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Box 9, Folder 4, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 3
  • Text: i 0. Ede August 18, 1969 Possible Urban Corps Directors Contacted To Date Bob Sigmond, Assistant Director, Resource Development Project SREB Ken Millwood, Public Relation Director, Atlanta Urban Corps John Sweet, VISTA Volunteer, Atlanta Alan Gould, Assistant Director, New York Urban Corps Elayne Landis, Assistant Director, New York Regional Metro Planning Commission James W. Foughner, Financial Aid Director, Dalton Junior College Ronnie Chinchilla, Director VISTA training program, Westinghouse Learning, Atlanta Imre. Kovacs, Youth and Urban Minister, NewHaven Congregational Church Thorburn Reid, President, Project Earning Power, Washington, D. C. Ronald Kabl, M.S. degree, Community Development, University of Missouri Michael K. Ray, Retired Major, EOA at present
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 11

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_011.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 11
  • Text: MINUTES GRANT REVIEW BOARD AUGUST 13, 1969 The Grant Review Board of the City of Atlanta met Wednesday, August 13, 1969, at 10:00 a.m. to discuss the Request for Proposal from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for participation in the Urban Information 2 evelopment 101 System project. The following persons were present at the meeting: Members Dan Sweat, Chairman Collier Gladin, Planning Director Jay Fountain, Deputy Director of Finance Others John Watson, Planner Raymond Fleming, UrbanCorps Intern Kenneth Gregor, Urban Observatory Coordinator Mr. Watson explained that the RFP invites proposals for the research and devel- opment of a comprehensive, integrated municipal information system or sub- system. This is an experiment to learn whether or not a prototype can be developed and successfully operated as a relatively standardized system which can be transferred to other municipalities with a minimum of alterations, It is the intention of HUD to select one city in the population range 50,000 to 500,000 to award a $2.5 million grant for the development of a comprehensive system and several cities will be chosen to receive lesser grants for development of individual sub-systems. A detailed summary of RFP 2-70 is attached. After much discussion, the Grant Review Board recommends the following: 1. That the City of Atlanta make application for the $2.5 million comprehensive system grant, provided the Mayor and Board of Aldermen commit adequate resources and assign high priority for the project. 2. That the responsibility for preparation-of the Grant application be lodged with the Data Processing Review Committee under the following conditions: (a) That the Data Processing Review Committee be expanded to include qualified representatives from each city department, the School Department and the Administrative Staff of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen and that an executive committee composed of those best Grant Review Board Minutes Page 2 August 13, 1969 qualified representatives of departments most affected by this project be chosen to guide development of the application. The project director for application development be recommended by this group and will report to it. (b) That this committee report to a joint committee of the Aldermanic Finance Committee and the Planning and Development Committee. 3. That the committee take immediate steps to accept proposals from interested software consulting firms and recommend a software firm to the Joint Aldermanic Committee. 4. That the committee establish immediate communications with the Urban Observatory through the City's Urban Observatory Coordinator to determine the interest of the Urban Observatory in participating in the Urban Information System project, Th nw Manet Darert ners Dane faanlen tent 414 4 a ee i ae nt eee UB bode CTL Cd Ae WI W wOaTaG 10615 tiat this is af adda pd betdde Up ud biiddiiy det tli City to obtain considerable federal assistance in developing an information system and that maximum effort should be put forth in an attempt to be selected as the comprehensive system city. Respectfully submitted, sy fool F WWE a Dan Sweat Chairman DS:je
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 10

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_010.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 10
  • Text: PERSOUAL DATA: Military History: 1943-1546 1950-1957 EDUCATION: 19h1-19h2 - 1939-1942 SERVICE SCHOOLS 1999 EPLOViiNT HISTORY: 9/15/50 to Present 1950-1952 \ 1952-1956 | RESUME OF; Michael K. Ray « Retired Major Date of Birth: 12/22/22 Weight: 155 Pounds Height: 5' 6" Marital Status: Married = 5 children Bratt. Status: 3BeA Infantry © Highest gradt Ist. Sgt. Infantry - Adj. Gen. Corp. Highest grade Major Retired June 30, 1967 American Institute of Banking Los Angeles, California Accounting and Principals of Banking Belnont High School Los Angeles, California Adj. Gen. Officers Career Course Ft. Harrison, Indiana ins 2 LO? 3 L a dec YPSe5 1 Personne Durins period of 1952 to 1967, ttended courses in Personnel Managenent, Civilien end Military Purchasing and Contracting Special Services Courses in oneretion of Recreation Aress to include fecilities such es Golf courses, Bowling Lanes, Service Clubs, Thesters, Crafts Club aud Snack Bar Operation. ' Public Relation Courses. Education ecual to epproximately three years college. United States Arery Officer - Primary duties: Chief of Special Services. Post and Division Level. ; Company Commander Ascistant Special Services Officer and Custodian of Ceatral Post Fund. Duties: Had complete respousibility for the contractiag and surchisins of all recreation supplies and materials, food and beverage for soldiers club, snack bars etc. Contracting Officer for new construction and rch2bdilitation plus furniture and fixtures. Handling all vhases to avardinz of contract. Supervised constructioa of 18 hole golf course, Pro shop and Clu> House. Staffed and suvervised operation of Club House, Cocktail Lounge, end -Dining Reon. Arransonents for all. private parties up to & maxirun of 250 was handled under my direct sunervisioa. Organlzcd Hollyvood Live Shows whieh Jneluded loenl talent, Bob [opo, Bing Crosby, Jack Benny end Lou Costello. Proviced transportation, Motel and Hotel acconodations.
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 13
  • Text: MEMORANDUM TO: Members of the Data Processing Review Committee FROM: John vaceoh SUBJECT: HUD RFP 2-70, Urban Information System Grant The City has received RFP 2-70 from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. This statement of work invites proposals for the research and development of a comprehensive, integrated municipal infor- mation system or sub-system. This is an experiment to learn whether or not a prototype can be developed and succdeseuliy operated as a relative- ly standardized system which can be transferred to other municipalities with a minimum of alterations, Past approaches to urban information systems have been fragmentary . What is needed is a system formulated as an integral part of municipal operations.based on the satisfaction of operational requirements of municipal decicias and maintenance of the data base for that system, To achieve this broad goal, a fourfold integration is required, linking together the following: 1. The processing, analytical and control capabilities of urban information systems. 2. The several complimentary approaches to information develop- ment; housekeeping, data bank, model-building, and process control. = 3. The various processes of urban administration, 4. The many urban and other governmental entities within a minicipality. There are several basic principles which this project must observe: 1. A fundamental analysis of the entize system and its needs is necessary. 2. The system must be operationally based, i.e. in support of sustel pail operations. The system is municipal - oriented, since it is at this level that urban problems and programs are dealt with. Automation rather than computerization of the system is desired. The system must provide for feedback from the community & its government. Since this is an R & D effort, experimentation and innovation are desirable. Careful documentation is an absolute necessity. Success and failures should be explicitly recorded for the bene- fit of other municipalities. One complete system and several subsystems will be funded in this project. In general, the functions of a municipality fall. in four categories: QO i. 2. 4. Public safety - police, fire, inspections Public finance - usually every department has an accounting function, with an overall budget department, Human resources development - health, welfare, education, rec- reation, etc. Physical and economic development - planning,«construction, maintenance, engineering, utilities. A subsystem comprising one of the above divisions should be complet- ed and tested within two years, while the complete system will have three years. Respondents are required to propose their respective formation into consortia, consisting of at a minimum the municipality as the prime con- tractor and a systems/software subcontractor. A college, university, or center subcontractor as a third member of the consortium is urged but not required. No contractor or sub-contractor may be involved in more than one such project, A.municipality must demonstrate that it has already made a sub- stantial investment of human and material resources into the develop- ment of a municipal information system, Existing experience and resources must be utilized to expedite the development of a system, The proposal must have a rational relationship to existing development of an infor- mation system or subsystem in the municipality. The municipality must provide the project leader and leadership for_all phases of the project. Assuming that a university or research center is included, the following roles are most appropriate: - educational and training course design, and orientation connected with the project - cost/benefit analysis and evaluation of the success & failures = systems conceptualization - rationalization of information and decision processes The systems/computer software organization would perform the following: - systems conceptualization detailed systems design programming systems & procedures detailed documentation & manual preparation technical training The proposal must specify who will do what and when it will be done, The consortium project team should include the following types of personnel: - experienced municipal functional and managerial professionals - municipal government analysts - computer technicians - documentation & procedures manual specialists - researchers, humsn factors scientists, social scientists - training specialists = academicians - political scientists, public administrators, urban- Ologists, and information and computer scientists, r The municipality must show evidence of the commitment of all pov- ernment individuals & units whose cooperation is essential to the scope of work proposed, It must also show a commitment of the following re- sources to the project: 1.. Personnel: suthe mix of talents available = the specific persons involved, their contribution and reie- vane background, & the time they will spend on it. - the relationship of non-project municipal professional employees & policy-making officials to the project. 