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Box 15, Folder 12, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_012.pdf
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  • Title: Box 15, Folder 12, Complete Folder
  • Text: C~TY 4-' 7r·~ OF I-\~ Li-\ ~ DEPARTMENT OF LAW 2614 FIR ST NATIONAL BAN K BUILDING Atlanta, Georgia 30303 April 5, 1968 HENRY L. BO WDEN CIT Y ATTORNEY ROBERTS. WIGGINS MARTIN MCFAR L AND EDWIN L. STERNE RALPH C . JENKINS JOH N E. DOUGHERTY CHARLE S M. LO KEY THOMAS F . CHO YCE JAMES 8. PILCHE R FERRIN Y. MATHEWS ASSISTANT CIT Y ATTORNEY A SSOCIATE CIT Y ATTORNEYS RO BERT A. H ARR IS HENR YM . MURFF CL A IM S A TTO RNEYS Hon. Ivan All en, Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia JAME S 8. HENDERSON SPECIAL ASSOCIATE CITY ATTORN E Y Dear Mayor Allen: Enclosed is a copy of the report that this Office recommen ds in the matter of riot control work for the City. HLB:jc Encl. �THE RESPONSE OF THE CITY ATTORNEY TO THE INQUIRY OF THE HONORABLE IVAN ALLEN, JR o, MAYOR OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA UNDER DATE OF MARCH 19, 1968, WITH RESPECT TO HIS INQUIRY CONCERNING REQUESTED ACTION TO BE TAKEN BY CITY DEPARTMENTS AND PUBLIC AGENCIES. .! / Following the ~ormat adopted by Mayor Allen in his communique to all depar tment heads dated March 19, . 1968, please be advised that no report ~as filed with respect to Paragraph 1 thereof inasmuch as the Law Departmen t of the City of Atlanta is nf the type of department which would be involved in the type oi activity set forth therein. · Consequently, no report is made lorn this d~partment concerning that feature of the letter. With respect to Paragraph 2 of the report dealing with Chapter 10 of Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, please be advised that the following represents a report of that chapter as the same is broken dO'wn in the book itself. The chapter is broken into two phases which shall be discussed in seritam fashion. · The first phase concerns short range work which should be done and after each suggestion, a comment will be made concerning how the Law Department may aid in the implementation thereof. (a) Establish neighborh9od action task force - it is the opinion of this department that we might do nothing effective with respect to the implementation of this: · (b) Establish effective grievance - response mechanism - it is the opinion of th e Law Departi:lent that we would be in a position " �I to assist h ere in that should such grievance - response hearings be held, an Associ a te City Attorney could be present in order to det ermine whether or not any proposed action taken would be legally - .., permissible. (c) I . Expand lega l services f0r the poor - inasmuch as the function of the City Attorney's Office is to represent the Mayor and Board of Aldermen, it is our opinion that this matter should be best be left to the Atlanta Bar Association and related agencies, such as, but not limited to, The Emory University School of Law. (s:l) Financial · assistance - we do not feel we could be of any assistance here. (e) Hearing ghetto problems and enacting appropriate local legislation - we could be of assistance here as indicated under (b) ( a&:tl-n=b o-l] above. (f) residents - Expand employment by City Governrrent of ghetto this_ department would not be able to assist in this part"icular function. - - -- with respect to the long term recommendations set forth in Chapter 10, and adopting the same format above set forth, this is our response to those. (a) Establish neighborhood city halls · - the Law De- -~ par t ment would in all prob ability not be of any assistance in this r e sp ect. (b) Deve lop mult i - service c ent ers - this appears ., to deal with such thi ngs as parks and rec reationa l faciliti es �. and the Law Dep ar tment ·would in all probability not be in a posi t ion to be of any assistance here. (c) Improve political rep r esentation~ _jt has long beeri the opinion of this department, as the sami has been · . . expressed thr ough the City Attorney, that the disproportionate representation cr eated by malapportioned wards is, if not unconstitutiona l, a bad practice. This is even though all aldermen are elect e d. on a city-wide .basis. Admittedly, the law's present posture se~ms to . be. city-wide elections are sufficient to take this situation out of any constitutionally infirm probl_em ·areas; however, a recent case in the Supreme ·, Court of the United States, coming out of Texas, and which we have not had an opportunity to digest, might indicate that opposition is not as sound as it was prior to the opinion set forth in the case. In any event, this department stands ready, willing and able to assist in such legisiation as is necessary to cure malapportioned . . wards. (d) More effective community participation - it is doubtful that the Law Department could serve in this particular function. With respect to the specific questions asked in Para~ graph 2, we feel that ' (a), (b) and (c) have already been answered in the analysis and as to estimating the probable _cos·t involved, we deem that the functions which we would do, as the same are set fo r th a bove, would be done without any incr eased cost to the City of At l ant a over and abov e the retainer s curr ently being paid to t he sever a l a t to r neys conne c ted with the Law Depart ment . ., �With respect to the third paragraph of the letter of Mar ch 19, 196 8 from Mayor Allen to the several department heads, the follo wing constitutes our response as the same concerns itself with Chapt e r 13 of the report of the National Advisory Commission on Civi l Disorder s. A work is necessar y with respect to some of ·the considerat ion s rais e d in this chapter and how the same has been analyz e d by this department. In all probability the report pretty well hits the nail on the head when it indicates in Chapter 13 that the handling and prosecution under a mass arrest situation is t _o tally diff~r ent from any normal type of operation that obtains in the several courts that would have jurisdi ction over the type of offenses tha t are normally committed during times of riot and violence. Also, the report seems to hit the nail on the head when it indicates tha~ the administration of justice is an incomplete function when primary emphasis is placed on the quelling of the riots and virtually no emphasis is placed upon the prosecu~ tion and conviction· of people who -i;-1ere involved in the riots. The repor-t of this department will primarily concern itself with these two featu r es of Chapter 13. It is the feeling of this department that the City of Atlanta have on a st?ndby b a sis, certain members of the local bar to act as both pro haec vice judg es and prosecutors. The r eason no recommendation is being made with respect. to defense coun s e l is that it is our f ee ling that the public de fender syst em now e st ablished by the Fulton Sup erior Court is sufficient to take c are o f :,th i s feat ur e of the administration of justice. c It is our • thinking tha t the lo cal b ar would ri se to the oc c as i on and tha t �these services would be furnished the City of Atlania at no cost to the City of Atlanta. Inasmuch as· the cry goes up concerning police brutality during post arrests, thi~ department · feels ' that responsible members of the negro coITLmunity should have access to detention areas of the city jail for the purp·ose of assuring the negro_ public that no abuse of prisoners is taking _place. As a concomitant of this, of course, the police would not abuse prisoners. Also, a matter ·which should be considered is the p ssibility _of holding neighborhood courts for bendable and I •. . recognisance offenses in an effort to keep the jails to a normal population. The implementation of this recommendation would be difficult; however, we might even go so far as to have the basements of schools utilized during periods of crisis for the purpose of having a judge set bond and for the pu~pose of having representatives of the several bonding companies present. In addition to schools, perhaps other public buildings located near the areas would be permissible for this type of situation. As above set forth, one of the grave problems concerning the aftermath of riots is that in very few instances have prosecutions which ensued as the resul:t of riots been successfully carried forward to conviction. We feel that this shortcoming might in part be attributable to lack on the part of policemen of knowing what state or local laws are violated in a riot situation. To this end, it is our thinking that a representative of the SolicitorGeneral!s office, the Solicitor of the Criminal Court of Fulton -· , " County and the City Attorney, acting as a team, make lectures or talk s to the polic e force in ord er to refamiliarize th em with �what does in fact constitute criminal activity in this area. Also, it is respectfully requested that the poiice begin using photographic equipment a~d motion _pictures in order that proper demonstrative evidence might be used by the prosecution for the conviction of people who violate the law in this type of situation. No recommendation is made with respect to bonding inasmuch as it is our opinion that the criterion rlready est~b1ished by the several judges of the Municipal Court are sufficient. . �I· t..-'-,.-·--f-{ ~-~ . ..._- 1 ,t-P.. r.' , . . ,!-.:... - ~ _.,___ ~ '--,.l. . I· • • ._,_ • i /'. -~--C- -'- \ - .. ~ • C ITY HAL L April 1, 1 968 .I A T LANTA , G A. 3030 3 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLE N, JR ., MAYOR CEC IL A. ALE XANDER , Chairma n Housi ng Resources Committee MA LCO LM D. JON ES Housing Coo rd inator The Honorable I van Al len, J r., Nayor City of A tla.rita Ci ty Hall Atlanta , Georgi a 30303 Dear Mayor Allen : Pursuant to y our directive of I-:arch 1 9, 1968 pertaining to a ction to be t aken by City Departr;-icnts and Public A3encies in implementation of the U. s. Riot Cor,rrnission a.ep ort , ui th special emphasis on Chapters 10 and 1 7 , t he p ortion on " Housini' , specifically assigned to the Housing Resources Committee i s hereuith subr:!i tts d , for file Hi th the Ea;;-or 1 s Office and the Advis0ry Cormnittee on Civil :Gisorclers . Attention is call ed to my initial l etter report of Earch 22 , 1 96~ copy a ttached (r.ncl.l) . A more detail ed report uor::...Ced up by the Housing Coorclinator and r eviewed by t his Corr!IT'i t t ee ' s Consultant, and with whi ch I 6 enerally concur is attached ( Encl.2). Sincerely , p / .. //,J / 0 .,,;'.,. · .---:':,-: .:-· . =// • /l_ ,-_e " / v (Jv ,'d . .·-~·-;::- cfl #: i,.-k ,• '° · v' , r. Cecil A. Alexander , C'nairman Housing ~es ourcc.s Cor.unitte e En els: Co:;:iy of l etter c:.ate d Var ch 22 , 1968 Repor t de veloped by- rfous ing Coordinator ,,. -1 • .4~ ;_;.; -~- ---143.215.248.55"':-- .._~-- �. Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal lfo.rch 22» 1968 The Honorable Iv.-.n Allen, Jr., tayor COPY City of Atlanta AtlDnta , Georg i2 Dec:r Ivan : In c:innecti.c•n with th e foplcmenta.tion of th e hous i ng phase of t he Riot I,cpol:·t, \ :e sug3est tl-;e foJ.loi:ing: 1 . A p e rt;onal le:ttr~x' frorn you to all developcr•s w!io 1:c::ve not hro}~en grour,G UP5 i r,s; th c,rn to get r.10ving . Colone l Jon es c an supp ly you ,-: i t h tLe m :~-;C:s . COPY 2. Call en tte Al~c1~1~nic Loar~ to r evise th e City Buildi~f Coc.e to confor·;:i .:ith t ~e Fc:t ion.J. l ?uildinz CoJ 0, t~iw; u ,ablh'ig les s expt:1:sivc co1~:-;tructi c n. 3. As k th e Atla nt« Eousin?, Autho~'ity to t c-iKG 1, 000 of tr:e unit s 110 ;1 to b;:: c:ev'9l o;-i"'d l:,y t r,c turi"iL'-"Y proc ess and r ev8:i:'t to the old m€:thod of buildinr, t nc.:i u t1i;,z, t ;-,e Autho1·it:y. It is in t1~e a!'~a of pu::ilic Lous inz vnit.:; t~:at ;.;e .rirc behinc. your s c~1·2dule . 12nd u ~c :112.n to '"irlcluTell as distribution on s:,-:c?J_ler scattered sites , is ver-J i-iOrth)' of' encoura:;er:1ent , in or der to 6et a·.·ay fro::: the i nstitutional i l'la ;; e of Publ i c Housing_. In f a ct it :,roulc. be verf hel?ful i .f t he Housine AuttJri ty ,,ould elininate all of i ts si gns a t the entrances to projects advertizing to the public in e ffe ct t hat "this ._is a l ow r ent ?e derall:r subs i di zed housing proj ect". Emph2.sis in t he rep ort on applic ation of the Hou~i ng Code in subs tandard and depress ed aTea s is ver~: a ppropriate , however ·the f eatur e that could be most effective, and which has b een most n e ~lecte d in Atlanta, is not r:ient ioned; that is tenant r esponsi bility . Thi.s shou ld and must be s tressed conti nous1..,v J in order to ge t more ef.fe c ti ve r es ults fro :-1 the Housir\ :; Cocie . All 1~0A 1'-~ei ghborhood Centers should pronote classes i n hous e~eeI)ing wd propert y maintenance by occupants of r ental housing , Instruction in this f i eld s hould b e ins ti tuted J perhaps at ni ght , to -,::1ich class e s t he Housing Court c oal.cl , senten ce minor offen de rs to att end a :orescriced n umber of s ess ions ) in l J.eu of monetary fi nes or jail sentences f or co de viola t i ons , in a sir-,2.l ar r;-iari..ner to the procedure no:r being practi ced i n Traffic Court of sentencing minor offe nder s to attend sessfor.s in Tra.f.;'.'i c 3chool. �.) T\1e cle anup of premis es, effe ct ing commer cial and indus tr i a l, as uell a s r esi dential proper t i es , i s a nother i mporta nt factor in improving tho ghe t t os . The condition of premis e s should g o hand in ha.nd ui th Hous ing Code enforcement, · whe t her it is dire cte d b? the Sanit ary Dep ar t ment or the Eousing Code Insp ectors. It is quite futile to i mprove the living conditions of a di,ielling unit a nd not require the i mmediate pr elfliscs and surroundin~ areas to b e cle an e d up and kept clean., ·espe cially in the gh_ettos . Similarly , it is usel~ss to improve a res idential property and l eave t he commercial or industrial p1·ope-;ties· in the same vicinity in I a dis;:;raceful and di sreput nbl e condition. Atlanta n eeds badly a Commercial and Industrial CocJ.e, just as it I1as a Housing Code. Some of the mor e pro~ressive citi e s have s uch code s today. The enablinr; . legi s l a tion r e cen t l y a douted which author i z ed Atlanta'°s "In Hem" Ordinance .