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Box 7, Folder 16, Document 24

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_016_024.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 16, Document 24
  • Text: ”~ Aovisory itt MUNITY RE Charles Adams Coca Cola Co. be _ 310 North Ave., N.W. bi Atlanta, Georgia t ee an spe B Lav Li ; , arvi@l Manager fel and Tel W. L. Calloway f - Calloway Realty Co. ' 193 Auburn Ave., N.E. . Atlanta, Georgia Alston, Miller & Gaines C &S National Bank Building Atlanta, Georgia ; Hewitt Covington, Partner James H, Davis Vice President and Treasurer Beck & Gregg Co... 217 Luckie St., N.W. Atlanta, Georgia Richard J. Grabowski Personne! Manager J. M. Tull Metals Co., Inc, 285 Marietta St., N.W, Atlanta, Georgia Charles Greene “ nye Atlanta Life Insurance Co, j 148 Auburn Ave., N.E. Atlanta, Georgie . September, 1967 widiaieeh ahead sis ima eo, OR a, oe Oe Sr es’ Rolland A. Maxwell Bee AE a “ * cane COMMISSION iy 4 . NEW coMMrnrer MEMBERS Ralph Hendrix Personnel Director Atlanta Gas Light Co. Atlanta, Georgia Carroll Jones Trust Company of Georgia 36 Edgewood Ave., N.E Atlanta, Georgia Herbert Megar Vice President Fulton National Bank 55 Marietta 2t., N.V/’., Atlanta, Georgia Tohn Miller Manager, Supply Branch Retail Credit Co. 1600 Peachtree St., N.W. . Atlanta, Géorgia : Richard A, Strauss, Store Manager Ponce de Leon Sears Roebuck & Co. 677 Ponce de Leon A:e., N. Atlanta, Georgia ti H,. W. (Bo) Whitman, Jr. Asst. Vice Pres. Main Office First National Bank Atlanta, Georgia » J. R. Wilson, Jr. Wilson & Co., Real Estate 905 Hunter St., N.W. Atlanta, Georgia ih «Tone Tamesgt ce .. @ eee ety a . Fr ae 8 eng mS é 1 toy Dae yyy * ™} — a “ wre ; i Were y set 8 Mags 4) Sie eee rr Re re — —— el) RSA Ra gE TU ua apa ie AN A Ui Re aL, a ere Re : ig : 4 Lhe pot Site, fir : : Vee + int ‘ a + See riscat arcee : @ijes . , : I: oe } fy 1 : i | i bf ‘| { ' fs 4 nie : - mal} . i i { Bi 1 1 ahi i iy Shihit t tale ; 1h | ts A f ; i : ? ' \ ' i CUR ae Van hat ftmeoltae'é. § oxi Bs Sn he e ‘ 4! -* Pf ‘ a b F i 7 Ip a th : E . : \) : \ * ; ' eT AO eel Ra tak a Saylots Andte_ pee feet 'R. F.. Clayton (Bon) . .. General District Manager ‘. | Public Relations Officer /-'* Georgia Power Co. A : ‘ Citizens & Southern National Bank 270 Peachtree St., N.W. a _. Marietta & Broad Atlanta, Georgia an ; Atlanta, Georgia Dual. Crockett > Ina") pe Melville Smiley > Vice President , Davison's Lockheed-Georgia Co, i 180 Peachtree St., N.W. _ Marietta, Georgia } Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Hugh K. Rickenbaker Sota ui . Ben O'Callaghan, President Asst. V. P. Public Relations Ben O'Callaghan Co. Life of Georgia 1279 Collier Rd.; N.W. 573 W. Peachtree, N.E. : Atlanta, Georgia Atlanta, Georgia (Housing Committee) (Housing Committee) , | James W.. Wright ‘ John Smith P.O. Box eazy 9 AO7E7 Advertising Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30320 Atlanta Inquirer; , Inc. (Law & Equal Enforcement) 787 Parsons St., S.W : Atlanta, Georgia William Merritt 338 Lincoln St., S.W. Thaddeus Stokes : . Atlanta, Georgia 30315 4 City Editor : (Employment) ss | ; es Atlanta Daily World, 210 Auburn Ave., N.E. Atlanta, Georgia 4 R. O. Sutton, Vice President Citizens Trust Company ; hed 212 Auburn Ave., N.E. | . iH Atlanta, Georgia | ] Otis Thorpe Vice President : . Q. V. Williamson & Co. . 855 Hunter St., N.W, 3 Atlanta; Georgia John Weitnauer V. P. & Personnel Directot Rich's ’ 45 Broad St., S.W.' : Atlanta, Georgia, oe * : f September, 1967 , 7 eye a aan 7 " : ' " a pi eae ae oa ace Ay ey oa FS Ree wo ALE ee ge fie So 5 : é rw , ae | aa Se ee ee ee ee ee ee Phas? ae!
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 16, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 17, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_017_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 17, Document 5
  • Text: TRAILER PARKS Through an inquiry by the Mayor, the Commission was asked to investigate the situation regarding the difficulty of Negroes attempting to rent space in Atlanta trailer parks. Two Negro families, Mr. and Mrs. Frame and Mr. and Mrs. Wheat, have attempted to rent places to park their trailers and have been unable to find any trailer park in Atlanta that will rent to them. Mr. Frame, an Army veteran, is presently employed with a local paper company, and Mr. Wheat is now on active duty with the U. S. Army. Both families believe that they are being denied access to the trailer parks because they are Negro. They related several instances in which they had called parks, been told that there was a vacancy, and upon arriving at the park been told that the vacancy had just been filled, Several parks had allowed the families to fill out application forms but, from all indications, these applications were never given any serious consider- ation. The staff of the Community Relations Commission has been able to gain the following information in regards to this issue: 1, The District Attorney's office has informed us that trailer parks are not covered under the Civil Rights Act of 1964. At present, certain agencies have written to Washington in an attempt to find out if trailer parks within a 34 mile radius of Ft. McPherson are included in Secretary McNamara's recent Federal Order concerning military housing. 2.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 17, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 17, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_017_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 17, Document 7
  • Text: Mr. Invinc K. Kater, Chairman OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1966 1203 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA 80308 TELEPHONE 528-4468 EXT. 433 THE HONORABLE SAM MasseELL, Jr., Ex-Officio President, Board of Aldermen COMMISSION MEMBERS Mr. T. M. ALEXANDER, SR. Mr. R. Byron ATTRIDGE Mrs. SARA BAKER Miss HELEN BULLARD Mr. R, J. BuTLER Mr. Rozert Dosss Mr. HAMILTON Dovauas, JR. Mr. C. G, Ezzarp Most Reverenp Pau J. HALLINAN Archbishop of Atlanta Mr. JoserH Haas Mr. AL KUETTNER Dr. Ropert E. Lee Mr. RoLLAND MAXWELL Mr. F. W, PATTERSON Rasar Jacos M. RoTHscHiLp Mr. M. 0. “Buzz" Ryran Mr. Jack SELLS Mrs. Mary STEPHENS THE REVEREND SAMUEL WILLIAMS Mrs. Eviza K. PascHALu, Executive Director November 1, 1967 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: At the October 27th meeting of the Community Relations Commission, the following resolution was passeds That the Community Reletions Commission commends the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen for the Ordinance prohibiting discrimination in employment on the part of city contractors, and that the Commission urges that additional provisions be made for affirmative action to implement the Ordinance, in addition to the esent enforcement provisions. D H Sincerely, Si Vr a (DQ oeluct (Mrs.)'Eliza K. Paschall Executive Director EKP:ce
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 17, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 16, Document 15

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_016_015.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 16, Document 15
  • Text: Office of Ube Mayor TO: FROM: Ivan Allen, Jr. For your information (_] Please refer to the atta¢hed correspondence and make the necessary reply. (_] Advise me the status of the attached. FORM 25-4
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 16, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 16, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_016_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 16, Document 3
  • Text: OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTARLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDEEMEN, NOVEMBER, 100 10a CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA seses TELEPHONE srssies EXT. 13 September 26, 1967 Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Allen: Just a note to congratulate you upon receiving the Abe Goldstein Human Relations Award. I was delighted to be able to attend the banquet and to take part in the tribute to you. Sincerely, Sf eens K. Paschall Executive Director EKP emt
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 16, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 17, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_017_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 17, Document 3
  • Text: November 22, 1967 Mr. Edgar T. Van Buren 230 Hammond Drive Norcross, Georgia 30071 Dear Mr. Van Buren: This will acknowledge receipt of your letter on behalf of the Community Relations Commission. I certainly appreciate receiving your support of our efforts in this area. Sincerely yours, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor IAJr/br Fk weal
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 17, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 17, Document 6

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_017_006.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 17, Document 6
  • Text: November 6, 1967 Mrs. Thomas H. Gibson 1646 Mt. Paran Road, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30327 Dear Mrs. Gibson: This will acknowledge receipt of your letter on ee behalf of the Community Relations Commission. lam most grateful for your support and your generous comments. Sincerely yours, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor tAJr/br
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 17, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 16, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_016_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 16, Document 7
  • Text: f ATLANTA, GEORGIA G ROUTE SLIP TO: Dd. EOL sae woke FROM: Dan E. Sweat, Jr. [_] For your information [_] Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the necessary reply. {[_] Advise me the status of the attached. FORM 25-4-S
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 16, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 17, Document 37

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_017_037.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 17, Document 37