2. Machines: - the EDP equipment available - the support available from suppliers/manufacturers 3. Organization: i - a project leader - the capability to continue the project beyond the life of the federal funding The municipality must include a “letter of intent" from all members of the consortium. It must also show evidence of its commitment to utilize the systems in planning, operations, and management. €) (mr The consortia involved in'the project will maintain a close liaison to discuss common problem areas & expressed needs. Informal status and progress reports will help to keep everyone informed and to reduce dup- lication of efforts. Research & development is defined to consist of six steps: 1. Systems analysis 3 z.. Systems Conceptualization 3. Systems Design 4, Systems Development 5.. Systems Implementation 6.. Systems Evaluation Each. step is: closely interrelated and provides inputs to the other. The areas which will require the greatest attention to detail, and which have been merely skimmed in the past, are data acquisition and data base Management. Present emphasis should be on an information and decision system rather than a data processing system. The research and development projects must utilize the systems approach, have clearly stated objectives, and exhibit effective systems management. They must also be based on design concepts that are trans- ferable to other municipalities, The information systems must provide for continuing data base management and development, as well as implemen- tation procedures for data base management, Data base documentation will include the exact mame of each datum, a discussion of its meaning where necessary .to.be absolutely clear, its source location, the frequency with which it is reported, the range and kind of values associated with it, the meaning of the codes, and the medium, place and identity of its storage. This process should be automated with a minimum of human interfacing wherever possible. The problem of ea ae data compatibility is greatly increased by multi-source reporting. pb itevenen th coding and classification schemes, data names, area definition, reporting dates and period covered will have to be reconciled. A data access control plan must be developed for the system, govern- ing the release of data in terms of hae, who, when and how. Certain data will be considered mandatory, some will be recommended, and some optional by Federal agencies. Geocoding of the data base is also required, The data system should be open-ended to allow data sharing. Proposals should reflect an interest to employ conventional models of hardware and peripherals which have mcapacity appropriate for the system or subsystem. This is necessary if the project is to be transferable to other cities. This approach permits the conceptualization of incremental develop- ment of the information system. At the least sophisticated level are automatic data processing techniques conventionally employed in the administrative affairs of the municipality. These include person finance and property accounting,. billing and disbursing, registering and licensing, and other routine tasks. The requirement for software is generally limited to data and files Management, cross-tabulation and report generation. The computer processing mode conventionally employed is batch-processing. A second level of sophistication are hardware and software in support of the control of operation of a municipality. These include scheduling, dispatching, allocation and monitering, e.g., traffic con- trol, and emergency vehicle dispatching. Emphasis here is on a rapid response capability, and therefore, the on-line, real time mode is more generally appropriate. A third level of sophistication is in terms of the hardware, soft- ware and files required for planning support. Here, both batch processing - 7J-«- and on-line, real time modes are important. Generalized software conventionally required includes PERT and/or CPM for planning and any scheduling, simulation and statistical analysis programs. The remaining level of sophistication is at the policy- making and management level. Here the requirement at its fullest development is- for exception-reporting techniques, a planning-programming-budgeting system, automated alerting systems, on-line cross-tabulation and report generation and the cathode ray tube and teletypewriter for on-line displays. Detailed analysis of current municipal operations is required to determine their relationship to the goals of the system. Existing procedures ; forms, records, and reports must be evaluated in terms of the basic functions performed by the city. Points of information generation, processing, and utilization and the extent of this information © must aiso be identified. Decision-flow analyses are aiso necessary. Below is a check list of specific capabilities the data processing system should have: --Capabilities to accept and output data in a variety of forms. --Capabilities to handle large volumes of data. --Capabilities to operate on individual values in a data set. --Capabilities to manipulate and alter data set structure. --Capabilities for report production and graphic display. --Capabilities for fact retrieval and analysis. --Capabilities for data base reference service and documentation, actapabl tities for process management. The development of an implementation plan must be effected in coordi- on ~ nation with all participating agencies. The plan should outline the steps necessary to implement the system. It should include: © ™ ape --Hardware and software considerations, i. e., detail the hardware installations and system programming. --Facility requirements. --Procedures necessary to integrate the system into operations. --Discussion of user needs and how the system will meet them. --Discussion of subsystem development and strategy. “Definition of external agency relations. --Automatic data processing policies. --A central index of information that presently exists in the muni- cipality. HUD will require that the proposals be submitted prior to 3:00 P.M. (EDT) October 31, 1969. Format for submission will be Part I, Technical and Administrative Data, and Part II, Financial Data. Standardized terms and conditions for federal grant programs will apply to the contract. Proposals will be evaluated by HUD and results of the competition should be known during December, 1969. Factors in Selection The selection of participants in this program will be determined by the extent to which each of the items listed below is satisfied in the proposals of respondents. These icéms are summarized from indicated loca- tions elsewhere in this scatement of work. They are listed in the order they appear, and not in order of importance. 1. Objectives of the Project. 2. Selection of project. 3. Emphasis on Fundamental Analysis. 4, Emphasis on operationally based. 5. Emphasis on municipal orientation, 10.. 1l. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. Emphasis on automation. Emphasis on providing environmental and governmental feedback. : I Emphasis on research and development. The type of project. If an information subsystem, the municipal functions which will be grouped together and served by the subsystem should be listed and discussed. If an integrated municipal infor- mation system, the functions grouped together in each subsystem should be listed according to subsystem. Full justification should be set forth for departures from the classification of functions | im the statement of work. Population of the municipality. Departures from the expressed rule must be justified. og Assurance of sufficient level of investment to promise completion of project within the allowed time. Current existing level of investment in municipal information systems, Relationship of the proposal to existing information system develop- ment in the municipality. Formation of Consortium and identification of members. Definition of roles of members of the consortium. Range of talents made available by the consortium, Evidence of cooperation. Resource commitment. Letters of intent. Long-range commitment. Plans for extra-consortium participants. Willingness to participate on Inter-Consortium Panel. Concept of Data Acquisition. 24. 25. 26... 29. 30. 31. 32. 333. 34.. 35%. 35:. oF 38, 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44, 45. 46. 47. = 10 = a Concept of Pata Base Management. Concept of Data Base Documentation. Concept of Data Compatibility. Concept .of Data Access Control. Concept of Data Standarcization. Statement of willingness to comply USAC standardized, data lists. Geocoding. | | Concept of system expansion. Concept of documentation. Concept of. Transferability--hardware, Concept of Transferability--software. ed of Transferability--System design. Concept of Transferability--Documentation. Concept of internal monitoring and evaluation. Statement of willingness to plan a program of briefings and demonstrations. Concept of Research Program. If the comprehensive integrated municipal ineoeeteien system (IMIS) option is exercised: Concept of IMIS, If the municipal information subsystem (MIS) option is exercised: Concept of MIS, Proposal of special area of research. Concept of system perspectives. Definition of effort and mix of resources allocated by tasks. Specification of task time-phasing. Agreement to perform tasks. Agreement to use conventional, non-machine language in programming. 48. 49... 50... aia 52. 53. 54. 55... 5h.. a7. 58. 59. 60. a he keeeeneat to use conventional, easily transferable programming language(s). Agreement to place all software and related documentation developed in this project in the public domain. Agreement to the principle of program modularity. Agreement to project orientation. Description of organizational arrangements. Disseuinatton plans. Continuation plans. Existing long-range information system development plan. Relate the proposal to the long-range plan. Identification of probable other resource support for plan. Agreement to maintain a project journal for case study. Agreement to use systems approach. Concept of specifications and characteristics.