· providing for moving directly a ga inst dilapidate d re s idential properties i nstead of, in the traditional manner, a gainst the owners, for violation of the Hou.sine Code, also authoriz e s such action a gainst· poorly ina i ntai necl comrnercial and indust rial e s tablis hments ·as , rell. . ' All tha t is n e eded i s a local irnpler,1enting Or dinan ce • In order to pr ovide and encourage much de s ired home ovm ershi p among low-income famili e s, a spe cial singl e family z oning district should be adopted 1-:hich would p er mit con struc tion of .s i n ~l e f amily home s of 720 squar e f eet or larger on lots having a maximum area of .S ,000 square feet, i-rith a minimum front ~a:::e of 50 1 • This would provide ample ar ea. tor lm-r-int..;OH18 sin;:;l e f amily hous es and would provide incr e a s e i n t he density by 50~; and r e duce the cos t of lots by 33 author iz e d by the Cllr r er.t applicable =t-5 1/y; fr or,1 that now single family r esidential zoning district. It is r e qormnended tha t some neH loi,r-income developme nt be iniated as s oon a s possi bl e t :ti s su.'Tu",1er in the l-1odel Ci ties area , by s el e cting a t l eas t one limited area ( pe rhaps four city bl ocks ) in the he ar t of the mos t dilapidat e d p ortion of the area and obtaining authority fr om the Fe deral governm,,nt to acquire the land t hrough an a dvance a cquisit i on proces s, s imilar to the manner in whi ch lci.nd for t he Audit or ium and Civic Center . Fas acquired, and t urning it ove r to the Housin g Authori t y, or thr oueh expedite d s ale to private enterprise to·cl.ev elop . It is a l s o r e commended tha t i niati on of devel opment o f' a t l e a s t . a por t i on of t he Feder a.l Prison s i t e be e:x:pe di t ed f or s t art i ng cons tru ction t his ·s urmrier of l owi ncone housing by pri vate enter pri se . I' I �SllI'u'-:ER YOl.:TH OPPOl~Tlf?HTY OGR.AH . ---·---·----·-----... --.- --Pt~ - ---------- VIN~ CITY FOUNDATION J r oi~_ct Re cre.:i t i on Pl ug_- I _J2 Thi s i s a pi l o t er,1 p l oy.-..-1ent p rogram des i gne d t o u t ili ze 11 ind i genous te e nage youth age s 16-2 0 t o se r ve as con~ unit y r ecreetion organ i zers . Th e you th Re crea tion Orga,1izcrs will recruit ; organize , p l an , 2n d supervise 10 othe r teenagers e a ch t o prov id e . pl anned s urr:rne r r ecreat i on on a 24 h our bas i s . Th e pro j ec t wi l l l as t for 11 weeks . $13,718 Budge t Re quest ~-- ( , J j C; ; OF L lBRARlANSllIP Stor_____ y Te ll_ _____ i ng. - Courses ___ - ----- - -·- . Thi s edu cat i ona l p ro gr am i s de s i gne d to pr ov id e e ff ec i cncy fo r S tor y Te ll er to be u se d duri ng th e s un~e r i n v a ri ous r e cr ea tio n pr og r ams . Th e pro j e ct will prov i de 12 cours es u t ili z i ng 20 enro ll ees f or a 8 \,Jee k pe riod . Du r a tio n - 8 wee k s . Budget Reques t ., $2 ,9 79.50 �I - -7BUTLER STREET Y1'-!CA The pr ogram p:i,· oposes to emp loy 5 youth in suarne r r es ident c amp as ca bin c ounselors , kitche n h e l pers and as main ten an ce pe rs onne l. The program will p rovide camp exper i ence f or 300 youth be t we en t he ages of 7-1 6 . Ac tiv i ty will include mus ic, paint i ng , dr ama , and a tutori a l progr am . Durati on - 3 week s . Bud ge t Request $19 , 352.72 Edu cat i on and Eme.l oyr::e nt A work- study s eminar to be c onducted at r es i dent c amp f or 12 h igh schoo l graduates fro ~1 poverty b ackgr ounds. The act i v i ty of t he s eminars wi ll consi s t of i nforma ti on that wou ld be app li cable to college e ntrance , d i scuss i on on curr en t socia l events , e t c . Duration o f pr oj e ct - 12 weeks . Budge t Reques t $1 2 , M9 . 82 Work In.c e nt ive Demons t r at i.on_ Progr am Thi s pro j e ct i s des igned t o serve 100 men bet,,;een t he ages of 16-21 in a work i ncent i v e p r ogran wi th the hope o f emp l oymen t a fter c ompl et i on of t he pro j e ct . Dura ti on - 2 weeks . Budge t Re quest $11 ,0 18 . 59 Camp __I mprove::1e nt Pro j e c t Th is e mp loy1,1en t progr am is d es i gned t o u t il i ze 90 you t h between the ages of 16- 21. The youth wi ll be i mrn l ve d i n 3· weeks of c amps it e i mprover.,ent of the Butler StreE;t Y.'·iCA ' s Lake All a toona Campsite . Activ iti es will in c lude wi11t e riz a tion of existins c amp structures , l ands ca pi ng a nd water front i mproveMen t . Eudgct Requ e st $17, 780 . 9 2 __ ___ _____ _ _______ .. e_ nd e d _S,~fr,_min,; Ext , ....:. To prov ide s ,.-1irn,'.ling activHi es fo r some 19 5 boys and g irls be t,,:ee n th e ages of 7··16. Durat i on 12 week s . $I:., 12 9 . 8 0 Bud get R2que s t So c-------i a l Re cr ea -Te--e nage - -- -·--- tion Thi s p ro g r a:n wi ll a tt empt t:o ful f ill th e rec r e a ti o n nee d s o f 60 0 youth b.2t1-,-?C' n tl e 2gcs of ] !'.;- 1 8 . Ac ti.vi t i.e s c o,1s i st.i.ng o f sw i ;ii.mi.n g , d ~c :i_r,2. ) orts C: cr 2 fl~, s ] ic:!c pr c-sc .: 1_r1.li 0n s :: s i n ~~ i il~~, c1 21:.c in.~~ :: r~L~ d · t a l cnt sllo·.-~s ·..' i U be c a r r i C'Cl on f or 12 1-;c"ks . �-8- DEKALB Yi·:CA . Kirkwo od Swj rnrn ing Cl as s This pr ogra,n will pr ov i de s wi n-~n in g act i viti es for 50 you t h ag e s 7-12 in scho o l. Du ra tion - approx i ma t e ly 12 we eks. Bud get Requ e s t $607 . 50 WORKSHOPS n :C:OR? ORATED This proj ect will pr ov i de a numbe r of plays for r e c r ea t ion a l prog r ams thro ughou t th e city. Budge t Re qu e st ACADEHY THEATRE Circu s This pro z r am i s des i gn e d to provi de s m:1.e of th e r e c re a tion a l n ee ds of Atl a nt a you th be twee n th e ages 5-11. The Ac a de,.ry wil 1 I pro du c e fi ve s h ows (Ci r c us ) pe r we ek for a si x we ek pe ri od. The Theat r e c a n h and l e 180 kids pe r performan ce . Bud ge t Req ue s t $39,361 ROYAL KNI GHTS FOliN DATIO~~ Thi s pr ogram h op e s to prov id e tu to ri a l, and cu l t u r a l e nr i chmen t pro g r ams in c lu ding ty ping , r e a d in g , b ase ba ll, f a s h i on s hows and et c. f or 600-700 yout h age s 5- 20 . Budg e t Re que s t $9,000 SUN-·HEC NEIGHBORH OOD EO.\ CE)lTER He cli c>.n_i_c sv il_l c_ Sti r:s7e r Pr o i ec t - Edu cc'.t io n;:i.1. Thi s pr ogram wil l be ope r a t e d ou t of t he Pry o r Str eet Sch oo l. Re c reat io n 2.nJ educ a tio n n 2eds dur i ng t he sur,I,12r mon th s . Large amo unt of yout h to be hi red . Ci t y Scho o l s do i ng about t he same . The pro j ec t will ru n 3 mo n t hs . Bu dget Req uest �- 9,- NASH HAS!-!INCTO,~ NEIGH nORl[OOD, EOA CE~iTER Keen Teens Program t o Hor k wi th h a rd core yout h . Youth work ing wi t h you t h. Clean u p c rews , r e cruit i ng for othe r pr oj ec t s , etc . Good proj ect - h igh emp l oyme n t . Budget Re ques t YOUNG HEN' s CI VIC LEAGUE, n ic, Thi s u niqu e \-!Ork-rec r ea t i on pro j e c t wi ll u t ili ze 200 youth a nd young adu l t s , ma l e and f ema le a ges 16~21 in a prog r am t o u pg r a de t he ir COiT'muni ty . Act i v i t i e s will i n c l ude cl e an ing stree t s , al l e ys , empt y l ots , an d r oden t c ont ro l. Budge t Re ques t Ui'1- MEC NEI GHBORHOOD EO.-\ CE~TER A c on preh ens i ve enp loyme n t , r ecrcc1.t i on, e duc a t i on , and cu lt u ra l pro j e c t t o serve 20, 000 you t h 1.1a l e a nd fema l e of a ll a ge s i n th e Sur.-,Me c Area . Activiti es will i ncl ude t u tor i a l, t yping , fi l mst rip s , dr ama , •couns e l i ng , fie l d ·t r ip s , etc . Bud ge t Re ques t NORTJ-ll·JE ST YOU;\;G HEi'l CIVIC AS SOCIATION Th i s p rog r am i s des i gne d t o serve s ome 7, 000 t eenage an d young adu lt s age s 13- 25 in a mu lti-purpos e you t h pr ogr am . Th e pro gr am wi ll e~ pl oy a number of i ncli ge nou r youth and young adu lts . Act i vi ti e s wi ll i n c l ud e l e ctu r es , t ou r s , youth foru ms , deve l o~~e nt o f you t h bus i n ess , gene r a l sp or t s ( i n doo r a nd out o f doo rs , a nd creat ive games . Bud ge t Re ques t . NORTH~EST P~RRY EOA CE~TER " Sock It To He " An e;npl oyi,1e;1t pro j e ct des i gnc,d t o serve 1,000 ma l e a nd fema l e age s 13- 25 in a n i n ten s i ve pr ogram of tr a i ning and c oun3e l ing . Lead t eenaiers and profc ~;s i or,2. l s ,.-::i 11 1-.' ork wit h t eenagers ,-.,ho h c>.ve no work histo ry as " peer Group Coui, se l or s . Du r a t i on of p ro j ect -ap pr ox i mate l y 12 wee ks . Budge t R e ques t �-10 WEST CENTRAL EOA NEIG!lBO Rl IOOD CENTER Summe r Activjt i es Pr o~am .j A r e cr e a tiona l, educa t i onal , cultural enr ichme nt pro gram will serve appi:ox ima t e l y 5,400 persons of all ages . Emp lo yi ng - ~ ---·youth in divers ifi e d jo bs . Activi t i es for thi s pro gr am will i n c lud e indo or and ou t of door r ec r ea tion , arts and cr afts , h eads t ar t , trip s to int erest in g p l aces , nei[:;hbor hood cl ean up s . Dur ation - app rox ima tely 11 weeks. Bud get Req ues t COLLEGE PARK CIVI C At\lD ED"' CAT IONAL CLll B, IN C. Thi s r ec r e at i ona l and educat iona l will serve a pproximate l y 9,000 youth both ma l e a nd f ema l e of al l a ges who r es ide i n l ow-income communiti es . The proj e ct: wi ll uti li ze 60 poor youth as yo uth ass istan t s and 9 young ad ults. Ac ti viti es for th e proj ec t: will in c lud e spor ts , a rts and cr afts , d ai ly persona l grooming , tri ps and excur s ion s , ce rami cs and divers i fied pl ayground progr aas . Durat i on - 12 weeks . Bud ge t Request EAST POINT 'RECREATION DEPARTNENT Thi s pr oj ec t will cove r th e fou r t ar ge t areas in th e city . It i s des i gned t o mee t .th e r ec r eat i ona l n eeds o f 5,000 pe r so ns of a ll ages . Th e p r oj e ct wil l employ 8 you th and young adu lt s fr om each of th e are a blo cks . Activiti es wi ll in clude sports , pl aygroun d activit i es , arts and .c rafts , .cer am i cs , sewing , pers on a l h ygiene and gro omi ng , trip s and excusio ns , te e n programs , s enior citi zen pr ogram , s wi nnn i ng and prE' ·· :,choo l pro~;:- 2ms . Du rati on 8 weeks Bt1d ge t Reques t EDGEWOOD KEIGHBOilllOOD EOA CENTER . Sun1rre r Cr::is.1 Re crt.:a l:io n Pr o j qct Thi s u nique pilot pr o j ec t wil l utili ze six youth fro m the ar e a t o work with n2 nt a l1.y r e t arde d ch i l dren . The pro j ect wi ll ser ve 24 me nt a ll y retard e d chi 1.cl ren by p1·oviding d a iJ y rne nt.a l and physic a l a ct i vit i es . Dura t ion - 9 wects . Bud g e t Rcq tie s t .... �-11 - H. R. BUTLER SQ!OOL A compr e he nsive employme nt , re c r eat iona l, edu cat iona l and cul t ural program des i gne d to emp loy a numbe r of youth and young a du l ts for the pur po se of supe rvising g roup activiti e s . The program will serv e a t otal of 500 pe rs ons ages 6-25 . Activ i t i es fo r t his program will include tu t or i a l in r ead i ng and gr ade i mprove me nt , arts and cr afts , Negro hi s tor y , s t ory hou rs , d ance instruction, s port s , playground activities , t r ips and swinrn ing . Duration 10 weeks . Budge t Requ es t EMMAUS HOUSE A unique program de s i gne d to t ak e 100 boy s and gir l s in th e Peop l estm-m-SurrJnerhill area to J e ky l l Is l and for one week i n an at tempt to r ep l ace a slum setting wi t h a ne,nor a b l e experience of a wor l d th e y h a ve never kn 01-m . Act i v iti e s fo r t h is prog ram ui l l inc lude r e cre a tion and couns e ling . After r e turn ing , t hese youth wil l be eng ijgcd in a 7 we ek r eme di a l r eading p ro g r am. Duration - 8 we eks . Bud g et Re ques t GWINNETT COUNTY EOA A compre he ns i ve emp l oyment, r e c r ea t i on , educat i on and cultur a l e ~ richment prog r a m to s e r ve about 6 7 000 youn g chil dr e n , both ma l e and f ema l e . Th e pr o j e c t wi ll empl oy 20 t e e n l eade r s to be di vid e d arnoung t11 e four ce nters. Prnj ec t activi ti es wi ll in c lud e field trips , pers ona l hy g i e ne , s ewing classes , cl as s e s in water and hun ti ng s afety , fir s t aid , body c are , dr a na , a nd mu sic a l g~o up s . Dur a tion ap prox i ma t e l y 10 wee ks : Bud ge. t Reques t WEST END r; EJGf·!RORH OOD EOA CENTER. Thi s e mpl oyrac n t , r e crea t i on a l a nd cul t u ra l e nr i chn~ n t program i s de s i gne d t o se r ve a nuITilie r o f y outh in th e 2i ea . TI~ p ro j ec t will e mp loy a numbe r o f yout h to d oordin a tc and s u pe r v i s e r e cre ationa l a nd enr i chme nt prog ra-s1s ( ages 17 -1 8 ) . Activ ities wil l i nc l ud e base b a 11 , bas k e l" b t! 11 , v o 1 1 y ~1 a l. J , s o c c e r , s t o r y h o u r s , a n cl t r i. p s . ·Dur a ti on - 13 ,,1ee ks . Bud ge t Re ques t ~-. �-1 2JOHN HOPE SCHOOL " Proj ect l:!_R li ft The p roject ~ill provi de education and recreationa l activities for 300 youth , young ad ults, and Sen i or Citi zens . The proj ec t will employ 15 j unior l eade rs (1 6-21) fr om th e area to provide l eade rship for child ren , yout h and Se nio r Citi zens . Activ iti es wi ll inc l ude Negro hi s t ory , bas ic educat i on i mproveme nt, tours , arts and c rafts , d ance , S':-Jiff,ming , sports, movi es , tr ack a nd fi e ld even ts , and i n s tru mcnta l musi c . Durat ion - 8 weeks Bud ge t Req ues t EDGE~OOD NEIGHBOfillOOD EOA CENTER Ed___gewoocl - _East Lake Youth SuCT'~, 1er_ Recrea t ion P~g,2::am Thi s summe r r ecreat io na l progr am wi ll serve ab ou t 500 youth o f all a ges . Act j v itie s will i nc lude - s ewi ng , crafts, stamp co ll ecting , guit ar l ess i ons , pi ano l cssions , d ~nce , wood work , and sports . Dur ation - ap prox i ma t e l y 9 weeks . I Bud get RL:: J-!..c'.}p_ f' ;_~SY.I-~:!.:' -· S-urn:ner scl;c,cls w i 11 be c.-::nduc-t-ecc; .~LP1_::,ib l,c-m..., $ t:-u~.!.St~.· TttE. Yc.-uth C uncil, v : tT: ..;:;u s Bo a r ds o f Education a n d o t Ler c- ,:Y:nmu;iit:y g r·uu ps w:i. 1 1 a n d a re W{(T.'k:~_r,g n p rojects that will h e lp s chc .:, ls deal wi.t.h s u:-h pn-'bl ems as absent:E:e.sm, :i.