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Box 9, Folder 7, Document 1

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_001.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 1
  • Text: cc: Mr. Charles L. Davis Mr. Forrest Gee Mr. George Berry June 20, 1969 Mr. Sam Williams, Director . Atlanta Urban Corps _ Municipal Auditorium Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Sam: Enclosed is City of Atlanta general fund check nurnber 6056 in the amount of $50, 00 for the purpose of funding a petty cash procedure for the Urban Corps Project. These funds are to be used only for those miscellaneous requirements for which it would not be prattical or possible to issue the regular purchase requests or miscellaneous requisitions to the Purchasing Agent. The expenditures from the proceeds of the petty cash fund must be for relatively small amounts. Every expenditure, without exception, is to be substantiated with some invoice, bill, or memoranda containing an adequate explanation as to what is being purchased. Periodically, as the fund nears depletion, you should accurnulate these written records and attach them to a miscellaneous requisition written for an arnount sufficient to bring the total fund back to a total of $50.00. You should charge the appropriate expense account for the amounts paid out, rental, printing, supplies, etc. This miscellaneous requisition, along with the supporting bills and invoices, should be forwarded to this office in the usual manner. As the project nears completion, you should make a final report on the petty cash fund, returning to this office a record of all then remaining paid bills along with the cash balance of the fund, These remaining paid bills along with the cash balance should total $50. 00. I trust this information is sifficient to instruct you on the proper operation of the petty cash fund, If any further clarification is needed, please contact me or GeorghBerry. Sincerely yours, Dan Sweat
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_002.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 2
  • Text: SS wr ee DRAFT RESOLUTION BY FINANCE COMMITTEE WHEREAS, the 1969 Urban Corps Project anticipates the receipt of federal funds through the College Work Study Program administered by the Department of Health, Education and Welfare through most Universities across the Country; and WHEREAS, the Finance Committee and Budget Commission, by resolution adopted June 16, 1969, anticipated $77,856 from this program for the support of the 1969 Urban Corps budget based on agreements that have been executed by various Colleges and Universities; and WHEREAS, such agreements have now been fully processed and are ready for execution by the city. NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE MAYOR AND BOARD OF ALDERMEN OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA that the Mayor be and is hereby authorized to execute agreements with various Colleges and Universities the effect of which is to commit the Colleges and Universities for the financial support of the 1969 Atlanta Urban Corps Project through the federal College Works Study Program.
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 11

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_011.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 11
  • Text: 30 Courtland Street, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 VW June 20, 1969 Urban Corps Interns, Supervisors and Friends: Nag / xX f ATLANTA URBAN CORPS The Urban Corps and several service organizations such as the Peace Corps, VISTA, and the Southern Regional Education Board are sponsoring a National Conference on service-learning in Atlanta June 30 = July 1, 1969. ‘The initial Conference will explore the service~ learning experience of existing volunteer and service programs and plan a metropolitan model for Atlanta involving area colleges, local agencies, and foundations. A series of follow-through meetings will be held during the summer to examine specific aspects of s*zvice~learning programs such as finance, college curriculum revision and educational aspects of service. All Urban Corps interns will attend the first day's session June 30, with registration starting at 8:30 a.m., at the White House Motor Inn, 70 Houston Street, N, E, Interns should notify their supervisors in advance about their planned absence from work that day. We especially would like intern supervisors to attend. Hopefully some interns and supervisors will be able to attend the Tuesday Meeting as well. During the afternoon session 2il interns will meet with Urban Corps evaluation staff members for additionla information about the internship. Therefore attendance is very crucial. Speakers for the Conference include Atlanta's Mayor, Student President at Clark College, Georgia Tech's President, Peace Corps and VISTA Regional Directors, and White House Aides, ; 3 ‘i ‘ We look forward to seeing you June 30. Sincerely, Kor Ci ATS SAM A, WILLIAMS Director Atlanta Urban Corps SAW sblu
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 10

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_010.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 10
  • Text: ATLANTA SERVICE-LEARNING CONFERENCE Room B-70 275 Peachtree Street Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Conference Participant: Just a reminder! Preparations for the Atlanta Service-Learning Conference opening meeting at the White House Motor Inn in Atlanta from June 30 to July 1 are being finalized. Response, thus far, has been gratifying both by the intended participants and by national and local media. Due to the support of participating organizations it has become possible to lower the registration fee to $15.00 for all participants. This fee covers the cost of the three meals included in the program. For those who cannot attend all three meals, further adjustment will be possible. If you need lodging, reservations at the White House Motor Inn should be made by you personally. Several areas of the conference have been integrated enabling us to conclude after the luncheon on Tuesday, July 1. This earlier conclusion will facili- tate the departure of those participants who wish to leave in the early afternoon. We hope that these changes will be conducive to your attendance at the conference. We look forward to seeing you there. Conference Steering Committee The City of Atlanta The Atlanta Urban Corps Economic Opportunity Atlanta The Colleges and Universities of Atlanta Department of Health, Education and Welfare The Southern Regional Education Board Volunteers in Service to America The Peace Corps
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 41

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_041.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 41
  • Text: DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE 501 CITY HALL ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 June 26, 1969 CHARLES L. DAVIS Ww. ROY SMITH DIRECTOR OF FINANCE DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE EDGAR A. VAUGHN, JR. JAMES R. FOUNTAIN, JR. DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Director of Governmental Liaison Mayor's Office City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Dan: Reference is made to your letter of June 25, 1969, in which you advise of the oversight in providing travel allowances for certain interns in the Urban Core Program. I agree with your concept of paying these interns; however, I believe it would be wise to transfer funds from the operating account, 770U, to a 500U account which is normally established for auto allowances or transportation purposes. This action would be consistent with the general accounting procedures of the city and would set forth the proper record of expenditures of the Urban Core. In order to implement this, I would need an estimate of the cost of transportation so that the appropriate transfer within appropriations can be made. Sincerely, Bhat. LO Charles L. Davis Director of Finance CLD: dhf
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 8
  • Text: URBAN NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 250 BROADWAY CORPS NEW YORK, N. ¥. 190007 The effectiveness of an Urban Corps depends in large part upon the perceptions of the participating students themselves. During the summer of 1968, 20 students from Sarah Lawrence College took part in New York City's Urban Corps, and one of them, Teresa Baker, wrote this article on their experiences with the city. Miss Baker had a bird's- eye view of the entire program from her internship position in the Urban Corps program development office. A native of Denver, Colorado, Miss Baker received her B,A. from Sarah Lawrence College in June, 1969. Miss Baker, 21, was editor of her college newspaper, an editorial assistant in the Sarah Lawrence Office of Publications and Publicity, and a tutor in the Upward Bound Program. She will be attending the Columbia University School of Journalism in September, 1969. Additional copies of this reprint are available upon request.
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 39

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_039.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 39
  • Text: ATLANTA URBAN CORPS AMOUNTS DUE ATLANTA CHILDREN AND YOUTH SERVICES COUNCIL Salaries ~ Net* Dianne Wilson Sue Zander Steve Mwamba Arlene Bird Office Supplies TOTAL due to Youth Council *Does not include withholdings as follows; Dianne Wilson Sue Zander Steve Mwamba- Arlene Bird FICA | FUT 33 err eo) 138530 19.90 69.10 -0- -0- -0- -0- $ 57.38 $ 207.40 Note: Details in Auditor's workpapers. $ 601.24 299.97 136.40 242.50 $ 1,280.11 35.00
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 12