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_004.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 4
  • Text: ELAYNE LANDIS 220 Garfield Place Brooklyn, New York 11215 EXPERIENCE: Editorial Assistant — World Scope Encyclopedia, New York City, August, 1959, to January, 1960, general editing of articles submitted for printing in en- cyclopedia Editor — Freelance, January, 1960, to August, 1960, research and editing of theses in political science and history; bibliographical research for maga- zine articles Editor — Anderson Map Company, New York City, April, 1960, to August, 1960, research for isometric map of New York City, developing location and significance of historical sites, ethnic neighborhoods and places of interest Teacher — New York City Board of Education, October, 1960, to January, 1966, teaching elementary school one year at P.S. 144 in Harlem; teaching English and Social Studies three years in junior high school in Greenwich Village; faculty advisor to student newspaper and magazine; faculty advisor to General Organization Urban Planner — Nassau County Planning Commission, January, 1966, to January, 1968, site planning for Mitchel Field; study of office construction and white collar employment; assignment by County Executive to work with Metropoli- tan Regional Council in New York City resulting in revival of the council of governments through revitalization of programs in transportation, jet noise, air pollution, water pollution, recreation, solid waste disposal, etc.; pre- paration and submission of first HUD application for planning funds. Assistant Director — Metropolitan Council, January, 1966 to present, general administration, organization, budgeting, program development and writing; direct responsibility for regional program areas in narcotics addiction, law enforcement, student internship; work with mayors and chief county elected officials in tri-state metropolitan area towards goal of regional cooperation and local participation in regional planning and decision-making EDUCATION: Brooklyn College, Government and History, B.A., 1958 Harvard University, Government, Summer, 1956 University of Pennsylvania, History, M.A., 1961 New York University, Urban Planning, 60 credits, M.U.P.; Werner-Hegemann Scholarship, 1963-64; 1964-65 THESES: Clay ike t nae Conf University of Pennsylvania, M.A. thesis about assimilation of immigrants in New York City, considering housing, education, group affiliations, employment; governmental participation New York University, M,U.P. thesis concerned with goals, problems and accomplishments of neighborhood conservation programs PERSONAL: Born: U.S.A, Age: REFERENCES: 32 Perry L. Norton, Professor of Planning Graduate School of Public Administration New York University Four Washington Square North New York, New York Hon. Lawrence F. Kramer Mayor City Hall Paterson, New Jersey Hon. Charles E. Pound Commissioner Department of Parks and Recreation County Office Building White Plains, New York Marital Status: Single
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 16

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_016.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 16
  • Text: July 28, 1969 MEMORANDUM To: Charles L. Davis From: George Berry “OS Subject: Urban Corps I met with Sam Williams and Inmond Deen of the Urban Corps this morning to review their financial status. It appears that we are pretty well on budget for the time being. This, however, depends upon the success we have in billing the colleges and universities for their participation under the College Work Study Program. As of yet, we have not submitted our first bills to them but as I understand it, they are on your desk for signature as of now. We should know within the next two weeks if we are operating within the budget that was approved on June 19, 1969. One of the items discussed was the proposed $9, 000 contribution that was to be contributed by Atlanta University from the proceeds of the city grant to them, Iadvised Sam that I would talk with you concerning this and if it was your desire, I would follow up and see what could be done to consummate this transaction. GB:je
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 30

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_030.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 30
  • Text: ATLANTA URBAN CORPS DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE To: Sam Williams, Director, Atlanta Urban Corps From: Inmond L. Deen, Jr., Director of Finance, Atlanta Urban Corps Re: Departmental Report Date: August 1, 1969 I, Payroll The payroll system is functioning satisfactorily, Two areas need improve- ment: A. At present, billing colleges requires a manual transferance of information from computer print outs which are grouped according to work location, typing of the bill, and checking of the figures, The city gave the option of having the print outs grouped either by work location or school. Someone chose to have the interns grouped by work location. This is of little value to my Department as agency (work location= agencies) financial arrangements are handled by contract, If the problem of separating CWSP interns and non-CWSP interns can be overcome (if the city can be sold on the idea) the computer print outs could be certified and mailed to the colleges, This would eliminate three steps and at the same time reduce the probability of errors, This system would, however, involve the inconvenience of sorting pay checks and grouping them by City Department and agency, Less time and effort are required to sort pay checks than to manually transfer the required information, In my esti- mation, this should be done if the city and the Urban Corps maintain their present relationship. The procedure outlined in section II, C, of my report dated July 2, 1969 is onerous and burdensome. The interns, justifiably, do not like it, I feel HEW should be made aware of the unpalatable nature of the guide line necessi- tating this procedure and a request for relief made, I intend to act accordingly, We were fortunate on the July 30, 1969 disbursement date, Only one problem of any sig- nificance arose: a staff member told Andrea Frye, a vol- unteer, she would receive $100 on July 30. The "culprit" had not the authority to make the decision, Nonetheless, we will pay her and Young Hughley at their convenience after 12:00 o'clock noon 8/1/69. Il, College Billing The college billing system will work adequately, Colleges will be billed (bills mailed) today for amounts owed as of July 2, 1969. They will be billed August 5, 1969, for amounts owed as of July 30, 1969. The August 13th, and August 27th, billings will be no problem, The September 10th billing should not be a problem but the mechanics have not been worked out. il. Agency Payments Non-profit agencies in which AUC interns are placed have contractually agreed to employ the student and to pay a part of the student's salary ranging from 100% to 00%. On Wednesday, August 6, 1969, prompting of agencies who have not fulfilled their contractual obligations will be commenced. IV. Contracts A. Agency Contracts EOA was delayed in executing our contract due to the change of di- rectorship. The contract has been delivered to George Berry for execution by the city. We still do not have a contract with SREB for the Fulton County Health Department, This involves 2l interns. Since SREB has given us $7,000, 00 and will give us $13, 000. 00 within two weeks (according to Bill Ramsay) I consider that organization reputable, © The decision was made to contract with the Academy Theater as a non-city agency even though the funds actually come from the City . (Atlanta Board of Education). Miss Nancy Hagar was talked with and agreed to this arrangement on July 15, 1969. A letter confirming the earlier verbal agreement and a written contract were mailed to Miss Hagar July 16, 1969, The contract has not of this date been returned to this office. ‘ The Atlanta Youth Council is for our purposes a non-city agency. The contract has been executed, College Contracts When the college contracts were executed, both copies of the West Georgia contract were returned to the college. Mr. Paul M. Smith, Jr., Director of Financial Aid, stated by telephone on 8/1/69 that he would on that date mail one copy to me, When it is received, Mr. Charles Davis, Director of Finance, City of Atlanta, will certify the West Georgia bill, Educational Advisor Contracts Contracts have been entered into between the City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban Corps, and Carl Wieck, Patrick Ntokogu, Roger Whedon, Bar- bara Rudisill, and the Georgia Institute of Technology--Roger Rupnow, Nee the said individuals to act as Educational Advisors to the 1969 Urban Corps Project, Duties to be performed shall include but not be limi- ted to job visitation with the interns and agency supervisors, planning and conducting education seminars for small groups, as well as all interns, working in coordination with our field evaluation staff to in- sure job relevancy and educational significance of the program for each intern, assisting the intern in his articulation of his experience and other counseling and advisory duties connected with the program. For the services outlined above, each Educational Advisor shall be compensated in the amount of One Thousand Dollars, Urban Corps-Library Theatre Contract A contract between the City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban Corps, and _ Arthur Pellman has been drawn, approved, and is in the process of execution, The contract provides in essence that Arthur Pellman is to serve as Director of the Urban Corps-Library Theatre for a period of not less than ten weeks and that he will be compensated in the amount of One Thousand Dollars. Staff Steve Mwamba is performing a task that is in my estimation tedious and demanding. He has and is continuing to keep errors at a minimum. Mac Rabb is now working in my office and is performing at a level that is above what can ordinarily be expected or demanded of an individual, Patty Harwell is doing an excellent job in providing secretarial support. She is diligent, unusually efficient, and in every respect a pleasure to work with.