• corri.gi bi.lity, over age prc,moti c.:: , dr.::pc,1.1ts, p r:"'s:na't?cies, emo ti onal dis t:urbances , ment al health, a n d te ach Er- pu p Jl r e lati onships, Pre s ently , the Youth C unc il is c o op n .at:i::1 g w it__ Arhm ta Uni.versit:y , EOA, Fa.m:i.ly Counseling Center , the Cc·v:n ~·y Wel f B.te, The AtJ.a r,te. Board o f Educa ti on and several oth er' groups i n _a pl.l · ,t: ab sE•.:-Ltf:e.ism p ro j e.ct, T'he Atla:r1ta Board of Educa.t:i.cr:1 :i.s pl anc.i.ng s ever-a l pn:,j e e:ts with var:L c us grou ps that wi.11 h a ve a si.g::-;_ i.f:.i.ca.r,t i.:np:3.c t: ---·n the.:i. r p r oblems. 7. Ed uc a tj.s.n..,2~1.b- ~ . The May ·Jr ' s Co nc:i.l n Ye; 1th Opportunity has orga nize d a sub-c ornm:U_:t 8e •-n edu cation . This c omra:i. t: tee i.s chaired by Mrs. Be t:Ly Cant c,::1 . Recreat ion, S9c i ~ C:.i l t:ura l Pr·c_g ra:ms A. Intr due:ti0n ~ Th ere. axe. appr0xLma ;·e l y 500,000 c hi. ldrE.:1 and youth i n. Greater Atlan ta. Most of thes e w:i.11 b e s e.e.ld.ng wa ys t: .:, sp e n d their s urrcr.e r leisure. time, Unfortunately, th e. L i.ck c,f r·ecrE::1.·.1~·:_.a.J a:1d i.:1 f o rmal e du ca.tic,:1.::1.l programs are most ac-ut:e 1.n the. p cvc> r.·ty c i.::rrrnu::d.t:i.es . Rea l :L zing th e g t ·eat nee d and shortage of whc· 1es ome r-ec re.at:i.0:-~:3. L a ct '.vit::i.e s year:-rou:.'J.d , t he va.ni. ·.i s Parks and Recreation De.p a.rtme'.1.t , The p1:ibl ic scho_ ls an d l i b rari es, t he arts group , the EOA Neighb orh ood Se r" .ice Ccr te r s, t~.e Che s t a.gencies and s eyeral youth groups have pl 3.nne d a ppr·cnd:ma. t: ely 68 p n .j ec t·s. The s e pro j ects c.c:nb :i.ne recr eation, edue:ati oa and e.wp l0yrrten t. Ma..'.'·. y ,f the s e wi 11 b e y ~-u t:h ma·ri.a.ge d and operated. �1. To provide me aningfu l recreat ional l eis ur e time and cultura l activities for n e edy children and· youth. 2. to 3. To pr-c-vi d e a we ll r. ou:td e d , well organized, and very inclusive rec- re aU o:-;&°!. pr-:-gr af!l. 4. T0 p r ·, i. d e. p rc,g r o.m3' t :1at significantly involve youth in plann ing, · opera.'.:i..::,:1 &r:d .,,-.,alu at i oo1 proces s es . pr ovide such a c tiviti e s at hours and places suitab l e to the n ee d s, int erest, a n d c onvi e nt to the youth to b e served . Th e g oa l is ·o pro v ide available recrea tional and /or l ei.sure. t i:'le ac u .,.1it l.e s i.~1 a~n:-1:ict of f requency and di.stance. I t wou ld b e i 1. '.: ~re s : .L:'. 3 t o l1 rie fly summa r i ze th e recreation a l asp e cts o f the Youth Op p ortu ~ i..ty Pr,, g ra=i. A t r,.,; 1 of 35 proposa l s wil 1 b e p r opose d. Th e f e d era l budge t requ e st on ~h e se pr0 p c s al s to tal $600,000. An i n t e gr al pa r t of t h e r ecre a t i ona l-cultural aspect · o f th e p r ogram wi ll b e resid en t a.~ d d cty c. cc 1p :..i:1.g p r u gr-a-,-ns. Effor t was mad e to incre ase the numbe r of day an d r e sid en t c amp sl ts c1·: a ~.l al:::l2 t o p o or c hild ren and youth. Pres e n t ly s l o ts are a v a i l abl e fo r 2 , 538 y :..:t.'~; L r e s i d e-::1t a ~ d d ay c amp ac tivities . in thi s p r o g r ara . Ma r,y· a g e n-· ci.e s a r e r:iaki.n g ;ra·: :y , f t1)c>. ir r egu l a r s umme r _ c amp s lots a v a il a bl e to poo r y outh . Thes e include t h e Bey SccrJ s , G:f.r l Sc ou ts, Camp Fire Girls, YMCA and YWCA, Be thl ehem Cen te r s, etc. Thes e orgaci. za ::i -,r;s wi l l provide d a y and r e sident camp for non~memb e rs . In addit ion the City f Ad ci:-, ·_-:1 Re cre a t ion De p ar t ment will operate c a mp i n g p r o g r am . The J ewis h C-::,:n:.-nu n ily Ce :: t c r wi ll m~ke its d a y c amp faciliti e s ava ila ble t o gro ps o f poor y o".ltli ::t.r. .:;·· gh ·-- t·. t h e s :.i.:rr..i .e r . 1: 1 a Ma n y yovhi wl ll s p e e d ~~ek a n d c e~p i ng t r ips at the State a n d Na tio na l Pa k s. Equa lly a s Li,p _.., r.t· ::i:,--; t: i s t he f a ct t h a t th e se proj ec ts will e mploy app roxi ma t e l y 1,000 poor tE. e :;:i~c. -:-·s a ·::d y c,:: .. g a du l t s. B. Qee. a :: i :ri a. 1 Or i9::· ~- 2-2. t Lc--:1s Th e C.:. " y 0 f Atl.s\'l ta Ps:ir.-k s, Re crea tion and Sc ho o l De p artmen t s wi ll carry t he rr.a j c r re sp ..:i-:.s :.::i.l i t y f o r the re c reat iona l p rogram . I n a dd it i on , t h e ci t i e s u:f Ea.s t l1clnt, a ;:1d R::is ewl l will pr ovi d e s p e cia l r e creati ona l p r g r a::i.s. The U::-d t e. d App ea l Age;;.cie s, t h e EOA Neighb orh ood Se r v i ce Ce n ter s, ,;,ri.d seve r. a l c cr:!f'.,U.'.1 -i t_y b a se d y ou t h a nd young adu l t gr oup s wi ll p r ovi d e s p e ci a l p r og r a:::,s . -5~ �The :;,':::m:'.' ers 2.:-.d ass c•ci at E -.:1e ..-:1::iets o f t:l: e Ar cs C'c•U'::.c .U wl.1 1 p r o v:f.. dE me.a:1 :: 1.-:gful a r·t a.n d cu l t u. ra. l p r c g r :in~ s. r-,: c r-d er c<· s :1 pp lE:::..e:1 :: t he se p r · 6 ra::.:s, s e·,·e. r d l b ..rn::.:-..e ss:r.E.·; c a-:: d wc,2e n &s well as s t. '/ E: ~3. l c. l u : • gr ou ps wi l l p r --v~.d•:. s p e c. ia. 1. p :cagr.a:'.1!s o f recr e a ti c' .. , f,:: r ·r.ee d e d c:~11.ld r e~~ a:-Jd y cu t h . C. kg,u1pldc. Spr e a d Ir~ a dd i.c.L.::,n to p l a-:.1 ::,1 6 c ri2 at:;_ve .s..r1.d ~,,::,.:;•;-,:i t Lv2 p r vg r-::1.:::is ? e,--.::,r y eff r t w.i'. 11 b e ma d e t o s p r E-a ~ i. he prc•j ects ge:..0 g r s.pr, f. c a i l y . Fr o je c ·: s a r:e h e 1.'::.g pl ann e d t .:, bE d ::.s ~.r :;.b· · te: d as f 11 ws t:1:.r ,:,:.igb :.,u ;: t~te ~:a rgct: a. r c':8. S : l- •o Se~~ r"·-'. r-e -, (:--....0 ·--,1. •i..- t:.L - ._ '" S N ""l ._g1-1bor . - u· u.:/... ~ c 0 0 _....,- Cent ra l Ci.t y Cc~t er East Cen t r a So t.h F\lJl t c ::1. Ea s t P0 i ~ t RE cr e ition C ile 6 e P::ir k Rec re.at i. a n Ce ~ te r Are a Bl ck " E" Cab" a 6 e Tew•• You th DE:: ,1 e 1 .:-pme-n t Ce , .te.r t Sum~M1:c c CE~ '- e r Young Me·2, 0 s Ci v ".c le a.g;u.e M2 ch aLi c s v~. 1 1 e P r ~j e c t Ed g ew o o d Ce:1t:e r M b -U e Vay Ca.:~,p NLr t hwe s t PEr: r ~/ Iic:ne s CE:_. te r Young Me ~ 0 s C~v ! c Ass o cia t i n Men ~a ] ly Retard e d DeKa lb " Y11 We.s t Ce n t'ral Ce·2t- e. .r Na s h - Wa s :11.::-.'.5 tc: Ce r. t e r We s i: Er d Ce:; t.c- :: North Fu l t0. Cent e r Gw l n!le t t C0u~ t J Pi ttsh · r g Ce1 t~ r Price Ce r. t er Ce 1t.r :1 l YMCA Sa l vat i.c , . A n r,y ( See Ct, 1t ra l Cit y ) B:u. tl er S tn:, E. t" " _' ! At ] n l 3 Gi rls ° Cl u b Gr a d y H.::-.:nEs , 1. rls ' Cl t; b At: l an. t.:,. Ur b3.:1 L"·ag e Boy Sc i_: t: s Met1·0po l i t a ~ B· y s ° C"ub We sl ey C ;r.;nt: n 1.t y Ce·:. t er- s Gir l Sc cu cs ... , -6 ~ �N. W. Perry Area - 17 sep ara t e Youth Oppor tunity Pr ogr am activiti e s; t wo are pr iva tely sponsored (Viking , Ne i ghborhood Serv ice Center) and the other fif t e en are sponsored by the City. These include five schools and ten rec r ea tiona l projects,including play1e t s and school grounds. West Central - Ther e will be 21 : sep arate a ctivities planned. Two are private ( Neighborhood Service Center and Chur ch of Master s), and 19 are city-sponsor ed projects - seven school and 12 rec r ea tiona l activ ities. Na sh Washing ton - There wi ll be 21 separat e activities, five being pr iva te (Neighbor hood Se r vic e Center, Roya l Kn i gh t , Vine City, Ralph Robinson Boys' Club, Ge orge Washing ton Carve r Boys ' c i ub). Six teen are sponsor ed py s even schools and nine rec reationa l activities. Central City - The r e are eleven separa te activities pl ann ed, four privately sponsore d (Centra l City Neighborhood Ser vice Center, Bellwood Sa lva tion Army Boys' Club, Centra l YMCA, Central YWCA). Seven a r e city sponsor ed - fiv e school and two recrea tion. East Centra l - Ther e a r e 38 separa te activities planned, nine pr ivate and 29 city. The public activities represent ten schools and 19 recreat iona l activiti e s. The priva te pr ojects a r e the Atlanta Youth Development Center, Area Block 11 E11 , Mennonite House, Gra dy Homes Girls' Club, Grady Home s Boys' Club, Butler Street YMCA, Cabbage Town, Vista, and S. E. Branch Girls Club . • Edgewood Area - Ther e a r e t wenty s epa rate a ct i vities. Seven are priva t e ly spons or ed, thes e by Ne ighbor hood Service Cen t er , DeKalb YWCA, Ea stside Boys' Club and Eastside YMCA. The public are seven school s and six r e creation centers. Sum-Me e - The r e are 23 s e pa r a te activities, fou r are priva tely sponsor ed, (Neighbo r hood Se rv ice Center, Young Men 's Civ ic Lea gue, Mechanics ville Adv i sory Boa rd and Wa r r en Memor i a l Boys' Club). Ther e are 19 pub lic pr oj e ctssix schools and 13 rec r e a t i ona l pr oj e cts : Price - The r e a r e t wenty pr ojects, fou r priva te. They are Emaus Ne i ghbor hood Serv ice Center , Be thl ehem Center and Grady Homes Girls' Club (Carve r Unit). There are 16 city -- seven schools and nine rec reationa l activiti es. Pit ts bu rgh - In the Pi ttsburgh area , th ere are f ive s epara t e act ivi t ies , one being pr i va t e (Neighb orhood Servic e Center), four by city - one s chool and three re creati on centers. South Ful ton - There are six pr oj e c ts , f ive private ly spons ored and one pub l i c . The private are t wo Neighborhood Service Centers , Coll ege Park Civi c Club , South Fu l t on Boys ' Cl ub, and Tr i - City Girls ' Club. The pub lic proj ec t recreation program i s spons ored by t he City of East Point. North Fulton - There are two activities, one private and one public. The private is Neighborhood Service Center and the publ ic is by t he City of Roswe l l. Rockdale County Area~ One activity s ponsor ed by the Rockdale Neighborhood Service Center. ., �e ,,-,,.)---e /'\,v . Pub l i. c ~Ag1:.nc L!=~S: · V:i~e Cit.y f o:rn d ::i.t:i c,n E:mm,E,U S H::,use Royal K!,igh t s Ra d io S tat fo:·, WACK An i.nt.e g r·al p a r t .:;f t·h c Y ·u t h Opp c n ud t y Pr ;:;gr""!I' wi ll be t o m::i.ke 3 v ery· specia l eff._,rt: t c, get E.\·e r y ycti. Lh pos s -:.ble , xegarole s s f whether or r,o '.: they are w,_'r ~·- ·:rig, gc.in g ~:c sch col , or j u s t i dl -Lng t:hi s s ·;~rnr,er, t s en: E: h i s c o:r:q1.;:1. i.: y . You t:h Wt.11 b e ur g Ed t. 0 j .... i.,1 th e Summe r "Swi r-gers " Prog r a-:n . Th e y u th will b e u rge d to p artL c t pate a.s volunteer pE,rso,,ne l in a.genc· ie s ffer i.r::g re c- r e ::t ~i.,J:.1, e.d 1.1ca. t ion, emp l oyzient a:.1 d c>th e r se rvi c es. You. th wi.11 a l so b e urge d t o for:n you t h ac: t i.cn 5 r r,u p s 1.n t h eir ne i ghbor h o d s. They wi l l be inc l u de d in se ve-ra.l c. c:r:n.rn i t t (.e·s a nd g r. o'Jp s. Tee na ge rs a :•.d y c,ung ad •J lt~s will a l so b e. i :nc: l ud e d ,.,, t·'le m,;-, rt.:,r i ng a r.d eva l uati.c:i. staff of the p rog1. 3:'Jl. 3/· ~r ~ Pla.71s _ 8:nd Act:J:;,~sLe s Re s.:r.EJ:l9l~2.£ · Eff'ort' s w-U 1 b e rn':ld e t o re c r uit s E.vcra l lvJcd r e d vol 1Jnteers through s c h,__..:,1 , c- h urc~1E:s, r:.eigh b o r h ood g rcv ps a r:d 01:ga .0.i. z a.ti c~ s . Re cruit: = ment wi ll be by p e r scnal a pp ea.rac1ce , lE:,tter, b r o ch ures , r 3.:H o a::-td T. \T . app ea l s. Orie r:•.:a ti c_:9...,a nd Tr_g. i ·:1_: n_g,. I r:. l ate April, ar1 orie r~at?: t: 1.oa prcg r a m will b e s t:art.e d f o r all youth s i r:d:i.c G.t~ h g intere s t J n v-:.lu.'1.teE-::ri.-~1~,;, s crv: .1g on ccm~i.ttees, etc. Trainin g c f t hese p o ter,tial volu ::.cee:r:s wi.11 b e g i.ci u ear l y May . Tb€ ;.is e r a gencies will train the v o l un.reers. I":>e.y w.C 11 be a ssist:ed by t be Re d Cre ss , VlSIA, and ther similar crgan ·i za.U. ·:. s . .El~E:!E.tri.t • The p "i a c eme·, t. pr ocess w.Lll b e un der t a ke,·1 lJy the Yu th Opp o rt:•.ml.ty c, [f.i:.e:e , EOA, in c. .... t,pe r at i c n w· .th s eve r a. l ot 1e r age·.:-" tc'.es. Attempts wil l be made t o f L:1d s i.1 i.L B.ble place :uer:~ s 1.·o a ger c'ies where t:hey migh t have p oss-L b 1e v c c a ti'. ona l ch i- i. ··e s o r i a t e r e s t.. 0 A~ s . a. ,d _Inc e -~ l 1..' ;!'- S_. A very c ar·ef 11:y worke d cu t: awa rd s a rid :i nce~ti.ve p rc,g r 3:m wd l be de ve 1c pe d st c".d i.rr.plerr:ent.e d . Th ese wil1 i r;c1:.:;de ex~ cu rsion, an award di :1:-te t er r..i 6 ht, 11A volunt eer of t he. su::.mc r ' ' a.wa rd, a.:id a t e a. Eac h u s e.r. age~,cy will be u rged t:o pr ovid e s ·•.1i. table i · 1c e-r1U\-e p r o ~ grams f er t:h eir volurite:ers. =lrl �Public Sprons ored Pr o jec ts The publicly-spons ored projects cons is t of 62 schools (50 elementary schools and 12 high schools ), which wi ll be open twelve hour s daily and six days each week, concentrating on bas ic education ancl · educational programs. · It is estimated that approximately 30,000 children and youths will be involved in various types of remedial, advanced and specia l educational programs, including fo rma l surrrrner school. Upwards of 50,000 dis advantaged children and_youths will part icipa te in the 255 recreational pr ograms , The Atlanta Public Library is als o increasing its pr ogram activities. Program Activities Planned I. II. Public Agencies (a) City of Atlanta Parks, Recreation and Schools (1) Par ks , Playgrounds and Playlots - 31,000; (2) School Center s - 11,000; (3) Swimming (Re creationa l) - 15,800; (4) Evening Dances - 800; (5) Trips and Excursions - 15,300; (6) Athletics - 20,000 (b) Other Cities and Counties (1) Eas t Point; (2) Roswell; (3) Rockdale; (4) College Park Private Non-Prcfit Organiza~ions (a) (b) (c) (d) ( e) (f) (g) (h) (i) (j) (k) ( 1) III. General rec reation pr ogram - 24,585; Swimming ( recreational ) - 6,950 ; Trips and Excursions - 650; Teen Program ( evening) - 10,000; Cul tural and Arts Programs - 6,060; Game rooms (day) - 10,000; Record Hops and dances - 10,000; Day camps and resident camps - 1,608; Residen t camps fo r t eens - 300; Small group recrea tiona l activities - 312; Informal educationa l activities - 200; Community Impr ovement - 90 Neighborhood Ser vice Cen t ers , Citizens Groups, etc. (a ) (b) (c) (d) ( e) ( £) (g) Coupled recreation , work etc. pr ogram - 33,870; Swinnning instruction - 50; Trips - 1,000; Connnunity Impr ovement - 7,400; Dancing - 400; Tutorials - 291; Arts and Crafts - 1300 �IV. Special Re crea tion Programs Relating to All Groups (Participa tion Events Only) (a) Dance Mobile, WAOK -- 10,000; (b) Bookmobile -- 10,000; (c). Junior Olympics -- 200; (d) · City-wide tra ck Recreation Committee A sub-committee on recreation is now in operation. Chairman . . ~, Mr. Henr y Helton is �Summary There is a total of 184 projects concentrated in these twelve poverty areas. In addition to these 184, there are fourteen agencies offering services in some or all of the area. These are the Atlanta Singers, the Urban League, Academy Thea ter, the School of Ballet, the Emory University Story-Telling Project, Actors' Workshop, the Girl Scouts, the Ruth Mitchell Dance, Theater - Atlanta , WAOK Jr. D.J. Project, the Fun Bowl, Butler Street YNCA. This means that if at lea st one pr ogram activity is opera ted in the ten target areas weekly, it· , .;ill give each ar ea fo';lrteen additional programs. -· �Employment A. Approximately ~-0,000 Youth Opportunity Campaign pre-job registration forms were sent to schools, neighborhood service centers, social agencies and churches. From these job applications, approxima tely 6,000 jobs . will be filled. The following agencies, projects and/or organizations will furnish jobs: National Alliance of Businessmen The Summer Recrea tion Proposals The Federal Agencies The State Agencies The Subsidized Jobs (Neighborhood Youth Corps, Vocational Education, Title I, Etc.) Miscellaneous Pla cement - Youth Opportunity Campaign Total Committed 3,300. 