible to enter into an institutional agreement with the Commissioner. (g) “Family” means parents or other individuals (except foster parents) who stand in loco parentis. (h) “Fiscal year” means the Federal fiscal year commencing on the first day of July and ending on the 30th day of the following June. (i) “Full-time attendance’ means compliance by a full-time student with the policies and regulations regarding attendance in effect at the institution in which he is enrolled. (j) “Full-time student” means a stu- dent who is pursuing any combination of courses, research, or special] studies (whether or not for credit) which, ac- cording to the standards and practices of the institution in which the student is enrolled, is considered full-time study. (k) “Good standing” means the eligi- bility of a student to continue in full- time attendance in accordance with the standards and practices of the institu- tion in which he is enrolled. () “Institution of higher education” means an educational institution in any State which meets the requirements of section 435(b) of the Act. The term “educational institution” limits the scope of this definition to establishments where teaching is conducted and which have an identity of their own. (m) “Institutional agreement” means the written agreement between an eligi- ble institution and the Commissioner, which provides for the conduct of a Work-Study Program and which meeis the conditions of section 444 of the Act. () “Low-income family” means a family whose basic needs exceed its means to satisfy them primarily because its annual income is less than the mini- mum amount determined, according to standards promulgated by the Commis- sioner from time to time, to be necessary to maintain a decent standard of living. (o) “National of the United States” means (1) a citizen of the United States, or (2) a person who though not a citizen of the United States owes permanent al- legiance to the United States. (8. U.S.C.A. 1101 (a) (22)). (p) “Part-time employment’ means hourly employment of a student under the Work-Study Program in accordance with the limits established in § 175.6. Work performed as a prereduisite to a degree or a certificate will not be con- sidered employment except for not more FEDERAL REGISTER, VOL, 34, NO. 91-——-TUESDAY, MAY 13, 1969 | than 120 days of work performed during any full-time work period of an orga- nized cooperative education program. (q) “Period of non-regular enroll- ment” means a summer vacation period or an equivalent period such as the full- time work period of an organized cooper- ative education program during which the student is enrolled in one or more classes. (ry) “Period of regular enrollment” means any period of time during which a particular student is normally expected by his institution to be pursuing a course of full-time studies, according to the usual standards and practices of the institution. (s) “Private nonprofit” (as applied to any school, institution, organization or agency) means a school, institution, or- ganization or agency, no part of whose earnings inures or lawfuly may inure directly or indirectly to the benefit of any private member, shareholder, or other individual. (t) “Public organization” includes a school, agency, organization or institu- tion of the United States. (u) “State” means, in addition to the several States of the Union, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Is- lands, and the Virgin Islands. § 175.3 Allotment of Federal funds to States. (a) Initial allotments: From sums ap- propriated to carry out this part for a fiscal year, not to oe 2 per centum shall be allotted by the Commissioner among Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, and the Virgin Islands aeccord- ing to their respective needs for assist- ance under this part. In addition to such sum, an amount shall be reserved to pro- vide work-study assistance to students who reside in, but attend eligible institu- tions outside of, American Samoa or the Trust Territory of the Pacifie Islands. The amount so reserved shall be allotted to eligible institutions and shall be avail- able only for the purpose of providing work-study assistance to such students. The remainder of the sums shall be allotted among the remaining States as provided in paragraph (b) of this sec- tion. For the purposes of computing this allotment, the Commissioner will use in- formation for the most recent year for ta satisfactory data are available to (b) Of the sums being allotted under this paragraph: . (1) One-third shall be allotted by the Commissioner among the States so that the allotment to each State under this clause will be an amount which bears the same ratio to such one-third as the number of persons enrolled on a full- time basis in institutions of higher edu- cation in such State bears to the total number of persons enrolled on a full- time basis in institutions of higher edu- cation in all the States; (2) One-third shall be allotted by the Commissioner among the States so that FEDERAL REGISTER, VOL. 34, NO. 91—TUESDAY, MAY 13, 1969 RULES AND REGULATIONS the allotment to each State under this clause will be an amount which bears the same ratio to such one-third as the number of high school graduates (as de- fined in section 103(d) (3) of the Higher Education Facilities Act of 1963) of such State bears to the total number of such high school graduates of all the States; and (3) One-third shall be allotted by the Commissioner among the States so that the allotment to each State under this clause will be an amount which bears the same ratio to such one-third as the number of related children under 18 years of age living in families with an- nual incomes of less than $3,000 in such State bears to the number of related chil- dren under 18 years of age living in fami- lies with annual incomes of less than $3,000 in all the States. (c) Reallotment: The amount of any State’s allotment which has not been granted to an institution at the end of the fiscal year for which appropriated shall be reallotted by the Commissioner in such a manner as he determines will best assist in achieving the purposes of the Act. Amounts reallotted under this paragraph shall be available for making grants until the close of the fiscal year next succeeding the fiscal year for which appropriated. § 175.4 Program eligibility. (a) General. Work-Study Programs operated under an institutional agree- ment for the part-time employment of students may involve work for the insti- tution itself or work for a public or pri- vate nonprofit organization in any State. (1) Such programs: (i) Must not result in the displace- ment of employed workers or impair ex- isting contracts for services; (ii) Must not involve the construction, operation, or maintenance of so much of any facility as is used or is to be used for sectarian instruction or as a place of religious worship. (2) The work provided under such pro- grams (i) must not involve any partisan _ or nonpartisan political activity associ- ated with a candidate, or contending faction or group, in an election for public or party office, and (ii) must be governed by such conditions of employment, in- cluding compensation, as will be appro- priate and reasonable in light of such factors as type of work performed, geo- graphical region, proficiency of the em- ployee, and any applicable Federal, State, or local legislation. ? tb) Work for the institution itself. 