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_012.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 12
  • Text: a - A PROPOSAL FOR MODEL SCHOOLS A MEMO SUBMITTED TO RICHARD NIXON FROM SAM WILLIAMS JOHN CAMPBELL FERRELL PAGE STUDENT COALITION WILLARD HOTEL UNITED CITIZENS FOR NIXON- AGNEW CHARLES RHYNNE, NATIONAL CHAIRMAN NOVEMBER 5, 1968 Before WHY NOT (or the"model schools") proposal can be presented as legislation the following points need to be researched in more depth, 1, The cost of carrying out WHY NOT in approximately 20 schools in the initial year, 2. The duration of the grants and how they might be renewed, 3. The proposal refined and organized into booklet form, 4, A schedule of deadlines for the participating groups" planning and implementation of programs. ._ 5. Approximately 20 schools representing the variety of existing institutions must be screened and briefed on the proposal. Pre-requisites for qualification would be a cooperative admini- stration very interested in playing a larger role in the urban community. 6. The drafting of a major Presidential speech to introduce the idea of WHY NOT. 7. The possible use of the surrogate candidates as Presidential visitors and guests at participating colleges, 8. The adoption of a name for the plan. WHY NOT conveys the ant challenging, incentive, daring of involved youth on the campus today. WHY NOT! "Colleges whose concept of education stops at the walls of ivy give little but the option of dropout to students seek- ing participation in the real world, In contrast, a college that combines the opportunity for off-campus service experiences with the opportunity for on-campus academic re- flection on the experiences, can engender in their students a thirst for educational involvement complementary to their thirst for societal involvement," 1 Proposal for a "MODEL SCHOOLS" program in the Nixon Administration to develop and expand service programs involving young people, A_DIRECTION Mr. Nixon in his speech "Today's Youth: The Great Generation" said: "Our future leadership must provide our young people with a cause to be for; a commitment to the right to be unique; a dedication to social responsibility on a person-to-person basis, | "We are not talking here about a way to work off youthful enthusiasm; we are talking about a way to work in a sense of idealism and meaning that will grow throughout a person's life, "There are 7 million college students today. The universities they attend are often close to and sometimes contribute to, urban problems. We have seen how government can make use of academic facilities as "think tanks" to move in on difficult projects, Every university must become a "think tank" for its local community. "In that way students will add realism to their education, as they bring needed services to their communities, "Some of this is well under way in pioneering colleges across the country; but now it should become a way of college life. "The idea of bringing the resources of youthful energy to bear on urban problems is beginning to take root; what is needed now is a national commitment to provide incentive and financing to the great challenge facing this generation of Americans." This proposal outlines how this national commitment might be started - to be concentrated initially at the education centers, but grants to be available to states, cities, and institutions whose projects fit the pro- posal's guidelines, To marshall the national resources of our young people to confront our social problems in general, and the urban problems in particular, the Nixon Administration must be aware of the magnitude of work that can be done through volunteer student groups and individuals primed by federal funds in a systematic approach, The "Model Schools" program attempts to achieve several distinct results: 1, Bring additional education resources to bear on social problems. 2, Provide a constructive outlet for the dissatisfaction many students feel with society by giving them the opportunity to develop and expand student resources in meaningful pro- grams of social value. 3. Provide a worthwhile supplement to the formal education of the university. } Donald J, Eberly, "Servile Experience a nd Educational Growth," Ed dcat ional Record, Spring, 1968. 7 WHAT STUDENTS ARE NOW DOING The importance of volunteer community service by students can not be over- emphasized. One individual helping another who is in need is one of the basic tenets which can build a revitalized society in our country, not only in the communities surrounding our nation's colleges and universities, but in every community. The suppressed radicalism of youth cries out for programs which can harness their energies for social betterment and which rely heavily on the principle of volunteerism, Many groups already exist that use student volunteers in basic educational (tutoring, remedial reading), community action (reereational programs, organi- zation of local newsletters), and rehabilitative (work in mental hospitals, prisons) activities, But many campuses lack even the basic organizational structure, and often where it does exist it suffers from a general absence of coordination, organization, experienced guidance and sufficient funding. Often the scope of a school's involvement in its neighboring area depends too much on the energies and time of too few members of the university community. Many creative and helpful community programs do exist: Memphis has a Volunteer Service Bureau that handles the placement of workers in over 200 positions in 50 non-profit agencies. Students work with the Memphis Area Project-South which sponsors “clothes closets" to provide families with essential clothing when disaster hits, MAPS also oversees "planned parenthood" programs in South Memphis and nutrition classes that give instruction in planning well- balanced meals to the poor Blacks in Memphis. The Human Opportunity Corporation in Austin has begun a foster grand- parents project. It recruits aged low-income persons to work with retarded children. The University of Texas Law School has a Human Rights Research Council staffed with law students to inform low-income Negroes and Mexican-Americans of their legal rights and privileges. The Community Involvement Committee at the University of Texas at Austin has submitted recommendations for field work in their personnel management pro- gram to work with minority groups and the hard-core unemployed to try to place them in better jobs. One school offers special programs for black students before registration and continuing help to those who need it during the academic year. The University of Chicago has allotted funds for a Summer Institute in _ Which black students prepare talented eighth and ninth graders for college preparatory work. Students at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle provided trans- portation one summer for low-income children for trips to the city zoos, parks and museums. A Community Arts Foundation in Chicago recently started a creative theatre for ghetto residents and held productions in alleys. The Interdenominational Theological Center at Atlanta University has special preparatory courses for future ghetto ministers. The University of Pennsylvania sponsored a program in criminal law and litigation, in which students accompanied police during their regular round of activities and assisted public defenders. Class credit was given for this work, The Law School at the University of Detroit has a legal aid program for ghetto residents, One group works on developing extracurricular activities within the walls of a prison -- sports, chess or bridge clubs,music lessons, quiz teams, managing of a literary magazine and the institution newspaper, management of an insti- tution radio program for inmate education, and participation in weekly discus- sion sessions. One student committee works with boys who are confined to a state reform school in Westborg,Massachusetts. One groups of student tutors works with children in the third and fourth grades to help them to express themselves better, by having them dictate tales to the tutors, pound out their ideas on old typewriters, write short poems, make science observations, keep scrap books of thoughts, and momentoes of trips. One program maintains an up-to-date collection of college, business and vocational school catalogues, a library of information on college board examina- tions, financial aid, and on "A Better Chance" and other available compensatory education programs. COPE is a Boston organization designed specifically to place teenages from low-income areas in institutions of higher education, done by represen- tatives from the admission offices of the local universities, colleges and vocational schsols. At one school four qualified volunteers (including one who just completed the course) are currently teaching their second round of a 10-week computer class for phetto residents. Some imaginative tutors have started a biology iearning room with a group of children who were introduced to the world of nature, foreign to their asphalt and cement world, by raising gerbils, hatching chickens and baby spiders, and growing plants. A council of Intercollegiate Affairs in Boston encourages cooperation among student volunteer programs engaged in similar activities on different campuses. Boston University's school of Nursing has sought out 27 young women from Roxbury who were interested in the field of nursing but who lacked the academic credentials for admission. Through a program, these girls have been successfully brought into the regular nursing program, ime Boston University offers its facilities for recruiting and training of volunteers to any outside organization. Harvard Business School students assist Roxbury ghetto businessmen. Some schools have programs to provide better training for prospective teachers who want to work in ghétto schools. Members of the Michigan State University Marching Band, "Band Brothers", offer free music lessons to children from low economic areas of Lansing. In one area "Community Gardens" were established on urban redevelopment land. ‘Through the purchase of shares, the community owns these gardens and the crops grown on then. ' Students operate several community cooperative stores in the west side of Lansing, Michigan. A program of consumer education "SHOP ALOT", uses student volunteers to aid inner-city residents in their shopping. In one community, teenagers from the inner city were given the opportunity to operate a student-run radio station. One faculty department sponsored a housing study to determine which low cost housing designs would best suit the needs of the people who will inhabit them. _ One university has as a requirement for the degree of Master of Governmental Administration the assignment of students to various departments of city govern- ment. Temple University has a Vice President for Urban Affairs to coordinate all activities with the community and has the responsibility for a Center for Urban Affairs and the Student Committee Action Center. Project College Bound is a six week summer program for Philadelphia high school graduates from low-income backgrounds who have been accepted at eellegess but have specific educational deficiencies. One school developed a counselor workshop--a three week summer institute to increase the professional competence of city high school guidance counselors in their work with students from minority groups. At the University of Pennsylvania, the University Council on Urbanism and Related Human Resources is conducting a survey of the University's schools and research centers in developing interdisciplinary faculty seminars on urban problems and charting a university wide approach to the study of urban life. The Temple University Hospital has developed a program for low-income mothers, giving pre-natal and delivery care. . A sorority developed a charm course (make up, hair care, personal hygiene, posture, ete.) for children from broken or inadequate homes. The Wharton Graduate School of Business has a Business Practice Service to provide management service to ghetto business people. One school developed a pilot program connecting housing rehabilitation with vocational education, providing part-time and summer employment for high school students. One University opened its olympic pool to poverty children during the week and provided instruction for an entire summer. One city has started traveling libraries to visit ghetto areas. Secretarial schools have developed technical-vocational courses in clerical skills to help needy girls find jobs. One student groupp started a program of working with young urban children as tutors, playground aides, and group leaders for boy and girl scouts. They also work in hospitals in the escort service, as candy stripers, in feeding patients and other assignments through the Red Cross. Others work with handi- capped persons, the mentally retarded, the deaf school, and many others. Volunteers from MIT have used their special skills in mechanics and science, for use on building radios, erector set projects, three-dmensional maps of the moon, airplane and rocket models for children. Tutoring Plus in Boston has produced its own textbook called "Tutoring On-A-Shoestring". Michigan State University has established an Office of Volunteer Programs to provide greater university support in advising and coordinating all student voluntary service activities and organizations as well as to encourage the formulation of new programs. One school developed a 13-week television course in Negro history and culture which was subsequently reproduced for use in teacher training in state- supported schools. The University of Pennsylvania has a course, Urban Social Change and Human Development, designed to assist the planning student in understanding the process of social change in the urban environment through studying the attitudes of low- income and minority populations toward housing, renewal, education, employment and welfare services. A special reading seminar is offered to familiarize the planning student with interdisciplinary literature on poverty, combined with intensive field experiences in a critical slum area near the University. The State of Michigan has a division of Volunteer Services. It is an in- formation center for all volunteer programs for all the colleges and universities in Michigan. It provides assistance and advice for individual student projects. A statewide Governor's Conference is held annually for the directors of individual programs and projects on the respective campuses. The division does not provide program monies, but provides assistance wherever possible. Presently, there are about 10,000 student volunteers in Michigan at 27 different campuses. From this outstanding example set by Michigan student volunteers, both Governor Romney and Lt. Governor Milliken have encouraged broader volunteer activities to be undertaken by all segments of the population. New York City has an URBAN CORPS internship program designed to offer college students the opportunity to participate first-hand in an urban society by taking a direct part in its administration. For eligible students, the program also provides a way to earn money through the use of college work-study funds. The URBAN CORPS is administered for the City of New York by the Office of the Mayor, in cooperation with the Department of Personnel. The URBAN CORPS is a cooperative venture of the City, the Federal Office of Education and the participating colleges and universities, Every assignment is individually prepared by the requesting agency or department, and is evaluated as to its applicability for a college student internship program. The majority of assignments are within existing agencies and departments, in on-going projects. Other assignments make the student a part of special task-force groups Students may also be assigned to the central staff of the URBAN CORPS, working on the administration and operation of the program itself. 4 WE PROPOSE A "MODEL SC3OOLS" PROGRAM that can offer qualifying schools of all sizes grants which would develop service programs that offer the promise of a more constructive and meaningful role both for students as well as to those in "neighboring comnaunities". The program would focus our society's educational techniques and talents on the problems of life - either in our tural or urban areas, It will not be simple to qualify for grants under this program. The government: has neither the means nor the desire to invest public funds in an expensive program whose net effects will be marginal, wasteful, or visible only after protracted delay. We intend to help only those schools, cities, states, and institutions whose plans really serve to help others in their struggle for a more meaningful and productive life. We propose the following guidelines for determining an applicant's qualifications for the benefits - and achieve- ments of this program. Many of these speak directly to the university edu- cational structure, as initially, work will probably be concentrated here, But the overriding generalities of realistic and complete planning will apply to all, The success that each deaonstration program can have will depend on the quality of its planning, and the degree of cooperation it elicits from the various governmental bodies concerned (i.e. students, administration, faculty, community bodies, "Model Cities" people, and those in local Urban Coalitions) as well as private interests. The absence of this cooperation between contiguous areas is wasteful, as well as blind to the reality of urban life. GUIDELINES: Service activities proposed should respond to the real needs of the community, by indicating a relevancy to the community given the realities of the environment. Adequate identification must be made, of the areas which would be best served through student help in the community, schools, recreation centers, medi- cal and mental hospitals, and probation departments. Long term goals should stress the encouragement of community residents to work with existing educational institutions to develop new programs especially in the technical-vocational field. Programs should be designed to nurture ghetto residents with recognized ability -- intellectual, academic, artistic, or athletic, The programs should foster the development of local and private initiative and widespread citizen participation in the planning and execution of the program. Local community groups should be encouraged to eventually develop and finance their own programs, and where possible people in the community should be trained to continue the specific educational or recreational project. Contact should be made with local community agencies and school systems to insure program coordination with the present community activities. Students should have a hand in assessing the nature of the service re- quired and defining the task to be done. Consideration should be given to involving adolescents in tutoring and counseling younger children for their mutual benefit. The program planned should be consistent with successful programs of the past, as well as integrated into what they are now doing. Experiences of often overlooked organizations like the YNCA should be utilized, Dilewmnte ne ek nee De Pe ne eee ede ali ee he ee ee ee ee — vision of all aspects of the program. There should be sufficient planning for projects to continue annually. The program should be manned in each area by a single authority with adequate powers to carry out and coordinate all phases of the program. There must be a serious commitment to the project on the part of school and local people. There should be adequate professional superv ision, as well as adequate orientation and training, of the needed volunteers, and possible use of fulltime social workers explored, "Tutoring" programs should include information guidance counseling, family services, school-home liaison, referrals, motivation-building, and recreational activities. Emphasis on volunteerism should be evident and the areas where salaries are necessary made very explicit. There should be evidence that the appropriate departments and groups within the university have been contacted to seek support for the proposed program. The program should reflect an attempt to make full use of the university structure, not only its students, but scientists, economists, architects, mathe- maticians, as well as buildings, athletic fields and libraries. Attempts must be made to focus research resources on problems facing the city, such as traffic congestion,. air pollution, housing, transportation, public health, etc. Where possible a joint effort, exchange, or coordination of programs with neighboring schools should be made. Lectures and special programs should be open to the community and scheduled with some attention to their interest and needs, e.g., a Black American series, : Evaluation of tutorial programs should be made through apptitude and psychological testing. ; . Plans should indicate an awareness of existing Federal programs which could provide financial support, and of techniques and projects which have pro- vided successful examples in other areas of the country. Institutional support should be available as needed, with a possible Sequential development along these lines: a) an initial commitment to the educational value of properly executed service experience; b) faculty assistance in training and orientation; c) possible future provisions for academic credit for Service experience; d) sufficient financial backing should be available so as to permit all students to participate; e) greater use should be made of work-study funds in pro- jects that both socially productive as well as financially remunerative to students; £) greater use should be made of work-study funds for off- campus work, both during the academic year, as well as dur- ing summer. GRANTS OF THE PROGRAM We recommend that participatin roups receive two types of federal assistance: I 1. special grants be made for programs to groups whose plans justify the expenditure and fulfill the guidelines of this proposal and give promise of a meaningful impact on those . participating, 2. that all available grants and urban aids in the fields of education, welfare, economic opportunity, and related pro- ‘grams be continued or expanded where justified. Plans will be reviewed by a national office according to the preceding prerequisites, The national office will be staffed with people knowladzeable about the available federal funds as well as with individuals experienced in the planning and implementation of volunteer programs, The research staff will have as its duties the gathering and distribution of all information that may be of use to submitting bodies, as well as the planning and organizing of relevant national and regional seminars and confer- ences on student social-work activities. Small pamphlets, educational materials and the results of training con- ferences and leadership workshops would be provided to new and expanding organizations, or to those who wished to improve the quality of their program, Another important aspect of the information gathering function would con- cern the financing of special student projects. A student group interested in working with the mentally ill at a local hospital would be able to obtain from this office information as to the funding programs in various government agencies which might be appropriate for its financing. The office would also assist the student group in preparing the proposal for federal funds. : Funds will be required to assist participating groups in the implemen- tations of their model demonstration plans. We should not underestimate the problems nor the financial needs involved in achieving these plans, The very scale of the demonstration and its widespread effects on the social structure of a comaunity calls for coordination of the community's planniag and adinini- strative resources on an unprecedented scale, The appropriate Federal contribution to this planning and implemantation effort would be _ 5 million the first year, growing in increments of _ million per year. SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS The scope and depth of the work done by universities, cities, states, or institutions will often require detailed planning, financial assistance, and study. But there are many things that could be done by our exceptional people in their mid-teens in secondary schools that can also have a massive effect, such as working as tutors in their communities in some of the remedial subjects, in secretarial fields, in home economics, and in the technical studies as well as art, music, etc. ' The President should urge each Congressman to communicate with the high schools in his district about the great need for these projects. The national research staff of the "model schools" could provide information for these schools. Congressmen would propose "model" high schools each year and their services projects for consideration of Presidential awards. Given the attention and priority, this could be a very beneficial program, both in terms of the community work and the recognition of the early maturation of today's younger generation. REWARDS The President through the research staff and evaluation board would make very predetohous awards to those groups who during a year's time initiate programs most exemplary of the "model school's" guidelines. It would be called the award, and could involve a Presidential visit, a Presidential dinner, or a contribution of Presidential books or research material. To qualify groups must: 1. show signs of major achievement of benefit to the surrounding community. 2. show signs of massive student involvement. 3. have produced action that is recent and a result: of a "model schools" program. a Successful action and innovation, not perfection or completeness, will be the real criteria. Finalists would be chosen by an impartial board, and their spokesman would come to Washington for a conference and presentation of their program, Greater use by the President of faculty-student prizes could also be used in areas, one particular individual faculty member or student did or initiated some particularly innovative idea or program by using an educational talent or technique on a social provlen. These rewards would be very important to generate the student -school action that is needed, to stress local involvement, and to stress the need for the teamwork approach to the problems. SUMMARY The character of the urban university is weakest in the area of communication and integration. There is a lack of communication both. within the university's structure and between the university and those who can effectively utilize its assistance. Integration goes hand in hand with communication in these areas, If integration seldom exists within academic institutions, it rarely exists within its community. There is an ever increasing need for the university to play a more diversified; participating role. Higher education is often a symbol of medieval isolation, with the university insulated in its castle from the surrounding environment, When a university does cross the moat to involve itself with the con- munity, the results are often uneven, fragmentary and unsystematic. The emphasis of education remains on the written word. In this change- oriented society the "PhD" and a long string of publications seems negatively correlated with problem solving capability. This program "Why Not" or "Model School's", suggests that the focus of education needs to be shifted away from the "print" to the problem. The purpose of education is primarily to prepare the student to meet the demands of his world. Students recognize the need for a more relevant educational experience. And the community demands a more involved university. Both need the university to become a more active agent in problem solving and direct service. But in spite of all the recent encouragement from the citizens and students, the university continues its aloof role and at times ignores its responsibilities. The poverty of an area breeds a psychological handicap for all ethnic groups. Welfare mothers and fathers without jobs frequently transfer their own guilt feelings to their children, and schools often underline the children's uncertainty. It is here that the facilities of the university and the available manpower of students can have a large impact. The proposals and requirements of "Why Not" (model schools) address themselves to the full integration of the university's resources ‘in solving the urban problem. The development of increased student power and intensified student participation support our belief that traditional walls must be broken down, both within the university and the surrounding community, in the effort to bring about a more humane urban environment. 2° To break down these walls and escape from the feudal armor of the castle-and-the-moat, university administrators and faculty must begin to conceive of the university as a total social institution which is different from the aggregate collection of departments and colleges. They must develop with the students a balance between the educational programs and basic research, social advocacy and problem solving. It is for them to develop a balance between scholars and intellectual activists, between student-oriented professors and community—oriented problem solvers. This balance and coordination must be conceptual as well as organizational to succeed. This academic movement must be with the assistance of student and community advice. The large brain trusts of universities are becoming like the federal government, bastions of bureaucracy where many people become lost. WHY NOT can develop contact between . the "little people", the university, and the government. And the link between all of these can be the student. Student tutorial programs already exist across the country and provide a perfect link with the community upon which the university can build. Tutorials are benficial to all parties involved if these parties involve : z: = are given a role in the planning.and supervision. Many successful tutorials have been initiated by local residents, The residents #f a ghetto in Cambridge, Massachusetts, created Tutoring Plus. In the summer of 1964, a group of teenagers met with a few older neighborhood youths who were attending college. All were trying to answer the question of why a small number of the » older youths had made it to college while few of the rest had even finished high school. Tutoring Plus now involves M.I.T. students, the Polaroid Corporation, and Christ Church in Cambridge. The successful example of Tutoring Plus points the way for the university, the city, and WHY NOT. In an increasingly open and secular EX2& society, young people are concerned with their own identity, the nature and quality of their society > and their relation to men everywhere, Tutorials bring a share of awareness and individual identity to both tutor and tutee, Ghetto youths often feel unable to deal with their environment, much less change it, This alienatéon is often translabed into a self-fulfilling hostility towards any future efforts at personal or néighborhood advancement, This alienation can be overcome by student volunteers running their own programs in conjunction with neighborhood community groups _ and parents, Student-run tutoring programs have inherent flexibility which enables them to be revised constantly to meet individual needs. They can operate with little of the stigma attached by adolescents to - schools and agency sponsored programs. First of all, the student volunteer is not too much older than the individuals they work with, thus contributing to a sense of conrade- ship and understanding between tutor and tutee. Secondly, the college student, by his very presence, is likely to provide the youth with a role model which is not memely a postiche of guidance counselor cliches but one which can communicate directly with the youth, overcoming a great deal of their time, energy, and thought, to the interpersonal relationships that are an integral part of any advancement’ activity. The student, merely by his presence at college, is likely to have access to all types of information his tutee may request. Many problems of student programs can be overcome with the active interest and participation of the university. The nature of a student's life, at first not much to do and then too much, cmwork to the disadvan- tage of these programs, Some substitute for money is necessary to encourage steady participation. Course credit is the logical suggestion, Very few schools give credit for undergraduate field work, but the majority of schools do for graduates, This discrepancy needs to be changed, The successful characteristics of student volunteer programs are relevant to any larger effort at community and tniversity involvement. Projects must be initiated on a small scale with supervision reflecting consultation with university, community, students, city and private enterprise, Projects should also be allowed to develop slowly to find adequate and responsible local leaders, Immediate funding of uninvesti- gated projects may end in misspent funds, which could severely damage the entire effort. Quality planning is most important. Freedom of progrsm selection must be guaranteed to each locale. Student committees must remain in control of volunteer programs with local citizens, Experience has shown that properly run volynteer programs attract the sincerest and highest quality workers. And that the introduction of remuneration often alienates the socially motivated and attracts the organiz#tionaz joiner or job hunter. The quality of service then drops. Public do-gooders with their weekend house painting serve only fo irritate the ghetto resident, Tutorial programs are only a fraction of what a university can do in an urban center, Not only do courses need to be changed to reftect ‘urban problems but new priorities and policies need to be stated, Why should a city have to employ outside economists or matématicians when the university's are available? Why should computors and programmers be hired when limitless reaearch hours are available on campus waiting direction? WHY NOT could use the university facilities in the summer, its athletic fields, museums, lecture rooms , its buses, pools and tennis courts, WHY NOT could work with the city's and the citizens' needs through the university's resources, The "model schools" program would show that the government and the university are willing to give a greater responsibility to the student. No longer- would there be dlack of communi- cation within the university and between the university and those who can effectively utilize its assistance. No longer would segregation exist between departments, students, the community and the university. WHY NOT seeks to coordinate and redirect the energies of education to problem solving within the city and to problem solcing training for the student. Can we prepare our students to face that challenge better if we make working.in it part of their education, maybe even for credit? Can we go beyond the research and problem-solving with our colleagues in . the community of institutions, and relate ourselves to our ghetto neighbors’ to improve their environmental condition? Can we even go beyond the poorly developed programs and technologies of today and develop new vésions of - neighborhood life to which both residential and university communities contribute? Is it possible that the urban university can become a more vital mover in all of its missions by making this attempt? WHY NOT. In a society characterized by accelerating change in all of its sub-systems, the problem solving urban university seems an inevitable trend, Will we be forced to it, or will we anticipate events and take leadership? That is the question. “fhe answer is WHY NOT.
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 18