1,000 700 7 600 500 6,100 The Youth Employment Center, Georgia State Employment Service, will be responsible for screenipg, counseling, and pla cement in the youth employment phase of this program. f The Atlanta Transit System h a s been appr oa ched about a ssisting in the transpor t ation of youths to jobs, As a pa rt of its work, the Youth Opportunity Program Staff will follow up on youths placed in this program and help them (1) (2) (3) Fine pa rt-time jobs after the summer is over; Obta in pl a cement in a ppr opria t e work expe rience and/or trai ning programs such a s the Ne i ghbor hood Youth Corps , Mcinpower Development and Training Act, Job Corps, JOBS, New Careers, etc.; Return to regular , voca tional or othe r spe cial scho~_ls. Severa l agencie s and organiza tions will be giving a ssistanc e to the you t h emp loymen t a spect of the Youth Oppor t unity Program . Thes e includ e the National All i ance o f Bus i nes smen , a ll Federa l Agenc ies , Economi c Opportun ity Atlanta , the Atlanta Board of Educa tion, Unite d Appeal Agencies , the Ci ty of Atlan t a , the Merit Emp loyment Ass ocia tion, various t rade as socia tions , and the Georg i a Sta t e Emp loymen t Servic e s (You th Employment Cente r ). �ADULT VOLUNTEER PROGRAM I. . Introduction A key to succ ess of the entire youth opportunity program will be the number of volunteers recruit e d. The manpower needed to carry out the many activi-ties in this pro gram is too numerous to be obtained from the limited funds available. Effort will be made to recruit, train and place a total of 500 full: iujd part time volunteers. These volunteers will serve in a variety of ways: Camp counselors, employ- . ment interviewers, game room supervisors, gym instructors, coaches, tµtors, bus supervisors, homemake teachers, arts and crafts instructors, and hundreds of other types of l eaders. II. Recruitment Recruitment of volunteers will be prima rily through public media, speaking engagements, brochures, and flyers. A full page ad will be placed in the three major n ews papers. The Federal Government, Labor Unions, several trade associatiops, professional organizations, churches, and religious groups will be solicited for volunteer services. The Federal agencies are asking all of its 27,000 volunteers to work in this program. III. Training Training of the volunteers will be don e by VISTA, the American Red Cross, and the us er agencies. IV. Plac ements A special volunte er placement connnittee is presently at work and will ptace the volunteers . Spe cial Even ts An import ant part of the Youth Opportunity Program will be special events . Severa l special events will be planned and implemented by the individual agencies and organi zations . The Sch ool and Recreation Department are now planning sp ec ial events such as J r. Olympics, Field Days, Chattanooga-At lanta Games and other similar events. In addition, arrangements are being made to obtain tickets and admission to movies, theaters , athletic events, and cultural activiti es. Bus ,·~-_p lane, train . ,., - 8= �and boat trips are b~ing arrang e d . Picnics, outings, and special sight - seeing tours are be ing arranged. The Special Events Sub-Committee is being chaired by Mr. st·eve Fox . TRANSPORTATION One of the most crucial and critical problems to be solved in the youth Opportunity program is transportation. Ninety-five per cent of all the proposals submitted requires transport~tion. The pr e s ent plan is to centralize all transportation and dispatch by request and re gular routing . The buses will be obtaine d from the following sources: The Atlanta Transit Company The/ Third Army and Other Military . The Fulton County Schools The DeKalb County Schools Fri ate owners of buse s us ed by the Counties Chu ch owned buses Th~ Greyhound Bus Th Trailways Bus Th Continental Trailways Bus Th'e major Rail Companies State National Guard An estimate of the transportation needs is illustrate d by the requests made in submitted projects. An estimated $158,000 is needed to provide th e need e d transportation for: ( Resident Camps Day Camps Trips Tours - 9- �GOAL: To recruit 100 Junior Volunteers for recrea tion; To recruit 50 .Jun.ior Volunteers for education; To recruit 50 Jun i or Volunteers for health; To recruit 100 Junior Voluntee rs for cultural enr ichmen.t; To recruit 100 Junior Volun t eers for tutoring; To recruit 100 Junior Volunteers for big pals; To recruit 100 Junior Volunteers for buddy program; To recruit 100 Junior Volunteers for day camp counselor; To recruit 100 Junior Volunteers for resident c &-nping; ' To recruit 100 Junior Volunteers for bus supervis ors; To recruit 100 Junior Volunteers for crafts and hobbies �INDIVIDUAL AND CASEWORK SERVICES This par t of the Youth Opportunity Program will attempt to accelerate services to individua ls or groups requiring specia l attention. The individua l and casework services wi ll deal with such pr oblems as unwed mothers, truancies, absenteeism, emotional disturb ances, delinquent b ehavior and VD. Most of its work will be done th r ough group services and recreational and religi ous agencies. Objectives: A. To augment and i ncrease needed individual and casework services to members of casework and hea lth agencies fo r child ren and youths. B. To h e lp poor youths more effectively, utili ze the services refe rred to above. C. To more tho r oughly familiarize poor fam ilies with avail ab le ser vic es in the community to serve thei r child r en and youth. D. Tb suppor t other pr ograms and staffs in their work with troubled and/or troubling children and youths . E. To undertake small demonstr a tion projects in the hope that they will become the r egular par t of the agencies' programs . A. To conduct a sma ll pi lot project aimed at some follow- up work with pregnan t g1.r1.s and unwed mothers. This project will involve 200 girls. B. To condu ct a pilot back-to-s chool and follow-up effort. C. To conduct pilot out-rea ch or street pr ograms in sel ected areas of the c ity . D. To conduc t a specia l counse l ing and small - group t reatment with s ome selected youths refe rred by agencies. E. To pr ovide some assistance to the Fult on and Dekalb Juven ile Courts in dealing with youths tha t are wards of the Cour ts. Goals: Program Activiti~ s Planned: A. Multi - agency proj ects to follow up on gir l s trea ted in the Grady Hospita l's unwed teena ge mo t h er projects. B. A ma jor ba ck- to - school effo rt in the f a ll of 1968; C. A limi ted oµ t -rea ch. s t r ee t workers pr oj ec t; D. A re l easee program f or youth returning f rom Youth Developmen t Center. �Committees on individual and casework services and juvenile delinquency have been organized. The chairmen are Mrs. Mar ian Ford and Edith Hambrick for casework and individual services, and Mr. J ames McGovern for delinquency. �A BHIEJ? PRO:-:trss Kr-;ro;.u · 07.,! ·nm YODTII o: J?O j,'((EU'. .'/ Pi:OGR',H ·--------· ........... ---··-·l. oxr;nn :i. z,l t i on' A. The M;.1y o1~ upp oin t 0d th~ Jlortr d of the Atl o.nl.:a Ch:i.ld:ccn a ncl Youth Ser vices Coun ciJ. as the Pr ozra m' s Ex ecutive Co:1l.rn:i.tte c. B. The Council established an Advi s o r y Con~ittee composed of soms 85 fci)C, i: t u r,ity P ro?;.·2m, /is n r e;su J.t , "/ 3 i n :i. t.:i.c: l. p 1.op 8::-.:t1.s were r cc2ivccl . t h e C0~-~ c i l r cc0 i v 0d pr o~oG~ J s f ro~ cul t~rn l nrt gro,1ps , Un :i_t cd t p;·, -::2 ls E. 0. A . l : d .shbc,::lic -::iJ Sc;:vJ.cic: C e~1 tc\ 1: [ ; ctt·1 d i ncl.i.~e no~i.':: r.;1:0~1pc::. }~. The Yoi.:t:h Oj, j,ortunj_ t y C, ,::r1 2 :i. ~n OfJ :i.c e h d.p sd t o d civ c J. o i1 tli c;c p1·opo s;: l s a l ong th e f c d cr2 l f,uid 2J.inc s . n. j)-~'(:!";C',, U .,, 3 p i·cz;:r.~11:-:: \ :.--:,: c CcJ] cc1 :i ri j1.:.:1.i_.,-f,1,.1:- ll y , [l J:c1 l ! 1~i.:1_· p i.... Oj (. C~~[_'. \ ~2 ).'C c~ i ,:-:ct.1 ~ S(. ~1 L;: :: p.:-. 11 t.; l ( J >: :,·,o:. . .:~} of }." \:;, r c :-<.: 1t::·. t :t, ·c. r3 f rc;:n t h e st.::.ff: o f E . 0 . I .. [·.nd th ,:,, SUlif c,,!c! };c, ::;·c1 o f: l.:112 /1t: l ::t,L1 C1d.J.cLcn inc1 Yoc:. t·l1 Sc :.: v:U:(:~~ C0._::-. c: .U . f .!_.<:o , tl1c, / . t.J. o.;_1t: r, T'.:-'.·. d:s ,:n0. Ec: c:rc:0 U .cu J);, lJ:l !~lJ::2-n · : :1 CY:::·!" J_..__ ••. ,· ...L n.:.(.) l·,O,. . _/'\ ,K · · .~ r ->· ., ., Ji).1n ...- "~:. ,/'") . .__ - 1 7 :-i"'· . .c ,.,.1,i.. ·t .l. e I C urnpU ::, (:.,'lp .l 0 .)"r.: r...on + .. ..n ,. U,t.) , ,). ,d , ""-' L /. ~ ). 8-:-; .. ..• OC c L J.on 0 1. Tht2 De p a:0trn e nt of Inte:d.or i s offer ing \. .· 1.-'• c . ._ , . _ _ ~ ~. Se1'v ices i s offeri ng fiJ.ms ) · t .l " fun ds ~ th e cw,d.l.a bi.l:ity of v oc~tiorw J. eclnc2t i o:1 wod:-study p r og;ra i:i and tl,e r;xpan ~; 5.on Grant Pi>og1··21:1, T:-: e PubJ..i.c Rc).a-:.: ions V-2p2tr·t ;:ic:nt o f llE1.·/ will a. l s o off er fp ee 111<::_il ir:;-; c1ncl pub.Uc i ty , 6. De na...rtmcnt o f La bo~ , Cont~cts we re made with th e LaLor Depart-nwU, nt:S,-,..,..~·.... to ma ke Ck'c-, Ll.e e s of ti,c 1/e ighborliood Yout h Co~' ps ccn d oth e1' prODi'.:E· ..... ,._ s J.ot:s c1va :i.l2bl~ to t h e ne e dy, f .s a r es ult I th e re h 2 s b c!cm 2.n inc1'c2,;e in inu·school slot ~ f m.' th is C.i. t y. The Labor Dq1:". r ti;1ent is ezp .lo:L'i n3; th e spe c.i.0,l i1,1? a ct p r og r"&r:1 for r:io:,ey ava ila b l e to th e pi.'og r,1m , 7. The Srn:.\J.l Bud .ness 1-.crn i nistra ·i: i o n i s circulari z i ng 27s0 00 e ~?loyces t o obt 2i n volunt ~crss s upp lies 2nd transport e.tion , 'l'h~iy 1:il). coe>rc1. i.na t c th.i. s pr·0i::·cn . 8. For t t!cPhc l.' son In~;t c1 .l).<1 t 5.or,, For·t l-icPh e;rs o n i s pl2.nni ng c'.nd c1.cve l opi nz c amping c:ctivitic::; for c1 chooscn 2.rcc1 , Co .l.oric J. Cc\ J J.oi·:,:y i s d5.scu ss .ir:z this info:r:;:1at5.on witli us and 1-: c ,:3. J..l. h 2:ve fu:e th e l' 5.n:~ol.'iil.:l t ion on th5.s at a l ater tir,·,e , 9, Sr1c1 l~, Bu.s:~nc s s Ac:m 5.n:i.~;t:•'cl t ioil . Th e Co~.;~ner ce De p2rtnc nt is e: onsid2:d.113 th E! t ,·.kePS for c'. S?ed.2 ]. cen s u s pPoz;l'cl::t . This o f f ice ha s 2.lre 2dy se;1t 7 00 y out h to c?.pply for s2.i d j ots . The Co ~!1111crc e Dc p "rt r.·,e n t i s iiOl'~ .i.n i •,;5. th th E: l::;-:p J. oy;r.e nt Co ,,,:~.i. t t ce s Pt1~Jlicity Co;,11,,itt c e as ,;E:ll 2.s SBt ~o pr·o:ilot e th i s p roz;r·c,:11 , 'i'il i s will 2.ls o U. S, De pe>.r t ;~e1~t of Co:-;1:,,erce , ~fiTi,J.·1~i····o'f--i:!-;·c;:~~-:rn:=I c:cf c:;i1st1s inc lude j obs eiven i f SBA so des i r es , B. S c,,_ t e 1. J.l.:-1 t .i o rw .1. Gi..' cll' d , Th e Nett 5.or.=1 J. G".lc.!.'d c:c,,·;tEtc:.: h 2 s b -2,:- ;, r0:~ .d c with Gcncl'c"'. l I C:c.l. n , 1-:l' , Bc.c:c-us i s h i ~; ,:0 cnt , Th (: N21 t.i.o:-:,:; l GL~.rd 1-;.U .J. r.,,d: G n s c o f t h e: !/cit 5.o ;,.=-:.l c~12r cl :'.:r,,-,0~··:: c s , 0 1 2, Gcor.-.~ 5.u _~·l:ctt o. _ D0 r:~~r.·t1.c. n t _ 0 f _ Fc,::: 5.)·Y... cln~1_Chi.l.C~:."::; ~-:_ SC!:·'v 54cc_~; ,. rfh is Jlcpc.1:i.'t f.1(?. llt i s 1:0:c·U.nJ 1-::i th tli ::o Cour:c i..7. 1 s Of f i ce t o try t o 6 c;t t he: Gov c:i.··,1-0!.' to c:p:::r-0i_)i.'.1.2tc~ $ :,0 ~ 00 to thi s p1·,c,.~;r' ~~,-1, Th e: D8j,.JC:'.'.' ~:;:H:n t o f Farn i.ly 2.1:d Cii .i.l clr-8n Se F ,' .i.c,) s i s c: J.s o s c2.:cc hL~g t o s c,e 11h 2, ,c fu rds i t c 2,n p i~o -..- i d e i' ll this l' (.~ .!)t.: C t , 3, St;,.t e lf ighi :2y lh~p21~·l_. ::1c nt h ~.s ag :-··c ;:,d t o to poo:,.' y o~1th tl"i.1.S su:::!TJ(.: P , 'i'h5 :. cr,~=~---~i tt er! j E; 0£ £·0:.• i n.:; 2..ss i st 143.215.248.55·ii:;c; . ......, .. --· -- ··- -· -~--- -- ., - -, _,. . _.,._ . . t o J_(;.::~ J. i>i... (;t·x, :1 5 11 c 0s i st i 1·1z; J.l'..-·:. :·)r·i!:-1·1$ c.. r:cl ~ J:c .::.Y / i c~ j_:-.,..: t E.. c L·ri i c-:t.l 0.ss.i.f: t unc-:: f>Cr··,i .lc ~;; 5, o .0 c:0:r~t.:_:~t --~\J·:·~~-~--~ ?:·,~·~:~-143.215.248.55;} _c..:,1_~11 Er , J; ,::c:tt 3. r:: i ~I r.:::.}~.l n~: sp0:c:chr.: s c~n cl h e .1- s c1.l r: o 1:·,2 ki ns cl }) ~)j_... t .i.o i-l or tl ie: t~:~-:·t:~; COi!,;,~5.f;s j Oi l ft~ !·!dS c.va.-:..1~~ b.l C! t o t h.i r; p r oi:..'.J::1 by cJ u,-,c~_in3 c1 f;psc .i :C ic p ::: c.j ect . ., �.., 6. St a t:e Pcerk s Dcp2 :,.:tn'. ~i1 t:. Th e St a t c P ,•.;_·ks De: p,1r t mc n t k l G b een c on t i"lC t c d ab out th e u ~;e ~f p a1{"s--fo1·h iking nn d c-::mping ( r e sid en t c1n d d t y ). 7. .Q.£9-D?; i a St~ t e He .:i. l th Dc pa· t me nt. Th :i. s Dep m: l me n t h o.s b e e n wo:.:k:i.ng wi t h t hi s o ff ice i n d e vt!l op i n g a r:.ocl e.n t: Contro l Prog ra m ,m(l e. l so o ff er ing i t s ass i sUm c c i n m;:i_ n y o t h er t y pe s o f p r.og1:,c:ms app ;:·op1:i <1 t. e £0 1· th is a ge ncy . 1. : Personn e l D~-~~rt r.1t>11 t, Th e Ci t y of Atl nn t a Pei: sonn e l Dcp.'.).rtment i s h e lping NYC enro ll ees obt a i n c op loym~n t in t h e City ' s p r ogrnms . The De p a rtme n t i s a l so d eve l op in g a sp2cia l ki n d o[ pro gram to h e l p ap prox :i.r.w. te l y l"/ 5 n eedy a ncl cUs a i.' S . 3. VIST!\ · ,-:.i. .l.l h!:,l p t rc!.5 n th e v c,J.unt c.:i.',; . Th e VIS'C/\ Cou;,ciJ. ·,,:i.l.J. als o~ hc .1.p t o finc1 tl'a isportic;.tio:1 r cso t1 rcc:s s c spcd .c1 J.ly 2.r.10:~::; the church,2s , 4. Some of th e pl' iv~t e s ubl\)."