'To be eligible for Federal financial partici- pation, work for the institution itself (in- eluding any nonprofit entity which is under the control of the governing board of the institution) must result in an ex- pansion or broadening of the institution’s student employment programs, (c) Work for a public or private non- profit organization. To be eligible for Federal financial participation, work for a, public or private nonprofit organization other than the institution must (1) be in the public interest (devoted to the gen- eral, national or community welfare 7633 rather than that of a particular interest or group), and (2) be evidenced by a written agreement containing the condi- tions of such work between the institution and the organization. The institution is responsible for ensuring that any ar- rangements be with a reliable organiza- tion with professional direction and staff, and that the work performed by each stu- dent will be properly supervised, and consistent with the purposes of the Act. (d) Work in the public interest. In no event shall work be considered to be in the public interest where (1) it is work for which the political support or affilia- tion of the student is a prerequisite or consideration for employment, (2) it is work to be performed for an elected offi- cial other than as part of the regular ad- ministration of Federal, State or local government or (3) it is work which is primarily for the benefit of the members of a limited membership organization (such as a credit union, fraternal order, or @ cooperative) , rather than the public. § 175.5 Eligibility and selection of stu- dent participants. (a) Eligibility. A student is eligible for part-time employment under the Work- Study Program only during periods in which he meets all of the following conditions: (1) Is a national of the United States, or is in the United States for other than a temporary purpose and intends to be- come a permanent resident thereof, or is a permanent resident of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands; (2) Is in need of the earnings from such employment in order to pursue a course of study at the institution; (3) Is capable, in the opinion of the institution, of maintaining good stand- ing in such course of study while em- ployed under this program; and (4) Has been accepted for enrollment as a full-time student at the institution or, in the case of a student already en- rolled in and attending the institution, is in good standing and in full-time at- tendance there, either as an undergradu- ate, graduate or professional student. (b) Eligibility of students attending area \vocational schools. A student en- Tolled in an area vocational school is eligible for employment under the Col- lege Work-Study Program only if he meets the following conditions in addi- tion to the provisions described in para- graph (a) of this section: (1) Has a certificate of graduation from a school providing secondary edu- cation or the recognized equivalent of such a certificate, and (2) Is pursuing a program of educa- tion or training which requires at least 6 months to complete and is designed to prepare the student for gainful em- ployment in a recognized occupation. — (ce) Determination of need. In deter- mining whether, and to what extent, a student is in need of the earnings from employment, the institution shall, at least annually, (1) determine what in- come, assets, and other resources (in- cluding other forms of aid) are avail- able to the student for the time period 7634 under consideration; (2) calculate ac- cording to standards published from time to time by the Commissioner what por- tion of the income, assets, and resources of the student’s family may reasonably be expected to be made available to the student; and (3) determine the cost reasonably necessary-for the student’s attendance at the institution, including any special needs and obligations which directly affect the student’s financial ability to attend the institution on a full-time basis. A student shall be con- sidered to be in need to the extent that such costs of attendance exceed the sum of the amounts determined to be avail- able to the student and the amounts, if any, which may reasonably be expected to be made available to him by his family. (d) Selection of students. In the selec- tion of students for employment under the Work-Study Program, an institution shall give preference to students from low-income families. (e) Availability of student employ- ment. Each institution shall make em- ployment under the Work-Study Pro- gram, or equivalent employment offered or arranged for by the institution, rea- sonably available (to the extent of avail- able funds) to all eligible students in the institution in need thereof. (f) Record of approval or disapproval. _ Each institution shall maintain records which refiect the approval or disapproval of all or part of each student’s applica- tion for employment under the program and which identify the institutional of- ficer who made each such determination. § 175.6 Limitations on the number of hours of employment. (a) During periods of regular enroll- ment, when classes in which a student is enrolled are in session, he shall be limited to working no more than an aver- age of 15 hours per week under the pro- gram, averaged over the semester or other time period on the basis of which the institution in which he is enrolled awards academic credits. Work per- formed during any week when the stu- dent is on vacation shall not exceed 40 hours and shall not be counted as con- tributing toward the average of 15 hours per week established in the preceding sentence. (b) During periods of nonregular en- rollment, when classes in which a stu- dent is enrolled are in session he may be employed under the program for as many as 40 hours per week or such lesser num- ber of hours per week as the institution may determine in accordance with its own standards and practices and con- ‘sidering (1) the extent of the student’s financial need and (2) the harm or po- tential harm of a particular combina- tion of hours of work and hours of study on a given student’s health or academic ‘progress. (ec) During periods not covered under paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, a student may work up to 40 hours per week under the program. § 175.7 Use of funds. (a) Federal funds made available on the basis of an approved application -RULES AND REGULATIONS submitted pursuant to this part may be used only (1) to pay the Federal share of compensation to eligible students em- ployed in eligible Work-Study Programs, and (2) to meet administrative expenses, as defined in § 175.2(b). The amount for such administrative expenses may not exceed 5 percent of that portion of the Federal payments used for compensation of students in work for public or private nonprofit organizations other than the institution itself. (b) Interest, if any, earned on Fed- eral funds shall be remitted to the Com- missioner in accordance