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_018.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 18
  • Text: == arene VELL SURVICE LEARNING \ PLATTERS present - ns ae 3 A BROAD APPROACH TO RAPID TRANS LT or the impact cf body size cn the transportation industry WoANTS SERVICE LEARNING CCNFERENCE White Hous Motor inn 70 Bouston Strest, NG Atlanta, Georgia 30303 June 30, 1569 THE ATLANTA SERVICE*LEARNING PLAYERS a present ‘cad approach to rapid transit The Iimpect cf Increased Body Size on the Transportation Industry CAST OF CHARACTERS Narrator Mb dhe RREG TI A noe QO. L. McDonald , . CouLeaistrests 2) . Cc, "Vic" Leider, . Mrs. Minn Ority. . Charlie Goodtime . Cyrius UBomeworker, Millie Tants . «. . Constant Lee Dewingeod Able N. Willing. . A. K, Demic. ° * e Carrie Burden. .. Wright N, Wright, III Ray Levant . . . e Irvin Core... o Leah Zonn... « « « Miss Peller. .. =, IvavGrant. te) se ¢ = == Chief Planner, Same Old Roads & Traffic Association (SORTA) Environmental Investigations with Economic Impact Of:ice (Z1TEIO) City Traffic Engineer eFresident, Merchants & Peopies Bank and Chairman of SORTA -Board Member, SORTA «Junior in Industrial Engineering, Agnes Brown Clark University (ABCU) -Graduate Student in Psychology, ABCU »Senior in Political Science, ABCU Senior in Sociology, ABCU »Senior in Political Science, ABCU -Dean, ABCU oFinancial Aid & Placement Officer, ABCU eProfessor, Political Science, A3CU -Associate Professor, Econemics, ABCU Director, Service-Learning Agency (SLA) eAssistant Director, SLA -Secratary to Mr. Core -Grant Assignments Depertment, (ZGAD) ACT T ee Lee ae THE INGREDIENTS OF SERVICEsLEARNING Scene T - A Community Need Place, . « © » o « » The Conference Room of SORTA(Same old Road & Time o o ° . ? eo [J Characters Present Situation. .... Scene II = Students Place ine Me aPo ia Time ° . 2 e e ° J Characters Present Situation. . 6 « ® Traffic Association) Spring M, T. Roads, Chief Planner, SORTA O. L. MeDonaid, Director, EIEIO(Environmentai Tnveetigations with Economic Impact Office) C, T, Streets, City Traffic Engineer C. "Vic" Leider, Chairman of SORTA Mes, Minn Ority, SCRTA Board Member EIEIO has just confirmed reports that bady size is increasing with each generation. The impact of this factor on SORTA plans for transportation facilities is the subject of this meeting. SORTA does not have the mazpower to explore the dimensions of the problem and is seeking help. The Student Union Coffee Shoppe of Agries Brown Clark University (A8CU) Spring Charlie Goodtime, Junior, Industrial Engineering Cyrius Hemeworker, Graduate Student, Psychology Millie Tante, Senior, Political Science Constant Lee Dewingeod, Senior, Sociology Able N. Willing, Junior, Feonomics Students are discussing their views of their courses and education and society in general, Talk turns to pians and wishes for the coming summer and beyond, Scene ITI - An Educational Institution PL ace . o e ee . J . eo Time onreeseeee Characters Present Si tuation, e . o ° o Dean's office at ABCU Spring A. K. Demic, Dean Carrie Burden, Financial Aid & Placement Officer Wright N. Wright, IIL, Professor, Political Science Ray Levant, Asseciate Professor, Economics The group is maeting as an ad hoc committee to discuss student problems from an administration and faculty perspective, On the agends are: (lL) academic standards, (2) student unrest, (3) financial problems, (4) physical facilities, (5)counseling,. Scene IV - A Coordinating Agent Place. .« » © © « e » Office of SLA (Service-Learning Agency) Time . 6 « © « e © » Late the same spring (Scene IV - continued) Characters Present . Irvin Core, Director, SLA Situation. eo 8 « Leah Zonn, Assistant Director, SLA Miss Peller, Secretary, SLA Iva Grant, EGAD, (Exemplary Grant Assignments Department) Contacts have been made with SORTA, ASCU and students securing agreement to cooperate in a service-learning project on body size ané transe portation. Funds have been secured. The agree= ments are to be confirmed and a first meeting of the project participants is to be scheduled. ACT IT SERVICE-LEARNING IN ACTION Scer* Ee Yoo Ber ject Place. . e oe o oe o °o SORTA Office Time 2. os 5 © « ce » LACO Boring Characters Present . M. %. Road3z Situation. . .« « e 0. L. McDonald "Abe" Willing Ray Levant Leah Zona Project participants are meeting as a project committee to help the intern define his task more specifically and to discuss roles. Scene IT - Education Interpretation PLACA Ss diray. ee ete Time ss ie tale cod Characters Present Situat ion. e e * e o Professor Levant's Office Mid=Summer Ray Levant "Abe" Willing Intern is well into his project and ke is discussing some of his observations and ideas with his counselor. Scene III - Coordination Pi BEC 6) aoe We) ofa! w Time ° oe . e o [J a Characters Present Situations < . « « ° Service-Learning Agency Office Late Summer Irvin Core Leah Zonn internships for the summer are almost over and she office is reviewing the situation, Scene IV - Field Rev:: 7 & Evaluation FPLSCG. ls 6. @ ¥ie Ga BORLA Time . . « » co © 6 » Late Summer Characters Present . M, T. Roads wo De Page 3 Act II ~ Scene IV, Continued O, L. McDonald "Abe" Willing Ray Levant Irvin Core Situation. . .. . » With only a few weeks to go, the project is reviewing with the intern his final steps and the preparation of his report. Discussion of community and educational issues evolves. ACT IIft Follow-Up and herermath Scene I - Atlanta Service-J.carnine Conference Place. . - » » « « » White House Motor Inn Time . o « « © « e » Now Characters Present . All of you Situation. . .. . . The script from here on is yet to be written.
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 5
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 29