·l n n ~choo.1.s ,:.-i..l.l p r ovic1c sc!.olc:i.r:s}iips fo r su;;-1m-:::1.' p i.'0 2) -'C:,i:ls f m.' p oor · yoFth , On0. ( T:i. ini.ty ) 1.15.cht b e: ,:! blc t o ma.k c ~; on:c . of it s tc.:i d w :i.··s e1vd.J. 21hle fo:i.' tu tc,~.--,.i.rig .i.n th e 5.rrnc:r- -0 city. G. l\(: d Cr·os.,_; II, !j,., c35_c ;:,.l. /,s,,oc i c~ i.:3. oi1 Tli ~, FultC>:l , rnr1 D:::: ~~2, J b J-'. c:d j c<~ l /,·;c;()C 5at i.ons 1-1.U ..l. v e-:,,,1:i ck: 11:·:, d :i.c.,:J. c x~nn 5.n,~ t io1is fo:-.·· c,1rnp . I. A~t ~ Counc i l s ., Th e t.-c- ·e:; Counc :iJ. -~ 1:i ll Li.id «ri rJ t r~d 11 v o .1.ll ntc c-:,.'s f o ;: 5.t :; c1rt:·: ,me] 1 Cl.ll'l.L: /', ..1 r•1 ·,,:'.-,_,_-,,,,:"' , -., �1. Georg i a Stc1tc Coll ege wi.l..l 2ssist with vo.lunt ec1°s f or ar.t an·~> . I . ' 600 5 00 •' Total Conmittcd - - ----·--- - --- - -------- - -·-------~·100 The Youth Employment Center, Geo1·gia St a te E,nployi112nt Scrvj'_ce , will be respons:i.b le f or screen ing, c ounse ling ~n. tecl by th:: reques t s mc1de in submitted pr oj e cts. An estima t ed $158,000 is needed to prov ide the neede d trans po r t at ion fo r r es id ent camps , day c a:·,1 ps, tri ps anc1 tours . ,, -l;-· . �r J CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 April 8, 1968 JACK C. DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER Mr. Dan sweat Director, Governmental Liaison Mayor's Office City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Dan: I attach hereto our proposal to E.O.A. for summer Recreation, Employment and Enrichment Program. You will note that the cash requested exceeds $1,300,000. On April 5, 1968 we were advised by Mr. Jim Parham, Director of E.O.A., that only $590,000 would be available to fund all proposals from private, as well as public agencies. We are asking to receive 100% of all cash available, but even if this is done, we will need supplemental financing by City funds. The attached proposal is submitted to your attention relative to the recently passed Ordinance requiring a review of all proposals by the Review Application Board, the Finance Corrnnittee, and the Department's respective Committee . The Parks Committee of the Board of Aldermen on March 22, 1968 approved the submission o f the attached. ncerely, C ~ .J Enclosure JCD:jw ck c. Delius eral Manager of ks and Recreation �March 29, 1968 DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION CITY OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA (In Conjunction With Atlanta Public Schools) I. TITLE OF PROJECT: Duration: II. III. IV. Recreation, Employment and Enrichment Program From June 1, 1968, to September 2, 1968 (With certain programs extending to December 31, 1968). (a) Department of Parks and Recreation, City of Atlanta, Georgia, (In conjunction with Atlanta Public Schools), City Hall Annex, 260 Central Avenue, S. W., Atlanta, Georgia, 30303 (Public). Ja. 2-4463, Ext. 311. (b) Jack C. Delius, General Manager, Parks & Recreation, and Alan Koth, School Department. (c) Stanley T. Ma rtin, Jr., J a ck C. Delius. (d) Charles L. Davis, Comptroller The geographic area to be covered is that portion of the City of Atlanta designated by E. O. A. as Tar ge t Area ; plus, Fringe Areas which are borderline in respect to economic and social cla ssi f ications. The persons to be s erved are f ive years of a ge to s e nior citizens; both s exes, in-school a nd out-of -school. V. It is estimated that 150 participa nts each day will us e ea ch location. Plans ca ll f or 140 loca tions to be s erved. Thus, 21,000 persons each day wi ll be served. This f i gure doe s not i nc lude a c tiv iti e s such a s Award Day, audien.ces f or band concerts, e tc., and other s pec tator a ctivities . VI . Many a r eas of the city a r e deficien t i n park and recreati on fa cili ties . This f a ct had been clearly noted by the just comp l e t e d 1968-1983 Parks and Recrea tion Pl an . Staf f of E. O. A. , Community Council, Ci ty Pl anning and Department of Parks conducted t he study. The need f or the pr ogram covered by this proposal i s clear ly e v i dent in the total a b sence of park and recreation fa c ili ties in many targe t areas and t h e inadequa cy of facilities where they do exis t . In resp onse t o these deficiencies , s ome 40 playlo ts have been cons tructed and s taffed, u s i ng f or the most part , E. O. A. f unds. These playlots f a il t o pr ovide full y ade~uate physical faci lities . Thus, s ome 62 school s wil l be u sed dur i ng the summer. The report Opportuni t y For Urban Excellence cites a c lose corre l ation between a bsence of fac i lities and incident of juveni l e delinquency. VII. A coordinator of summer activities will be employed by May 1, 1968. His duties wi ll be to ·.initi~lly locate and recruit l eaders of ALL age levels in ALL target areas to serve a s an Adv isory Counci l f or planning and development. The Coordinator will be assisted in recruitment by school counci l ors �at 62 elementary and high school locations; by E. O. A. Neighborhood Service Center Personnel; by the Community Council and by staff of Parks and Recreation Department, Leaders representing not only their age group but their respective neighborhoods will be asked to assist the staff in planning the summer program. It is intended that each location (be it school, park or public housing project) will have local preferences as to types of programs. However, it is assumed that some identifiable basic list of prepared activities will emerge and utilized as a base to insure "equal" programs on a city-wide basis. The program will initially be developed on a .pilot basis with constant evaluation by neighborhood leaders. Once assured of our acceptability and desirability of a given activity, it will be offered city-wide for the duration of the summer, Heavy emphasis will be placed on employing disadvantaged citizens in the operation of the program, Assignments of employment will range from actually operational, such as Recreation Aides to Advisory and Representation Roles in the various communities. It is planned that distinctive shirts will be suppl:•.ed to teenagers wlu:- will serve as cadre on a voluntary basis, approximately 100 teenagers and young adults will be transported to Atlanta Wilderness Camp each week to assist in its development while at camp. The young people will be taught swimming, canoeing, camping, nature interpretation, etc, VIII. IX. The project will have an overall Director, Assistant Director, Clerical Staff, Recreation Leaders, Recreation Supervisors, Camp Directors, Enrichment Personnel (Dance, Drama, Music, Arts and Craft). The number of poor youth , employed will be 336. Volunteers will exceed 100. The program will cover all areas within the defined boundries of E. O. A's. target zones. Some 140 locations will be staffed, using 62 schools and 78 parks and playlot locations. The hours of operation will be 9 A.M. - 9 P.M., Monday through Saturday. There will be a Central Headquarters located at Central Junior High School, 232 Pryor Street, S. E. The central office will coo r din,::i.te all Pa r k and Rec r eation Department and Atlanta Public School Department's summer activites related to recreation, employment and cultural enrichment for the disadvantaged. The Program Director will be in ove r all charge of the project and will answer to a committee made up of School and Parks personnel as well as advisory committee of citizens. Al l supplies, e uipment, travel and transportaion, payroll, etc., will be handled a t the Central Office, The City of Atlanta Purchasing Department will handle pu rchase transactions when requisitioned by the Central Office. The Central Office will maintain account records in order to h ave available current data. The Da t a Processing Division of Atlanta Public Schools will be utilized if needed to analyze problems, expenditures, p articipation, etc. It is imperative th at the Central Office be staffed by May 1, 1968 in order to establish procedures, communications with the neighborhood's recruitment and supply channels. This Parks/Schools joint venture will carefully supplement and mesh with (1) regular City recreation problems, (2) Community Schools, (3) work - study and vocational education, (4) Title I Pro gr ams, (5) Neighborhood Youth Corps InSchool Enrollees, (6) contributing private agencies, (7) Academic Summer Schoo l Pr ogram (8) Head Start, (9) individual contributions, (10) other public agenc y c ontribu tions. The At l anta Children and You t h Council will s erve as overall �coordinator acting for and with Mayor's Council on Youth Opportunity to see that all other support agencies are carefully coordinated with the City's program. This project will not pre-emp, but rather supplement r egular City programs. Without Federa l Funds, much, if not all, of the planned activities for disadvantaged areas would be curtailed, Thus, this Community Action Program complements the total City program. Youth, young adults, adults and senior citizens will assist in planning the program, its operation, and evaluation. Of special emphasis will be a ge group 5-25 years with the greatest attention directed to the teenager and young adult. The school drop-out, the potentia l drop-out, those wi t h no immediate source of income, those with no positive contacts with Social Service Agencies, and those with no consistent work history on marketable skills will be located and employed by Central Office as an initial step in structuring and planning the program. Allocation of job slots will be based on geographical distribution and population so that all target areas wi l l contribute. The Neighborhood Service Center, School Counselors and Soci a l Agencies will be invited to assist in locating and screening applicant s. A police record will not necessarily preclude employment, but the Director's judgement will prevail in cases involving morals, and in particular, s exua l offenses. There will be no formal Civil Service Examination; selection will be based on (1) need for employment as outlined above, (2) neighborhood identification, (3) leadership a bility, and (4) skills that can contr i but e t o the progr am. The Pro gr am Dir ector will name fin a l selection and a s s i gnment. Arrangements will be made for medical physicals to be given each applicant. Medical problems will be reported to Fulton County Medical Department for follow-up. Medical prot lems will not necessarily bar employment, but rather serve as a guide in a ssignments. Five recreation districts will be established and supe rvis ed by re gular Park/School personnel. Youth will be u sed a s Aide s in e a ch dis t rict office (as well as Control Office), each school and each park area. Activities to be offe red: Crea t i ve Rhytmics Outdoor Games Quiet Garnes Folk Dancing So f tba ll Volleyba ll Camp Craft s Sewi ng Ceramics Photography Mu sic Apprec iation Team Spo rts Weight Training Day and Overnight Camping Wood Wor k i ng Ba ton Lessons Cheer leading Swimming Tra ck and Fie ld Puppetr y Tumblin g Typing Fie ld Tr ips Teen Ch arm Jewe l ry Making Modern a nd Tap Dancing Judo �Obviously, not all of the above activities can be offered at each location. The Citizens 1 Advisory gr oups may delete and/or add to the list. As to frequency, in the c a se of field trips, these will be scheduled for at least once a week per location. Definite schedules and programs wil l be distributed thru schools (before they recess for summer) Neighb orh ood Se rvice Centers, and. news media. Already, one television station has agreed to publicize the program on a continuing daily basis. X. ; · Atlanta Youth Council. Coordination of private and public agencies in youth opportunity program. Ga. Arts Commission. Contribution of technical assistance in arts and drama. Production of neighborhood movies and plays. Atlanta Braves and Atlanta Chie fs . to stadium events. Sports clinics, donated tickets Atlanta School System. Full partnership with Parks Department in summer program. Program will use some 62 schools. Army Corp 1 s of Engineers. Full utilization of Lake Allatoona property, namely, Atlanta Wilderness Camp s and Atlanta Recreation Camps. At lanta University Cen te r . Supply some 50 students majoring in Phs . Ed . and Recreation to serve internship in summer. Childrens' Academy Theatr e . Public Library. Plays in t a rget areas. Readin g clinics. Band of Atlanta . At least two concer ts in disadvantaged areas. Th eater Atlanta. Series of free productions. Buckhead Men 1 s Ga rd en Club . etc. " Mag ic o f Growing ". Mr. George Meyer. Private Theater Group - Mr. Eugene Moor e . Individual. Farm". Douglasville , Ga. Junior League. Children gar den p lots, Plays in Pi edmont Park. Large es tate - apple orchard . "Day at the Individu al participation. Possible Donor - Wegner Showmobile. XI . All facilities of the Department o f Parks and The Atlanta School Sy ste m which are needed to have a successful program will be used. The l oca tion of schools is as follows: �TENTATIVE LIST OF SCHOOLS WITH A COMPLETE SUMMER PROGRAM AREA I Elementary High School English Avenue, 1., 2., 3. Craddock, 1. Bethune, 1., 2., 3. Ware, 1., 2., 3, Couch, 1., 3. Fowler, 1. Haygood, 1. Hardnett, 1., 2. Harris, 3. M.A. Jones, 1., 2., 3. Ragsdale Herndon, 1. E. R. Carter Brown, 1., 2. Washington, 1. O'Keefe Central (Office) AREA II Harper, 1. Parks . Jr. High, 1. Gilbert, 3. Benteen Blair Village, 2., 3. Price, 1. , 2. Fulton AREA III Scott, 1., 3. Bolton Mt. Vernon Finch, 1. Hill, 1., 2., 3. Forre st, 1. Butler, 1. John Hope, 1. Inman Park, 1. Archer, 1. Grady, 2. AREA IV Mayson, 1. Towns Fain Williams, 1., 2., 3 . Carey, 1. West Haven White Clement, 1. We st Fulton, 1. Turner, 1., 2. Harper �AREA V Reynolds, 1. Lin Pryor, 1. Cooper, 1. Capitol Avenue, 1., 2., 3. Slaton, 1., 3. Cook, 1., 3. E. P. Johnson, 1. Daniel Stanton, 1. Hubert, 1. Coan, 1. Wesley, 1., 2., 3. Toomer Bass Roosevelt, 1., 2. Murphy, 1. ELIMINATED DUE TO CONSTRUCTION IMPROVEMENTS Chattahoochee Highland Bryant Howard - Hope CODE 1. 2. 3, Title I Academic Program Head Start PARKS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10 . 