with instructions issued by him. § 175.8. Limitations on Federal share of student compensation. (a) The Federal share of the com- pensation of students employed in any Work-Study Program under an institu- tional agreement shall not exceed 80 percent of such compensation for part- time employment, except that in unusual cases a Federal share in excess of 80 percent may be approved by the Com- missioner, but only and to the extent that he determines, pursuant to such ob- - jective criteria as may be established in regulations, that a Federal share in ex- cess of 80 percent is required to achieve the purposes of this part. (b) The Federal share of compensa- tion for part-time employment shall be calculated on the basis of the hourly rate paid the student for actual time on the job but such calculation shall not include any compensation paid which is in ex- cess of such maximum hourly wage rate as may from time to time be set by the Commissioner, or any costs of the em- ployer’s contribution to Social Security, workmen’s compensation, retirement, or any other welfare or insurance programs which may be paid by the employer on account of a student employed ater the Work-Study Program, § 175.9 Minimum wage rate. The minimum rate of compensation for a student employed under the Work- - Study Program shall be (a) $1.15 an hour for work performed through January 31, 1969; (b) $1.30 an hour for work performed from February 1, 1969, through Janu- ary 31, 1970; (ec) $1.45 an hour for work performed from February 1, 1970, through Janu- ary 31,1971; and (d) $1.60 an hour for work performed thereafter; (e) Or such higher minimum wage as may be required under any applicable Federal, State, or local legislation; ex- cept that the Commissioner may approve a lower rate of compensation in cases (1) where a lower minimum wage for such employees has been established by the Secretary of Labor, under the provi- sions of the Fair Labor Standards Act, or (2) where exceptional circumstances warrant a lower rate and where the ap- proval of a lower rate is not precluded by law and is consistent with and pro- motive of the purposes of this part, § 175.10 Nature and source of institu- tional share of student compensation. (a) An institution may use any source available to it to pay its share of the compensation paid to students employed under the Work-Study Program. (b) No institution shall solicit or permit any public or private nonprofit organization with which it has an ar- rangement pursuant to §175.4(c) to solicit from a student or any other per- son any fee, commission, or compensa- tion of any kind, or the granting of a gift or gratuity of any kind, as a considera- tion or a prerequisite for the employ- ment of any particular student under the program. § 175.11 Maintenance of level of ex- penditures. In each fiscal year during which the institutional agreement remains in effect, the institution shall expend (from sources other than payments of Federal grants under this part) for the employ- ment of its students (whether or not in employment eligible for assistance under this part) an amount that is not less than the institution’s average annual ex- penditures for such employment during the three fiscal years preceding the fiscal year for which the institutional agree- ment is in effect. § 175.12 Coordination of student finan- cial aid programs. In order to carry out the purpose of the Work-Study Program, the institu- tion shall provide for the coordination of this program with other programs of student financial aid, including the Na- tional Defense Student Loan and Edu- cational Opportunity Grants Programs where the institution also participates in such programs. Responsibility for the general conduct of the operation of the Work-Study Program shall be assigned to an institutional official who has other student financial aid responsibility. § 175.13 Institutional agreement and ap- plication for funds, (a) Applications for Federal funds under this part shall be approved only if there is in.effect an institutional agree- ment. Such agreement shall be executed by an official of the institution who is legally authorized to commit the institu- tion. (b) Applications for Federal funds must be submitted to the Commissioner by an authorized official ofthe institu- tion in such form and at such time as the Commissioner may prescribe, § 175.14 Criteria for approval of insti- tutional applications. In order to achieve equitable distribu- tion of assistance as required by section 446 of the Act, institutional applications for the allocation of funds under this program shall be reviewed and approved, in whole or in part, on the basis of, but not limited to, the following criteria: (a) Whether the institution employs under the program a large proportion of students from low-income families in relation to the total number of needy students employed under the program; \ FEDERAL REGISTER, VOL, 34, NO. 91—TIUESDAY, MAY 13, 1969 ‘ (b) Whether provision has been made for effective administration of the pro- gram, including effective coordination with -institutional and other Federal programs of student financial aid; (c} Whether public and private non- profit organizations, especially those en- gaged in health, education, welfare, and related public service activities have been included; (d) Whether the institution has dem- onstrated a strong commitment to enroll students from low-income families, as evidenced by (1) specialized recruitment and admission, such as that provided through the programs of Talent Search or Upward Bound, (2) remedial instruc- tion, (3) specialized counseling, and (4) any other relevant factors; (e) The anticipated number of stu- dents to be employed under this pro- gram as compared to the institution’s anticipated enrollment; : (f) The anticipated average compen- sation of Work-Study students in rela- tion to the institution’s average educa- tional costs; (g) The institution’s utilization of Work-Study Program funds, if any, allo- cated in previous years; and (h) The institution’s total request for Federal student financial aid funds (in- eluding Educational Opportunity Grants and National Defense Student Loans) in relation to the average cost of educa- tion at the institution and the institu- tion’s anticipated enrollment. § 175.15 Payment and reallocation of grant funds. (a) Payment of funds. Funds will be made available in advance on the basis of substantiated need and periodic fiscal reports submitted by the institution. (b) Reallocation of unused Federal funds. Any funds which are available to an institution but not used, or which the institution agrees will not be used, by the end of the period for which such funds were made available shall, in the discre- tion of the Commissioner, either remain FEDERAL REGISTER, VOL, 34, NO, 91—TUESDAY, MAY 13, 1969 RULES AND REGULATIONS available for use by the institution dur- ing a subsequent grant period or be made available for use by other eligible institutions. (c) No waiver. Neither approval of any application nor any payment of funds to an institution shall be deemed to waive the right or duty of the Commissioner to withhold funds by reason of failure of the institution to observe, before