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 29

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_029.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 29
  • Text: ATLANTA URBAN CORPS DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE To: Sam Williams, Director, Atlanta Urban Corps From: Inmond L. Deen, Jr., Director of Finance, Atlanta Urban Corps Re: Departmental Report Date: July 16, 1969 LL After repeated efforts to resolve the unusually perplexing situation surround- ing compensation for VISTA volunteers assigned through the Southern Regionai Education Board to the City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban Corps, little has been accomplished. Responsibilities, however, have been defined, to wit: A. VISTA volunteers will receive bi-weekly supplements from the City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban Corps in amounts determinable by multiplying the total number of compensable hours worked by each intern during the preceding pay period by either .07, .47, or .77, depending upon the individuals educational level. B. Volt Technical Corporation, a subsidiary of Volt Information Sciences, Inc., 795 Peachtree Street, N.E., Suite 630, Atlanta, Georgia, a private corporation under contract with VISTA to provide administrative and logistical financial support, will disperse on a weekly basis the VISTA share of VISTA volunteers pay. C. The City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban Corps supplement plus the VISTA share will closely approximate that received by all other interns of a comparable educational level. D. Carol Lim, Volt Technical Corporation, phone 876-6354, has been designated as the representative of her company to handle inquiries from VISTA Volunteers assigned to the Urban Corps regarding compensation from VISTA, i The procedure outlined in section II of this Department's initial report, dated July 2, 1969, regarding College-Work Study Program guidelines is proving satisfactory. III. The book keeping system outlined in Section III of this Department's initial report is now in operation and is relatively efficient. Improvement is needed in this area. As a bare minimum the following is necessary: A. Working space (available for payroll auditors) B. Freedom from unnecessary interruptions and confusion IV. Mr. W. Walton Clarke, First National Bank of Atlanta, was talked with on July 10, 1969. He agreed on behalf of the First National Bank to donate One Thousand Dollars ($1,000.00) to the City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban Corps. Mr. Charles S. Marvin, A.T.&T., was talked with on July 9, 1969. Mr. Marvin indicated an interest on the part of A.T.&T. to make a dona- tion to the Urban Corps. He suggested that I call his immediate supervisor, Mr. Tom Koneig, on July 14, 1969, and arrange a conference. Mr. Koneig was ill. However, his secretary set up a conference for July 22, 1969 at 10:00 A.M. Mr. Plemon Whatley (Junior at Harvard) , employed by A.T.&T. and assigned to E,O.A., was talked with on or about July 1, 1969, and has reported to Mr. Marvin that he feels the Urban Corps is deserving ofa donation, A.T.&T.'s offices in Atlanta are located at Room 1831, The Hartford Building. Vis In general, Finance has been plagued by senseless mistakes, inadequate secretarial support, and troublesome inefficiency. At this time the addition of Dianne Wilson to this Department in a some- what elusive position is not, in my opinion, justifiable either in cost to the Urban Corps cr in increased efficiency. The above mentioned recommendation, if followed, will provide the needed space mentioned in Section III], A, above and will eliminate the need for close supervision and will, to some extent, provide relief from unnecessary confusion and inefficiency.
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 28

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_028.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 28
  • Text: ATLANTA URBAN CORPS DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE To: Sam Williams, Director, Atlanta Urban Corps From: Inmond L. Deen, Director of Finance, Atlanta Urban Corps Re: Initial Report on the Department of Finance Date: July 2, 1969 I, The payroll schedule for employees of the Atlanta Urban Corps is set forth in a memorandum (labeled Appendage '"'A'!) which has been distributed to all interns, Individuals. who agreed to work as volunteers and who are to receive $200. 00 as compensation for their services will be paid $100.00 on July 16, 1969, © and $100.00 on August 27, 1969. It is felt that this method will serve to encourage the volunteer in that it permits him to receive some monetary reward for his services prior to the conclusion of the summer program. It further has the effect of providing protection to the Urban Corps in the event that the volunteer resigns prior to the conclusion of the summer pro- gram. Payment at the beginning of the program would leave the Urban Corps without protection from financial loss should the volunteer resign, Payment at the conclusion of the program could conceivably, while affording protection to the Urban Corps, impose a burden on the volunteer and would not contain the incentive factor inherent in the split payment method. it. In order to comply with guidelines set forth by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, College Work-Study Program Division, the fol- lowing procedure has been inaugurated: A. A certified statement (labeled Appendage ''B'') will be mailed to each participating college or university having College Work-Study Program students employed by the Atlanta Urban Corps. The statement will include information relating to each student as follows: 1, Name. 2. Wage rate. 3. Total number of compensable hours worked during the immediately preceding pay period. 4, Gross pay received for the immediately preceding pay period, and 5. Gross pay received to date. B. Time cards (labeled Appendage ''C"') signed by each student and his immediate supervisor certifying that a particular number of hours were worked by the student will be mailed to the student's college or university in instances where the student is enrolled in the College Work-Study Program. Cc. Each employee is required to pick up in person his paycheck or to give written authorization to the individual who will pick up the check, In the former situation the individual is re- quired to give written certification of receipt, In the latter situation the authorized individual is required to certify receipt Page 2 July 2, 1969 III - of all pay checks received. (See Appendages "D" and"E",) A bookkeeping system has been designed and is tentatively scheduled to become operative on July 10, 1969. The system will consist of the main- tenance of the following Journals and Ledgers: A. General Journal--posted daily Monday through Friday prior to 9:15 a.m. listing all monies received and all liabilities incurred the preceding day. Cash Receipts and Disbursements Ledger--posted twice weekly recording the flow of capital. General Ledger--posted twice weekly containing separate accounts for: hone Office equipment, Office supplies, Payment received from agencies as contracted for, Payment received from educational institutions as con- tracted for, Payment received in the form of grants and donations from foundations, Payment received in the form of grants and donations from the private business sector, Utilities, and All other necessary accounts, Individual Earnings Records--posted bi-weekly. Petty Cash Records--maintained by Sam Williams. Inmond L. Deen, Jr. Director of Finance Atlanta Urban Corps
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 17

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_017.pdf
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 17
  • Text: ATLANTA URBAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND STREET.N.E. / PHONE [404] 624-8091 / ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 July 18, 1969 Mr. George Berry Office of the Mayor City of Atlanta . City Hall 68 Mitchell Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia Dear George: Camp totalling $116.79 which I approved in advance y Aras om Also enclosed are donations to cover this amount. Would you please route this through proper chanels to see that the bill is paid. Enclosed are accumulative bills from the Mentally ype 2 bao co Sincerely, PAY A. WILLIAMS Director SAW:sz Enclosures (3) 1. Two bills from Stone Mountain Memorial Association 2. Two checks (1@$50; 1@$10) 3. $56.80 - cash
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_020.pdf
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 20
  • Text: July 18, 1969 Mr. Charles L. Davis Director Department of Finance Dear Charles: Iam submitting fully executed copies with 15 colleges and universities providing for their financial commitment to the Atlanta Urban Corps Project under the College Work Study Program: Brandeis University Brown University DeKalb College Emory University Clark College Georgia College Georgia State College Georgia Institute of Technology Lake Forest College Morehouse College Morris Brown College Spelman College Vassar College Yeshiva University The University of the South Please file and index these contracts as the official City copy. Very truly yours, George Berry GB:je Enclosures
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 23
  • Text: U Clan Canes CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 TO: George Berry FROM: Linda Anderson Lo SUBJECT: Urban Corps Attached are four checks (each in the amount of $250.00) in payment of the first installment due under the agreements with Carl Wiecke, Patrick Ntukogu, Roger Whedon and the Georgia Institute of Technology (Roger Rupnow) for services as educational advisors, LArs Attachments
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 8