11 . 12. 13, 14. 15 . 16 . 1 7. 18. 19. 20 . 21 . 22 . Chattahoochee (undeveloped) Gun Club English Parks - supplement Adamsville (use Fain playground) - supplement Cen t er Hill Gr ove ·- suppl ement Ande rs on Pa r k - supplemen t Mozley - supplement Maddox Park Wa shing t on Park Universi ty Park Cou ch Park Home Park - s upplement Te chwood (Housing Pro j e c t ) Piedmont Pa rk Bed f or d-Pine (Hill Sch ool) But l er Park Bass - s upplemen t Sava nna h Stree t Oa kla nd Ci ty Park Adair Pa rk - supplement Pi t t man - supplement �PARKS (Cont'd) 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32, 33. 34. 35. 36. Joyla nd - extended Carver - exte nded Rawson-Washington - supplement Thomasville - supplement Walker Park Wesley Park Branham Park - supplement 71 Little Stre et 253 Dodd Avenue 666 Parkway Drive Haynes Street Vine City Kni ght Park Harper Park (4 Senior Hi gh Rise) BLOCK PARKS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11 . 12 . 13 . 14. 15 . 16 . 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24, 25 . 26, 27. 28, 29. 30. Auburn Avenue - Boulevard, N. E. Forres t & For t Avenue , N. E. Angier - Parkway , N. E. Merri tts & Bedf or d St ., N. E. Blvd, Pl. & Glen Iris Dr., N. E. Samp son - East Avenue , N. E. Wylie & Tye St., S. E. Ver non St r ee t, N. E. Hanover & Renfr oe St., S. E. Conley St ., S . E. Atl anta Sta dium Wind sor St., S. W. I r a St ., S. W. Eugenia-Rawson St. , S. W. McDanie l St. & Georgia Avenue Ashby Circ l e Harris Homes Rhodes St . - Suns et Blvd. 3 73 Thurmond St. , S , W. Vanier & Cap i tal Hubbard & University Park Avenue & Lansing Haygood & Crew La dd St., S. W. Wilson Dr., N. W. Verbena St., N. W. Ha bshal & Il=rry Blvd., N. w. Perry Blvd. & Lively, N. W. Arlington Circle, N. W. Daniel Stree t, N. E. �XII. XIII. Constant monitoring and evaluation by Citizens' Advisory Committee as well as staff of School Board and Parks Department. This project compliments and extends normal agency program and fills gaps and deficiencies existing in disadvantaged areas. In addition to service to the .poor, the program will clearly illustrate to the city and its citizens what can be done with sufficient financing. It can not be stated a t this time what part of this program will be continued once federal funding is completed. However, on two previous occasions, the ~City has continued parts of O.E.O. financed funding. �CITY OF ATLANTA -RECREATION, EMPLOYMENT , AJ.~D ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR SUMMER , 1968 BUDGET RECAP FE DERAL SHARE i; . II. III. I V. v. VI . VII . PERSONNEL $ 873,367 NON-FEDERAL SH.ll.RE $ 101 , 6 00 CONSULTANTS & CONTRACT .SERVICES , 3,000 None TRAVEL 90, 4 10 1, 7 35 2 ,0 25 261,1 8 0 28 2,29 7 9,000 8 0, 55 0 62 , 880 7, 130 51,295 SPACE COSTS & RENTALS CONSUMABLE SUPPLI ES RENTAL/LEASE/ PURCHASE OF EQUIPMENT OTHER COSTS $1 , 338,779 FEDERAL SHARE: $ 1 , 338 ,779 NON- FEDERAL SHARE: $ 487, 690 TOTAL COST OF PROJECT: · $ 1 , 826 , 469 $ 487,(59(? I f �CITY OF ATLANTA RECREATION, EMPLOYMENT, AND ENRICHMENT PROGRAM SUMMER, 1968 BUDGET - FEDERAL SHARE . FEDERAL SHARE I i I I I. t PERSONNEL I I i I I ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF: I Dil:RECTOR - 4 MONTHS@ $1,000.00/MO. $ 4 ,000.00 ASSISTANT DIRECTOR - 4 MONTHS@ $754.00/MO. 3,016.00 · BUSINESS MANAGER - 4 MONTHS @ $612.00/MO 2, 4 4 8 .00 ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT - 4 MONTHS @ $ 497.00/MO. 1, 988.00 PAYROLL CLERK - 1 , 260.00 3 MONTHS@ $ 420.00/MO. PRINCIPAL STENOGRAPHER - 4 MONTHS @ $457.00/MO. 1, 828.00 GENERAL CLERK - 4 MONTHS@ $326.00/MO. 1,304 .. 00 YOUTH ASSISTANTS (3) - 4 MONTHS@ $1.40/HOUR EACH 2,688.00 REGIONAL OFFICES: AREA RECREATION SUPERVISORS ( 5) - 15 DAYS @ $ 32. 00/DAY EACH AREA SCHOOL SUPERVISORS (5) - 80 DAYS @ $ 32. 00/DAY EACH 2, ,4 0 0 .00 12, 8 00.00 I I I ASSISTANT RECREATION SUPERVISORS (5) - 3 MONTHS @ $438.00/MO. EACH 6,570.00 TYPIST CLERKS (5) - 3 MONTHS@ $326.00/MO . EACH 4 , 8 90 .. 00 YOUTH ASSISTANTS (10) - 3 MONTHS @ $1.40/HR. EACE 6 ,7 20 . 00 I I I PARKS/SCHOOLS/ BLOCK PARKS: COMMUNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS (13) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $ 20. 25/DAY 21,060 . 00 COMMUNITY RECREATI ON LEADERS ( 5 7) - 8 0 DAYS EACH @ $16.40/DAY 74,784 .. 00 ENRICHMENT SPECI.ALISTS ( 36) - 560 HOURS EACH @ $4.00/HR. 80 ,640 . 00 �PERSONNEL - Continued YOUTH ASSIST ANTS ( 336) - 12 WEEKS EACH @ $56.00/WEEK 225,792.00 i . BLOCK PARK LEADERS ( 60) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $16 .. 40/DAY 78,720 .. 00 SENIOR CITIZEN LEADERS (8) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $16. 4 0/DAY 10, 49 6.00 , SPECIALISTS (8) - 40 DAYS EACH@ $20.00?DAY ASSISTANT POOL SUPERVISOR - 13 WEEKS@ $100.00/WEEK WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTORS (22) - 280 HOURS EACH @ $2.25/HOUR WATER SAFETY ASSISTANTS (11) - 280 HOURS EACH @ $1.75/HOUR WATER SAFETY AIDES (11) 280 HOURS EACH @ $1.40/HOUR 6, 4 00 ... 00 1,300.00 13,860.00 5,390.00 4,312.00 AREA RECREATION DIRECTORS (12) - 60 DAYS EACH @ $22.95/DAY 16,5 24.00 COMMUNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS (62) DAYS EACH @ $ 20. 25/DAY 75, 32.0.00 COMMUNITY RECREATION LEADERS (56) - 60 DAYS EACH @ $16.4_0 /DAY 55,104 .00 INSTRUCTORS (124) - 15 HOURS PER WEEK EACH @ $ 4 .00/HOUR FOR 10 WEEKS 7 4 , 4-00.00 WILDERNESS CAMP: PROJECT DIRECTOR - 48 DAYS @ $26.00/DAY ASSISTANT PROJECT DIRECTOR - 48 DAYS@ $24.95/DAY PROGRAM DIRECTOR - 48@ $2 4 .95/DAY 1,197.00 COUNSELORS ( 6 ) - 48 DAYS EACH @ $16.40/DAY 4,723.00 COOK - 48 DAYS@ $20.00/DAY 9 6 0.00 . ASSISTANT COOK - 48 DAYS @ $12.50/DAY 600.00 ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP: CAMP DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $26.00/DAY 2,08 0.00 ASSISTANT CAMP DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $20.25/DAY 1, 620 .00 PROGRJ..M DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $16. 40/DAY 1, 312 .00 i· �PERSONNEL - Continued COUNSELORS (6) - 80 DAYS @ $15.00/DAY EACH 7., 200 .00 REGISTERED NURSE - 80 DAYS @ $26.00/DAY DIETITIAN - 80 DKYS@ $20.00/DAY 1., 6 00 .. 0 0 COOK - 80 DAYS@ $20.00/DAY 1, 6 0 0 .00 ASSISTh~T COOK - 80 DAYS @ $12.50/DKY 1.,000.00 INSTANT RECREATION TASK FORCE: PROJECT DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $20.25/DAY I I 1,6 20 . 00 RECREATION LEADERS (20) - 80 DAYS EACH@ $16. 40/DAY 26, 240.00 II ROVING YlA.INTENANCE CREWS: i GROUNDS FOREMEN (5) - 26 DAYS EACH@ $29.45/DAY 3,828 . 0 0 LABOR FOREMEN (10) - 26 DAYS EACH@ $21.10/DAY 5, 486.00 EQUIPMENT OPERATORS (10) - 26 DAYS EA. @ $1 6 . 40/DAY 4 , 26 ~ w00 LABORERS (20) - 26 DAYS EACH@ $1 4 . 40/DAY 7, 488.00 TOTAL PERSONNEL I .I I $ 87 3 , 367.00 FEDERAL SHARE II. CONSULTANTS AND CONTRACT SERVICES CONSULTANTS FEES FOR FINAL EVALUATION TOTAL III. $ 3,000 .. 00 $ 3 , 000.00 TRAVEL i RENTAL OF BUSES FOR FIELD TRIPS INSIDE CITY 1250 TRIPS@ $41. 0 0 EACH RENTAL OF BUSES FOR FIELD TRIPS OUT OF CITY 200 TRIPS@ $45.00 EACH ALL DAY RENTAL OF BUSES 420 BUSES@ $68,00 PER DAY EACH ·CAR ALLOWANCES: DIRECTOR= 4 MONTHS@ $80000/MOo $ 51,250. 00 9,000 .. 00 I �TRAVEL - Continued ASSISTANT DIRECTOR - 4 MONTHS@ $80.00/MO. 320.00 PAYROLL CLERK - 3 MONTHS @ $50.00/MO. 150 .. 00 RECREATION DISTRICT SUPERVISORS (5) 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO• · , . SCHOOL DISTRICT SUPERVISORS (5) - 3 MONTHS __@ $ 5 0 • 0 0 /MO • 150 .. 00 COMMUNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS (5) 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 150 .. 00 I I r I I I I ASSISTANT POOL SUPERVISOR - 3 MONTHS @ $20.00/MO. 60.00 I I I PROJECT DIRECTORS (2)- 2 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 100.00 ASSISTANT PROJECT DIRECTORS (2) - 2 MONTHS @ $50.00/MO. 100 .. 00 PROGRAM DIRECTORS (2) - 2 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 100 . 00 TOTAL $ 90, 410.00 II i IV. SPACE COSTS AND RENTALS INDOOR FACILITIES FOR TEMPORARY RECREATION CENTERS - 3 HOUSES@ $120.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS .,.~·$ BLOCK PARKS - 45 RENTALS @ $7 .00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS TOTAL 1,080 . 00 9 4 5 .. 00 $ 2,025.00 FEDERAL SHARE V. CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES CENTRAL OFFICE : OFFICE SUPPLIES - $250.00/ MO. FOR 4 MONTHS $ ·1 , 000 .oo �CO NSUMABLE SUPPL I ES - Co n t inued REGIONAL OFFICES: OFFICE SUPPLIES - 5 LOCATIONS @ $35.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 525 .. 0 0 PARKS/SCHOOLS/BLOCK PA...qK s : RECREATION SUPPLIES - BALLS, G.AlvIES, ARTS . & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, ATHLETI C SUPPLIES FOR 140 LOCATIONS @ $ 500. 00/LOCATIONS 70,000 . 00 FOOD FOR LUNCHES - 100 CHILDREN PER DAY @ $.20/CHILD AT 140 LOCATIONS FOR 60 DAYS 168,000.00 WILDERNESS CAMP: ATHLETIC SUPPLIES, SHELLS, A...1:ffiOWS, ARTS & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, GAMES, BLANKETS, SHEETS, FIRST AID SUPPLIES, CAMPING SUPPLIES FOOD FOR 4 8 DAYS FOR 111 TEENAGERS AND STAFF @ $4.00/DAY EACH ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP: ATHLETIC SUPPLIES, ARTS & CRAF TS SUPPLIES, GAMES, BLANKETS, SHEETS, F I RST AID SUPPLIES FOOD FOR 80 DAYS FOR 5 3 CHILDREN AND STAFF @ $ 4 .00/DAY EACH TOTAL VI . $ 2 8 :2, 29 7 . 00 RENTAL/LE ASE/PURCHASE OF EQUIPMENT PARKS/SCHOOLS/BLOCK PARK S : 1 8 POOL TABLES @ $ 35 0 . 00 EACH 6,300 . 00 $ PARALLEL BAR S & RELATED PHYSICAL FITNESS EQUIPMENT - 120 ITEMS @ 1 00.00 EACH 12,000 . 0 0 WEI GHT LI FTING EQUIPMENT & BENCH 10 SETS@ $ 5 0 . 0 0 EACH 500 . 00 MATS FOR 10 AREAS@ $2 00 . 00/AREA 25 BASKETBALL GOALS BACKBOARDS @ $50 . 00 EACH 5 SETS OF SOCCER GOAL S @ $15 0 . 00/SET & 1, 2 50 . 0 0 7 5 0 . 00 ...... ·--~. ... -· �RENTAL/LE ASE/PURCHASE OF EQUIPMENT - Continued I L0,000 .. 00 BASEBALL GLOVES FOR 100 TEAMS@ $100.00/TEAM 1,500 . 00 100 TENNIS RACKETS@ $15.00 EACH I I I .,.Ii . !! I I I VOLLEY BALL STANDARDS - 100 PAIRS @ $25.00/PAIR 2,500 .00 300 ARCHERY BOWS@ $12.00 EACH 3,600.00 100 ARCHERY TARGETS @ $20.00 EACH 2,000.00 i i I I PORTABLE TOILET RENTALS FOR 50 LOCATIONS @ $45.00/MONTH EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 6,750 .. 00 MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPJVlENT RENTALS & PURCHASES - . FILM RENTALS, RECORD PLAYERS, ETC. FOR 140 LOCATIONS@ $100.00/LOCATION 14,000.00 WILDERNESS CAMP: STOVE , ELECTRIC GENERATOR, COOKING SHELTER, STORAGE SHED, COTS, TOILETS, TOOLS, ETC. ESTIMATED BY CITY 10,000.00 2,000.00 ELECTRIC PUMP AND WATER TANK RENTAL OF PICKUP TRUCKS - 2 TRUCKS @ $150.00/MO. FOR 3 MONTHS 900.00 ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP: BOATS, PADDLES, BUOYS, CHAIRS, DISHES, UTENSILS AND MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS ESTIMATED BY CITY 2 ,500.00 ELECTRIC PUMP & WATER TANK TOTAL VII. $ 80,550.00 $ 3,500 .. 00 OTHER COSTS PHYSICAL EXAMS FOR APPROXIMATELY 350 YOUTH EMPLOYED @ $10.00/EMPLOYEE ADVERTISING EXPENSE 2 , 00 0 .. 00 ADMISSION TICKETS FOR SPECIAL EVENTS 7 ADDITI ONAL TELEPHONES @ $3 0 . 00/MOo FOR 3 MONTHS 1 ,0 00.00 TOTAL TOTAL FEDERAL SHARE $ 7 , ·13 0 .. oo $ 1, 338,7 79.00 II �SUM.L'1ER RECREATION PROGRAM ., JUNE 1, 1968 - SEPT. 1, 1968 '• ,· ·: :,. .: I I  : ' . ii TOTAL BUDGET - NON-FEDERAL SHARE I. PERSONNEL GENERAL MAL~AGER OF PARKS & RECREATION ONE MONTH @ $17,628.00 Al.~NUAL $ P.SSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER OF PARKS TWO . WEEKS@ $12,116.00 ANNUAL 1,469.00 \ . 466.00 ' . II DIRECTOR OF RECREATION - ONE MONTH @ $12,116.00 Al.'lliUAL Ii 1,009.00 ADMIN ISTRATIVE .ASSISTANT - ONE MONTH @ $9,841.00 ANNUAL 820.00 ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF RECREATIO N ONE MONTH@ $9,048.00 ANNUAL 75 4 •.00 RECREATION SUPERVISORS (8) - TWO WEEKS EACH @ $7,345.00 ANNUAL ' I I I I I I. 2,260.00 OFFICE MANAGER - TWO WEEKS@ $9,048.00 ANNUAL 348 .00 ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT - TWO WEEKS @ $5,967.00 ANNUAL 229.50 PRINCIPAL STENOGRAPHER - TWO WEEKS @ $5,486.00 ANNUAL 211.00 SENIOR TYPIST CLERK - ONE WEEK@ $4,641.00 . · '89. 25 ·, . ! STENO CLERK - ONE WEEK@ $ 4/264. 00 ANNUAL 82.00 I TYPIST CLERK - ONE WEEK@ $ 3 ,913 . 00 ANNUAL 75 .25 i PARKS ENGINEER - TWO WEEKS@ $11,15 4. 00 ANNUAL 429.00 DRAFTSMAN - TWO WEEKS@ $5,720.00 ANNUAL 220.00 I I I I . i· !. I I I PARKS MAINTENANCE SUPERINTENDENT - ONE MONTH @ $10,257.00 ANNUAL ~54.00 ENGINEERING ASSISTANT - ONE MONTH @ $8,671.00 ANNUAL 722 . 00 .I I. I· ENGINEERING AI DE II ( 2) - ONE MONTH EACH @ $4,836.00 ANNUAL 806.00 GROUNDS FOREMA..~ II - ONE WEEK @ $7,657.00 ANNUAL 147.25 LABOR FOREMAN = TWO MONTHS @ $5,486 .. 00 ANNUAL 914.00 i I �PERSONNEL - Continued LABORERS - 1,800 HOURS @ $1. 80/HOUR -CARPENTERS - 40 HOURS@ $3.25/HOUR 3,240.00 130 .. 00 GENERAL MAINTENANCE JV.LECHANIC II - TWO WEEKS @ $7,345.00 ANNUAL 282.50 EQUIPMENT OPERATOR I - 8 HOURS @ $2.05/HOUR 16. 4 0 .. FORESTRY FOREMAN - 8 HOURS @ $3.25/HOUR 26.00 TREE TRIMMER II - 24 HOURS @ $2.13/HOUR 51.12 TREE TRIMMER I - 24 HOURS 45.12 I @ $1. 88/HOUR ELECTRICIAN FOREMAN - 16 ;HOURS@ $3.68/HOUR 58. 88 ELECTRICIANS - 32 HOURS@ $3.11/HOUR 99.52 I ASSOCIATE CITY ATTORNEY - ONE WEEK@ $11.154.00 ANNUAL SENIOR BUDGET ANALYST - TWO WEEKS @ $9,841.00 ANNUAL COMPTROLLER - ONE DAY@ $76.85/DAY j. !: ' ' 378 .. 50 i 76. 85 I. 1- l I CITY CLERK - ONE DAY @ $ 57 .40/DAY 57. 4 0 I II II DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENTAL LIAISON - ONE WEEK @ $17,628.00 ANNUAL 339.00 DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL - TWO WEEKS@ $IS~82.00 ANNUAL 707.00 DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL - ONE MONTH @ $12, 116 .. 00 Af-..TNUAL 1,009 . 00 PERSONNEL TECHNICIANS (3) - ONE MONTH EACH @ $7,34 5.00 ANNUAL 1, 836.00 RIGHT- OF-WAY AGENT - TWO WEEKS@ $7,046 .00 ANNUAL 271.00 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS - ONE WEEK @ $32,000.00 ANNUAL, 615.00 \ I I ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR INSTRUCTION TWO WEEKS@ $20,000.00 ANNUAL 769.00 ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR SCHOOL PLANT & PLANNING - TWO DAYS@ $75.00/ DAY 150.00 ' i I I I I 't DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY SCHOOLS - TWO MONTHS @ $15,360.00 ANNUAL COORDINATORS (4) - ONE WEEK EACH @ $10,000.00 ANNUAL II ' 769.20 �E~RSONNEL - Continued A.."CIBA SUPERINTENDENTS (5) - ONE WEEK EACH @ $18,000.00 ANNUAL ACCOUNTANT - ONE WEEK @ $,7, 982. 