  • Text: bt i ‘ COMMUNITY RELATIGNS COMMISSION 1203 CITY HALL ATLANTA, GEORGIA incidents which took plsc. in the Dixie Hills area June 17th thru hy ‘NOTE: "The City of Atienta’Polics Department is investigating all of the ! ra June 20th." July 12, 1967 ae jon REPORT ON DIXIE HILLS EPISODE cor YOUR INFORMAT A memo in the files of the Community Relations Commission, dated April 5, 1967 states "Mr, Charles Hart suggests that the Commission hold a hearing in the Northwest area immediately = including, Troy Street area, Dixie Hills, Almond Park, etc. He pointed out several problems in the area. -. On. April 19th a meeting was held at Alien A. Me. E. Church, at which time 24 persons spoke, and some 15 more submitted written statements about needs. (On May 4th, a meeting was held at Wilkes Chapel, in Perry Homes area) The complaints included sewers; street paving; street signs; police protection, "In Dixie Hills Plaza"; recreation; double session schools; charges in public housing projects; rats; maintenance of apartments. The individual complaints were referred to the appropriate departments and the Commission was informed that an encouraging number had been handled. The major ones, of inadequate resources for young people would require major resources and programs through the City Rarks and Recreation Department or through the Board of Education. On May 9th, the Center Hill - Grove Park Civic Association and the CNAC for the West Central EOA center submitted requests to the Parks Committee for 8 specific programs in the general area. On May 10th same groups submitted to the Police Committee requests for development of a Police Athletic Leagu®, The Dixie Hills Shopping Center is in area of about one block by one-half block, It is surrounded by apartment houses with little open space --- a parking area for about 20 cars. On the evening of Saturday, June 17th, a customer left the Flamingo Grill at about 9:15 P, M. and was etanding on a corner in the plaza.[He was drinking beer, | According to him, Eddie Wilkins,.wharwes. the one arreste2rs "I was standing on the corner, had a can of beer and I'm old enough, I'm over 213; then three security policemen from the Flamingo Grill, cams up and told me to move on, He's got. a grudge against me; the security guards said ‘You can't stand here on the corner' I said 'Why?' Then he pushed me. (The security guard) Then we started to fight. And tha. the city police came." Eddie Wilkins' sister, Georgia Wilkins, was arrested later, He veri | was* "Detective J. W. Bailey pulled me over and tried to handce.+ He -.anped me and I started to fight back. My Daddy told me it. | powice take me on in and he would get me out. They put a a tons cut brass knuckles, beat the boy and then started bea*: 27 an stai.ast and back. I asked why they were arresting and hates: ae The Negro officer told me to shut up! He said he had arrested =F for bad language. I said they should arrest everybody then. I kept quiet so they would'nt- beat me." Page #2 Report on Dixie Hills Episode During this period, a crowd gathered and some protested the arrests. Another man was also arrested. A police officer said Miss Wilkins was hitting at them with her pocketbook and cursing. She was arrested on charges of an assualt on an officer, using obscene and vulgar language. Her brother was arrested on a miscellaneous mischief charge. The third person, Joseph Kendrick of Proctor Street, was charged with interfering with an officer. They claim to have been beaten by the police in the car. The crowd gathered. The police officer denied the charges against him, saying that they were fighting and protesting. There were no disturbances on Saturday night and no police cars in the area. The incidents in the Dixie Hills area were sparked off as a result of the fight with the security guards on Saturday. On Sunday afternoon Stokley Carmichael and his SNCC companions were in the neighborhood. After a swimming trip at Mozley Park, they were arrested for loitering. It was reported by Howard Watson, a resident of the Dixie Hills area, there were about 4 police cars patroling. He held a meeting at St. doseph's Church on Verbena Street, N. W., with some residents of the community to decide whether they should picket the shopping plaza. The meeting was held at 3:00 P. . , shortly after Stokley Carmichael's arrest. There were no incidents Sunday night. Monday afternoon, a young man was shot by a police officer. The incident was discribed by an eyewitness as follows: "Somebody threw a brick in the shopping center and hit the window to a store, the burglar alarm went off. A boy (the one who was shot) picked up a stick and started beating on the alarm to try to make it stop, as they had seen policemen do. The police drove up, one man got out of the car and came over to the boy and told him to stop. The boy didn't stop. When the boy continued beating, the policeman demanded again that he stop. When the boy continued beat- ing, the policeman pushed him. The boy's friend suggested that he defend himself. Then the boy retaliated by pushing the policeman back. They started to séuffle. The boy pushed the policeman against his car and backed away from him. The policeman pulled out his pistol and shot the boy." Marion Ward, 31 Shirley Place, gave this account of what happened Tues. night. He said: "The Police Department got nasty with us last night after people got shot. We tried to get police officers to help us out, he told us to wait, we should have been in the house, to wait, they would get to us when they could ----- Fellow was dead, little boy would have died --- told me to pick fellow up and bring him to him --= fellow was already dead --=- the fellow I went to was the person who did the shooting. Police were scared to death, had shotguns. fellow who threw firebomb was no where near us. Lady said 'We better go in the house’ when firebomb was thrown, tried to get in the same door. I would know police officer whe shat --- got a good look at him in light of bomb", Page #3 Report on Dixie Hills Episode The observations of Reginald Carter after Dixie Hills Rioting . (Community Relations Steff) I arrived into the area about 9:15 A. M., Tuesday, June 20th at Verbena Street at the EOA West Central Neighborhood Service Center. I saw the bulldozers and tractors uf the City of Atlanta grading ground to be used for a play lot. The street cleaners were clearing the streets. The sewers were being cleaned out and many of the city officials were in the area giving directions and making plans about what is to be done next about play lots. The area was without incident. Later on in the evening, 10:15 P. M., when I arrived back into the area, policemen were fully armed. I had heard that four (4) people were shot, one fatally. The area was high in tension and several shots were fired periodically. I went to Grady Hospital in an effort to get an official report of the incident and possibly ta talk to some of the injured. I was only able to get a story of what happened from a news reporter. She reported: "A Mr. Timothy Ross was fatally shot while sitting on a step at his home; Marion Ward was shot between the eyes, his injury was not serious; Catherine Duncan was shot in the hand while in her apartment. The shooting resulted from a kid who threw,a fire bomb at a policeman. The policeman got excited and started shooting". Reginald Rivers, age nine (9) was shot in the side. I returned to the area of Dixie Hills and heard that the Mayor had been there fur a short while. I listened while Reverend Boone, Rush Congregational Church, Reverend J. C. Ward, Hunter Hill Baptist Church, Ben Perry, wWAOK, and Douglas Jackson who was shot by the police on the evening before, was interviewed about the shooting of the afternoon. I left the area about 12:15 A. M., there were no further incidents. Wednesday morning: Mayor Allen rendered a 9 P.M. . @ A. M. curfew under powers granted to him on Monday, and requested the Community Relations Commission's Executive Committee to hold a meeting to hear from residents of the area --- notes attached: Upon recommendation of the local leaders and the Community Relations Commission the Mayor extended the curfew to midnight. Washington and Anderson Parks are progressing. Meetings of residents with apartment managers and store managers in the riot area have resulted in agreements for better maintenance service in the apartments and better quality goods in the stores. The Reverends Boone and J. C. Ward were very interested in this. At its meeting on Friday, June 23, 1967 the Community Relations Commission adopted resolutions: 1. Urging the Retail Food Dealers Association to adopt membership qualifications and to dicipline its members, 2. Requesting an immediate survey of Recreation resources raiif Page #4 Report on Dixie Hills Episode 3. Asking the Community Council to convene a city-wide meeting for long-term plans for recreation, and 4. WW resolution addressed to the Mayor and Board of Aldermen, the text of which is attached. Minutes of the Hearing held by the Commission on Wednesday afternoon, are attached and copy of requests from Citizens Groups to Parks and Recreation Committee on May 9th and Police Committee on May 10th. Disposition of Cases, as of July 21, 1967: Miss Georgia Wilkins: In Municipal Court, fined $17 for resisting arrest; $15 for profane language; bound over to County Court on charge of assault and battery. Mr, Eddie Wilkins: In Municipal Court, charge of vulgar language, dismissed; bound over to County Court on charges of assualt and battery and maliscious mischief. Mr. Joseph Hendricks: In Municipal Court, for interferring with arrest, fined $25, or $15 and time,suspended; charge of profane language dismissed; bound over on charge of assault and battery. The cases have not been set for trial in County court; probably in September.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 17, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 17, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_017_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 17, Document 8
  • Text: COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION 1203 City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Special Meeting of the Community Relations Commission, Saptenper 14, 1967, City Hall. j ; Members Present: . Mr, Irving K, Kaler; Chairman Rev. Samuel. Williams, lst VicesChaircman Miss Helen Bullard, 2nd Vice-Chairman Mrs. Fred W. Patterson, Secretary Mrs, Eliza K.’ Paschall, Executive Director Archbishop Paul J. Hallinan Dr. Robert E. Lee Mr. Robert Dobbs ' Mr. R, Byron Attridge Mr. Jack Sells ‘ Mr. T. M. Alexander, Sr. Rabbi Jacob M, Rothchild Mrs, Sara Baker Mr. Hamilton”Douglas, Jr. -. Mr. M. O. Ryan Mr. James Pilcher, Associate City Attorney Mrs. Ann Moses, Executive peCEReey to the Mayor -- Alderman John M, Flanigen . Alderman G. Everett Millican were present. Mr. Kaler opened the meeting with a statement that the Commission had called the meeting acting under the Ordinance which authorizes the Commission to "act as conciliator"; that the Commission had "intervened prior to the crisis" and at this time was calling upon responeabic persons and those "whose testimony’: is pertinent". ; . He announced that members of the Board of Education had been requested to attend, and recognized Mr. Tom McWhirter, Assistant School Board Attorney, Mr. McWhirter said that the School Board was in session at the time, at a special meeting called previously for a special personnel matter, that they regretted the breakdown in communication. Rev. Williams asked about 1962 and 1965 bond issues and promises to Vine City. Archibishop Hallinan said that the talk about "double session sounds like double talk". : Senator Slls announced that he was requesting the legisjative counsel to draw a bill calling for the election of the Atlanta school superintendent. T,, The following persons spoke: Rev. Elroy Embry: "Yesterday we went to Dr. Letson's office, asked for a meeting with the Board, were told only two methods for calling a,.meeting = by President Cook or majority of the Board. We asked him to contact membéts of the Board, he said, he didn't know if he could contact them....