  • Text: Resume THORBURN REID Home: 3429 34th Place, N.W. Office: Project Earning Power Washington, D.C. 20016 1826 Jefferson Place, N.W, 363-8554 (202) Washington, D.C. 20036 296-4433 (202) SUMMARY Skills * Program analysis, evaluation and devel opment * Writing: analyses and programs : : an * General management and administration | -% Youth leadership , : pte nes * Fluent Spanish, fair French Areas of Experience * National and international government agencies * Community development, urban and rural * Youth involvement in contemporary probl ems .* International relations and law ' % Latin America | WORK EXPERIENCE 1967- ‘ present —° PRESIDENT, Project Earning Power, a national, non-profit corporation with headquarters in Washington. The Corporation's first president and officer. Responsibility for planning and administering a national program to assist severely handicapped workers in sheltered workshops | to raise their earnings. The job involves: * Securing and administering government contracts and grants. * Directing, evaluating and supporting national organization with offices in Los Angeles, Chicago and New York. * Coordinating and directing professional (designers, businessmen, etc.) volunteers, consultants, national organizations such as the Women's Committee of the President's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped, the National Association of Sheltered Work- shops, the Industrial Design Society of America. * Total reorganization of all phases of the Corporation, stressing establishment of clear goals and clear lines of authority, and streamlined organi zation. - 1967- | 1966 ADMINISTRATOR, Mid-Atlantic Region, VISTA, Washington, D.C. The "domestic peace corps'', a program of volunteers working in the war on poverty. Responsible for establishing and directing the Mid-Atlantic office when VISTA was first regionalized, * Selected and supervised staff of 28, regarded as best regional staff. * Planned, administered, evaluated and supervised programs and training involving 750 voluneeeks in seven states and the District of ’ Columbia. 4 ome * Coordinated progicws with OEO0 offices, state and local agencies, and project ‘sponsors. * Programs wore predominantly in urban and rural ‘conmdntiey devel op- ment and mental health; stressed institution building in programming, i.e., assigning volunteers to institutions which would thereby be aided most in becoming self-sufficient. 1966- wen = ne 1964 ° DEPUTY DIRECTOR, Peace Corps/Peru, in Lima, Peru. Volunteers work in development programs in: urban and rural community development; coops, and small industry development; education. * Shared responsibility with Director for planning and administering programs for over 400 volunteers. * Coordinated and worked with participating Peruvian agencies and U.S. Overseas Mission officials. * Shared responsibility with Director for seven regional offices and ten associate directors, plus three Peruvian technical advisors. i, % Emphasized: building self-sufficient Peruvian institutions; establishing clear program priorities reflecting Peruvian needs; matching volunteers with appropriate jobs; maintaining open communications with volunteers and staff. i 1964- ; ' 1962 ‘EVALUATOR, Peace Corps/Washington. Evaluation Division reviewed for Director all aspects of Peace Corps, including selection and training of volunteers, program planning and operation overseas. * Prepared written reports for Peace Corps Director and Division - Heads on all aspects of Peace Corps country programs; and | reports on all aspects of Peace Corps training programs. * Visited and studied intensively Peace Corps programs in countries , in Latin America, and 3 countries in East Asia and Africa, interviewing Peace Corps, AID, Embassy and host national ‘officials and Peace Corps volunteers. * Stressed: comparison of stated program goals with actual per- i formance; aptness of program goals; nately volunteers with ; appropriate jobs. 1962- | 1960 . COMMITTEE COUNSEL, Special Committee on World Peace Through Law of the Committee was engaged in ‘% American Bar Association, Washington, D.C. preparing and directing four regional international conferences to Pronets developmentl of international law. * Prepared draft conference working papers on problems and a of international law; special committee reports; conference | agendas and budgets; correspondence for participating lawyers here and abroad. | * Responsible for advance preparation on site and administration of conferences in Costa Rica, Nigeria, Italy and Japan with local public and private officials.
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_009.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 9
  • Text: RESUME lvofidelress —_——— jal — , RONALD J. KALIL . <-. é // The Rado TEMPORARY ADDRESS (until June 1959) HOME ADDRESS fA pte 314 Sead College Avenue - 163 Kohanza Street Pit lovtes _ Columbi L Naesour 65201 =n ‘Benkory, Connecticut Phone! 314-449-4556 | Phone: 203-748-6134 VOCATIONAL GOAL © engage in any or all aspects of communi evelopment: trainin romotion To engag y Il aspects of co ty development: ft g, promotion, programming, marketing, evaluation, and consulting. ’ PERSONAL Born: April 4, 1942 Health: Excellent Danbury, Connecticut Height: 5' 8" Marital Status: Single Weight: 155 pounds EDUCATION M.S. : Community Development, University of Missouri, June 1969 B.B.A.: Accounting, Uxiverttiy of Connecticut, June] 964 EXPERIENCE September 1968 to Present: Graduate Research Assistant An eight month assistantship to work on community development research projects in mid-Missouri. September 1967 to Present: Graduate Student | am working toward on M.S. degree in Community Development. It will be completed in June 1969. a June 1967 to September 1967: VISTA Associates Program Manager A temporary job to act as liaison between VISTA central office.in Washington, D.C. and VISTA volunteers in the field. It was my job to select eighty applicants, assist in training them, finding placements for them, and representing these summer volunteers in the field. November 1966 to June 1967: Peace Corps Recruiter I was employed by Peace Corps as a campus recruiter at colleges and universities in the southern and southwestern regions of the United States. August 1964 to August 1966; = Peace Corps Volunteer | worked in a community development project at the village level in rural Northeast Brazil. FOREIGN LANGUAGES Portuguese, Spanish, and Arabic TRAVEL Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina, Uraguay, Chile, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Venezuela, Dominican Republic, and Mexico. | REFERENCES Dr. Lee J. Cary Dept. of Regional and Community Chairman of Depart- Affairs ‘* ment and Professor Professional Building ; 3 University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri 65201 Joseph Higdon Trans Century Corporation Program 1520 Seventh Street, N.W. Administrator Washington, D.C. 20001 Roger Bouteiller 127 Westville Avenue Ext. Businessman Danbury, Connecticut 06810 Laurie Graeff 2600 East Ward Terrace #10 Social Worker Anaheim, California
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_025.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 25
  • Text: pita ff ™ ) / ~— — 7G -—1— » rt ( “ITY OF ATI ANITA a ae a —— i f % @ BS % \ ’ x New DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE 501 CITY HALL ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 July 28, 1969 CHARLES L. DAVIS W. ROY SMITH DIRECTOR OF FINANCE DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE EDGAR A. VAUGHN, JR. JAMES R. FOUNTAIN, JR. DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Memorandum To: George Berry From: Linda Anderson bie Subject: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council Accounts Receivable from Atlanta Urban Corps Thanks for the three miscellaneous requisitions which you forwarded to me on July 17, 1969, as follows: (1) MR #16 - net salaries $1,315.11 (2) MR #15 - office supplies 33,86 (3) MR #14 - postage 20,00 I am sending MR #16 to accounts payable for processing, however, I am holding MR #14 and MR #15 for further verification. The report furnished to me by Mike Aarons of our Audit Staff indicated an account receivable for office supplies of $35.00. By copy of this memo, I am requesting Mike to verify the amount for me. The charge for postage would have arisen from use of the Youth Council's postage machine, By copy of this memo, I am requesting Martin Burke to check their postage log and advise if the amount is correct, (This figure would not have been picked up on Mike's audit as his records would indicate total expenditures from postage rather than any usage allocation), cc: Martin Burke, Youth Council Mike Aarons, Audit Division
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 24

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_024.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 24
  • Text: DEPARTMENT OF LAW 2614 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 ROBERT S. WIGGINS MARTIN MCFARLAND EDWIN L. STERNE RALPH C. JENKINS JOHN E. DOUGHERTY HENRY L. BOWDEN CHARLES M. LOKEY THOMAS F.CHOYCE cITY ATTORNEY JAMES B, PILCHER PERRIN YMA THEWS ASSOCIATE CITY ATTORNEYS ASSISTANT CITY ATTORNEY July 24, 1969 HORACE T. WARD DEPUTY CITY ATTORNEY ROBERT A. HARRIS HENRY M.MURFF CLAIMS ATTORNEYS JAMES B. HENDERSON SPECIAL ASSOCIATE CITY ATTORNEY Mr. George J. Berry Administrative Coordinator City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Berry: I am herewith returning the following contracts which have been approved as to form: 1. Twenty-five (25) contracts between the Atlanta Urban Corps and non-city agencies. 2. Five (5) contracts between the Atlanta Urban Corps and specific colleges and universities. With best regards, I am HTW/ej Enclosures
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 15

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_015.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 15
  • Text: Account Number G-25-62 G-25-500U G-25-62-830U G-25-62-7140 Y G=25-62-7600 v G-25-62-7610 v G-25-62-7700 G-25-62-8109 { ATLANTA URBAN COR#S, GENERAL FUND ACCOUNT Title Partitions Mileage Salaries ~ 1-2 Telephone Postage Printing and Reproduction Office Supplies Rentals BALANCE SHEET August 14, 1969 Appropriation 646, 00 500. 00 170,195, 00~ 600. 00 150.00 500. 00 1,000. 00 400.00 Encumberances 62.24 171. 80 210.00 Expenditure s 646. 00 281.70 88, 212. 08 298.75 150.00 902.23 450, 43 90.00 Balance d' 218.30 ~ 1, 7 Fo 82,447.39 301. 25< (464, 47) 378.49 a 100. 00 _ 1».