00 Al.~NUAL SCHOOL ATTORNEY i. 76 .. 85 SCHOOL COYlPTROLLER - ONE DAY@ $76.85/DAY i 153 .. 50 ONE DAY@ $76.00/DAY 75.00 ' I PRINCIPALS (62) - THREE WEEKS EACH@ $12,000.00 ANNUAL . l'I 42,921.36 I I 'CUSTODIANS (62) - ONE MONTH EACH @ $3,900.00' ANNUAL I I 20,150 ... 00 I I !' , I SUB TOTAL $ 90,714.70 ! iI. I EMPLOYEE BENEFITS AT 12% OF GROSS SALARIES OF ABOVE INDIVIDUALS (12% x $90,71 4 .70). IT IS THE CITY'S EXPERIENCE THAT TEE COST OF EMPLOYEE BENEFITS AVERAGE 12% OF THE COST OF DIRECT SALARIES. THE CITY MATCHES EMPLOYEESi CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PENSION FUND, WHICH IS 6% OF THEIR GROSS SALARIES. TI-IE CITY ALSO PARTICIPATES IN THE CQST OF HEALT"d AND LIFE INSURANCE. THE EXACT AMOUNT DEPENDING UPON THE PARTICULAR POLICY AND THE NUMBER OF 10,885 07 6 DEPENDENTS. i I' I .I II I , I TOTAL II. III . $ .I 101,600. 46 I NONE CONSULTANTS AND CONTRACT SERVICES I I I TRAVEL .I USE OF ONE CI TY OWNED BUS AND TWO STATION WAGONS FOR SUMMER ' j. $ II 1, 300.00 5 AREA SUPERINTENDENTS @ $ 15. 00/MO. FOR 3 MONTHS J 1 8 0 .00 4 COORDINATORS @ $15.00/MO. FOR 3 MONTHS i I I , I TOTAL I 300 0 0 l SUPERINTENDENT@ $10.00/MO . FOR 3 MONTHS $ .I 1.,735 .00 I I Vo l . I SPACE COSTS AND RENTAL S ' ! , I WI LDERNESS CAMl?., 47 3 ACRE1 TRACT ON L.AKE ALLATOONA $ ..,.. .. _., ,.. �'· SPACE COSTS AND RENTAL S - Continued 'iI ATLAL\"l'TA RECREATION CAMP, LAKE ALLATOONA 47 DAYS@ $100.00/DAY $', SWIMMING POOLS - 5 POOLS FOR 5 DAYS @ $200.00/DAY PER POOL z90 300.00 3 MONTHS @ $100. 00/MO. 300.00 , 71 LITTLE STREET - 3 MONTHS @ $100.00/MO. , 300.00 4 0 P~AYLOTS - 3 MONTHS@ $60.00/MO. 7,200.00 RENTAL VALUE OF TWELVE COMi"lUNITY CENTE RS OPEN AN ADDITIONAL 234 HOURS FOR SUMMER @ $10.00 PER HOUR - $2,3 4 0 EACH X 12 CENTERS 28,080.00 12 HIGH SCHOOL GROUNDS @ $200.00 EACH FOR SUMMER 2,400 .. 00 50 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GROUNDS @ $100.00 EACH FOR SUMMER 5,000 .00 396 CLASSROOMS - 118,800. 00 60 DAYS @ $5.00 PER DAY EACH 12 SCHOOL GYMS - 60 DAYS @ $20.00 PER DAY EACH 1 4 , 4 00.00 30 DAYS @ $15.00 PER DAY EACH 5,400. 00 25 AUDITORIUMS - 30 DAYS @ $10.00 PER DAY EACH 7,500.00 12 AUDITORIUMS 2 STADIUMS - 10 TIMES EACH@ $500.00 PER OCCASION 10,000.00 62 CAFETERIAS - 50 DAYS @ $15.00 PER DAY EACH CENTRAL OFFICE - 4 MONTHS · @ $200.00 PER MO. 8 00 .00 5 AREA OFFICES - 3 ~ONTHS @ $100.00 PER MO. 1,500 . 00 TOTAL V. $ 261,180.00 $ 1,000.00 CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES SWIMMING POOL SUPPLIES - CHLORINE, SODA ASH, KICKBOARDS, WASHBASINS, CLIP BOARDS, ETC. RECREATI ON SUPPLIES - ARTS, & CRAFTS, GAMES, ETC. TO BE PROVIDED BY CITY FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS AT 12 RECREATION CENTERS@ $100.00 PER CENTER FOR SUMMER ' i 5,.000.00 CLASSROOM - 3 MONTHS@ $100.00/MO. SAVAL'lliAH STREET MJ.=SSION - '4,700.00 . 1,200 . 00 ' I �CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES - Continued SAJ.~D, LUMBER, PAINT, CONCRETE BLOCKS, AND OTHER MATER~ALS INCLUDING COST OF HAL~DLING PURCHASE ORDERS - ESTIMATE BASED ON PAST EXPERIENCE OF CITY ' VI. TOTAL I $ i 9,000.00 I i RENTAL/LEASE/PURCHASE OF EQUIPMENT ·II ONE PORTABLE SWIMMING POOL TO BE PURCHASED AND INSTALLED BY CITY $ I 7,.125.00 j RENTAL VALUE OF 4 EXISTING PORTABLE SWIMMING POOLS@ $500.00 EACH FOR SUMMER 2, ·ooo .oo RECREATION EQUIPMENT PROVIDED BY CITY FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS AT 12 RECREATION CENTERS @ $200.00 PER CENTER FOR SUIVli~ ER 2,. 4 00.00 EXISTING EQUI PMENT AT ATLAL~TA RECREATION CAMP RENTAL VALUE OF $200.00/WEEK FOR 8 WEEKS 1,600.00 iI 22,000 .. 00 .I LOADERS - 500 HOURS@ $17.50/HOUR 8,750.00 I' GRADERS - 500 HOURS @ $15.00/HOUR 7,500.00 STATION WAGON (ENGINEER) - 4 00 HOURS@ $9.00/HOUR 3,600.00 5 0 F I RE HYDRANT WRENCHES - 90 DAYS @ $1.00/DAY EA. 4,50 0.00 I' TRUCKS - 2,000 HOURS@ $11.00/HOUR I I I 1 4 TYPEWRITERS @ $20.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 8 4 0 .00 6 CALCULATORS@ $20.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 36 0 . 0 0 6 M!MEOGRAPH MACHINES @ $ 30. 00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 5 40 .00 6 DITTO MACHINES@ $30.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 540 . 00 25 DESKS & CHAIRS @ ,125 000 $ 1 5.00/MO . EACH FOR 3 MONTHS _ _ _1=....;::.; TOTAL $ 62,. 880 . 0 0 . I I I , l �I . VII. OTHER COSTS FREE ADMISSIONS TO CYCLORAMA - 3000 CHILDREN @ $. 50 .Ai."il'D 500 ADULTS @ $1. 00 EACH I $ 2,000.00 i. .i i 'i·' FREE ADMISSION TO ATLAl."il'TA BRAVES GAMES AND ATLANTA CHIEFS GAMES - 30,000 TICKETS @ $.50 EACH i. 15,.000.00 'JET RIDE ON SOUTP.i.ERN AIRWAYS PLANE ; ,· 1,000 CHILDREN@ $10.00 EACH 10,000.00 ,.y I LECTURES BY CURATOR OF REPTILES, ZOO FOREMAN, ETC. 1,000 .. 00 UTILITIES (ELECTRICITY, GAS, WATER & TELEPHONES) 62 SCHOOLS@ $100.00/MONTH EACH FOR 3 MONTHS UTILITIES - ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP@ $100.00/MO. FOR 2 MONTHS UTILITIES - LIGHTS FOR 7 PLAYLOTS, WATER FOR 25 PLAYLOTS AND 50 FIRE HYDRANT SPRINKLERS, UTILITIES FOR 4 HOUSES I ! i' 18,600.00 I !· ! 200.00 2,000 .. 00 UTILITIES FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS IN 12 RECREATION CENTERS - 3 MONTHS@ $20.00/MO. X 12 CENTERS WATER AND OT"dER UTILITIES FOR 5 PORTABLE SWIMMING POOLS - 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. EACH 750.00 WATER AND OTHER UTILITIES FOR 5 MAJOR SWIMMING . POOLS FOR EXTENDED SWIMMING PROGRAM 5 DAYS @ $5.00 PER DAY X 5 POOLS 125.00 I I UTILITIES AND TELEPHONES FOR CENTRAL OFFICE AND 5 AREA OFFICES - 6 LOCATIONS@ $50.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 ~.ONTHS TOTAL ' I , I $ I 900.00 51,295.00 • t j. TOTAL NON-FEDERAL SnAKE $ 487,690. 4 6 I �CITY OF ATLANTA OFFICE OF COMPTROLLER CITY HALL Atlanta, Georgia 30303 April 25, 1968 CHARLES L. DAVIS COMPTROLLER EDGAR A. VAUGHN, JR, DEPUTY COMPTROLLER MEmRANDUM TO: Finance Committee FROM: Charles L. Davis //fl_ I am enclosing a copy of a Sunnner Recreation Program which has been developed jointly by the Parks Department, Sch:>ol Department, and others. This application has been approved by the Grant Review Board and has been submitted to EOA for funding. You will note in your review of the program that the total program amounts to $1,826,469 with $487,690 being made up of non-cash grants-in-aid which are being furnished by the city and/or the Atlanta Board of Education. Funds for most of the items have already been appropriated, and there will be little additional need to undertake the program if the federal government allocates their $1,338,779 through EOA. Correspondence and discussions with Mr. Delius indicate that the total available funds from EOA for the entire metropolitan region will amount to $590,000 which indicates that the program must be considerably curtailed if it is to be kept within the present appropriations. We should have an answer from EOA very shortly so a decision may be made as to the funding of this program. I am also enclosing a copy of a letter dated April 21, 1968, to Mayor Allen from Mr. Delius regarding the sununer program for your further information. C.L.D. CLD:dhf Enclosure �March 29, 1968 DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION . CITY OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA (In Conjunction With Atlanta Public Schools) I. TITLE OF PROJECT: , Duration: II. III. IV. Recreation, Employment and Enrichment Program From June 1, 1968, to September 2, 1968 (W~th certain programs extending to December 31, 1968). (a) Department of Parks and Recreation, City of Atlanta, Georgia, (In conjunction with Atlanta Public Schools), City Hall Annex, 260 Central Avenue, S. W., Atlanta, Georgia , 30303 (Public). Ja. 2-4463, Ext. 311. (b) Jack C. Delius, General Manager, Parks & Recreation, and Alan Koth, School Department. (c) Stanley T. Martin, Jr., Jack C. Delius. (d) Charles L. Davis, Comptroller The geographic are a to be cover ed is tha t portion of the City of Atlan t a designated by E. O. A. as Target Area ; plus , Fringe Areas which are borderline in respect to economic and social class ifica tions . The persons to be served are five years of age to s enior c i tizens ; both sexes, in-school and out-of-school. v. It · is estima t e d tha t 150 participants each day will use each location. Plans ca ll for 140 loca tions to be s erved. Thus, 21,000 persons each day wi ll be s erved. This figure does no t inc lude activi ties such as Award Day, aud i ei'J.ces for band concer ts, etc., and other spectator activi ties . VI. Many areas of the city are deficient in park and recreation faci lities . This fact ha d been clear ly noted by the just comp l eted 1968- 1983 Parks and Recreation Plan. Staff of E. O. A., Community Council, City Planning and Departmen t of Parks conduc ted the study . The need for the program covered by this proposal is clearly evident in the total absence of park and recreation facilities in many target areas and the inadequacy of faciliti es where they do exist. In response to these deficienci es , some 40 playlo ts have been constructed and staffed, using for t he most par t, E. O. A; funds. These playlots fail to provide fully ade~uate physical faci li ties . Thus, some 62 schools will be used during the summer. The report Opportunity For Urban Exce llence cites a close correlation be tween absence of facilities and incident of juvenile de linquency. VII. \ A coordinator of SUITu~er activities will be emp loyed by May 1, 1968. His duties will be to'.initi~lly locate and recruit leader s of ALL age leve ls in ALL target areas to serve as an Advisory _C ouncil for planning and deve lop ment. The Coordinator will be assisted in recruitment by school councilors �- I at 62 elementary and high school locations; by E. O. A. Neighborhood Service Center Personnel; by the Community Council and by staff of Parks and Recreation Department. Leaders repre sen ting not only their age group but their respective neighborhoods will be a sked to assist the staff in planning the sumi~ er program. It is intended that each location (be it school, park or public housing project) will have local preferences as to types of programs. However, it is assumed that some identifiable basic list of prepared activities will emerge and U;tilized as a base to insure "equal" programs on a · city-wide basis. The program will initially be developed on 'a .pilot basis with constant evaluation by neighborhood leaders. Once assured of our acceptability and desirability of a given activity, it will be offered city-wide for the duration of the summer. Heavy emphasis will be placed on employing disadvantaged citizens in the operation of the program. Assignme nts of employment will range from actually operational, such as Recrea tion Aides to Advisory and Repre sentation Roles in the various communities. It is planned that distinctive · shirts wiil be suppl5.ed to teenagers wlH-:- will serve as cadre on a voluntary basis, approximately 1100 teenagers and young adults will be transported to Atlanta Wilderness Camp each week to assist in its development while at camp. The young people will be taught swimming, canoeing, camping, nature interpretation, etc, VIII. IX. \ The . project will have an overall Dire ctor, Assistant Director, Clerical Staff, Recreation Leaders, Recreation Supervisors, Camp Directors, Enrichment Personnel (Dance, Drama, Music, Arts and Craft). The number of poor youth, employed will be 336. Volunteers will exceed 100. The program will cover all areas within the defined boundries of E. O. A's. target zone s. Some 140 loc a tions will be st a ff ed, using 62 schools and 78 parks and pl aylot locations. The hours of ope r a tion will be 9 A.M. - 9 P.M., Monday through Saturday. There will be a Central Headquarters located at Central Junior High School, 232 Pryor Street, S. E. The central office will coo:r.din.<1.te all Par k and Re cT.eation Department and Atlant a Public School De partment's ~ummer activites rel a t e d to r e cre a tion, employment and cultur al enrichment for the dis advan taged, The Pro gr am Director will be in ove r a li ch arge of the project and will an swer to a commi t t ee made up o f School and Parks pe rsonne l as well a s adviso r y committee of citi zens. All supplies , e uipment, travel and transportaion, payroll, etc., will be handled at the Central Office. The City of Atlanta Purch asing Department will handl e purchase transactions when requisitioned by the Ce nt r a l Of fice. The Ce nt ral Off ice will maintain account reco r d s in order to h ave av a il able current d a t a . The Da t a Proce ssing Divi s ion of At lant a Public Schools will be u t ili zed if ne eded to ana ly ze pr obl ems , expenditu re s, parti cipation, etc, I t i s impe r a tive th a t the Central Off ice be staffed by May 1, 19 68 in order to establish pr ocedures, communications with the neighborhood's recruitme nt and supply channe l s. This Parks/Schools joint venture will c arefully s uppleme nt and mesh wi t h (1) r egu l ar Ci t y r e creat i on p r obl ems , (2) Community Schoo l s , ( 3) work-study and voca tional educ a t ion , (4) Ti t l e I Pro gr ams, ( 5) Ne i gh borhood Youth Corp s InSchool Enrol l ee s , (6) con tri bu ti ng pr iva t e age ncies , ( 7) Ac ademic Summer School. Pr o gram ( 8) Head Start , ( 9) i nd ividua l contributions , ( 10) o t he r publ ic agency contri bu tions . The Atl an t a Children and Youth Counc il wi ll serve as ove rall �coordinator acting for and with Mayor's Council on Youth Opportunity to see that all other support agencies are carefully coordinated with the City's program. This project will not pre-emp, but rather supplement regular City programs. Without Federal Funds, much, if not all, of the planned activities for disadvantaged areas would be curtailed. Thus, this Community Action Program complements the total City program. Youth, young adults, adults and senior citizens will assist in planning the program, its operation, and evaluation. Of special emphasis will be age ·group 5-25 years with the greatest attention directed to the teenager and young adult. The school drop-out, the potential drop-out, those with no immediate source of income, those with no positive contacts with Social Service