-Board, Dr. Letson need to kvee they are working for us", cE, Mr. Robert E. Baldwins “Took eight days ta get appointment with Board, knew ten years ago schools overcrowded, When child gets off at 12, that's a half day. If I work till 12, get paid for $ day. Unless Board acts, this is going to hurt white children too. Uneducated people lead to poverty. It has helped to have this meeting, Turner High has heen twa weeks without books. Page 2 : Minutes of Special Meeting, September 14, 1967 Rev. Amos Holmes: "We elicit your support for our requests; during 1959-60 asked Board to face problems, urged against token assignments; this has been taking place since 1960; patience has a right to be exhausted; we want to be reasonable, but the Board demonstrates that rising radicalism might be justified. If Atlanta faces riot, could happen on this issue.’ Never. seen anything that has unified people so. Simplest thing Board can do is to meet", Miss Helen Bullard: "Is that the priority, failure of Board to meet"? Rev. Amos Holmes: "Not just meet but that is most crucial’. Archbishop Paul J. Hallinan: "In complete agreement, this is-no time for delay. If we can assure you of a meeting tonight, is there enough confidence to with- hold action"? ¢ Rev. Amos Holmes: "If we had been given assurance the other night, would have waited”. ; Archbishop Paul J. Hallinan: "Have asked for a meeting, asked citizens to with- hold taking action until Commission has exhausted all means". Rev. Amos Holmes: "Not here to put Commission between us and the Board; to see if Commission will act with us. Board should be wijling to commit themselves to a certain case, Rev. Samuel Williams: “What do you really expect"? Rev. Amos Holmes: "Every request could be met in 24 hours". Archbishop Paul J. Hallinan: "Commission has much at stake". Rev. Amos Holmes: “After Dixie Hills, you reported fairly". Rabbi Jacob M, Rothschild: "What would you accept as a compromise"? Rev. Amos Holmes: "In a conference with dendexe; we would respond". Mr. Robert Dobbs: "Want to speak about priorties, for mother of eight children, who goes to Buckhead and leaves here children at home to get themselves to school. Dr. Tate asked to correct this. Board knows the problem of bonding, should be leading fight to get this changed, have Board members who never visit schools". Mr. T. M. Alexander, Sr.: “Consequential damage can disrupt the whole town, When children are involved, parents are not patient; this can disrupt the community, consequences must rest on their shoulders’. Rev. Joe Boone: “Here representing my daughter, 79 in class, 2 teachers; have worked with Breadbasket, got Regency and others to open jobs, can't find qualified people, people have to “limp your way in"; got to tell Letson, Allen people not satisfied; tired of policies; no white pupils at Agnes Jones, whites at Harris Homes go to another school; Whites at Harris Homes go to Brown, Negroes to Washington, You all wouldn't have had this meeting without what happened at the Board meeting", 7 Page 3 Minutes of Special Meeting, September 14, 1967 Rev. Samuel Williams: "Commission did meet with Letson!. Mr. T. M. Alexander, Sr.: "Commission was meeting Monday night, very time of your meeting with Board, voted to meet with Board". Mrs. Dorothy Bolden: "Have three girls at Washington High, have to leave home in the dark, not going to put my girls out in street at that hour". Rev. Howard Creecy, asked Rev, Williams to read the demands: copy attached Rev. Creecy: "We have been psychologically barred; want to balance the schools; we did not force our way into Letson's office". Mr, Robert Bayries and Rev. Ward also spoke, emphasizing the point that if "we must have burdens, we (Negroes & Whites) should bear them equally". Mr. Kaler asked Mr. Attridge to go to the meeting of the School Board and ask if any member of the Board or the staff would come to the meeting, and to request a meeting with:the Board within 48 hours. Mr, Attridge returned to say that he had conveyed the request; answer was that "last evening the Board promised the Summit-Leadership Conference an answer in two weeks; will go into Executive Session to consider points and will contact their leadership; their attorney will contact the chairman; need time to consider the points". Mr. Alexander said, "we asked not to meet to hear them restate their position, but to discuss matters with them", Archbishop Hallinan moved following resolution, which was passed: "The Community Relations Commission, appointed by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of Atlanta and representative of the community of Atlanta is convinced that the Board of Education fails to grasp the urgency of this education situation, and again the Commission urgently requests that a meeting be held between the Commis=' sion, the Board of Education and the Superintendent, within 48 hours (5:30 p.m. Saturday, September 16)", (Message was telegraphed to President of the Board Ed S. Cook immediately following the meeting, with copies sent to members of the Board and to Dr. Letson)",
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 17, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 17, Document 40

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_017_040.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 17, Document 40
  • Text: OMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION Mr. Invinc K. Kater, Chairman THE HoNORASLE SAM MASSELL, JR., Ex-Officio President, Board of Aldermen COMMISSION MEMBERS Mr. 'T. M. ALEXANDER, Sr. Mr. R. BYRON ATTRIDGE Mrs, SARA BAKER Miss HELEN BULLARD Mr. R. J. BUTLER Mr. Rosert Dosss Mr. Hamitton Douc.as, JR. Mr. C. G. Ezzarp Most ReveREND Pau. J. HALLINAN Archbishop of Atlanta Mr. JosepH Haas Mr. AL KUETTNER Dr. Rover? E, Lee Mr. RottAND MAXWELL Mr. F. W. PATTERSON Rasst Jacos M. RoTHscutip Mr. M. 0. “Buzz Ryan Mr. Jack SELLS Mrs. Many STEPHENS THE REVEREND SAMUEL WILLIAMS Mrs. Eviza K. PASCHALL, Executive Director ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1966 1209 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA 50503 TELEPHONE 522-4468 EXT. 488 July 17, 1967 (Dictated July 15, 1967) Mrs. Eliza K. Paschall Executive Director Community Relations Commission 1203 City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 “Sy Dear Eliza: Please note the attached corres- pondence from the Mayor's Office. It is quite clear that he wants us to send the letter of appreciation. I concur that this should be done promptly and, therefore, would appreciate your sending a letter of appreciation over my Signature as Chairman to Reverend C. E. Maddox. Yours very sincerely, Sf Maa & / CL ff ; fe ae Irving K. Kaler Chairman IKK: rjg Enclosures
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 17, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 17, Document 53

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_017_053.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 17, Document 53
  • Text: Mr. Irvine K. Kater, Chairman JOMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1966 1203 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA 30303 TELEPHONE 522-4468 EXT. 438 THE HoNnorRABLe SAM MASSELL, JR., Ex-Officio President, Board of Aldermen COMMISSION MEMBERS Mr. T. M. ALEXANDER, SR. Mr. R. Byron ATTRIDGE Mrs. Sara BAKER Miss HELEN BULLARD Mr. R. J. BUTLER Mr. Rosert Dosss Mr. Hamitton Dovc.as, Jr. Mr. C. G. Ezzarp Most REVEREND Paut J. HALLINAN Archbishop of Atlanta Mr. JosepH Haas Mr. AL KuUETTNER Dr. Rosert E. Lee Mr. RottAND MAXWELL Mr. F. W. Patterson Razer Jacos M. RoTHSCHILD Mr. M. 0. “Buzz" Ryan Mr. Jack SELLS Mrs. Mary STEPHENS THE REVEREND SAMUEL WILLIAMS Mrs. Eviza K. PAScHALL, Executive Director June 28, 1967 TO: THE MAYOR AND BOARD OF ALDERMEN FROM: THE COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA The Commission, by unanimous vote, wishes to recommend to the Mayor and Board of Aldermen that contracts of the City include an equal employment opportunity clause, and that grants of money from the City include an equal employment opportunity clause, and further, that the proper administrative set-up for implementing it be provided. Adopted at the regular monthly meeting of the Community Relations Commission, June 23, 1967, Committee Room #2, City Hall, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 17, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 3

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 3
  • Text: eis y RR; Mr. Irving K. Kaler,/Chairmaa, : Community Relations Commission, City of Atlanta, E Fultoa National Baak Bldg., Atlanta, Ga, 30303. / Dear Irving, § I have accepted the Senior Editorship of Pace Magazise, published ia Los Amgeles, aad I will be moviag to the weat Coast duriag the summer. This, of eourse, makea it aecessary for me to resign as a member of the Commusity Relatioas Compissioan, While it will be several weeka before I make thia move, I am tex¢ering my resignation at this tims, to be accepted at your pleasure, so that you may be free to ehoose s replacement whea you see fit. Phe short associetioa I have had with thie Commission leaves m with very high hopes that it wiil be succeasful in solving some of the bagie problems ia this city. I have never s¢en a group of people -- all of them busy at Many taske -~ go devoted to the purposes and work of an agency ae are the members of thie body. i have also been extremely impressed with the quality of leaéeréhip you have exerted es chairman, With thie reluctazt resignatioa go my prayers and best wishes for this work so robly begus. why ; jie, ec: The Hom. Ivan Allea
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 17, Document 51

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 17, Document 51
  • Text: yYOMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVEMBER, 1966 1203 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA s0s03 TELEPHONE 528-4468 EXT. 438 June 29, 1967 Mz. Jack Delius Parks Department City Halli Annex Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr, Delius: The Community Relations Commission at its regular meeting on June 23, voted to adopt a resolution of high preise to the Perks and Recreation Department for th@ir efforts to provide for these needs in Atlanta within the limits of their resources and to pledge the cooperation of] the Commission to incrsese those resources, We also express appreciation for the cordial and friendly cooperation which we have enjoyed with the Parks and Reereation Department since this Commission was established. We endorse the suggestion that private groups be encouraged to develop their @wn resources to the fullest, Sincerely, (ire.) Eliza K, Paschal Executive Director EKP smt ects Miss Virginie Carmicheel Mr. Charlee Leftwich Mz. Douglas L. Fowlkes Me. Q. V, Williemeon Mz. G. Everett Millican Mayor Ivan Allen, J, -~ Vice-Mayor Sem Maesell, Jx.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 17, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 6

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_018_006.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 6