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_029.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 29
  • Text: NAME L. D. Alexander Melvin Almond Phyllis Atkins Franklin Benefield Edwin M. Barrett Marianne T. Boder Jane Bridges James M. Bruce s Steve Chandler Charles Choice \ A) Dancthriistienwomy Ab Walter Collier ‘Naney Corcoran Inmond Deen Daniel Dragalin Walter Driver Peggy Durrah James Elman \ J Thomas Fleming — Michael Floyd Gramaze Fretwell Beverly J. Gaither Margaret Gerber B COLLEGE Clark College DeKalb College Georgia State Emory University Morehouse College Georgia Tech Georg9a State Florida Presby. Clark College GEOREA A TEC Dees Geergia State Emory University Tulane University Georgia Tech.. Clark College Georga State Vanderbilt Univ. Georgia State Mor ehouse Clark College Georgia State - Emroy University AGENCY HeKalb/Decatur YMCA City-Traffic Engineering Wheat Street City-Sanitation Ga. State Employ Ser City-Finance Dept City-Public Library Emory University .._ City-Mayor's. Office Fulton Connty Health City-Planning Dept. City-Mayor's Office City-Aviation Emroy-Legal Aid Atlanta Urban Corps City-Water Dept Community Arts, Inc. City-Parks Dept City-Sanitation City-Mayors Office City-Parks Dept Atl. Youth Council Fulton County Health Atlanta Urban Corps $1.80 $1.80 $2.20 $2.50 $2.20 $2.20 $2.50 $2.50 $1.80 $2.20 $2.50 $1.80 $2.50 $2.50 $2.20 $2.20 $1.80 $2.50 $2.50 $2.20 $2.20 $1.80 $2.50 80% CWSP CWSP CWSP AUC CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP Agency Agency Agency Agency ws Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency VISTA AGENCY Vista Vista Agency Vista Urban Corps | Agency Vista Vista Page 2 NAME Frank S. Goodson David M. Harvey Tony Hatcher Janice Herring Iris Hightower Freddye Hill Joan Hollenbach John Hotard lydia H. Howard Dorothy Humphry Martha Irby Rudolph Jefferson Arlon Kennedy Rita Kirshstein Diane Lewis Marjorina Langford Cathleen Liang Andrea Luce Robett Lynes Cynthia Knight John Mann ® COLLEGE Univ. of Ga. Emory Univ. Ga. Tech Clark College Clark College Northwestern Univ Emory Law School Univ of Ga. Spelman Morris Brown Emory University Morris Brown Morehouse Emory Spelman Georgia State Atlanta Univ. Randolph-Macon West Gerogia Clark College West Georgia AGENCY City-Public Workds City-Finance Dept. City-Public Works City-Public Library Community Arts, Inc. Emmgys House City-Attorney's Office City-Sanitation Literacy Action Found. YWCA City-Finance Mennonite House Rent-a-Kid Fulton County Health Atlanta Girls Club Urban C rps Staff City-Finance Decatur/DeKalb YMCA City-Water Works Wheat Street Bapt. Rent-a-Kid RATE $2.20 $2.50 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.50 $2.50 $2.20 $2.50 $1.80 $2.20 $2.20 $1.80 $2.20 $1.80 $1.80 $2.50 $180 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 804 CWSP CWSP AUC CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP AUC CWSP CWSP CWSP Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency. Agency Agency Agency AUC* Agency 100% Agency Agency Urban Corps Vista Agency Vista Agency Agency Agency Page 3 TAME \ \ COLLEGE AGENCY Jospph Mene Oglethorpe College City-Mayor's Office — Emmett MeCord Albertine McCrary Eddie McMichael Alan Miller Addie Mitchell Jesse Moore James A. Mulligan Harold R. Nash Naney A. Norbert Richard Padgett Delbest Paul Betty Peters Linda Robinson Leon Scandrick Teia Sinkfield Bartow Snooks Ruth Simmons Valendia Spaulding Paul Stansbury Julius Stephens Margaret SwartseL (a) DeKalb Junior Georgia State Morehouse Ga. Tech Morris Brown Morehouse Emory University Berogaii Tech Emroy Univ. Brown Univ. Georgia Tech Clark College Georgaa State DeKalb Junior Spelamn Emory Emory Brandeis Ga. Tech Morehouse Agaes Scott Rent-a-Kid fity-Atl. Public Lib. Community Arts, Inc. Kennesaw Park Wheat Street Bpt. American Cancer Society Fulton County Health CTity-Treffic Enginner. City-Parks & Ree-Kenn. Atl. Youth Council Wheat Street Bapt. Literacy Action Found. Wheat Street Bapt. Rent-a-Kid Youth Council City-Sanitation City-Parks & Rec-Kenn. Rent-a-Kid City-Sanitation City-Parks & Rec. Urban Corps Staff RATE $2.20 $1.80 $1.80. $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.50 $2.20 $2.50 $1.80 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $1.80 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $1.80 $2.20 $2.20 $2.50 80% CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP 20% Agency Agency Agency ea% Auc * Agency Agency Agency AUC * Agency AUC * Agency Agency © Agency Agency 100% Vista Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency AUC Page NAME —_—_—— Charles &, Thomas Jerry Thompson Larry Tilley Randall Tony Valerie Tomlinson William Travis Sally Tucker James Uffleman Bettye Underwood Patricia Watkins Paula Whatley David Whelan Benjamin White Dawn White James Wilcox James Wilson Rosalind Williams Michael Winston ; Gary Wood ~, Mary J. Woodward \\Y lo COLLEGE DeKalb Junior Emory West Ga. Ga. State DeKalb Junior Ga. State Agnes Scott Ga. Tech Morris Brown DeKalb Junior Univ of Penn. Harvard UNC Atlanta Univ. Ga. Tech Ga. Tech Morris Brown West Georgia Mercer —— Ga. State. AGENCY Community Council Family Counseling Center Rent-a-Kid City-Sanitation YWCA-Phyllis Wheatley City=Sanitation City-Parks & Rec-Kenn. Sity-Sanitation Urban Corps Staff YWCA-Phyllis Wheatley Fulton County Health Urban Corps Staff Literacy Action Found. Urban Corps Staff City-W ater Dept. Rent-a-Kid Gate City Day Nursery City-Dept of Planning Rent-a-Kid City-Mayors Office RATE $1.80 $2.20 $1.80 $2.20 $1.80 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $1.80 $2.20 $2.50 $2.50 $2.50. $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.50 804, CWSP AUC CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP Auc CWSP AUC AUC AUC Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency AUC VISTA VISTA (Assigned) Page 5 NAME Rudine Arnold Stanley Ball + a UP Maney Berk.q__)! Macy Best Katherine Betsill Solomon Berry, Jr. Carol Bonner Clifton Bostick Regina Braxton Charles Brown Iucille Brown Robert Brown Sally Cantor Vivian Chandler Roosevelt Childress Margie Cohen Brenda Comer Diane Cousineau Tom Cuffie Caretha Daniels Mary Daniels 1 COLLGE Spelman West Ga. Antioch DeKalb Junior West Ga. Univ. of Ga. Clark College Ga. State Morris Brown Ga. Tech West Ga. Moreshouse Lake Forest Morris Brown Clark College Morris Brown Mppris Brown West Ga. Morehouse Ga. State Mmory AGENCY Kirkwood Christain C. Fulton County Health City_Mayors Office Urban Lab In Bducation Decatur/NeKalb YMCK Crime Commission Peace Corps Project City-Sanitation Fulton County Health St. Vincent De Paul Fulton County Heal h City-Purheasing Dpet. Service Learning Conf. Gate City Day Nursery City-Water Workds City-Atl Public Lib. Atl. Girls Club Fulton County Health City-Atl. Public Lib. Grady Hospital Kirkwood Christian RATE $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $1.80 $1.80 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $1.80 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.50 . $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 80% CWSP CWSP AUC CWSP CWSP CWSP(via CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWS P CWSP CWSP CWSP CWBP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP SREB) 20% Agency Agency Agency — AUC . Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency AUC Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency 100% Agency AUC uU Page 6 (assigned) NAME Calvin Davis Sylvia Dawson Carolis Deal _Inmond Deen Peggy Dodson Alvin Dollar Pamela Dozier Sara Erlick Kenneth Fagen Mary Fagan Gregory Faison Frances Flowers Janice Foster Mary Freeman Morris Friedman Robert Friend Mary Gordon Katherin Hatcher Charles Haynes Rose Haywood David Henderson COLLEGE Morris Brown Lake Forest Sewanee Tulane Clark College Morehouse Spelman Me. Holyoke Morehouse Clark College mer Ga. State Southwestern Ga. Tech Vassar Univ of Ga. Morehouse Agnes Scott Ga. Tech Emroy Morris Brown Ga. Tech AGENCY City-Parks & Rec. Atlanta Youth Council Gate City Nay Nursery Urban Corps Staff City-Atl. Pub. Lib. Crime Commission Ga. Easter Seal Soceity Atl. Service Learning City-Traffic Engin. American Cancer Soc. City-Sanitation City-Comn. Rel. Comm. City-Mayors Office Decatur /DeKalb YMCA City-Water Dept. Atlanta Youth Council Community Council City-Water Dept. Street Theater Atlanta Youth Council City-Water Dept. RATE ! $1.80 $1.80 $2.20 $2.50 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $1.80 $2.50 $1.80 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $1.80 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 CWSP CWSP CWSP AUC CWSP CNEP CWSP CwSP CwSP AUC CWSP CWSP* (see SREB) CWSP AUC CWSP AUC CWSP CWSP 80% Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency 100% AUC AUC Agency Page & 7 (assigned) NAME COLLEGE AGENCY RATE 80% 20% 100% a Ernest Henderson West Georgia ..- City-Parks & Rec $2.20 CWSP Agency we Barbara Holland Clark College Urban Lab in Educa. VOL. URBAN CORPS -$200 Michael Hollard Emory Univ. City-Finance Dept. $2.50 Agency Jerry Howard Morris Brown City-Parks & Rec. $2.20 CWSP Agency Mostofa Howeedy Ga. Tech City-Planning Dept. $2.50 Agency Thomas Hunt Ga. Tech Atl. Housing Conf. $2.20 VISTA JoAnn Ingle Georgia College Atlanta Youth Council $2.20 CWSP Agency Norman Ingram : West Georgia City-Atlanta Pub. Lib $2.20 CWSP Agency A Seapets tema GY NNAOTET Office $2.20 VISTA Margaret Jaccino West Ga. Fulton County Health $1.80 CWSP Agency Barbara Kalvelage Ga. State Atlanta Setvice Learn. $2.20 | AUC Allen Keck Ga. Tech Rent-a-Kid $2.20 @WSP Agency William Kemp Ga. Tech City-Water Dept. $2.50 Agency Kathleen Kennedy West Ga. Fulton County Health $1.80 CWSP Agency Stephen Kiemele West Ga. Fulton County Health $1.80 CWwSP Agency Sohn King Ga. Tech Atlanta Youth Council VOLUNTEER - . Qapnny? 02 | Maureen Kreger Spelman Fulton County Health $2.20 . VISTA Paul Ss. Li Ga. Tech City-Sanitation $2.50 Agency Susie Lindsey Ga. State Atlanta Girls Club $1.80 AUC Agency Gordon Lurie Emory Fulton County Health $2.50 VISTA Marvin Mangham Morehouse City-Finance Dept. $2.50 Agency (\ Jon Martin rn ~*~ Gity-Mayors Office $2.20 VISTA Page 8 (assigned) NAME Ralph Martin Jennifer Mauldin Anne Mayeaux Fred McCord ”" Chester McElroy Patricia McLaughlin Kenneth Millwood Madie Moore Steve Mwamba Helen Newman Shirley Owens William Patterson Belinda Pennington John Petzelt Susan Pickard Sanford Prather James Rabb Rubye Render Gene Roberts Charlotte Robinson Russe@l Rucker James Search i COLLEGE Mmory Agnes Scott Emory DeKalb Junior Morris Brown West Ga. Univ of Ga. Spelman Ga. State Emory Ga. College Indiana Univ. Morris Brown Ga. State Agens Scott Morris Brown Ga. Tech Morris Brown Southwestern DeKalb Junior DeKalb Junior DeKalb Junior ° AGENCY National Welfare Rights Fulton County Health Family Counseling Center Decatur/DeKalb YMCA Pity-Parks & Rec. Atlanta Girls Club Urban Corps Staff City-Atl Public Lib. Urban Corps Staff Fulton County Health City- Atl. Public Lib. Atlanta Youth Council Immigration Dept. Ga. State Dept of Pshy. Kennesaw Mt. Sara Murphy Homes City-Finance Dept. City-Parks & Rec. Street Theater Gate City Day Nursery Kirkwood Christain Vine City Child Dev. RATE $1.80 $1.80 $2.50 $1.80 $1.80 $1.80 $2.50 $2.20 $2.20 $2.50 $2.20 $2.20 $1.80 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 ¢2.20 $1.80 $1.80 $1.80 $1.80 AUC CWSP CWSP CWSP CWwSP CWSP CWSP CWSP AUC CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency 200% VISTA Agency AUC AUC Vista VISTA VISTA Agency z‘ Page 9 (assigned) NAME Leroy Shields Michele Silberstein Carroll Simmons Martha Simmons Deborah Small Christine Smith Vorginia Smtih Susan Strobhert Mary Strozier Michael Stubblefield Evans Studdivent Constance Thurman Donna Turner Valerie Valera Arthur von Keller Archlee Wallace John Walsh Eloise Warner Carol Watkins Geneva Weaver ELizapeth Whigham COLLEGE Yeshieva College George Wash. Univ. Morris Brown Clark College Morris Brown Ga. State Spelman West Georgia Morris Brown Morehouse DeKalb Junior West Georgia West Georgia Ga. State Emory Ga. Tech Erory Morris Brown Agnes Scott Fa. Tech Emory AGENCY Ga. Easter Seal Soc. Atlanta Youfh Council Atlanta Girls Club Atlanta Youth Council Immigration Dept. Street Theater Gate City Day Nursery Kirkwood Christian Vine City Child Dev. Street Theater Boy Scouts Grady Girls Club Decatur/DeKalb YMCA Ga. State Dept of Ed Psy Emroy Legal Aid City-Sanitation City-Finance Dept. Gate City Day nursery Fulton County Health Gate City Day ieee Atlanta Housing Conf. RATE $2.20 Volunteer - $2.20 $1.80 $1.80 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $2.20 $1.80 $2.20 $2.20 $2.50 $2.50 $2.20 $2.50 $2.20 $2.20 $1.80 $2.20 80% CWSP CWSP AUC CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP AUC CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP 20% Agency Agency-$200 Agency Agency Agency Agency Agenct Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency — Agency Agency 1004 VISTA VISTA Agency Agency Agency Vista a Page 10 (assigned) NAME Eugen White Susan Windom Eulis Witcher _ Dorothy Wright Gunter Zietlow COLLEGE Ga. Tech West Ga. East Carolina Clark College Ga. tech AGENCY City-Water Dept. Fulton County Health Fulton County Governt. City-Atlanta Public Lib. City-Avaition RATE $2.20 $2.20 $2.50 $2.20 $2.50 80% CWSP CWSP AUC CWSP 20% Agency Agency Agency Agency Agency PAGE 11 TENTATIVE PLACEMENT NAME Pamela Wilkes Richard de Mayo Burnley HMainbridge " Sandra Mincey Beverly Grimes Clovia Wheeler Mary Hampton Patricia Simms Richard Steele Ruth Sistaire James Deiures Lloyd Sanders Dorothy Hicks a KY Wolly Bloom yy College Clark College Emory Emroy Spelman DeKalb Junior Morris Brown DeKalb Junior Ga. College Ga Tech Morris Brown Clark College Morehouse Morris Brown GrTak AGENCY City-Parks & Rec.-Kenn City-Parks & Rec.-Kenn Atlanta Girls Club Wheat Street City-Blanning City-Purchasing City-Parks & Rec Urban Lab in Education City-Water Dept Rent-a-Kid Atlanta Youth Council Atlanta Youth Council City-Motor Transportation eye ey, RATE $1.80 $2.20 VoL. $2.20 $1.80 $2.20 $1.80 $1.80 $2.20 $1.80 $1.80 $2.20 $2.20 220 CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP CWSP Agency-$200 Agency Agency Agency AUC Agency Agency Agency Agency 100% Agency Agency AUC Agency VISTA
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_019.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 19
  • Text: Mayor's Comments to Atlanta Service-Learning Conference June 30, 1969 White Houge Motor Inn 70 Houston Street, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Total Attendance: 300 Purpose of Conference To explore existing service programs involving youth and government in urban, domestic, and foreign setting and develop a metro-Atlanta model of service-learning between area colleges, government units, agencies and students. Two day Conference sponsored by: Urban Corps VISTA Peace Corps Atlanta Colleges Economic Opportuntty Atlanta, Inc. Teacher Corps Southern Regional Education Board -DRAFT = Introductory remarks - welcome to Atlanta, etc. ‘We cannot, any more than past generations, see the face of the guture," Ralph McGill has writeen. "But we know that written across it is the word Educa- tion." Education today is repidly changing from the old monolithic forms of yesteryear, Todaya youth are demanding educational reforms. Many of you young people are in fact creating a new kind of education through your off-campus setvice activigies. The service-learning concept ia not new but its youthful appdicationa are having a new affect on both domestic and foreign problems. Whether young people are serving in the Peace Corps in Zambia or workigg in Cabbage Town as a VISTA Volunteer they are having a learning experience. They are learning that education doesn't end at the classroom door. In fact those of you that are Urban Corps interns will probably be amazed at your own learning experience after this brief summer. The Urban Corps is an excellend example of educatiomlinnovation coupled with service. Interns will see the problems of our city by actually participating in city government as well as private agencies. They will be learning through a pagatical extension of their academic studies. In short, they help the city, expand their education, and help pay college expenses ~- all in one. This Urban Corps is truly a student program. I first heard of this idea of relevant internships in city government when a group of student leaders from various Atlanta colleges came to City Hall with the idea more then a year ago. These students wanted a way to learn about the city and perform a service by actually work- ing in it. After many meetings and a great deal of encouragement by Dan Sweat of my staff and Bill Ramsay of the Southern Regional Education Board, we provided a group young activists some support to see if this program would work. Almost all of the planning, development of jobs and placement was actually done by students. From what I hear, the intern jobs are very challenging and exciting. Just the physical appearance of City Hall has been greatly improved by ail these young faces. Naturally there will be some disappointments and I'1l assure you that you'll become frustrated and you'll see that we do have some almost un-solvable problems. I urge you not to become discouraged but to help us find new ways of correcting the ills of our seemingly archaic system. We need your youthful enthusiasm and you'd be surprised how it will change the attitude of those in our city who have been laboring, almost alone at times, for change and progress. We in the city hope that this brief exposure to our problems and potentials will attract some of you young people to return after graduation and pursve this as a career. Governing our cities ia this nations greatest problem. It is an exhaustive but rewarding experience that you young people must sic begin to take responsibility for. I hope the Urban Corps is only a beginning. Already we're hating pre- dictions of three-fold expansion of this intern program for next year. Just the fact that nearly 1,000 students applied this year is astounding, and when one considerg that Atlanta has almost 40,000 students and nearly 35 colleges we can begin to see the potential. We need this focused, aggressive concern of young people. We need move movement between the two worlds of academia and city. In New York, an outgrowth cf their intern program has been a rapid exchange of ideas and personnel between city government and universities. We need this amiable relationship of university and city in Atlanta. We have just begun an Urban Life Center at Georgia State which all local colleges are being asked to partici- pate in. We in the cities must take greater advantage of our universities and vice versa. As John Gardder has said, the three main purposes of the university are research, teaching, and service to the community. We've seen how students are gerving the community already but there are still many unexploited potentials inside our college gates. Tf we look at the history of higher education we note that the greatest impetus was with the Land-Grant University almost 100 years ago - a system built to aid our agricultural society. Today our society is urban. But by comparison, our education system has not properly responded to our change in society. We need more people working on our cities problems. If the discipline of city planning can be used as an example, we will recognize the dramatic crisis. In all our universities combined we graduate legs than 400 planners per year. More greduates of Medieval History are put on the job market than are urban experts. What do we in the cities do for manpower? We must innovate and try to compete with industry for talent and we are in the disadvantage. Hence another reason why our cities are ungovernable. Key urban persuasion posts are occupied by lawyers, déeeotey undettakers, clergyment, businessmen, bankdrs and social workers. These professionals have been produced by universities. These people are usually consulted on a technical or specialized problems, but the solving of ehese problems depends on related matters almost always falling outside the expertise of the consultath. In other words, the key experés in our urban society = through the exercise of their expertise - enter a realm of generalization for which they haven't been properly prepared by undergraduate or professional education. Therefore, universities should try to expose their professionala in urban areas to some type of urben education. The The simplest method is by practical experience such as the Urban Corps, and the eventual solution is more teaching in urban concepts. We must not neglect the professor in our plan for community involvement of our universities. Ways Bhould be found to involve professors in areas of their academic prowness in the city. Perhaps we should have an Urban Corps for poofessors too: I am sure that there are needed areas of reasearch in the city that would interest many college instructors. This would insure that teaching does indeed remain relevant to our actual needs. In order to facilitate this dialogue, we must have more cooper&tion between colleves. Students and faculty should be able to more freely move between campuses. Atlana@a colleges are unique and should keep their individual identity, but should encourage exchanges. We have great medical schools, law schools, schools of urban design and the greatest predominantely Negro college complex in the world. We've only looked at the city as a laboratory, let's see how the city can help the university. Many young innovators on the urban scene could serve as gueas lecturers or associate professors in ovr colleges. A vivid example of this is Bill Allison, now Director of TOA, who serves as an associate professor at Georgia Tech. This type of exchange should be greatly encouraged and ways should be found to foster and develop both professor=-city exchanges and administrator- campus exchanges We must not only research problema but we must implément them too. Often times a very good report is written - only to gather duet - or ig written not with an eye for implémentation. it is the seme with residents in our deprived neighbor- hoods. They are tired of being studied. They want help. Research must be balanced by practicality and kept veievant. Our cities will not go away. ‘They will expand and multiply. We must plan do@ that. We must demand hélp from our universities. The Urban Corps should only be a beginning. We need youthful enthusiasm of young people in VISTA, returning Peace Corps volunteers, Neighborhood Youth Corps enrollees, service groups on campus, adult education tutoring by students in the dozena of service projects, We need more exchange between our city and our campuses - & « on all levels. I hope this Service-Learming Conference explores all these possibilities and presents them to people who will actoto develop and carry them out. Ralph McGill always said the South was the most exciting area of the country and the most exciting part of the South was to be young and taking part in its development. Those of you who are stddents today must except this challegge of developing the South and our city, and those of you who are educators must help them.
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 40