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 41

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_041.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 41
  • Text: MANPOWER FOR DEVELOPMENT 190S A REPORT OF THE STUDENT INTERNSHIP PROGRAMS IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT SOUTHERN REGIONAL EDUCATION BOARD RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT PROJECT SIXTH STREET» ial! ATLANTA, GEORGI/, 303 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTERNSHIP PROGRAM BROCHURE . INTRODUCTION « « «0 © ase o + PARTICIPANTS» oy sa: 2: cnpst (eta gel nc loyt owen oy co PROJECT SUBJECTS. . ... 1968 SUMMER INTERN ASSIGNMENTS SITES. SEMINARS AND MEETINGS ...... PINAt REPORTS: o0at ss 5 20s « SS Sede G8 ACADEMIC YEAR INTERNS . . . 2.2. -. «sees VARIETY OF APPROACHES . . 1.2. see eee EVALUATION NOTES .-. . 0 « we © # @ we INTERNS INTERESTED IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT EMPLOYMENT AND/OR EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES . APPENDER 3, 5. at Gs. old: gee 4k woh Academic Year Compendium ‘ Statistical Summary JIwiwiw Fr Ww oil eri iT wil - a mt m i - va . oUt thi Gav PAE AL i sh Biggs i ea | TIGN BOARD | ; un ee “hal GD srk internships in Resource e Developments 1968 GENERAL INFORMATION The Resource Development Project of the Southern Regional Education Board is offering summer intern- ship appointments to a limited number of college juniors, seniors and graduate students who demon- strate an interest in the processes of social and economic change. The program is designed to provide service-learning experiences for students through as- signments to specific projects of development agen- cies, community action programs, and to other local or regional organizations concerned with the prob- lems of developmental change. Projects to which interns are assigned are selected and structured to achieve several goals: (1) To give immediate manpower assistance through the work of students to economic and social development agencies. (2) To provide constructive service opportunities for students seeking to participate in the solution of social and economic problems. To encourage young people to consider careers and citizen leadership roles in programs of development and to provide a pool of trained personnel for recruitment by sponsoring agencies. (3) To give students in social sciences and related studies a more relevant and meaningful educa- tion and training in the complexities of re- source development. (4) To provide additional avenues of communica- tion between institutions of higher learning and programs of social and economic development by making the resources of the universities and colleges more accessible to the community and keeping curriculum, teaching and research relevant to societal needs. (5) PROGRAM OPERATION Each intern is guided by a project committee con- sisting of at least one representative of the local organization, a university representative appointed as a counselor, and a technical adviser—usually from the sponsoring agency. The project committee assists in defining specific objectives and suggests ap- proaches to operation at the initiation of each proj- ect. Interns, however, plan and carry out assigned projects with a minimum of supervision and direc- tion. Hach intern participates in an orientation pro- gram and at least one seminar on resource develop- ment during his appointment. A written report is required of each intern upon Se of the project. FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS A stipend of $65 per week for undergraduates and $75 per week for graduate students is paid to each intern for a 12-week assignment period. The first payment is made upon initiation of the project and final pay- ment is made upon completion of the final report. A travel and miscellaneous allowance of up to $200 is available to each intern. On-the-job travel is reim- bursed at 8 cents per mile. Housing and food arrange- ments are the responsibility of the intern. REQUIREMENTS Interns must have completed at least two years of college prior to beginning their assignments. They must have demonstrated high academic achieve- ment, maturity, writing ability and be capable of independent work. They must be citizens of the United States, in good health and free to spend full time in the area of assignment for the 12-week internship period. APPLICATION Interns apply to designated persons of the partici- pating university or college or may send forms to the address below. Applications are available from the SREB Resource Development Project. Appoint- ments are made beginning in April, andsummer interns normally begin working in June. PROGRAM SPONSORSHIP Financial support is provided by federal agencies interested in economic development, resource de- velopment, community action and related fields. During the summers of 1966 and 1967, internships were supported by the Tennessee Valley Authority; the Economic Development Administration of the U.S. Department of Commerce; the Office of Eeonom- ic Opportunity, and the U. S. Department of Labor. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Campus representative: SOUTHERN REGIONAL EDUCATION BOARD Resource Development Project 130 Sixth Street, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30313 Phone: (404) 872-3873 Resource Development Project Southern Regional Education Board SOUTHERN REGIONAL EDUCATION BOARD IN RESOURCE - DEVELOPMENT 1968 e A 12-WEEK SUMMER PROGRAM FOR COLLEGE JUNIORS, SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS TO WORK WITH DEVELOPMENT AGENCIES AND COMMUNITY AC- TION PROGRAMS IN THE SOUTH. e $65 PER WEEK FOR UNDERGRAD- UATE STUDENTS. e $75 PER WEEK FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS. e LIMITED TRAVEL AND MISCEL- LANEOUS EXPENSES. SREB was established in 1949 under interstate compact, now ratified by the legislatures of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Missis- sippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennes- see, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. SREB aids in the social and economic advancement of the South by assisting states to improve the quality of higher education . . . provide the widest opportunity possible in higher education . . . build educational programs which meet the social and economic needs of the region. SREB is devoted to helping Southern colleges build high quality research and education programs . . . by providing regional support and utilization of advanced programs... and avoiding unnecessary duplication of facilities among the compact states. (over) INTRODUCTION Internship assignments were arranged for 151 students during the summer of 1968 by the Resource Development Project of the Southern Regional Educaticn Board. Interns were appointed in each of the 15 member states of SREB, in- volving 109 local, state and regional agencies and 69 southern colleges and universities. All internship projects were concerned with developmental problems and opportunities in the region, and were conducted in the context of SPEB's service-learning internship model. These 1968 internships were technically in four separate programs, each sponsored by a different federal or state agency. Agency sponsorship deter- mined the general focus of the projects and the types of organizations to which interns were assigned. Although major financial support for the internships came through the four federal grants or contracts, a variety of local, state and regionsa1. organizations also provided financial support. The major sponsors were: Economic Development Administration Office of Program Analysis and Economic Research Economic Development Administration Office of Technical Assistance Office of Economic Opportunity Community Action Frogram Tennessee Valley Authority Office of Tributary Area Development State, local and regional agencies supporting interns include: Appalachian Regional Commission: Tennessee The City of Atlanta Coastal Plains Regional Commission Nerth Carolina State Planning Task Force Tennessee Office of Economic Opportunity Fifteen Area Planning and Development Commissions: Georgia Administration by the Southern Regional Education Board allowed for coordination of all internships into a single program. This unified approach provided for economy and efficiency in management and emphasized the related roles of various programs and agencies in the total development picture. PARTICIPANTS Internships were extended to include three states and 39 academic institutions not previously participating. Over 600 individuals participated in the program during the summer and academic year. Summer 1968 Academic Year 68-69 Totals Interns 151 el 172 Local Agency Committee Members 116 8 12h Faculty Counselors 106 12 118 Technical Representatives 178 il 189 Total Participants 551 52 603 PROJECT SUBJECTS Project subjects, identified by host agencies, continued to reflect a wide variety of topics. Project subject areas that previously interns had not been asked to examine included: Economic Impact of College on Community OB-GYN Service Delivery of Public Hospital Headstart Training in Rural Area Small Business Administration Assistance in Mississippi Census of Mississippi City Neighborhood Youth Corps Evaluation Study of Dyslexia and School Dropouts Profile of Seafood Processing Industry in two North Carolina Counties Family Planning Assistance and Review Comprehensive Health Planning Assistance Aid for the Elderly High School Counseling Assistance with Rural Co-ops These topics, in addition to the traditional project categories, continue to suggest that student manpower is capable of assisting with a great variety of societal problems, and that their services can be applied with insight and skill. (See Summer 1968 Bibliography. ) 1968 SUMMER INTERN ASSIGNMENT SITES e e t eo 00 tlt ee ee oO bp sh eo ef e 665 , 5 eee e © ee oO C e€& e€ e oO e e 2 ee Te. a ee a - Appalachian Regional Commission e - Economic Development Administration 0 - Office of Economic Opportunity t - Tennessee Valley Authority SEMINARS AND MEETINGS Counselor Seminars were conducted in Memphis and Atlanta to acquaint faculty participants with program objectives and operations, federal agency sponsors and the roles of counselors. Sixty professors attended. Intern Seminars were arranged for student participants to explore devel- opmental and educational objectives. LHighty-two percent of the interns attended at least one seminar. INTERN SEMINAR ATTENDANCE--SUMMER 1968 OBO EDA TVA ARC TOTAL Atlanta (July 18-19) 5 16 3 : oh Charleston (July 22-23) 7 9 2 - 18 Louisville (July 18-19) 3 14 1 - 18 New Orleans (July 21-22) 6 12 - - 18 Memphis (July 24-25) 4 13 2 ~ 1 Washington, D.C. (July 28-30) 30: 2. 