  • Text: June 12, 1967 Mrs. Eliza K. Paschall Executive Director Community Relations Commission 1203 City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mrs. Paschall: This is to acknowledge receipt of your letter of June 7, 1967. The meeting you referred to on the morning of June 6th was a meeting called for the heads of the various operating departments of the City Government. It has never been our practice to include the executive directors of the various government agencies such as Civil Defense, Metropolitan Planning Commission, the Atlanta Youth Council, etc. at these meetings. However, they are not closed meetings, and we would be happy to have you attend future meetings if you so desire. Iam sure that Mr. Collier Gladin, head of the Planning Depart- ment, will be happy to furnish you with any and all information submitted to the department heads at the meeting on June 6th. Sincerely yours, R. Earl Landers Administrative Assistant REL:ip CC: Mr. Irving Kaler
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 17, Document 14

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_017_014.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 17, Document 14
  • Text: FF AAT EP eS Lo SP oe SS Te SS - —> ————$ METROPOLITAN OPERA ASSOCIATION, INC. LINCOLN CENTER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10023 5 October 1967 COPY | Mrs. Eliza K, Paschall = Executive Director “23 Community Relations Commission 1203 City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mrs. Paschall, Mr. Bing has referred to me your letter of the third. Mr, Bing has been in touch with Mrs. King, Mr. Kennedy and Mayor Allen, and we are all working toward a solution of the ticket situation. Mr. Bing asked me to thank you for your interest and to convey his best wishes. Yours truly, Francis Robinson FR/cf cc: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Mrs. Martin Luther King, Jr. Mr. Alfred Kennedy
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 17, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 17, Document 10

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_017_010.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 17, Document 10
  • Text: October 23, 1967 Mr. LeRoy A. Woodward 834 Oakdale Road, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia 30307 Dear LeRoy: Thank you very much for your letter of October 19th which I have read very carefully. The next time you are at City Hall, drop by, as I would be pleased to discuss it with you. Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. IAJr:am
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 17, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 29

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_018_029.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 29
  • Text: COMMUNITY RELATIONS CAMMISSJON .1203, CITY HALL. ATLANTA, GEORGIA. DILEMMAS OF THE CITY September, 1967 The Community Relaticns Commission, since February, 1967 has held 29 meetings and has heard from more than 350 private citizens and officials, including the Superintendent of schools, City Director of parks and Director of recreation, The Atlanta Housing Authority, and spokesman for the Independent Food Dealerc, The President of the Atlanta branch of NAACP, The President of the affiliate of the SCLC. These meetings have been well reported in the press and have resulted in some changes which were within the limits of auth®rity and resources of the officials. We find, however, that many wrongs are beyond the legal and financial limits of present public sclicies and it is the dilemmas created by these limitations thst the following reports illustrate. For convenience, they are divided inlo separate topics, but they illustrate the interplay of each on the others and again and again point up that the unit of con- cern is a human being. Dilemmas in City Services: There is cantinuous call far more of all services --- streets paved, sidewalks paved, trash picked up, garbage collected, police assignec to street beats, houses inspected ------- 7 Trash and garbage collections -- the sanitary department is about 100 workers short. Why? Some say the salary scale, beginning at $276 or »jJ00 a month is not a drawing card for a family man. Another difficulty is that the pay period is two weeks, (the first check sometimes takes longer to be processed) and a head of a family looking for work often cannot afford to wait two or three weeks to pay rent, buy food, clothes, bus tokens. He does better standing on the corner of Decatur street and working by the day, doine the same job at the same rate of pay. Irresponsible? Shiftless. But would we as citizens condone the sani-~ tary department paying hi- two weeks wages in advance? Another problem for the sanitary department is that many have listened and heeded lectures on self-respect and ambition and are not content to collect trash as a permanent career. Fringe benefits are not much inducement for city employment. The city Civil service is not under social security, and under the city's plan of benefits, not until an employee has worked for 10 years is his family entitled to any pension provisions comparable to social security in case of his death. Another problem is the child labor laws, designed to prevent exploit- ation of child labor, but there are jobs which 14 to 18 year olds might like to do as a temporary measure which they are prohibited by law from doing. Streets: Priority is given by the Construction Department to thoro- fares, but this little help to people who have few streets in their neighborhoods that go through to those thorofares, particularly those dependent on public transportation. How would you set priority ina street construction program? Sewers: The building boom of which we are all so proud has increased the areas which are paved, which in turn has increased the need for storm sewers to the point it is estimated that it would cost $30,000,000 to meet the needs. This is bad enough where cars drive though the water, but, again where where there are many residents who do not have cars and must walk to bus staps, where children must walk to school or rely on public transportation, the problem is intensified. How should we balance emergency and long-term systematic improvement? Parks & Recreation: Atlanta spends about 6 per person per year on parks and recreation, slightly lower than the Georgia State average. Delton, Georgia and Statesboro, Georgia spend about ¥8, per person. Parks and facilities of the city are used and enjoyed by residents of Metropolitan Atlanta and beyond, who contribute nothing to their cost. A well equipped community center, without the land, costs over $200,000 The Decatur-DeKalb YMCA in 1960 cost a total of 656,000 plus $50,000 for the land. for the past 2 summers, the city hus received additional operating funds from O£0 and EQOA. In both cases, the appropriations were not approved until June, and people were hired to start work on Page 2 Dilemmas faith. Those programs closed the end of August, with the opening of school, Given funds to spend, the Parks and Recreation cepartment is confronted with a choice of buying land, developing land already owned, or hiring people ta staff the developments. For example, to have a softball league of neighborhood teams in a community park, instead of 1 community team as a part of a city league, requires more workers, either paid or volun- teers, and in the areas that need valunteers most, there are fewer adults with free time and energy to help. Same goes for Boy Scouts, Gray Y and the rest. Do we plan for what we can pay for? Do we count on volunteers? Bo we re-think the jobs and hire younger people, instigate training pro- grams? Who would pay for those? Police: Not enough police to prevent things from happening, too many when things do happen. That's the opinion most often expressed at CAC meetings. The success of officers assigned to the EQOA Centers emphasizes the repeated requests for "a beat policeman", a person "who will know’ us". Presently Atlanta police are assigned to large areas, to patrol in cars, which make the force more mobile. Charges of police brutality are taken up by the Police Committee of the Board of Aldermen, who some claim will "naturally" support the police. But isn't it natural for a department’ to support its own staff? And yet how does the public protect itself against the mutual protection of members of a bureauracy?, whether it be a police force, a school staff, a public housing staff or what? On the other hand, how can a single police officer, etc., be reassured of lack of reprisal if he raises questions? How do we get sympathy and understanding, protection and fairness on both sides? In all these cases, money may not cure all ills, but it seems necessary to cure any. The CRC is scheduling a meeting with the Fulton County legislative delegation to put before them the case of the need for add- itional sources of revenue for the city's general operating budget. HHKKPERE KEE BHT Dilemmas in Public Housing: Four facts immediately contribute to di- lemmas in public housing, 1. The Atlanta Housing Authority must obtain enough from rents to operate the projects. The City & U. S, Governments participate in fihancing the building but there are no subsidies for operating the projects. 2, Some rent must be paid by every tenant. Therefore those in need, who have no income whatsoever, cannot be served by public housing, under present policies, 3. Public housing is no resource for emergency housing. The only such resource in Atlanta is the Salvation Army, which houses and takes individuals for a brief time in extreme emergencies, but does not house families together. Women and children under 12 go tao one center, men to another. 4. Housing policies exclude same in greatest need for help, such as families of prisoners, serving felony sentences and mothers with illegitimate children under 1 year old. Misconceptions about these on the part of the general public often result in criticism of the Housing Authority Staff, who must operate within these policies. Other limiting policies are those requiring “security deposits" and a month's rent in advance and charges for repairs. Since rent is based on family income, increase in income means increase in rent. This is particularly self-defeating when a new member of the family goes to work and his added income, often sought to pay for education or other improvements, results in rent increases, This reflects not the opinion of the housing staff but a public policy. Another policy, which is within the jurisdiction of the Atlanta Housing Authority, is that of excluding from public housing families of prison inmates and women with illegitimate children under one year old. [he policy does not remove from the community the problems of illegitimacy Page 3 D:.lemmas or providing decent, sanitary housing for the persons involved. It does reflect a realistic concern for public opinion about public housing and what the community will stand for. If we do not agree with such restrictions on public housing, then it is up to us, the community to have them changed. But even with restrictions, in 1966 there was a back-log of 1500 applications for public housing in Atlanta. As of September 25, 1967 in a11 Atlanta Housing Authority projects there was a total of 17 vacancies( and these must be filled by the proper size family for the size of the unit), Dilemmas in Non-public Housing: In spite of code requirements and inspections, in 1960, 163,405 (10% of all city housing units) were in the slum category. In the first