or after such administrative action, any Federal requirement. § 175.16 Fiscal procedures, records, and reports. (a) Fiscal procedures. (1) The insti- tution shall administer the Work-Study Program in such a manner as to provide for an adequate system of internal con- trols. Wherever practical, the various ad- ministrative responsibilities shall be di- vided so as to prevent the handling of all aspects of the program by a single individual. (2) If a fiscal agent is utilized by the ‘institution, its function must be limited solely to the performance of ministerial acts. The responsibilities of the institu- tion to make determinations relative to the eligibility of students for employ- ment under the program cannot be delegated. (3) Payments to students shall be made at least once a month. The insti- tution is responsible for ensuring that students are paid the full amount of wages earned under the program, whether the work is for the institution itself or for a public or private non- profit organization. (b) Records. The institution shall maintain, on a current basis, adequate records which reflect all transactions with respect to the program, and shall establish and maintain such general led- ger control accounts and related subsid- lary accounts as are prescribed by the Commissioner. Such records shall: (1) Meet at least the minimum stand- ards prescribed by the Commissioner as set forth in the most recent officia] Col- 7635 lege Work-Study Manual and other of- ficial guidelines that may be issued from time to time; (2) Be maintained in such a manner as to separately identify all program transactions from other institutional funds and activities; and (3) Be maintained in such a manner as to be readily auditable. All records pertaining to activity during a given fis- cal year, including applications of stu- dents for employment under the Work- Study Program during that fiscal year, shall be retained for a period of 5 years following the end of the fiscal year, or until audited by a representative of the Commissioner, whichever is earlier. Rec- ords involved in any claim or expendi- ture questioned by the Commissioner, or on audit, shall be retained until neces- sary adjustments have been reviewed and approved by the Commissioner. (c) Reports. Institutions shall submit such reports and information as the Commissioner may reasonably require in connection with the administration of the Work-Study Program and shall com- ply with such procedures as he may find necessary to ensure the correctness and verification of such reports. § 175.17 Preceding provisions not ex- haustive of jurisdiction of the Com- missioner. No provision of this part now or here- after promulgated shall be deemed ex- haustive of the jurisdiction of the Commissioner under the Act. The pro- visions of this part may be modified or further regulations may be issued here- after as circumstances may warrant. Dated: April 10, 1969. PETER P. MuIRHEAD, U.S. Commissioner of Education, ” Approved: May 7, 1969. RosBERT H. FiIncH, Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare. [F.R. Doc. 69-5667; Filed, May 12, 1969; 8:45 a.m,] | J
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 31

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_031.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 31
  • Text: URBAN CORPS cNational “News JUNE —JULY 1969 The National Program - - - A PROGRESS REPORT The Urban Corps National Develop- ment Office was established in the fall of 1968 under a grant from The Ford Foun- dation to serve as a catalyst for the estab- lishment of local Urban Corps programs in cities throughout the nation, and through this vehicle to create new and viable relationships between the academic community and our urban centers. This initial period of our operations has been devoted to exploring the feasi- bility of implementing Urban Corps in a wide variety of communities and in de- veloping a series of reports documenting and examining the concept and tech- nology of the Urban Corps. Our success in this pursuit may now be measured in terms of concrete accom- plishments: - - - Our initial pilot group of eight cities has blossomed into more than 15 operating Urban Corps programs in every part of the nation. -- - Federal officials, including the Sec- retary of Health, Education and Welfare and the Commissioner of Education, have enthusiastically endorsed the Urban Corps concept as a valuable method of both serving the needs of the city and the colleges — and providing our nation’s young people with an opportunity to constructively participate in the resolu- tion of the urban crisis. - - - Institutions of higher education and regional organizations have begun to move actively towards the development of new forms of academic curricula, in- volving not only courses and lectures but also the opportunity to test theory against the realities of the outside world. In several cases the local Urban Corps is serving as the test-bed for this de- velopment. (continued on page 2) NUMBER 5 EDUCATION CHIEF URGES CHANGE IN WORK-STUDY PRIORITIES U.S. Commissioner of Education James E. Allen, Jr. has called for an increased com- mitment of Federal work-study funds to programs which reflect the concern of today’s college population for “an education geared to realities.”’ OE ALLOCATES $23.4-MILLION IN ADDITIONAL CWSP FUNDS The nation’s colleges and universities will share an additional $23.4-million in College Work-Study Program funds, thanks to a supplemental allocation just announced by the U.S. Office of Educa- tion. The new money brings the total allocation of CWSP funds for the six month period ending December 31, 1969 to $102,662,178, an increase of nearly twenty-five per cent over the previously announced Work-Study levels. The supplemental grants are the result of a re-allocation of CWSP funds orig- inally allocated for use during 1968 and unexpended by the participating colleges as of December 31st of last year. The new money is being distributed primarily to colleges in those states which suffered most heavily from the low level of the initial CWSP funding for the July- December 1969 period. Generally, insti- tutions in those states which received less than 70% of the amount recommended by the regional CWSP panels have been granted enough additional funds to bring them up to that level. Schools in states which already received all or nearly all of their recommended funding will not share in the supplement. The largest supplemental grant went to California, which received $3.7-million in additional funds, increasing its allocation from 44% of the level approved by the regional panel to 70%. The University of California at Berke- ley will receive the nation’s largest CWSP grant of $879,898, with $320,012 com- ing from the supplement. Speaking at the opening session of the Atlanta Service-Learning Conference, Dr. Allen said that young people have re- versed the traditional concepts of success, putting “the pursuit of goals beyond the self” before monetary rewards. ‘’Today’s youth is as bored with four-wall abstrac- tions as it is with materialism,’ the nation’s education chief told the more than 200 delegates to the conference. He said that education