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_040.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 40
  • Text: URBAN CORPS MINUTES MEETING 3:00 pm Friday the 27th of June Mr. Robinson stated that if the Urban Corps people wanted to have meetings outside of their regularly scheduled meetingjwith him-, such as for the purpose of sensi- tivity training, then it would be okay with him only if he were contacted in advance as_to the time and place of such meeting. If the meeting was to be held in City Hall, Mr. Robinson would also have to make arrangements to reserve the proper facilities. Two federal government inters will be working on the field starting Monday. Mr. Dement will be working in East Central dv and Miss Sorrel will be working in Nash- Washington, The City Hall interas should pian to make sure that these two new interns blend in with their activities, =— aa i Mr, Robinson then announced that two interns, Mr, Berk and Mr. Fleming, would also be pout out in the field shortly and arrangements would be made accordingly. Mr. Robinson felt that it was a good idea for the interns to get as diversified aw summer as possible, Effective July 1, 1969, the Police department will have four new wretkers going at full steam to remove all the unwanted, inoperative autbmobiles Garbage and trash remain a constant problem throughout the poverty areas that die ‘interns are working in. Mr. Robinson announced that if any of the interns wanted to have a clean-up program that they let their supervisors know in advance so that arrangements might be made for, trucks and machinery to be there on the day fofthe clean-up project. A comment from the audience expressed that Saturday would be a good day to pick up the trash, Sanitary meetings are always on Wednesday and itis good to let the department know of any project that a pick-up would have to be made for. Mr, Bloom. said that there were many cars that needed to be picked up in the Pittsburg area of the city. He said that in a area that amounted to only one-eighth (1/8) of Pittsburg he marked over 50 cars and felt that he missed as many, He expressed the opinion that a total plan involving all the interns be evolved so that a more effective clean-up can be reached in these areas, A discussion then ensued as to which philosophy was best, having cars picked up inef ficiently but with community backing or to have cars picked up efficiently but without much community support . Mr. Robinson felt that since this problem is such a constant one, and since the interns will be here only a summer, it is would be better to have the community backing even if the clean-up was not as efficient as it could be. Those favoring community action as opposed to effectiveness seemed to dominate, Mr. Robinson then called the COs into hs his office and he turned the meeting over to the Urban Corps people,
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 20
  • Text: — THE INVGLVEuinss Ue HIGHER EPICAT uN IN SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS: A PRELIMINARY REPORT Determining the degree to which area colleges and uni- versities are involved in service-learning programs and ascer- taining the attitudes of higher education stvderts, faculty, and administrators toward community involvement constitute two of the principal concerns of the Atlanta Service Learning Confexence. To provide insight into these two areas of special interest, a number of college students are currently in the process of completing a survey of ten area colleges and universities. The ten institutions include. Agnes Scott College, Atlanta University, Clark College, Emory University, Georgia State College, Georgia Tech, Morehouse College, Morris brown College, Oglethorpe College, and Spelman College. As part of a broader study of student manpower resources, this survey will seek answers to the following kinds of questions: 1. To what extent does the invoivement of higher education institutions vary from campus to campus? What factors account for the variations? 2. To what extent does the degree of service-learning activities vary between different schools and depart- ments within particular institutions? What accounts for the variations? 3. What areas of community life most readily lend themselves to student involvement? 4. What are the relative roles of students, faculty, and administrative personnel in community development activities? 5. To what extent does existing curriculum encourage stu- dent involvement in the community? Do students require academic credit for participation in community activities? 6. How important are community involvement programs to stu- dents, faculty, and administrators? What do the terms “community involvement" and “service~learning" suggest to these three important clientele groups? 7. What areas of community concern presently receive the greatest attention from higher education? The least concern? 8. Do existing patterns of service-learning practices suggest that some institutions can best serve by specializing in particular programs? It is expected that answers to the above questions will be of value to ASLC for the following reasons: 1. The research will identify both the forces facilita- ting and the forces inhibiting development of the ser- vice-learning concept. 2. Cataloguing existing programs of community activities can assist ASLC'S role in coordinating service-learning programs and directing students into programs most suitable to their individual preferences. 3. The research will mirror the present scope of service- learning programs and identify areas of neglect. 4. In the long run, certain priorities may be set and there- by assist ASLC in gaining the essential financial resour- ces for funding service-learning programs in the areas demanding the greatest concentration of community efforts.
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 44