2 a {27 Totals 35 78 10 1 124 In November, a Review Conference brought together 30 representatives of sponsoring federal agencies, state agencies, university officials, students and local developmental agencies to critically examine the Southern Regional Education poard's.Resource Development’ Internship Programs. {Donald Fberly's "Diakonia Paideia" paper reports on the substantive issves discussed during iis conference.) Experimental interdisciplinary seminars were conducted by Memphis State University and the University of Tennessee for interns participating in internships in their area. The seven Memphis State University interns were enrolled in a seminar course for six credit hours. These interns were assigned to OHO, EDA and TVA related agencies. The seminar met weekly and used the intern assignments as primary subject matter for discussion, Interns appointed in the East Tennessee area attended three seminars on resource development in July, August and October on a non-credit basis. These were arranged through the Political Science Department of the University of Tennessee. FINAL REPORTS One hundred twenty-eight final reports prepared by interns have been reproduced, with 11 not yet completed. Several reports represent team efforts. Reports have been provided to sponsoring federal agency representatives as they have been completed. Local distribution of reports has been arranged by the host agency representatives. Requests have been received for re- printing several intern reports. (See Summer 1968 Bibliography. ) ACADEMIC YEAR INTERNS--1968-69 Internship assignments were arranged for 21 students during the academic year of 1968-69. These interns were appointed on a part-time basis and in- volved 16 colleges and universities and eight local, state and regional agencies. A compendium of these assignments is in the Appendix. VARIETY OF APPROACHES Extending beyond the one intern from one university to worl: on a single problem with a single agency, a variety of approaches to resource development internships characterized the 1968 summer programs. (1) A statewide project to collect and analyze data on municipal and county government financial status was completed in cooperation with the Georgia Municipal Association, Georgia Area Planning and Develcpment Commis- sions, County Commissioner's Association and nine state colleges and univer- sities in Georgia. Twenty-eight interns used a standard data collection procedure for obtaining basic data which was in turn sent to Georgia Municipal Association for computer processing. This information has provided the basic content of GMA's data bank for service to Georgia communities and agencies. In addition, each intern prepared a special report on one facet of local government for the participating Area Planning and Devel- opment Commission. (See Bibliography. ) (2) Four interns were appointed on part-time bases during the Spring semester to develop their projects in more detail prior to initiating a full-time summer commitment. Advantages of such an approach are clearer project definition, earlier university involvement and a longer time period for the project. (3) Georgia Area Planning and Development Commissions and other host agencies participated in a cost-sharing arrangement for the partial support of internships. (4) Three interns worked with the Atlanta Model Cities Program. Two landscape architecture undergraduates from the University of Georgia were supported directly by the City of Atlanta with educational overhead being covered by SREB from EDA funds. The third intern was supported with CEO funds with the cooperation of Economic Opportunity Atlanta. (5) In several projects, a team of interns collaborated on a single project: Three East Carolina University interns prepared an extensive economic base study for a four county area in Eastern North Carolina. Two University of Kentucky Law students worked with Legal Aid efforts in Lexington, Kentucky. In Little Rock, Arkansas, two University of Arkansas medical students conducted a thorough review of outpatient practices of the OB-GYN Section. Improved services have since been reported. A study of Negro entrepreneurs in three Southwest Mississippi counties was completed by joint work of an Alcorn A & M student and a University of Southern Mississippi student. Manpower projects in North Carolina and Georgia were done by teams of two interns each. (6) A former intern (James Wilson, TVA '66) served as a counselor for an EDA intern in Virginia. (7) Several agencies requested extensions of projects. (8) Five interns from the 1967 program period were appointed as advanced interns during the 1968 summer program. EVALUATION NOTES All project committee members and interns were requested to evaluate the internship program and their particular project experience. Questions were formulated by SREB and mailed to participants. Ninety percent of the counselors prepared lengthy evaluation statements, and over 50 percent of the other committee members responded. (1) Interns, counselors and all other project committee members indi- cated the worth of the intern's project for the host agency as follows: Interns Counselors Local Reps. Total Resp. % Resp. % Resp. —% Resp. % Very valuable yh 49.9 26 52.0 55 59.7 125 55.8 Of limited value 31 34.4 17 —- 34.0 30 32.6 78 33.6 No value or negative value 1 121 i 2.0 1 U2 3 1.3 Don't know vio 16.56 Geo) 6686 LD 90 50 92 232 (2) Learning dimensions and educational values indicated in the questicn- naires are very similar among interns, counselors and comnittee members. Most frequently mentioned educational values were: 1. Participation with problem solving or developmental process at many levels. 2. Better understanding of research, interviewing, analyzing and writing techniques. 3. Enhanced human relations abilities. 4. Motivation for educational and career goals. (3) Interns responded to the question, “How will your internship relats to your academic program? (Check as many as apply)" in the following way: % of 83 Interns No. Responding Complement classroom activities he 50.5 No direct relationship, just broaden background kl 49.4 Help prepare for eventual career 29 34.8 Research for advanced degree 9 10.8 Other 2 2.4 (4) Sixty-five percent of the interns responding to a question asking for recommendation on curriculum change recommended offering wide variety of courses that require field work experience with concrete societal problen. (5) Based on responses received, about 30 percent of the 1968 summer interns received academic credit for their internship activity. Course credit ranged from one hour to 10 hours credit for required field experience. (6) The following quotes from evaluation materials indicate that basic objectives and operational procedures remain worthwhile and functional. Zo give immediate manpower assistance to development agencies and provide constructive service opportunities for students. "Mr. Bigner established and conducted an in-service training program for Head Start which will be continued and enlarged upon as time pro- gresses." (Les Montgomery, OEO Project Committee Member) "It (the intern's report) has been of tremendous help to us in eval- uating the goals of our organization. The report will be widely dis- tributed and studied throughout our organization and used as a future policy guide." (R. Kirksey, EDA Project Committee Member) " -my work on this project provides them (agency) with significant information relative to their objectives of promoting tourist avtrac- tions. Much uncoordinated material has been arranged into the finel report." (Kenny Smith, EDA Intern) "The intern compiled a Where to Turn Directory, a compilation of re- sources in Dade County, indexed in a simple way to make it especially useful for target area workers and residents." (Betty Lou Barbieri, OEO Project Committee Member) "The report is to be used for educational purposes with governmental officials, thought molders in the community, and civic leaders who will work for solution to the solid waste problem." (Clarence Streetmsan, TVA Project Committee Member) Jo_ encourage young people to consider careers and citizen leadership in pro- pres of development and to provide a pool of trained personnel for recruit- mant by sponsoring agencies. "The program has convinced me that a career in urban or regional planning is the one I would most like to pursue." (James Nichol, TVA Intern) "The internship program has caused me to take courses dealing with social and economic problems in my academic studies this year. . .I have decided definitely upon a career dealing with some phase of community development." (Betty Dwight, OEO Intern) "I have learned different aspects