must extend beyond the confines of the campus, to give stu- dents the sort of first-hand experience they now demand. Dr. Allen applauded the Urban Corps as a way to inject reality testing into the present academic structure. He called for major changes in the College Work-Study Program to facilitate the development of programs for the constructive involvement of college students in important urban- related activities. Observing that most work-study funds are now used for the employment of students in work on their college campuses, Dr. Allen said that he would like to see this situation reversed, with the bulk of work-study resources being used to help the nation’s communi- ties resolve their most pressing problems. Dr. Allen also called for an examina- tion of techniques for the effective inte- gration of new people into existing organ- izations on a short-term basis, and for the exploration of programs combining com- munity service with academic credit. “The need,” Dr. Allen concluded, “‘is to concentrate on ways of helping the young to realize the potential of their new sense of purpose and spirit for service.” URBAN CORPS NATIONAL NEWS Published by the Urban Corps National Development Office under a grant from the Ford Foundation, June —July 1969 Number 5 Michael B. Goldstein Director Anna Beranek Editor 250 Broadway New York 10007 Telephone: (212) 964-5552 PROGRESS REPORT (continued from page 1) - - - Dozens of cities have expressed an interest in adopting the Urban Corps con- cept, and a number of state governments have begun to offer coordinating and re- source services for those of their cities de- siring to develop such a program. - - - Hundreds of copies of each of the reports issued to date by the National Office are in use by cities and universities throughout the nation, and each issue of the National News now reaches more than 5,000 persons (up from an initial press run of 200 in the early spring). Remaining ahead is the expansion of the Urban Corps concept to every major Urban Center, the development of ‘‘spin- off’ programs intimately involving the cities with the academic community, completion of the documentation of the Urban Corps experience and method- ology, and an analysis of the success, techniques and impact of the various Urban Corps programs throughout the nation. The Urban Corps National Develop- ment Office is programmed to conclude its effort in the spring of 1971. At that time it is our sincere hope that the Urban Corps will have proven itself a viable and valuable program for the nation and its people. - -- Michael B. Goldstein Director WUNnNDVIVUYT NOEUYVULALIViWe After more than four years of oper- ating under unofficial guidelines, the U.S. Office of Education has promulgated a set of Regulations governing the College Work-Study Program. The new Regula- tions, effective June 13, 1969, together with the legislative requirements of Title IV-C of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (as amended) provide the legal framework for all CWSP programs, whether involving work for the college itself, or off-campus (such as an Urban Corps). The CWSP guidelines, embodied in the 7968 College Work-Study Program Manual, remain in effect as the official interpretation of Federal law. It should be noted, however, that the new Regulations modify certain aspects of the program, so that the guidelines as cur- rently issued do not completely conform. Conflicts must be resolved in favor of the Regulations. The most noteworthy changes caused by the new Regulations concern the increased emphasis upon off-campus work relating to public service activities, especially in the health, education and welfare areas. The Regulations also pro- vide specific guides for the full-time employment of students attending sum- mer school or other “non-regular” courses, and recognize for the first time the legal right of an institution to dele- gate to an outside agency (e.g. an Urban Corps) the ministerial functions of admin- istering an off-campus work-study pro- gram, such as payroll processing and On-going supervision. The Requlations specifically reserve to the institutions the sole power to determine the eligibility of students for CWSP awards. (continued next column) Alumni Journal Tells A ee ee ee ee ee me ee ee ee More than seventy upperclassmen attending units of the City University of New York have been working part-time in city agencies as part of a new seminar- experience program in urban government. Each of the students is enrolled in the seminar at his college, and spends ten hours a week on a high-level assignment within a municipal agency. Weekly semi- nars are augmented by monthly meetings of all the participating students, with top urban officials discussing the problems and prospects of the city. The students in each seminar often concentrate. on a specific geographic part of the city, permitting an interchange of ideas and perceptions concerning the vari- ous services, resources and needs of the community. Although the students re- ceive no pay for their work, they do receive academic credits for the successful completion of the program. The seminar-experience program is ad- ministered jointly by the City Adminis- trator’s office and the City University, under the direction of Deputy City Ad- ministrator Philip Finkelstein and Dr. Robert Hirschfeld of Hunter College. The Regulations were published May 13, 1969 in Vol. 34, Number 91 of the Federal Register at pages 7632-7635 and will appear in Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at Part 175. Copies of the new CWSP Regulations, together with an analysis and finding list keyed to the CWSP Manual, are available from the Urban Corps National Develop- ment Office. Urban Corps Story The Fall/Winter edition of the Sarah Lawrence College Alumnae Magazine carries a lengthy article on the exploits of twenty Sarah Lawrence students who participated in the New York City Urban Corps during the summer of 1968. Written by an undergraduate, Teresa Baker, who herself served in the program, the well-illustrated article examines the rewards and frustrations the girls experienced during three months with the city. The girls worked in a wide variety of assignments, from tutoring children and working with addicts to researching the problems of air and water pollution. They tell of their encounters with government bureaucracy, and their own perceptions of the effectiveness of their experience. Reprints of the article are available without charge from the Urban Corps National Development Office, 250 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10007. NEW HAVEN URBAN CORPS LAUNCHED Mayor Richard C. Lee has announced the formation of a New Haven Urban Corps to give the Connecticut city “an opportunity to benefit from the enthusiasm, energy and ideal- ism of our young people.” Lee said that the program will assign students to ‘meaningful and creative jobs” ina wide variety of city activities, including health, public safety, education and recreation. The Mayor said that the students will work in administrative, research and evaluative capacities, under the supervision of regular city employees. Mayor Lee also announced the appointment of Alan