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_044.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 44
  • Text: bee: Bir. George Berry Mr. Sam Williams June 25, 1969 Mr, Charles L. Davis Director of Finance City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Charles: An unanticipated expense item has arisen in connection with the Urban Corps Project. No budget provision was made for travel expenses in connection with any of the enrollees. Most of them are engaged in duties which do not require travel. However, a relatively small number have been assigned to work which does require the use of their personal vehicle. Examples are those in the Mayor's Office assigned as Community Service Coordinators in the EOA Centers and, also, those on the Urban Corps staff that are required to travel to the various work stations to interview supervisors, take care of complaints, and perform the evaluation function. Also, there is a problem, we find, in transporting the payroll records from the various work stations to and from the central payroll unit in City Hall. It is, of course, not right for the enrollees to be required to use their private vehicles in the performance of their assigned duties without reimbursement. I am well aware, however, it would not be practical to request the Board of Aldermen to establish temporary auto allowances for such a program as this, especially in view of the fact that there are no established numbered positions. 7 We propose, therefore, to reimburse those enrollees who use their car on the basis of the standard city rate. We propose to secure a signed statement certifying as to the miles driven on Urban Corps business within a given month and forward.to your office for payment along with a miscellaneous requisition. Because the amounts will be relatively small both individually — and in total, we will charge account G-25-62-770U. We believe that this will be the most expeditious way to handle this matter. Sincerely yours, Dan Sweat DS :fy
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 33