place, inspections are part of a process. When inspectors find code violations, the owner is contacted and given time (30 days? 60 days?) to make repairs. If not, the case is reported ta the Better Housing Commission and the Housing Court. The owner must make repairs with a stated time or pay a fine. What is “reasonable time” te find a contractor, let the contract, make repairs? What protection is there against an increase in rent when repairs are made? What protection is there against eviction because of complaints? If repairs are not made and rent is withheld, the renter can be evicted. If repairs are not made and rent is paid, what protection does the renter have? Move. "He can move" is the usual answer. There is a shortage of low and middle cost housing for sale and for rent in the city, and those available to Negroes are fewer than those available overall. It.costs money to pay for moving. There are specialized restrictions on various property. Some places won't take children, some places won't take un- married women, some places won't take divorcees, and some places won't take 9 children --- even for $90.00 a month. So if you have 3 rooms for your 9 children for 990.00 a month, you're likely to stay there even if they are cold and ratty. No steady job, no credit references, and on welfare. Husband in jail. There's little choice for such families. Race is an important factor still, no matter what the inccme. In one part of town, apartments close to a Negro neighborhood were asked if they would take Negroes as tenants, and none said yes. High rents for substandard housiny: This often turns out to be public housing in that the rent money in many cases comes from welfare allot-— ments, so that we the public are subsidizing the slums, The Department of Family & Children Services, whose clients, many of these clients are, cannot produce homes. The allotment for rent must come out of the total family allotment, the maximum for which is 0154.00 in Georgia, regardless of how many children there are. This is with no father at home. If he is present, the family is not eligible for Aid ta dependant children, mo matter how little he earns (unless he qualifies as physically disabled). The Georgia legislature could enact lagislation to implement the Unemployed Parent provisions of the federal law. This would use primarily federal money but would require some additianal and county money. The State Board of Family & Childrens Services, appointed by the Govenor, and the legislature would have to authorize the program and appropriate the money, which would permit men looking for work to stay at home with their families. The EGA has no money to pay moving costs and rent. Its resources are limited to existing public housing and other housing for rent from private owners. Why are people allowed ta live in these substandard houses? Aren't the landlords and the tenants both violating the law? Some of the worst areas are in that sort of limbo between "planning" and "having something done”. the planning may be for urban renewal, model neighborhood, etc,., but these are long involved processes, and meanwhile things are left pretty much as they are, waiting, waiting and deteriorating. For example, in one slum area which has been approved by the City Planning Department and the Aldermanic Board for urban renewal, everybody is wait~ ing now for the next phase, for the U. S. Department of HUD to approve the actual plans, appropriate the money, etc. -----~ Once this has been done, tenant-residents will receive grants for their property. So it appears to be to their advantage to wait. The Inspection Department requires minimum compliance since most of the buildings will be bought by the city and demolished. But UR office in the area says the earliest possibly for the Urban Renewal program to begin to move people out of ve ma: : ; oF y es . Ste : 4 3/2 Ww ie Serie iG an me Page 4 Dilemmas these slums will be 6 months. So they face another winter, with little heat, no hot waiter, leaks, utterly miserable living conditions. If they move now, they do it on their own ------- and where are there vacancies they can afford or where will they be accepted as tenants or buyers (because of income, family, race, etc.) ? Dilemmas in Evictions: Other families just a little higher in income face rents higher than their incomes warrant for new, cheaply Constructed, poorly maintained apartments, where eviction is an automatic process when rents are not paid on time. Few of these units (many with hundreds of families) have resident managers, and it is difficult to find someone to whom to make complaints or pay back-rent. Substandard conditions and lack of repairs are not legal grounds for withholding rent in Georgia. You complain, and nothing happens except that you maybe given notice to leave. The frustration of trying to deal with nameless, faceless landlords, often just a street address, adds to the overall despair. It takes energy, know-how, time and courage to pierce the anonymity of a corporation and someone who can speak and is wiliing to speak, even toa listen. Neighborhood Stabilization: In efferts for "neighborhood stabilization", we are conironted with more dilemmas and paradoxes. By neighborhood stabilization we mean achieving and maintaining a viable balance between white and Negro residents. So this means if the neighborhood is all white or all Negro, some moving should take place, but at a certain point (what point?) the moving and selling should stop. How do Negroes get "started" in 8 new neighborhood? What is the part of real estate dealeys? At what point do we eicourege Negroes ta move in and what point do we discourage them? What does it take to make whites stay? (Reassurance about schools, as much as anything, we are told.) How do we relieve pressure on the area now “in transition'? It is evident that any area concerned cannot "save itself". I+ is also evident that it cannot be “saved" by isolated, localized action. If any area, and in this case, southwest Atlanta, is ta become and remain racial- ly integrated, there must be choices of comparable housing values in other areas available to Negroes, buyers and renters so they do nat all end up in ane spot. There is no law requiring segregation but under present practices, Negroes are not free to choose from the entire metro area as whites are. They have trouvle finding a real estate agent to show them property outside present Negro neighborhoods. The real estate agent has trouble getting “white” property to show. The Negro buyer has trouble getting financing of such property. Some predict that open occupancy legislation for Atlanta would scare whites to move sutside of the city linits even faster than they are now. What are the prospects of getting Open occupancy legislatisn or practices in the metro area? What short of national legislation will help Atlanta from being a Negro city Surrounded by white suburbs? What would be tne results if it were? Dilemmas in Jobs - Treini.g & Employment: Most discussions of urban problems end with a statement to the erfect that "the important thing is jobs". Jobs keep people busy. Jobs give people money. Jobs give people stability. Jobs keep families together. Jobs give people a stake in the community. How does Atlanta Stand: In the first place, it must be clearly under- stood that there are no new public programs designed primarily to put people to work. The new programs ere designed either to train people ar to give social services, sa individuals can care for children, take jobs, etc., but once the training has been given and the social services have been provided, the fact of whether there is a job is up to the normal system of ongoing public and private programs which hire people. Either private industry or ongoing public programs thust produce the jobs. Many of the new public programs provide additional jobs, but moze for professional or skilled persons than for the "jobless". EQOA cannot produce jobs, except for those employed by "the program". The Georgia State Employment Service cannot produce jobs. There is much talk about “job development", about the need for lowering pro- fessional standards, for giving on-the-job training, but the persons who advocate such changes seldom adopt them themselves, and there are few examples of success. How realistic are our admonitions (usually to others) to make the job fit the person who is looking for employment. One dilemma is that ell the surveys and all comments by job counselors confirm the fact, that . * Fage 5 Dtlemmas the majority of thuse looking for work are female, the majority of those are Negro, either very young with no experience, or 30 or 40, with per- haps @ high schecl diploma but no "marketable skills", On the other hand, in spite of federal laws against discrininaticn based on sex, the great majority of job orders are for males, males with experience and males with skills. To what extent Negroes an Atlanta are denied jobs because they ere Necrozs needs to be determined, but it is a fact that 8 higher percestege af these looking for jobs are Nejro, and that of those persuns with johs, a higher percentage of whites have good jobs (professicnal, “anagerial, etc.). Years of discripination because of race have resulted in Negroes being less qualified according to standards set by whites for whites. Jo we continue to apply quelifications which exclude Neoroes (such as experience which they have been unable to get) or do we hire "qualifiable" Negroes and give them a chance to qualify on the job? The August list of vacancies for the City of Atlanta Personnel department, for example, lists only 6 out of 29 categories which require no experience, Are there enough hobs to go around? Are there more people than jobs or more jobs than people? The Georgia State Employment Officies in Metro Atlanta as of July 31, 1967 had 649 job orders ("a slack season" a spokes- man said). At the sane time, there were 11,324 "active applicants" (5,874 female), Negroes who are working earn less than whites. When the head of the household. male cr female, makes a marginal salary, teenage children, Or yourger chilcren, must go to work to provide for themselves and/or to contvicutie te the family income. An increase in adult incomes might ease the cc for teenage jobs. There are, for example, approximately 1000 families in one Atlanta public housing project being supported by women who cai\) their families’ living at domestic service, for which the average rats is (8.00 6 day with no prospect of promotion, no future, no fringe benefits, lucky if social security is paid. Employment to a teen- age member of such a family becomes a necessity unless somehow the family income is increased. Men and women with families work for us, the public, at full time, permanent jobs at the "poverty" level (e.g., maids at Grady hospital at $1.08 an hour; male nursing assistants at $1.29 an hour, increases within the last few years). further increases will re- quire increased public funds. Whom do we encourage to take these jobs? Whom should we encourage to take these jobs? Dilemmas in Training: What about taining programs? Some cost; others pay trainees. How closely does the vocational education program (as re- flected in the new $9,000,000 