Trager, a 22-year-old city plan- ning student, to serve as coordinator of the new program. A former VISTA volunteer and program planner, Trager previously participated in an effort to involve city planning students in local poverty programs. Festivities Mark Urban Corps Openings During the month of June more than a dozen cities throughout the nation for- mally launched their Urban Corps pro- grams. Here is a sampling of the opening events. Atlanta — More than 200 students at- tended the opening session of the Atlanta Service-Learning Conference. They heard Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen and U.S. Com- missioner of Education James Allen, Jr. urge the development of programs geared to the needs of today’s youth. Detroit — The Motor City welcomed its Urban Corps students with a reception on the grounds of Mayor Jerome Cav- anagh’s official residence. The Mayor wel- comed the group of 100 students, and spent over an hour discussing the city’s problems and prospects with them. Boston — Mayor Kevin White greeted several hundred Urban Corps students in ceremonies at Boston’s new award-win- ning City Hall. He stressed that the poten- tial learning experience of a summer in the city is just as important as the work they will be doing. Minneapolis — Urban Corps students ‘working in the Minnesota city spent a full day getting acquainted with their host- employer. Mayor Arthur Naftalin, in his final official address after eight years in City Hall, called upon the students to direct their talents towards improving their community. City Coordinator Thomas Thompson discussed transit problems in the Twin Cities area, and a panel of city officials and civic leaders participated in a series of round-table dis- cussions on specific local problems. The students were guests of the city at a luncheon at the Minneapolis Athletic Club. New York — More than a thousand Urban Corps students heard Deputy Mayor Timothy W. Costello urge them to “shake things up’ through what he termed “constructive dissent.” “Action Summer”, a motion picture on the Urban Corps, was shown at this opening event. From The Editor... The National News is designed to serve as a vehicle for the interchange of ideas and developments in the growth of Urban Corps student involvement programs, and indeed in the entire area of the urban- academic interface. We hope that by spreading an understanding of the concept, benefits and technology of the Urban Corps we will be serving to stimu- late the growth of these programs throughout the nation. This issue of the National News marks two important mileposts in our rather short existence: distribution to every major city and institution of higher edu- cation in the nation, and a new format permitting both enlarged content and easier reading. Indeed, this issue has been delayed due to the need to adapt our pro- duction facilities to “mass production.” We will resume monthly publication with the August issue. Thanks to the generous support of the Ford Foundation, we are able to circulate the National News without charge. Re- quests for new subscriptions and/or addi- tional copies should be addressed to Anna Beranek, Editor, Urban Corps National News, Room 1410, 250 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10007. We of course invite your comments and suggestions for future issues. ATLANTA URBAN CORPS TO TEST “SERVICE-LEARNING” The Atlanta Urban Corps has been selected to serve as a “practical labora- tory” for the development of a broad- based urban-academic involvement effort in the Atlanta area. The Atlanta Urban Corps will work with the recently organized Atlanta Serv- ice-Learning Conference to test new ideas and concepts designed to involve stu- dents, faculty and practitioners in ar- rangements providing both valuable services to the community and relevant learning experiences for the participants. The Atlanta Service-Learning Confer- ence is designed to bring together agencies, institutions, organizations and individuals interested in the relationships between service experience and higher education, combining their resources in “an exploration and development of a conceptual framework and _ practical model for service-learning programs,"’ The Conference will operate for a nine-month period, examining the various elements of the service-learning concept, from curriculumdesign and service potentials to financial resources and inter-institutional relationships. Conference meetings are planned on a regular basis, with monthly reports of the results of detailed examina- tions of each element. The Atlanta area is considered a hospi- table one for this type of experimenta- tion due to its unusual diversity of organi- zations and institutions, coupled with a tradition for innovative local develop- ment. More than 30,000 students attend Atlanta’s eleven colleges and universities, and most of the “‘socially-relevant” Federal agencies, such as HEW, HUD and the Peace Corps have regional head- quarters in the city. The Conference is being sponsored by the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), a public agency of 15 Southern states created by interstate compact to assist in the development of higher educa- tion and the fostering of social and economic growth in the Southern region. Information on the Conference may be obtained from Mr. William Ramsay, Director, Resource Development Project, Southern Regional Education Board, 130 Sixth Street N.W., Atlanta, Georgia 30313. Area code (404) 872-3873. “AKRON Richard Neal Youth Coordinator City-County Building 219 South High Street Akron, Ohio 44308 (216) 376-1431 *ALBUQUERQUE John Cordova Director Model Cities Program P.O. Box 1293 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87103 (505) 243-8661 ATLANTA Sam Williams Director Atlanta Urban Corps 30 Courtland Street Atlanta, Ga. 30303 (404) 524-8091 Estimated size: 250 BOSTON Roblin Williamson Director Boston Urban Corps City Hall Boston, Mass. 02101 (617) 722-4100 Estimated size: 300 BUFFALO Peter Fleischmann Director, Council on Youth Opportunity City Hall Buffalo, New York 14202 (716) 854-1022 Estimated size: 40 *CINCINNAT! Barry Cholak Youth Coordinator Office of the City Manager Room 105, City Hall Cincinnati, Ohio 45404 (513) 421-5700 URBAN CORPS AROUND THE NATION (All programs are operational unless otherwise noted) *CLEVELAND Robert McAuliffe Manager of Recruitment, Placement and Training Personnel Department Room 120 601 Lakeside Avenue Cleveland, Ohio 44114 (216) 694-2635 *COLUMBUS Frank Cleveland Director of Youth Opportunity Office of the Mayor City Hall Columbus, Ohio 43215 (614) 461-8384 DAYTON S. Henry Lawton Director Dayton Urban Corps Third and Ludlow Streets Dayton, Ohio 45402 (513) 222-3441 Estimated size: 130 DETROIT Carroll Lucht Director Detroit Urban Corps City-County Building Detroit, Mich. 48226 (313) 965-3992 Estimated size: 150 * EUGENE Hugh McKinley City Manager City Hall Eugene, Oregon 97401 (503) 342-5221 * INDIANAPOLIS Robert D. Beckmann, Jr. Director of Public Information Office of the Mayor City-County Building Indianapolis, Indiana 46204 (317) 633-3371 * program in advanced stages of development NEW HAVEN Alan M., Trager Director New Haven Urban Corps 185 Church Street New Haven, Conn. 06510 (203) 772-3460 Estimated size: 20 NEW YORK Martin Rose Director New York Urban Corps 250 Broadway New York, New York 10007 (212) 566-3952 Estimated size: 3000 NEW YORK METROPOLITAN REGION (Outside New York City) Elayne Landis Associate Director Metropolitan Regional Council 155 East 71 Street New York, New York 10021 (212) 628-6803 Estimated size: 50 MADISON Charles F. Reott, Jr. Director Personnel Department City-County Building Madison, Wisconsin 53709 (608) 266-4422 Estimated size: 20 MINNEAPOLIS Babak Armajani Director Minneapolis Urban Corps City Hall Minneapolis, Minn, 55415 (612) 330-2293 Estimated size: 60 SAN FRANCISCO Thomas P. Nagle Director San Francisco Urban Corps City Hall San Francisco, Calif. 