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_033.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 33
  • Text: bee: Mir. George Berry Mr, Sam Williams June 25, 1969 Mr. Charles L. Davis Director of Finance City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Charles: Ao unanticipated expense item has arisen in connection with the Urban Corps Project. No budget provision was made for travel expenses in connection with any of the enrollees. Most of them are engaged in duties which do not require travel. However, a relatively small number have been assigned to work which does require the use of their personal vehicle. Examples are those in the Mayor's Office assigned as Community Service Coordinators in the EOA Centers and, also, those on the Urban Corps staff that are required to travel to the various work stations to interview supervisors, take care of complaints, and perform _ the evaluation function. Also, there is a problem, we find, in transporting the payroll records from the various work stations to and from the central payroll unit in City Hall. It is, of course, not right for the enrollees to be required to use their private vehicles in the performance of their assigned duties without reimbursement. I am well aware, however, it would not be practical to request the Board of Aldermen to establish temporary auto allowances for such a program as this, especially in view of the fact that there are no established numbered positions, \ We propose, therefore, to reimburse those enrollees who use their car on the basis of the standard city rate. We propose to secure a signed statement certifying as to the miles driven on Urban Corps business within 2a given month and forward to your office for payment along with a miscellaneous requisition. Because the amounts will be relatively small both individually and in total, we will charge account G-25-62-770U. We believe that this will be the moet expeditious way to handle this matter. Sincerely yours, Dan Sweat
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 32