Atlanta Trade School) reflect present and future job markets? All courses there do not require high school education but they require aptitude tests and fees, though small, and costs of materials, small enough if you have it, but to a family with no margin, it might as well be 1000. Some training programs are specifically for young peaple. The Neigh- borhood Youth Corps gives “training jobs" both in and ont of school, but the record of post-NYC employment quantity-wise is nat impressive. From October '66 through July '67, of 620 out-of-school NYC trainees in Atlanta, 98 were placed in fWflltime jobs {most of which were train- ing releted). Often the job pays little more than the "training" did (v1.50 an hour). Furthermore, the training allowance does not count on family income, etc., whereas “earned income" does. (A side effect of training allowances, which give self-respect and dignity and inde- pendence to the young, is the resentment on the partof some adult worker such as custodians and cooks at seeing an NYC trainee "earn" about as much as they are paid straight wages. This could destroy rather than strengthen a family.) Again, the vocational education department nor the NYC can produce permanent jobs. How realistic is the training? What about the family? Shoulc all young people be encouraged to work? Should all mothers be encouraged to work? The MDTA programs also have suffered from lack af jobs into which trainees could move. Here race plus sex has compounded the problem again, with most jobs calling for males with experience, and skills still uncommon among Negroes. As of August, 1967, the Atlanta office GSES had no MOTA training programs to which applicants could bs asaigned. = Page 6 Dilemmas . The new $4,570,793 Atianta Concentrated Employment Program (ACEP) is another caneetunaes for training, restricted to low-income areas af the city. The first group of 252 beyan August 14, 1967. It is expected to enroll 10U ever, 2 weeks for a training period of 6 ~ 16 weeks. To be eligible you must live in one of the 5 areas (Price, Pittsburg, Summerhill-Mechanicsville, Nash-Washington, or West-End), be 16 or older and presently "below the poverty level", 98% of the farst 200 are females. The living allowance for a head of ‘household is $35.00 to 056.0U a week and for a non-head of household, 20,00 a week, Like other training programs it includes pre-vocatianal, orientation, and other supporting social services. It is designed to train for existing or new jobs, but it cannot guarantee a job or produce one, Dilemmas in Education: School buildings in one part of town converted to special pregrams as the school population moves out. School build~ ings in other parts of town with double enrollment as the school pop- ulation moves in. tffect on schools of zoning changes -- apartments bring many new children for school. Cumbersome and lengthy process of bond issues to finance new buildings. Pre-kindergarten "headstert" programs with low pupil-teacher ratio feeding pupils into schools with large classes and double sessions. Double session, which” means z school ‘ day, doing away with lunch for, children to whom lunch is the best meal of the day and for many a free meal. >. day for some 8th graders in high school (those credits do.not figues. an graduation requirements), but 13 and 14 year olds can't work -- it's against the law in many in- stances. (When school opened in August more than 7000 pupils, all of whom.are Negro, were on what is Soe described as "double: session", dith school day-cut in he Lf nee does a lst ees: énd grader, /th grader, 8th grader, 11th grader-do the rest of the day? There's no room at school to stay. There is likely to be little room at home’ and even less likely to be an adult at home to supervise, to chauffeur, to “play, to guide, to help with studies, .to encourage, to listen, . ee REPKE HHEREREHHE These are some af the Dilemmas of the City. We cannot hold a welfare worker responsible for inadequate housing of welfare clients when we limit her resources to $154.00 a month. We cannot hold a public housing ‘manager responsible for keeping tenants who cannot pay even minimum rent when we do not give him public money to operate on. We cannot hold training supervisors responsible for lack of jobs. Agreed we need new innovative programs, but programs that spend more money, not.less and programs that provide actual economic opportunity, 1.e., jobs. A few basic misconceptions stand in the way of innovative “programs. One misconception is that our current social services, even with the additional "new programs" are adequate. A second misconception is that when "even more money” has not solved the problems, that "money is not the answer", More money may not insure successes, but there is little likelihood of success without it. The most effective uses of public money may be debated but the needs are enormous, widespread and urgent and can be met only by massive, similtaneous programs. - Teachers, doctors, dentist, recreation workers, planners and the like spend money. If we are to have. enough of the kinds of services they “provide, we must be prepared to spend more money, much more. Some of this will create jobs but that is not the prime purpose nor the crit- erion of success of ‘social service paogeens or training programs. The other misconception is that social services and training guarantee jobs and income, and/or guarantee access to capitol.- -You can have - everybody healthy, all the babies in a day care center, the would-be. workers traied, but unless there is a productive job available, none: -of this brings in family income. Anti-poverty programs: today train some people. They take care of some children. They take some to the hospital, t& the employment office. But they do not produce jobs - (nor-+do they produce houses). They do not produce the opportunity to make a man, 4 woman, ° ‘a young person self=supporting,’ unless he is fortunate enough to be hired as a staff member of ane of the "programs". They can ready him to: take advantage of the opportunity, . but. until the Sqmmunity provides at, he will have to waits There were in ‘Atlanta 2 : pie a) iis 2 seis wows aa Faget Sune Abs oo ; fe er “he: a “ay fs i wt nV i = oe = Page 7 Dilemmas during the month uf July more than 11,000 waiting, registered for jobs with the Employment Services. Sself-helping is not the same as self-generating. Self-help programs require something to start with, something to help. A credit union is not much help if each member needs to borrow £50.00 and can hardly put in $9.00 (if you work by the day and miss two days and don't have money for rent and food, borrowing from a loan shark at high interest and "Service" charges may not be good business, but what is the alternative?) A civic association with no members who own property or have any margin of income cannot come up with "seed money", loans or fees for technical assistance. Indeed it is hard for them to produce the minimum amount to get the help necessary to apply for grants, etd. Training, counsel, sympathy, recreation, social services all have their places but in our money economy, nene of these is a substitute for money. Indeed a minimum income is necessary to take advantage even of "free" services. As has been said, one has to have a boot before he can have a boot strap. Dazens of people with no bocts still comes out no boot straps. Zero multiplied by "infinity" is still zero. Another notion which is misleading is thet the problems can be “taken one at a time". Chances are a child growing up in a good house in a good neighborhood will go to a good school and get a good job; chances are a poor house in a poor neighborhood will go to a poor school and get a poor job. Hause, school, neighborhood, family conditions, health are all parts of a wholes, and the whole is a human being. HERR ERKEREREEK ‘The decisions which resuit in school and houses and jobs, or no schools and no houses and no jobs are matters of public policy. The fact that the decisions are complex and difficult does not alter the fact that they must be made, and that we are all helping to make them, like it or not. The democratic process is still the same. The burden of responsible citizenship is not likely to become lighter. EKER KKKREEEKERE Detailed Reports of the meetings which have pointed up these dilemmas provide an interesting Diary of Atlanta. These, and other information such as questions and answers on Housing are available from the CRC office. The record from February, 1968 through August, 1967, is: Neighborhood Meetings Number Approx Attendance App. Spoke 11 1000 250 Special CRE "Hearings" at City Hall 1 650 100 Special CRC Meetings 4 60 Regular CRC Meetings i 250 Vistors 30 299 1. 1960 380 Approximately 800 requests have been processed through the office. Detailed minutes. of all meetings and 10 Neighborhood Profiles have been widely circulated, plus special reports such as Dixie Hills, Housing, etc. The Community Relations Commission of the City af Atlanta, appointed by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen, meets the 4th Friday of each month, at 1:30 P.M., in Committee Room #2, City Hall. The public is invited and citizens are urged to bring to the attention of the Commission matters pertaining to its functions and duties, which outlined in the Ordinance, include: "To foster mutual understanding, tolerance, and respect among all economic, social religious, and ethnic groups in the City. To help make it possible for each citizen, regardless of race, color, ereed, religion, national origin or ancestry, to develop his talents: and abilities without limitation. To aid in permitting the City of Atlanta to benefit from the full- est realization of its human resources. To investigate, discourage and seek to prevent discriminatory practices against any individual because of race, color, creed, religion, national origin or ancestry. Jo attempt to act as conciliator in controversies involving human relations." In between meetings, individuals and groups are invited to visit or telephone the Commission office (522-4463, Ext 433) to report matters of interest and to obtain information and assistance on specific sub- jects. Community Relations Commission 1203 City Hall Non = Profit 68 Mitchell Street, Sw . Organization Atlanta, Georgia 30303 U. S. Postage PUA IsD Atlanta, Georgia Permit No./1l Mr. R. Earl Landers Adm. Asst. to Mayor | 68 Mitchell St., sw Atlanta, Ga. 30303
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 21

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_018_021.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 21