of resource development that I never saw before. I have been thinking seriously of changing majors if I don't lose too many credits. I feel that I would enjoy planning work." (Raymond S. Cannon, EDA Intern) "It has influenced my thinking to the extent that I am now considering taking Urban and Regional Planning in Graduate School, instead of Economics." (Richard V. Dunn, EDA Intern) To give students in social sciences and related studies a more relevant and meaningful education in the complexities of resource development. "I have learned more through my internship than through any previous college or work experience. . .It has strengthened my dedication to the field of social sciences." (Stuart A. Bach, OEO Intern) "I now view this program as a valued part of the needed effort to have each and every person develop to the fullest his potential with a feel- ing of responsibility to the society which made that development possible. . ." (Carol Brumby, EDA Counselor) "The most significant part of the internship project is thet young men and women are given the opportunity to mature to face reality and to be ready to enter the world realizing that they have civic obligations as well as selfish obligations." (Thomas W. Willis, EDA Counselor) "I learned about what goes on in the world other than that which is immediately linked to my 18 straight years of education." (Thomas J. Blystad, EDA Intern) "I learned how to work with people more effectively; something that I could never have learned in a classroom." (Tommy Austin, TVA Intern) To vrovide additional avenues of communication between institutions of higher learning and programs of social and economic development. "We have now established working relationships with the university's Department of Home Economics through Bigner's vork here." (Les Montgomery, OEO Project Committee Member) "This experience has gotten our foot substantially into the door of the UNC Population Center. . .Theirs is a big operation and already we are making full use of their audio-visual section, and hope to have train- ing further augmented by them after their training subcommittee formu- lates plans. Your program gave me new insights." (Leon Mann, OEO Project Committee Member) "An important secondary benefit to the agency as well as the university has been that these two institutions have been brought into a meaning- ful contact, which may lead to fruitful cooperation in the future." (Sagar Jain, OEO Counselor) 10 "On the basis of this experience, credit will be given for future internship activity. Under study is a plan to conduct all summer school architectural design activity much Like an internship program with field work and independent study as the basis for other course effort." (Anders J. Kaufmann, OEO Counselor) Counselor comments on the most significant part of the internship program. "This opportunity to gain insight, first-hand, into the complex problems of human and physical resource utilization and develop- ment is one of the most significant contributions of the intern- ship program." (James D. Wilson, EDA Counselor) "The most significant part of the entire program was the scheduled and unscheduled meetings." (Bill R. Darden, EDA Counselor) "The opportunity for students to become exposed to an action setting, to work largely on their own but with counseling available, and the opportunity to be freed of course and grading requirements are the most significant parts of the internship. Not to be overlooked, however, are the reciprocal benefits which accrue to faculty counselors who observe student growth and to agency persons who have opportunity to learn what students are interested in and capable of doing." (Daniel F. Hobbs, Jr., OEO Counselor) "Action, man, action--student action, without the confinements of the curriculum and the classroom, against which rebellion is overdue. Self-determination, self-reliance, self-imagination, self-ingenuity, self-responsibility, self-etc." (Robert M. Viles, OEO Counselor) ", . .The most significant part of the internship program is the opportunity for students to participate in situations related to but often not available in the academic atmosphere. By being in- volved in service activities, students are sensitized to the needs and problems of their community and the society as a whole." (Mason Willrich, OEO Counselor) IL INTERNS INTERESTED IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT EMPLOYMENT AND/OR EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES Interns, upon completion of their assignments, are asked about their interests in receiving information related to employment or education opportunities in resource development. Since 87 percent responded affir- matively, a listing of these former interns, indicating their present position and/or academic background and their SREB internship assignment particulars has been compiled. Individuals are listed by academic backgrounds, which include law, economics, liberal arts, medicine, political science, social sciences, business and natural sciences. This listing is provided to developmental agency employers and educa- tional institutions. CASE STUDIES OF SELECTED INTERNSHIPS Case study brochures have been pnepabed to illustrate the scone and nature of resource development internships. The case study includes a statement of the intern's project subject; a note on the intern; a brief description of the project activity; and notes on the final report and follow-up results.
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 34

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_034.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 34
  • Text: THE ATLANTA CONSTITITIG vturday, Nav, of, 1965 ACO: F 9 jt On ot fe i. e “ag q Or ur vd 1 DIRE 8 UD HUET E HUE Uroain Atlanta city government hones to have an Urban Corps of up to 100 college interns working for and with it by the spring _ semester. Dan Sweat, aison director at City Hall, said Friday that the city is seeking to employ 100 under the federal College Work Study Program, and already is negotiating with college officials. - Sam Williams, president of the Georgia Tech student hody last year, brought the attention of Sweat and Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. to the success of the New York intern program last spring. Williams and other college a leaders have followed up this fall. out the city’s massive summer program, Sweat explained. Sweat met with the students ° last Monday and has another = session set for next Thursday. The students have been asked to select a spokesman. who ‘sll be sent to New York to concer with the director of the program there, Michael Gildstein. The Ford Foundation gave New York funds to provide free technical assistance to other ci- ties interested in establishing an Urban Corps. Sweat said that the City Per- sonnel department has estab- lished two classifications for the college interns. John Cox, execu- tive director of the Atlanta Chil- dren and Youth Services Com- mission also has cooperated. Sweat hopes that the college students can provide general ad- ministration and supervision for the program. The program will hit its peak during the summer governmental li- The delay was due to the - time needed to begin and carry ; l POS 5 | OY QTR HE Con Liep> iD LAYS SL a “iu UO competences Frank McGaughey and Eugene PN po McLemore last summer rein- ee forced the intent of the city to establish a larger program. “We must use the talents of the young men and women,” Sweat said. ‘We've found they can carry a larger role than we : normally would think. We must use their creative abilities in our government.” PLANS FOR SPRING Dan Sweat months Sweat said, bui could have about 50 working for the city in all departments during} , the spring months. New York ' City has about 3,000 in its pro- gram. ; Georgia Tech stuidents “spear- F headed the drive to establish an Urban Corps here, Sweat said, and Emory University and the Atlanta University Center have also been interested. [n fact, Sweat added, he hopes all ' 38 colleges in the metropolitan area will eventually take part. Sweat said the outstanding . performance of city interns te aaa
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 4, Document 31

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004_031.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 4, Document 31
  • Text: July 18, 1969 Miss Blayne Landis Associate Director Metropolitan Regional Council 155 East 7lst Street New York, New York 10012 Dear Elayne: I am leaving Atlanta the first week of September for Harvard Business School and we need a Director. I've been talking to Mike Goldstein about possible directors and he suggested you. I did casually mention at the recent Urban Corps Conference that we're looking, but I'd like to make it more definite. As you know, Atlanta's Urban Corps is progressing verve. wes beye cooperative resources from area colleges, business donors, city govern- ment and private agencies. I have no doubt about expansion possibilities- only through planning. City government is co-sponsoring an Urban Life Center with Georgia State College through a special grant from Housing and Urban Development. It is a "kind of'' university relations office with promising opportunity. The Mayor's assistant says that if a decision was made to hire a person of your caliber that you could possibly be a professor in the Urban Life Center as well as direct the Urban Corps. If you are interested, could you please send me a resume and call me about arranging a visit? erely, M A. WILLIAMS Director I ce: Mayor's Office - Dan Sweat
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 4, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021