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_032.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 32
  • Text: Il. 12 13. 14. 15) 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. hee Not baw Cai ATLANTA URBAN CORPS STAFF Sumner, 1969 Executive: Directories occic tesserae Sam Williams..........23373652 Executive Assistant. occ sieve bees see SUG LANIELs ss sicicd 020s sO O-09L9 Director of Development............David Whelan..........378=-3850 Fiscal Director.....s.sseeeeseeees ~Inmond Deen......2....261-1192 SG Director for Special Projects......Dianne Wilson.........521-3827 Payroll, Coordinator... faccssasccnes -Steve Mwamba..........627-8837 Payroll (Coordinators. :cccisre ss ejeisie,s ee MAC RAD Diareatelelsis & eieleisie OT OC LOAG Education & Evaluation Director....Resna Hammer..........872-6576 Evaluation Staff... cscsescscoceeseMappie Gerber....e20e 232271029 Evaluation Staff.......eeeeeeeeee+-Dawn White.......66..-522-2464 Evaluation (Statistic. sce ss/ejessslas ooo LAM ROPELSs c\cis.c cle-ccice KOTO= TADS Public Relations Director..........Ken Millwood.........-428-4668 Public Relations Staff.............lara Swartsel.........634-6864 SECTELATY ec cevccccscossececsasscseeebettye Underwood. .... : Secretary..ccccccccccceccccccceeee sPatty Harwell........./58=2477 Receptionist.......ceseeeeeeeseees Diane Lovejoy........./58=7741 Interns Assigned to the Urban Corps Staff Atlanta Service Learning Conference......eeseescee++babs Kalvelage....63429957 634=8069 Atlanta Service Learning Conference........ee++e+++++Melinda Lawrence. .523-4597 Atlanta Service Learning Conferencé.....cccccececcechkytle Fryé....+2--63673877 Atlanta Service Learning Conference(at SREB)......-.Sally Cantor......876=2927
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 43

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_043.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 43
  • Text: ATLANTA URBAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND STREET, N.E. / PHONE [404] 524-8091 / ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 June 25, 1969 Mr. George Berry Office of the Mayor City Hall City of Atlanta 68 Mitchell Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear George: Attached are two statements certifying part-time, spring term employment for Mr. Bill Adams and Mr. David Whelan with the Atlanta Urban Corps. These men are to receive $250 each as an educational stipend. (This is not taxable income since they were receiving academic eredit for their Urban Corps services, therefore there are no W-2 forms attached for tax deduction purposes. ) Two other students were employed under the sameagreement. They are Rich Speer and Marcus Dash. I do not have their statements at this time certifying employment. Please pardon the rush on these two students, but Bill Adams is leaving for Europe Thursday, June 26, 1969, and needs his check before he leaves. Thank you for helping us expidite this matter. foe ) oH SAM A. WILLIAMS Director \ SAW: sz seianak hath ud S ; err fort &-2 +]
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 42

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_042.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 42
  • Text: June 25, 1969 Mr. Sam Williams Atlanta Urban Corps Project Municipa} Auditorium Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Sam: Please note the attached copy of a letter to Director of Finance Charles Davis concerning travel expenses for Urban Corps Enrollees. It is requested that you provide me with a list of those enrollees who will be requesting reimbursement for this purpose and, also, an estimate of the number of miles that will be driven both monthly and in total for the benefit of the Urban Corps Project. Very truly yours, George J. Berry Administrative Coordinator GBJ ip Attachment be: Charles L. Davis Dan Sweat Johnny Robinson
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 9, Folder 7, Document 53

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_007_053.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 7, Document 53
  • Text: A d 0 fq 4 0 p Q cs : 4 Q 5 fl . 5 . fe ‘ > 0 YO 875-9211 ATLANTA, GHORGIA BOs1s + 130 SIXTH STREET, N. vw, * June 12, 1969 Mr. Charles Davis City of Atlanta 6& Mitchell Street, 3S. W. Atlanta, Georgia Dear Charles: [ | P is made to our letter of March 19 regarding cooperation - City of Atlanta and the Southern Regional Education As stated The use of We wish to con- support for the development of an Urban Corps in Atlanta. We of course are most anxious that the maximum number of internships be appointed this fhe enclosed check for $7,000 is provided from Summer end meet high standerds of service and learning. the Economic Development Administration grant to assist in effec- tuating the Urban Corps and the appointment of interns. These critéria and standards heve been discussed with appointment of summer internships. Corps will be a means to increase opportunities for college students to have service-learning experiences related to community development and to their educational and personal growth. AS we have discussed, SREB has set aside $20,000 of funds received under federal grants in support of internships to invest in the number of internships conforming to these standards. This must in- SREB's criteria and standards are required to meet our contractual elude a strong educational dimension. Atlenta program. in our letter of Merch 19 a minimum of 17 internships which meet obligation. Mr. Sam Williams of the Atlanta Urban Corps. students provided by SREB should be directed toward the maximum f i 1 bili HH. Corps ever and above the $20,000 © in other ways within itg Mr. Sem Willians on assignment az & the Atlanta We will be glad to | - are or of know, we funds i “ June 12, 1969 Mr. Charles Davis South and for the Nation. Sincerely, Wiliiem R. Ramsay Resource Development Project WRR: lee
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 7, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021