  • Text: JOMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION ESTABLISHED BY THE MAYOR AND THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, NOVSUBER, 1068 1208 CITY HALL, ATLANTA GEORGIA s0s03 TELEPHONE 522-4463 EXT. 488 Mr. Invinc K. Kater, Chairman Tae Hononante Sast Masseui, JR» Ze-Ofielo = WT CHANICSVILLE~PITTSBURGH AREAS MEETING, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5, 1967 at ZION HILL BAPTIST CHURCH, 666 McDANIEL ST. COMMISSION MEMBERS Mr. T. M. ALEXANDER, Sr. Mr. R. BYRON ATTRIDGE eee en cakes Miss Helen Bullard, Chairman, called the meeting to order at Mx. R. J. Bureae 7:45 P.M. Forty-seven attendance cards were returned. Members Mr. Ronert Doras pr esent : Mr. Hamitton Douctas, JR. Mr. C. G. Ezzarp Most Reverend et J. HALLINAN Mr. Rolland Maxwell Archbishop of Atlanta ss Te : Mr. Josern HaAAs Dr. sam Wil i ams . Mr. AL KuETrNER Rabbi Jacob Rothschild Dr. Ropert E. Lee i o 7 Se Rats as wea Mr. Clarence G. Ezzard ; Mr. F. W. PaTTEnson Mrs. Eliza K. Paschall, Executive Director Raset Jacos M, RoTHscHILp Mr. M. O. “Buzz" Ryan Mr. Jack SELLS Observers: Mrs. Many STEPHENS THE REVEREND SAMUEL WILLIAMS uve. Jacob Rothschild ee a eee Mrs. Marilyn Baldwin Executive Director Mr. Joseph Amisano Rep. John Hood Miss Bullard remarked that the CRC was appointed by the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen to try to help to deal with the problems of living together. She asked the group what it considered No. 1 problem in all Atlanta. Group answered: “Money..money..money. The next problem: "Clean up...clean up. The yards, the streets.""' Individuals spoke out mentioning crime; housing...not enough and what there is, inadequate. At this point, Miss Bullard invited people to get up and speak out. l. MR. MARVIN K. MACDOWELL, 781 Hubbard St. S.W.: Speaking for SCLC, Operation Breadbasket. They are having meetings in the different neighborhoods, Mechanicsville, Pittsburgh, Grant Park, to get something done regarding housing and second, the streets...the majority are dirt streets which need to be paved. Said the people will have to get up and speak. Miss Bullard asked if the complaint had been made to the city formally or informally. He said they have been to EOA centers in the neighborhoods. 2. MR. RUDOLPH HINES, 65 Harlan Rd. S.W.: “One of the problems in Atlanta is lack of concern that the people of Atlanta have about somebody else...For 11 months I was assistant director for John Hope Homes. I know how these people live...Hines continued. "I don't represent any group but my concern is .. for ail the Negroes in Atlanta....the evils can be pinpointed in this one...it is inhuman... it is beyond the law....a lady called me tonight...she said last month I paid $46 rent...in April I pay $86.." On questioning from Miss Bullard, he said this is the way rents are adjusted and computed in public housing...that Mr. Satterfield and Mr. Boggs are little gods in this town. He told of an incident where a person was seen at the car stop and since he was then presumably working, his rent was adjusted so that he owed back rent of $490. Mr. Hines commented Page 2 of Minutes of Mechanicsville-Pittsburgh Meeting, April 5, 1967 that the tenant organization was not effective since Paragraph S in the lease says the manager of any individual housing project in Atlanta can evict any family without written notice for the reason of the eviction. Mrs. Paschall said she uncerstocd that readjusted rents were not retroactive. Myr. Hines said that if a person calis the central office the call is sent back to the area management office...a vicious circle... the mere fact that the tenant calls downtown makes that tenant next in line for eviction. : Mrs. Paschall asked for location of specific streets that needed repairing to pass on to Mr. Nixon. Group: "McDaniel Street...it is a hazard. Bass Street...from Cooper to McDaniel. Pryor...Minora Street to the stadium." In the group's opinion, formal complaints on these streets have probably gone into the wastebasket. A woman remarked that on the weekends, teenagers tear them (the roads) up. 3. REV. Le. C. CLACK, 591 Pulliam St. SW.: He objects to Collier Street being zoned for commercial use. Thinks it unnecessary...commercial district already out to Fulton Industrial Boulevard. Advised he had been to one Zoning meeting. Said he was making a statement right then requesting it be kept residential. Told Dr. Williams he thought they should attend the zoning meetings. Dr. Williams skeptical about the effectiveness of zoning hearings. Miss Bullard to next speaker: “Are you Speaking as an individual?" 4.MR. EDWIN MOODY, 241 Doane St. S.W. "For once in my life!" Said he agreed with Dr. Williams about zoning committee. Has several recommendations for Commission to present to “city fathers" as follows: a. “Top issue is appointees...most of problems bloom from people appointed that know or care very little for the problems...how can a well- fed person know actually how a hungry person feels..how can a person in a mansion know how a person in a ragged, substandard house lives? b. "Tax dollars - start to spend fund to labor where it has been neglected.. in Mechanicsville, Summerhill, Pittsburgh. c. "Hire us on a qualified man-to-man basis...in the Georgia State Employment Service, it hasn't stopped... d. "Laws voted by legislature..almost any tax increase is helping poverty.. Atlanta's sewage tax falls on the tenants...our representatives voted themselves raises..this means more tax for the poor man to pay. I will not vote for a single person offering for re-election next time and I hope you Will follow the same example. e. "I will conclude with planning, zoning and housing..to get a house you have to get it zoned from a to z, to get conmercial you have to get it zoned from a to z, same for schools...when you go before the zoning committee, you don’t make A, you-done Lost out...these departments should be one and an allowance should be made for elderly homeowners...members, 2° c 4. "i : = : pore don't come out and listen and place it in file 13--come out here and do something about this...there is a long hot summer coming...I got Page 3 of Minutes of Mechanicsville-Pittsburgh Meeting, April 5, 1967 kids in the schools and those two-for-a-quarter rides come dear for me... (he mentioned meeting at State Capitol re increase)...the Commission (Public Service) will hold a hearing...the more of us get there the less chance they will get to raise...Sommerville will get mad but I have got to pay Mr, Sommerville. Remarked that not voting for those presently in office might let the next one know not to vote himself a raise. On questioning by a reporter, remarked that the Georgia State Employment Service still goes by a color line. 5. MRS. ETHEL SHAW, 592 Whitehall Terrace. Complained of surrounding apartment buildings having no janitors. "Have called City Hall five times, written to Ivan Allen, Jr. ...the inspector came out and went around and cleaned up one time...been no one Since. Don't know who the landlords of buildings are......apartment at 600 Whitehall Terrace is ridiculous." (Discussion between Mrs. Shaw and person in group re contacting her area block chairman for corrective action.) 6. REP. JOHN HOOD, 124 District, 802% Pryor St. S.W. In checking, he found that motels are going in this area. Pryor St. area sewer problem is a hazard...on a rainy day your car will almost drown out. Commission should recommend to City Hall something be done. Need a school to go along with 650 apartment units planned for construction on McDaniel St. Construction (of the school) has not started and if it is to be finished within the allotted time, they will have to get on the ball (they being the Bd. of Education) to get property in this area. Mr. Hood advised he had voted for salary increase. One person reported a river when it rains on Ira Street where he lives and a horrible mess afterwards. 7. MRS. ROSA BROWN, Chairman of Area Block 42, EOA. Adressing Mr. Hood; "The people on Garbaldi Street have been asking for a light." Cited dangers of dark area. Sewer too small on Stevens and Sanders St...stays stopped up all the time. (Light on Garibaldi between Bass & Stephens.) Mrs. Paschall advised that the city is beginning a lighting modernization plan - asked that she be advised of special places where lights are needed - takes six to eight weeks because the Board of Aldermen has to pass a resolution for each location. Group: "We have asked for a light at Rockwell and McDaniel. 396 Baker is broke up." Mr. Moody speaking again asked why the planners and the zoning committee don't get together on the Model City plan - work in places going to be wasted - office building was to be built on Richardson and Central - neighborhood protested - protested on I-20. If commercial comes into neighborhood, residents might as well pick up and leave. Mrs. Paschall reported what Mr. Gladin told her about the Model City program - the application from City of Atlanta to Federal Government is for $500,000 to pay for a year of planning and at the end of the year would come a grant to put the plans into effect .. if grant is approved, they will want to meet with the people in the community to talk about what kind of neighborhood the people want - the more prepared the people are to talk about what they want, the stronger the plan will be when it gets going. Page 4 of Minutes of Mechanicsville-Pittsburgh Meeting, April 5, 1967. Mr. Hood speaking again: “Mr. Hazzard and I are in a peculiar situation because the last two meetings I have found myself with the Commission in the neighborhood in which I live ... and I have been trying to keep up with it as much as possible." Thinks a strong organization will be needed in Atlanta if it gets the grant. Thinks one and a half million dollars is a small sum. Mr. Blackwell and Mr. Thompson (congressmen from 4th and 5th Districts) have got a lot of correspondence against it - doubts if 5 of present group have written two congressmen to support the project. Need to get ball rolling for model city. if turned down, will apply to private source. Thinks the stadium has helped south side a lot. Regarding bare apartments, thinks Commission could recommend that there be some liaison person to visit apartment developments to-make sure people keep them up - they are unsanitary on Commerce Street...Primrose.... Journal reporter asked: "With the interstate system and the stadium, it makes slum areas prime business sites in the future and is it the Commission's objective to keep this residential area and keep out businesses andwhat is the overall objective in this area?" Dr. Williams referred him to the ordinance setting up the Commission. Business of Commission is to see that there is peace and harmony in the community and justice done where people Live. Moody and Ezzard and other people have said that the people in the city will have something to say about what happens re the model city and we have no position .. the people who live there must be taken into account .. our concern is what happens to people .. would that satisfy you? Reporter: The economic factors mean that this would be a tremendous business area. Dr. Williams: "One of the things wrong with this town..we place economic opportunity before the interest of people.. I don't know if he wants these notes or not because these aren't what you want to put in the newspaper...I am offended about America on this..America offends: me at this point...theee things matter in America..that is profit, profits and property and then we say to hell with people..we have got to correct that...people have been living here for a long time and..our (early) pastor here had to carry on a fight to keep people from being evicted here...now because of the stadium we have come to see what prime property this...is..young man, I hope you get a little conversion here and see