94102 (415). 558-5930 Estimated size: 25 *SAN JUAN Franklin D. Lopez Special Aide to the Mayor City Hall San Juan, Puerto Rico (809) 725-6775 ST. LOUIS John Maier Director St. Louis Urban Corps 303 N. 12th Street St. Louis, Missouri 63101 (314) 621-4827 Estimated size: 175 SYRACUSE Frank T. Wood, Jr. Director Executive Department Division of Research and Development County Office Building 603 South State Street Syracuse, New York 13202 (315) 477-7645 *TOLEDO Charles Buckenmeyer Youth Coordinator Office of the Mayor City Hall Toledo, Ohio 43624 (419) 255-1500 TRENTON Jerry Miller Program Developer Model Cities Program City Hall Annex Trenton, New Jersey 08608 (609) 394-3242 Estimated size: 50 WASHINGTON, D.C. Marcia R. Kunen Deputy Director Program Coordination Unit Office of the Mayor 1329 “E"’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20004 (202) 628-6000 Ext. 3495 Estimated size: 125 (Dec. 1969) Urban Corps National Development Office 250 Broadway New York, New York 10007 Hon, Daniel Sweat Assistant to the Mayor City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID NEW YORK.N.Y. PERMIT NO. 22 SF 346
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 32

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_032.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 32
  • Text: STATE-BY-STATE ANALYSIS OF CWSP GRANTS JULY 1, 1969 — DECEMBER 31, 1969 SOURCE: U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION REPORTS State ALABAMA ALASKA ARIZONA ARKANSAS CALIFORNIA COLORADO CONNECTICUT DELAWARE D.C. FLORIDA GEORGIA HAWAII IDAHO ILLINOIS INDIANA IOWA KANSAS KENTUCKY LOUISIANA MAINE MARYLAND MASSACHUSETTS MICHIGAN MINNESOTA MISSISSIPPI MISSOURI MONTANA NEBRASKA NEVADA NEW HAMPSHIRE NEW JERSEY NEW MEXICO NEW YORK NORTH CAROLINA NORTH DAKOTA OHIO OKLAHOMA OREGON PENNSYLVANIA RHODE ISLAND SOUTH CAROLINA SOUTH DAKOTA TENNESSEE TEXAS UTAH VERMONT VIRGINIA WASHINGTON WEST VIRGINIA WISCONSIN WYOMING GUAM PUERTO RICO VIRGIN ISLANDS TOTALS 1969 $ 2,576,668 133,844 856,363 1,869,023 10,220,954 1,488,121 1,224,327 141,163 905,839 2,767,480 1,897,108 399,495 401,491 3,933,688 1,744,989 1,409,829 1,186,820 1,713,068 1,970,513 599,761 1,082,731 5,182,142 3,536,808 2,150,169 2,238,181 2,254,088 2,249,413 800,480 212,879 544,196 2,326,422 910,077 7,060,948 3,348,490 567,424 3,523,585 1,418,514 2,531,756 3,827,699 443,338 1,043,836 565,648 2,752,225 5,568,463 798,666 288,364 1,358,592 2,067,502 1,199,597 2,645,802 334,412 66,472 313,615 9,100 $102,662,178 1968 $ 1,782,172 65,321 711,477 1,573,204 7,455,118 1,120,927 1,018,251 173,893 338,233 1,957,226 1,293,104 240,587 332,887 3,848,506 1,457,736 1,194,601 978,994 1,579,372 1,648,010 478,974 853,114 3,507,862 2,907,969 1,568,109 1,573,392 1,716,345 1,860,429 756,785 153,690 367,343 2,023,512 604,861 5,719,414 2,877,249 400,788 2,898,890 1,190,013 2,026,828 4,232,789 319,420 828,989 392,232 2,255,468 4,712,246 735,646 212,317 979,497 1,487,133 1,102,732 2,041,511 212,134 37,861 349,289 10,080 $82,196,284 Change 1969 % of 1968 144.5% 204.9 120.3 118.8 137.0 132.7 120.2 81.1 267.8 141.3 146.7 166.0 120.6 102.2 119.7 118.0 121.2 108.4 119.5 125.2 126.9 147.7 121.6 137.1 142.2 131.3 120.9 105.7 138.5 148.1 114.9 150.4 123.4 116.3 140.7 121.5 119.2 124.9 90.4 138.7 125.9 144.2 122.0 118.1 108.5 135.8 138.7 139.0 108.7 129.6 157.6 175.5 89.5 90.2 124.8 SCHOOLS RECEIVING LARGEST CWSP GRANTS July 1 - December 31, 1969 SCHOOL 1. University of California at Berkeley 2. Boston University 3. San Jose State College 4. Northeastern University 5, Ohio University 6. University of Montana 7. Montana State 8. University of Washington 9. Michigan State University 10. San Diego State College 11, University of Minnesota 12. University of California at Los Angeles 13. Central YMCA Junior College 14. Portland State College 15. Oregon State 16. University of Oregon 17. Rutgers University 18. Harvard 19. Bishop 20. University of Utah 21. Mississippi State University 22. University of Alabama 23. Miami-Dade Junior College 24. ~~ Yeshiva University 25, Ohio State University 26. Indiana University 27. Columbia University 28. University of Missouri 29. Wilberforce 30. Temple University Sources CITY Berkeley, California Boston, Massachusetts San Jose, California Boston, Massachusetts all campuses Missoula, Montana Bozeman, Montana Seattle, Washington East Lansing, Michigan San Diego, California Minneapolis, Minnesota Los Angeles, California Chicago, Illinois Portland, Oregon Corvallis, Oregon all campuses (New Jersey) all campuses Cambridge, Massachusetts Dallas, Texas Salt Lake City, Utah all campuses University, Alabama Miami, Florida New York, New York all campuses all campuses New York, New York Columbia, Missouri Wilberforce, Ohio Philadelphia, Pennsylvania AMOUNT! ENROLLMENT2 PER CAPITAGRANT $879,898 28,863 $ 30 787,227 23,011 34 765,597 26,975 28 741,759 34,831 21 686,007 21,858 31 657,951 6,655 98 655,992 6,888 95 622,877 30,357 20 602,695 38,758 15 586,646 22,355 26 558,286 58,304 9 554,483 29,070 19 546,558 3,826 142 535,160 9,479 56 531,660 13,319 39 512,078 15,207 33 505,806 30,319 15 503,860 19,135 26 499,367 1,598 312 498,546 18,488 26 496,016 9,114 54 461,515 13,236 34 460,835 23,326 19 456,686 5,528 82 455,982 42,206 10 450,700 47,806 9 442,628 17,459 25 431,000 20,945 20 345,206 914 377 329,615 33,824 9 TWork-Study Reports No. 29 (4/18/69); Supplement No. 1 (5/5/69); Supplement No. 2 (6/6/69); U.S. Office of Education education Directory, 1968-1969, U.S. Office of Education The U.S. Office of Education has issued a set of revision pages to up-date the 1968 College Work-Study Program Manual. Copies of the replacement pages, and a new ‘‘Model Off-Campus Agreement’ which incorporates provisions more suited to the requirements of an Urban Corps, are available from any regional office of the U.S. Office of Education or from the College Work-Study Program Branch, Bureau of Higher Education, U.S. Office of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202. WORK-STUDY MANUAL REVISED
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 24

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_024.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 24