that people are more important than property..and when we do we will see that America is a great place and if we don't people are going to be doomed.... There waS a question regarding whether or not to go ahead and improve property on Windsor St. Miss Bullard suggested calling City Planning Department, Ir. Hood was critical of the application for the Model City. It shows on the policy making level the mayor, two aldermen (Alderedge and Cook) and one private member (business community representative) but no representatives from the community. There was a consensus of the group that they have representa- tives from the community. Discussion revealed that action is expected on the model city program in May. And that Mr. Gladin of the City Planning Department does anticipate involving the neighborhood people, Mrs. Paschall pointed out, the more organized and ready the community is the better. She suggested a Page 5 of Minutes of Mechanicsville-Pititsburgch Meeting, April 5, 1967. G by all groups and have Stions re housing. Maybe a ization. joint meeting of all model city areaS Sponsore J gz t Gladin, Buchanan and Wofford come to answer au 3 good idea to form a permanent joint group orga A woman in the group stated that she had written President Johnson and was referred to some people in Atlanta who say it will be one year before the model city plan is effective and she was unhappy with just waiting which is what they had been doing for a long time. Nr. Hood remarked that the application was in and the city administration was getting ready and now the people had to get involved. Rev. L. Terrill: Made a plea to set up a joint meeting of all groups involved in model city application to talk with City Planning Department staff. Mr. Hood advised that a meeting was held in Summerhill Last week and they had agreed at that meeting to try to arrange a joint meeting in 3 weeks and everybody would be advised. On a motion made by Rev. Terrill and seconded, a resolution that a meeting of all the people in Peoplestown, Summerhill, Mechanicsville, etc., be heid in April was passed. Mr. Moody: shouldn't say what he is trving to tell me.. the mayor came out with two meetings before with more people and said what do you want?..when that thing got to Washington what was in there was what the mayor wanted and not us..if you don't argue about it now just save your breath child because the mayor done got it that thick and you haven't said the word. Before adjourning, Miss Bullard explained the Commission has no policy making powers and its purpose is to take back to the city administration expressions of what the groups consider their problems. When asked if they felt they had had their say, the group replied Yes, Yes, thank you. One last comment from an in group re buses coming down West Avenue: "I think that if the transit could ask for more money I think we could ask for more transportation...” Miss Bullard thanked the people for coming and told them if they wanted to ask a personal question, to come down front. The Meeting was adjourned at 10:30 approximately.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 18, Document 22

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_018_022.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 18, Document 22
  • Text: Community Relations Commission 1203 City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Northwest Area Neighborhood Hearing, Wednesday, April 19, 1967 at Allen Temple AME Church, 7:30 P.M. Mr. Charles Hart, chairman of the EOA CNAC, who had arranged for the meeting, had served on the Human Relations Committee appointed by the Board of Aldermen, which preceded the Commission. He ex- plained the formation of the Commission, and said it was "designed to find out needs and problems of the city". Commission members present - Mr. Robert Dobbs, Chairman; Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, Mr. Byron Attridge, Mr. R. S. Butler, and Mrs. Eliza Paschall, Executive Director. Ll. Mr. William Brown, 847 Gertrude Place. Polluted stream between Gertrude Place, and Hortense Place; offensive odors, have to close windows. Had contacted Mr. Respress, who had replied that he needed a bond issue for new sewers; wrote Mayor; Health Department said to write city; nothing done. 2. Mrs. Gaynelle Byrd, 1894 Tremont Drive, N. W. Street paving problems on Anderson and Simpson; Dixie Hills Circle too narrow; need turnaround paved; area confusing and street signs confusing, almost impossible to give directions. 3. Mrs. Mary Williams, 2041 Morehouse Drive, N. W., 799-8001. Dixie Hills Civic Club: need cross walk at Newberry Chapel, at Spelman and Simpson Road; need "Slow School" sign on west side of Simpson Road from Dixie Hills Circle to protect children going to W. White School; Parks Department promised 2 years ago to fix Recreation Center at Anderson Park; need police protection at Dixie Hills Plaza against teenagers who gang up against people trying to get through the area. Rothschild, etc. asked if they have tried to solve the problem; Attridge asked if they are local teenagers; Mrs. Williams said they don't know. Mr. Dobbs said it takes police 15 minutes to arrive when they are called, “why so long?" 4. Mr. John Howard, 2105 Baker Road. Teenagers in park near his home throw trash in his yard; urges play- lot at Baker and North Avenue. | . 5. Mrs. Judge Barlow, 60 Edwin Place, N. W., 794-1224. Put trash on streets, stays 2 to 3 weeks, wants schedule; teenagers siphon gas out of car, takes police “an hour to comet; big boys at Perry Homes run off small children from playlots. 6. Mr. Andrew Hill, 1623 Westview Drive, S. W., 753-0132. Former Manager of apartments, dismissed because he checked the buildings; agents don't care, just so they get their money; people should not be “afraid to the truth." 7. Mr. Robert Baldwin, 264 Richardson, N. W., 794-7901. Turner High PTA; understands Turner High going on double session. Dr. Bowen says they will know about it. This would mean 1000 children in the streets. Mr. Davis says 330 seniors, 370 llth graders, 320 LOth graders dismissed at 12; 500 8th graders, 490 9th graders in streets until noon. Teenagers do not have enough constructive things to do. 300 girls did not finish at one high school on double session last year because of pregnancy. With LO portable units could avoid double sessions. Mr. Dobbs said Archer will go on double session in September too. ‘Rabbi Rothschild asked if there were objections to portable units. Group agreed would prefer portable units to double session. 8. Mrs. D. Shaw, 2232 Verbena Street, #10, Dixie Hills Apt., 794-9065. Complained of rats, has called Rodent Control, still bad. 9. Mr. Otis Montgomery, 730 Hortense Place, N. W. (Hortense Community Club). Steel cable tower in middle of street; city owns land, Ga. Power owns tower, can't get anybody to take it down; sewerage inadequate, can't walk in street when it rains; Hortense and Florence Streets . heed resurfacing; dogs run Loose. (Commission members Jack Sells and T. M. Alexander arrived; also Alderman 0. V. Williamson). 10. Mrs. Ed. W. Hall, 1999 Baker Road, N. W. 794-3949, Blind curve, children playing in streets; vacant house, yard grown up, abandoned station wagon on Arlington Circle; her son, along with other teenagers, gets out of school at 12:20 (Fulton High), “used to know a child was out of schoo. when you saw him in the streets, now you don't know if he is coming or going to school; nothing to do but break windows. ll. Mrs. Daisy B. Stinson, 2056 Arlington Circle, N. W. Need trees trimmed and Light in middle of street, would help women coming home from work. 12. Mr. Sidney T. Dennis, 645 S. Evelyn Place, S. W. 794-1236. Has 4 children in school, refused to sign school assignment form for next year; no use for parent and child to make request if area Supt. and Principal can make assignment too late for an appeal; should be notified of assignments in time to request another one, not just bb sent back to present school; when school goes on double session (extended day''), should have supervised recreation program. Mrs. English, assistant Principal at West Fulton, explained that the school assignment form “is part of the law; ask to return forms as soon as possible; those requesting transfers sent to area Supt.; if request transfer to another area, sent to Supt. of that area; noti- fied "as soon as processed". | | Mr. Dobbs asked if other area Supt. has authority to decide. Mr. Williamson asked if decision may be appealed to Supt. Mrs. English said she did not know. 13. Mrs. Pearlina Jones, 1153 Wilkes Circle, N. W., #176. Pipes burst on Wilkes Circle, sewerage odor bad; need light behind apartments; are all projects costs the same? Prices for screen doors vary, some $1.50, some $3.50; she has reported to the manager. Mr. Attridge asked if she was satisfied with public housing? Mrs. Jones said she is interested in other people, particularly older people; is it possible to have copies of rules and regulations? 14. Mrs. Lewis Johnson, 1193 Wilkes Circle, #148. Rent has increased twice within a year; income has stayed the same. 15. Mrs. Margaret Phillips, 1193 Wilkes Circle, #143, 792-8742. Charged $12.50 for % a screen door; cashier said should have had correct change for paying rent. 16. Mrs. Blanche Matthews, 1275 Wilkes Circle, N. W. #81. $2517.70 income, manager says it is $3,598; says it is “anticipated income''-how does he know how much to anticipate? 17. Mr. Wesley J. Mapp, 1240 Wilkes Circle, N. W. New rent charges are more than he makes a month, moved into public housing fairly recently; will move out as soon as he can. 18. Mrs. Mary E. Peek, 1165 Wilkes Circle, #164. Husband disabled, Live on social security and her salary as a Nurse's Aide; income same in April as last September, rent went up. 19. Mrs. Frankie M. Deans, 1207 Walden Street, #432. As supply in school cafeteria, makes $37.50 a week. Husband started driving cab (?); rent increased from $37 to $80; has 2 teenage daughters. "Go to bed early, nothing to do; if I can't take care of them, I wish somebody would take them and give them a good home." 20. Mrs. Ernestine Price, 1056 Chivers Street, 799-8317. Husband died; charged back rent; present rent “couldn't base it a what she is making"; asked manager about it and he said "I still have authority to put you out." 21. Mr. Edward Young, 2279 Hill Street,-N. W. Center Hill area, transition area for 2 years; "new people but old houses, owners are "chisleing", 3 houses in area were condemned, came out and did little bit of repairs, after they were "fixed", tenants spent "their time emptying basins when it rains." 22. Mrs. Bobbie Mathis, 1140 Wilkes Circle, #204. Rent increased, she does not understand why. 23. Mrs. Daley, Bowen Homes. Works at Hillhaven Homes, had 3 different notices of income, none of which she says is right. 24. Mrs. Ernestine Pope, 99 Chivers Street, 3282. Says she was charged for paper on grass; excess gas bills but she doesn't see how it could be that much. oO” Mr. Hart then read a long list of additional requests drawn up by re- sidents, which he said he would turn off to the Commission office.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 18, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021