  • Text: Urban Needs = Educational Opportunities 9:00 9:30 11:00 12:15 2:00 5:30 7:00 9:00 11:00 12:15 2:00 4:00 5:00 5:30 Monday, June 30 Welcome by Mayor Ivan Allen A Case Study presented by the service-learning players Service-Learning in Action in Atlanta -- up-to-the-minute report Needs of Urban America luncheon address Seminars on service-learning concept and programs Social hour Educational Needs of Young , People -- dinner address Tuesday, July 1 Service-Learning and National Programs, an exchange with national officials of the Teacher Corps, VISTA and the Peace Corps Workshops Service Learning Curriculum Finance Research Methods and Programs eye Service by Youth luncheon address Workshops resume Workshop reports and discussion What Next? Conclusion © THE ATLANTA SERVICE-LEARNING CONFERENCE ® Atlanta shares with other major American cities its needs for increased services and its large population of college students -- some 40,000 in the metropolitan area. In an attempt to explore ways to meet urban needs, to offer students a more relevant education, and to bring campus and community closer together, Atlanta students, city officials, higher educa- tion faculty and staff, regional and federal agency officials are jointly launching the Atlanta Service-Learning Conference. Meeting Series The meeting on June 30 and July 1 marks the opening event of the Conference. The Conference will continue for six months and will sponsor periodic meetings to consider ma- jor dimensions of the service-learning concept. Work Groups In exploring the service-learning concept, work groups will be formed to concentrate on particular aspects of the idea. These work groups, and a typical question to be posed to each of them, are listed below: Service: How can the student make a maximum contribution in his short term assignment? Learning: What learning can take place during the assignment? Curriculum: What are the implications of the service-learning idea for curricular deve- lopment? Financing: What is an equitable distribu- tion of cost among the host agency? the college? the government? Research: How are students’ educational and career choices affected through partici- pation in service-learning programs? Methods and Programs: How should a service-learning program be designed for implementation on a large scale? Laboratory Among the work group participants will be members of the Atlanta Urban Corps and other service-learning programs which will form a practical laboratory for the Conference. Information Exchange and Results The Conference will foster the exchange of information among participants and with in- terested persons in other metropolitan areas. It is already sponsoring surveys of student manpower resources in the urban area, of the needs ef the public and voluntary agency sectors for student manpower, and of present college and university programs helping to fill these needs. A wrap-up meeting and publica- tion is planned for the coming winter, when plans for continuing the examination of service- learning and extending service-learning pro- srams will be considered. Participation Participation in the Conference is open to all persons and groups interested in sharing information on service-learning programs. Inquiries may be addressed to: Atlanta Service-Learning Conference Peace Corps, Southern Region Suite B-70 275 Peachtree Street, N.E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 The Atlanta Service-Learning Conference invites you to its inaugural meeting Urban Needs = Educational Opportunities at the White House Motor Inn, Atlanta June 30 -- July 1, 1969 The first in a series of meetings planned for 1969 by sponsors of the Atlanta Service-Learning Conference, including: The City of Atlanta The Atlanta Urban Corps Economic Opportunity Atlanta The Colleges and Universities of Atlanta Department of Health, Education and Welfare The Southern Regional Education Board Volunteers in Service to America The Peace Corps
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 34

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_034.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 34
  • Text: July 24, 1969 Summation of a discussion between Atlanta Urban Corps and Fulton National Bank Participants: J. Leland Phillips, Vice-President, Fulton National Bank Inmond Deen, Urban Corps Dave Whelan, Urban Corps Materials presented: Atlanta Urban Corps Prospectus, labeled appendage "A''", Length of Discussion: 50 minutes Major Topics: 1, Definition of Atlanta Urban Corps goals and scope 2. Fulton National's involvement in the community P (As a representative sample, Fulton National provides fi- nancial support to United Appeal, Lovett School, Westminster School, private colleges in Georgia, ) 3. Fulton National, according to Mr. Phillips, has a Founda~ tion which was created 5 years ago and which does not as yet yield substantial income. As a result of this the bulk of the money donated to service organizations, etc, is taken from the bank's net profit. 4, Need to coordinate various service groups in the Atlanta area in a fashion similar to United Appeal. 5. The ineffectiveness of Federal programs to achieve results, i.e. Job Corps, VISTA. 6. The stigma of the name Urban Corps. Summation: Fulton National Bank appears to be a rather conservative organiza- tion. The Urban Corps would profit considerably from endorsement of its program by Fulton National Bank, The prospects of Fulton National Bank providing financial support and thereby endorsing the Urban Corps are good, The relationship, however, must be carefully cultivated. Action Taken: Fulton National has been placed on the Urban Corps mailing list in an effort to provide continuing information to the bank and thereby permit closer observation and evaluation of the Atlanta Urban Corps. Page 2 Recommendations: It is recommended that the Director who will assume leadership of the Atlanta Urban Corps at the expiration of the 1969 Summer Pro- gram contact personally Mr. Phillipps and present and explain the most thorough evaluative summary of the Atlanta Urban Corps that is obtain- able. It is felt that if the program has achieved substantial fulfillment of its goals and Mr. Phillipps is appraised thereof, Fulton National Bank will provide financial support.
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 14

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_014.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 14
  • Text: geet Vo Sos BQ WRaemwaey SIN S\o Dorey Deaxe Dnrwerce oo \ons VR wok se ance Le mead: So co\\ecX ae Com mentoa Qanss, a Se whose AXcka\ eaque\s sve: NN Cea eohds Wow Sade veca~ W2sdX , SeoWS ASCiyjSeky
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 1, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 1, Document 23
  • Text: ACTION ROUTING AND TRANSMITTAL SLIP ' TO (Name, office symbol or location) EETLACS FUR CORATE, Mr. George Berry DATE COORDINATION 2 INITIALS ff) FILE DATE INFORMATION 3 INITIALS PNOTE AND RETURN DATE PER CON - VERSATION 4 INITIALS JSEE ME DATE SIGNATURE * edfcl 5 | Lotfona fer Shawld $ aend on MER om Do NOT use this form as a RECORD of approvals, concurrences, disapprovals, clearances, and similar actions. FROM (Name, office symbol or location) DATE Sam Williams 6-24-69 PHONE 524-8091 OPTIONAL FORM 41 GPO ; 1967 0—300-455 (8-H) §=95041-101 AUGUST 1967 GSA FPMR (41CFR) 100-11.206
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 1, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021