Agencies, and those with no consistent work history on marketable skills will be located and employed by Central Office as an initial step in structuring and planning the program. Allocation of job slots will be based on geographical distrtbution and population so that all target areas will contribute. The Neighborhood Service Center, School Counselors and Social Agencies will be invited to assist in locating and screening applicants. A police record will not necessarily preclude employment, but the Director's judgement will prevail in cases involving morals, and in particular, sexual offenses. There will be no formal Civil Service Examination; selection will be based on (1) need for employ,ne.nt as outlined above, (2) neighborhood identification, (3) leadership ability, and (4) skills that can contribute to the program. The Program Director will name final selection and assignment. Arrangements will be made for medical physicals to be given each applicant. Medical problems will be reported to Fulton County Medical Department for follow-up. Medical pro;;, lems will not necessarily bar employment, but rather serve as a guide in assignments. Five recreation districts will be established and supervised by regular Park/School personnel. Youth will be used as Aides in each district office (as well as Control Office), each school and each park area. Activities to be offered: Creative Rhytmics Outdoor Games Quiet Games Folk Dancing Softball Volleyball Camp Crafts Sewing Ceramics Photography Music Appreciation Team Sports Weight Tr aining Day and Overnight Camping Wood Working Baton Lessons Cheer leading Swimming Track and Field Puppetry Tumbling Typing Field Trips Te e n Charm Jewelry Making Modern and Tap Dancing Judo �Obviously, not all of the above activities can be offered at each location. The Citizens ' AdvisoTy groups may delete and/or add to the list. As to frequency, in the case of field trips, these will be scheduled for at least once a week per loca tion. Definite schedules and programs will be distributed thru schools (before they recess for summer) Neighborhood Service Centers, and. news media. Already, one television station has agreed to publicize the program on a continuing daily basis. X. , · Atlanta Youth Council. Coordination of private and public agencies in youth opportunity program. Ga. Arts Commission. Contribution of technical assistance in arts and drama. Production of neighborhood movies and plays. Atianta Braves and Atlanta Chiefs. to stadium events. Sports clinics, donated tickets Atlanta School System. Full partnership with Parks Department in summer program. Program will use some 62 schools. Army Corp's of Engineers. Full utilization of Lake Allatoona proper ty, namely, Atlanta Wilderness Camps and Atlanta Recreation Camp s. Atlanta University Center . Supply some 50 students majoring in Phs. Ed. and Recreation to serve internship in summer. Childrens' Academy Theatre. Public Library . Plays in target areas. Reading clinics. Band of Atlanta. At least two concerts in disadvantaged areas. Theater Atlanta. Series of free productions. Buckhead Men 's Garden Club. etc. " Magic of Growing". Mr. George Meyer. Private Theater Group - Mr. Eugene Moore, Individual. Farm". Douglasville, Ga. Junior League . Children garden plots, Plays in Piedmont Park. Large estate - apple orchard. "Day at the Individua l participation. Possible Donor - Wegner Showmobile. XI. All faciliti e s of the Department of Parks and The Atlanta School System which a r e ne eded to have a succes sful progr am will be used, Th e location of school s is a s follows : �r TENTATIVE LIST OF SCHOOLS WITH A COMPLETE SUMMER PROGRAM AREA ·I El ementary Hi gh School English Avenue , 1.' 2.' 3. Cra ddoc k , 1. Bethune , 1.' 2. ' 3. War e , 1.' 2.' 3_. Couch, 1.' 3. Fowl er, 1. Haygood, 1. Hardnett , 1.' 2 . Harri s, 3. M, A. Jones, 1. ,. 2. , 3 . Ragsda l e Herndon , 1. E. R. Carter Brown , 1.' 2. Wash ingt on , 1. O' Keefe Centra l (Off ice ) AREA II Harp er, 1. Parks . J r, Hi gh, 1. Gilb er t , 3. Bente en Bla ir Villa ge , 2. , 3. Price, 1.' 2. Fulton AREA I II Scott , 1., 3. Bolton Mt . Vernon Finch , 1. Archer, 1. Gra dy , 2. Hill, 1., 2 . , 3. Forres t, 1. Bu t l er, 1. John Hope , 1. I nman Park, 1. AREA IV May s on, 1. Towns Fain Williams, 1., 2., 3. Carey, 1. West Haven White Clement, 1. Wes t Fulton, 1. Turner, 1. , . 2 . Har per �·' AREA V Reyno1ds, 1. Lin Pryor, 1. Cooper, 1. Capitol Avenue, 1., 2., 3. Slaton, 1., 3. Cook, 1., 3. E. P. Johnson, 1. Daniel Stanton, 1. Hubert, 1. Coan, 1. Wesley, 1., 2., 3. Toomer Bass Roosevelt, 1., 2. Murphy, 1. ELIMINATED DUE TO CONSTRUCTION IMPROVKMENTS Chattahoochee Highland Bryant Howard - Hope CODE 1. 2. 3. Title I Academic Program Head Start PARKS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10, 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21 . \ 22, Chattahoochee (undeve lop ed) Gun Club English Parks - supplemen t Adamsville (us e Fa in playground) - supplemen t Center Hill Grove ·- supplement Anderson Park - supp lement Mozle y - supplement Maddox Park Wa shington Park Univers ity Park Couch Park Home Park - supp l ement Techwood (Housing Project) Piedmont Park Bedford-Pine (Hill School ) But l er Park Bass - supplement Savannah Stree t Oakland City Park Adair Park - supp l ement Pittman - supplement �·I PARKS (Cont'd) 23. · Joyland - ext ended 24. Carver - extended 25. Rawson-Wa shington - supplement 26. Thomasville - supplement 27r Walker Park 28. Wesley Park 29. Branham Park - supplement 30. 71 Little Street 31. 253 Dodd Avenue 32. 666 Parkway Drive 33. Haynes Street 34. Vine City 35. Knight Park 36. . Harper Park (4 Senior High Rise) BLOCK PARKS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17 . 18. 19 . 20 . 21. 22 . 23 . 24 . 25 . 26 . 27. 28 . 29. 30 . Auburn Avenue - Boulevard, N. E. Forrest & Fort Ave nue , N. E. Angier-Parkway, N. E. Merritts & Be dford St., N. E. Blvd. Pl. & Glen Iris Dr., N. E. Sampson - East Avenue , N. E. Wylie & Tye St., S. E. Vernon Street, N. E. Hanover & Renfroe St., S, E. Conley St., S. E. Atlanta Stadium Windsor St., S. W. Ira St., S. W. Eu geni a -Rawson St., S. W. McDani e l St. & Georgia Avenue Ashby Circle Harris Home s Rhod e s St. - Sunset Blvd. 373 Thurmond St., S. W. Va ni er & Capita l Hubbard & University Park Avenue & Lansing Haygood & Cr ew Ladd St . , S. W. Wils on Dr., N. W. Verbena St . , N. W. Hab sha l & Berr y Blvd . , N. w. Perry Bl vd. & Live ly, N. W. Arlington Circ l e, N. w. Daniel Street, N. E. �XII. XIII. Constant monitoring and evaluation by Citizens' Advisory Committee as well as staff of School Board and Parks Department. This project compliments and extends normal agency program and fills gaps and deficiencies existing in disadvantaged areas. In addition to service to the .poor, the program will clearly illustrate to the city and its citizens what can be done with sufficient financing. It can not be stated ~t this time what part of this program will be continued once federal funding is completed. However, on two previous occasions, the _·_city has continued parts of O,E. 0, financed funding. �CITY OF ATLJi.NTA -RECREATION, EMPLOY~.!.ENT, .AND ENRICP.....,\IBNT PROGR.AJ.\1 BUDGET RECAP i ,. ' /· FEDERAL SHARE i;. II. III. IV. V. VI .. VII. PERSONNEL $ CONSULTANTS & CONTRACT .SERVICES 873,367 NON-FEDER.';L SHJI.RE $ , 3,000 TRAVEL SPACE COSTS & RENTALS CONSUMABLE SUPPLI ES RENTAL/LEASE/PURCHASE OF - EQUIPMENT OTHER COSTS $ 1,338,779 NON-FEDERAL SHARE: $ 487,690 TOTAL COST OF PROJECT: · $ 1,826,469 None . 90,410 1,735 2,025 261,180 282,297 9,000 80,550 62,880 7ll30 51,295 $1,338,779 . FEDERAL SHARE: lOl,600 $ 487,090 ., ' �CITY OF ATLANTA RECREATION., E~,.PLOYMENT., AND ENRICHMENT PROGRAM SUIV.i.MER., 1968 BUDGET FEDERAL SHARE . FEDERAL s:-=J.. .J'Cll . I. PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF: DIRECTOR - 4 MONTHS@ $1,000.00/MO. $ 4,000.00 ASSISTANT DIRECTOR - 4 MONTHS@ $754.00/MO. 3,016.00 · BUSINESS MANAGER - 4 MONTHS@ $612.00/MO 2,/248.00 ACCOUNTING ASSISTAJ.~T - 4 MONTHS@ $497.00/MO. 1,988.00 PAYROLL CLERK - 1;260.00 3 MONTHS @ $420.00/MO. PRINCIPAL STENOGRAPHER - 4 MONTHS@ $457.00/MO. 1,828.00 . 1., 30 4 .00 GENERAL CLERK - 4 MONTHS@ $326.00/MO. YOUTH ASSISTANTS (3) - 4 MONTHS@ $1.40/HOUR EACH 2.,688.00 REGIONAL OFFICES: AREA RECREATION SUPERVISORS (5) - 15 DAYS @ $32.00/DAY EACH 2., ,400. 00 AREA SCHOOL SUPERVISORS (5) - 80 DAYS @ $ 32.00/DAY EACH 12.,800.00 ASSISTANT RECREATION SUPERVISORS (5) - 3 MONTHS @ $438.00/MO. EACH 6.,570 . 00 TYPIST CLERKS (5) - 3 MONTHS@ $326 . 00/MO. EACH YOUTH ASSISTANTS (10) - 3 MONTHS@ $1 . 40/HR. EACE ~ 6,7 20 . 00 PARKS/SCHOOLS/BLOCK PARKS: COV.IMUNITY RECREATION DI RECTORS (13) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $ 2 0 . 25/ DAY 21, 0 6 0 . 00 COMMUNITY RECREATION LEADERS (57) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $ 16.40/DAY 74., 78-1-.. 00 ENRI CHMENT SPECIALISTS ( 36 ) - 5 60 HOURS EACH @ $4 .. 00/BR .. ., 80,6 4 0 . 00 . �PERSONNEL - Coutinued 12 WEEKS EACH @ $ 56. 00/WEEK 225,792.00 BLOCK PA...-qrz LEADERS ( 60) - 80 DAYS EJI.CH @ $16 .. 4-0/DAY 78,720.00 YOUTH ASSISTlu~TS (336) SENIOR CITIZEN LEADERS (8) ; S~ECIALISTS (8) ~ 80 DAYS EACH @ $16. 40/DAY . 40 DAYS EACH@ $20.00~DAY ASSISTANT POOL SUPERVISOR - 13 WEEKS@ $100.00/WEEK WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTORS (22) WATER SAFETY ASSISTANTS (11) WATER SAFETY AIDES (11) - 280 HOURS EACH @ $ 2. 25/tlOUR 280 HOURS EACH @ $1.75/HOUR 280 HOURS EACH . @ $1. 40/HOUR !· ' 10,496.00 I 6,. 400 ... 00 I 1,.300 .. 00 J,.3,.860.00 5,390 .. 00 4,.312.00 A...~A RECREATION DIRECTORS (12) - 60 DAYS EACH @ $22.95/DAY 16,. 52-1-.. 00 COMMUNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS (62) DAY S EACH @ $ 20. 25/DAY 75,330.00 COMi.'\filNITY RECREAT I ON LEADERS (56) - 60 DAY S EACH @ $16. 4.0/DAY 55,10 4 .00 INSTRUCTORS (124) - 15 HOURS PER WEEK EACH @ $ 4. 00/HOUR FOR 10 WEEKS 74,400.00 . i WILTIERNESS CAMP: PROJECT DIRECTOR - 48 DAYS@ $26 .. 00/DAY 1 , 2 48 ... 00 ASSISTANT PROJECT DIRECTOR - 48 DAYS@ $24. 95/DAY 1,.197.00 PROGRAM DIRECTOR - 48 @ $ 24 .. 95/DAY 1,.197.00 COUNSELORS (6) - 48 DAYS EACH @ $16 .40/DAY 4,.723.00 COOK - 48 DAYS @ $20.00/DAY 960.00 . ASSISTANT COOK - 48 DAYS@ $12.50/DAY 600.00 ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP: CAMP DIRECTO R - \I 80 DAYS @ $26 . 00/DAY ASSI STANT CAMP DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $20 .. 25/DAY PROGRAM DIRECTOR - 8 0 DAYS@ $16~ 4 0/DAY 1 , 6 2 0 . 00 1,.31 2~ 00 ' · �,. PERSONNEL - Continued COUNSELORS (6) - 80 DAYS @ $15.00/DAY EACH REGISTERED NURSE - 80 DAYS @ 7,200.00 $ 26. 00/DAr DIETITIAN - 80 DAYS @ $20.00/DAY 1,600 .. 00 COOK - 80 DAYS@ $20.00/DAY 1,600.00 . 1.,000.00 ASSISTANT COOK - - 80 DAYS @ $12 . 50/DAY INSTANT RECREATION TASK FORCE: PROJECT DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS@ $20.25/DAY 1,620.00 RECREATION LEADERS (20) - 80 DAYS EACH@ $16.40/DAY 26,2 40.00 ROVING MAINTENANCE CREWS: 3,828.00 GROUNDS FOREMEN (5) - 26 DAYS EACH @ $29.45/DAY LABOR FORE.t-1..EN (10) - 26 DAYS EACH @ $ 21.10/DAY EQUIPV...ENT OPERATORS (10) - 26 DAYS EA.@ $16.40/DAY LABORERS (20) 26 DAYS EACH @ $14.40/DAY TOTAL PERSONNEL $ 873,367.00 FEDERAL SEA.qE II. CONSULTANTS AND CONTRACT SERVICES CONSULTANTS FEES FOR FIN PL EVALUATION TOTAL III. $ · 3,000.00 TRAVEL RENTAL OF BUSES FOR FIELD TRIPS I NSIDE CITY 1250 TRIPS@ $41.00 EACH RENTAL OF BUSES FOR FIELD TRIPS OUT OF CITY 200 TRIPS@ $45.00 EACH ALL DAY RENTAL OF BUSES - 420 BUSES@ $68 ,. 00 PER DAY EACH ·CAR ALLOWANCES: DIRECTOR - 4 MONT"dS@ $80~00/MO~ $ 51,250.00 9,000.00 �TRAVEL - Continued ASSISTANT DIRECTOR - 4 MONTES@ $80.00/MO. 320.00 PAYROLL CLERK - 150.00 3 MON7BS @ $50.00/MO. ! RECrt.EATION DISTRICT SUPERVISORS (5) 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. . SCHOOL DISTRICT SUPERVISORS (5) __ @ $ 50. 00/MO. I ' .' 150 .. 00 3 MONTHS 150.00 COM.J.\filNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS (5) 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 150 .. 00 ASSISTANT POOL SUPERVISOR - 3 MONTHS @ $20.00/MO. 60.00 PROJECT DIRECTORS (2)- 2 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 100.00 ASSISTANT PROJECT DIRECTORS (2) - 2 MONTHS @ $ 5 0. 0 0 /MO • 100 .. 00 PROGRAM DIRECTORS (2) - 100~00 2 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. TOTAL $ 90.,410 .. 00 I IV. SPACE COSTS AND RENTALS INDOOR FACILITIES FOR TEMPORARY RECREATION CENTERS - 3 HOUSES@ $120.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS ~$ .,. BLOCK PARKS - 45 RENTALS@ $7.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS TOTAL 1.,080 .. 00 9 4 5 .. 00 $ 2.,025.00 FEDERAL SHARE V. CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES CENTRAL OFFICE : OFFICE SUPPLIE S - $ 25 0 . 00/MO. FOR 4 MONTHS $ ·1 , 000 .. 00 �l CONSU~.i..ABLE SUPPLIES - Continued REGIONAL OFFICES: OFFICE SUPPLIES - 5 LOCATIONS@ $35.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS PARKS/SCHOOLS/BLOCK PA..q.Ks: RECREATION SUPPLIES - BALLS, GA1'1ES, ARTS · . & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, ATHLETIC SUPPLIES FOR 140 LOC.zi.TIONS@ $500.00/LOCATIONS 70,000 .. 00 FOOD FOR LUNCHES - 100 CHILDREN PER DAY $.20/CHILD AT 140 LOCATIONS FOR . 60 DAYS 168,000.00 @ WILDERi~ESS CAMP: ATHLETIC -SUPPLIES, SHELLS, A..'ffi.OWS, ARTS & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, GA1'1ES, BL~. NKETS, SHEETS, FIRST AID SUPPLIES, CA.l.'1PIHG SUPPLIES FOOD FOR 48 DAYS FOR 111 TEENAGERS AND STAFF @ $4.00/DAY EACH fl,312 .. 00 ATLANTA RECREATION CA.J.'1P: ATHLETIC SUPPLIES, A._qTs & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, GAMES, BLANKETS, SHEETS, FIRST AID SUPPLIES 2,500.00 FOOD FOR 80 DAYS FOR 53 CHILDREN Al.~D STAFF @ $ 4. 00/DAY EACH 16,960.00 TOTAL VI. $ 282,297 .. 00 RENTAL/LEASE/PURCHASE OF EQUI PMENT PARKS/SCHOOLS/BLOCK PA..-qJNCE SUPERINTENDENT - ONE MONTH @ $10,257.00 ANNUAL \\GROUNDS FOREMAN I I - ONE WEEK@ $7,657.,00 ANNUAL LABOR FOREMAN - TWO MONTHS @ $5,486., 00 ANNUAL I I ,; I f.?54.00 ENGINEERING ASSISTANT - ONE MONTH @ $8,671.,00 ANNUAL ENGINEERING AIDE II ( 2) - ONE MONTH EACI1 @ $4,836a00 ANNUAL . ·, . !" PARKS ENGINEER - TWO WEEKS@ $11,154 . 00 ANNUAL . 806.,00 147 .. 25 914.,00 . I. 1.,009.00 820.00 RECREATION SUPERVISORS (8) - TWO WEEKS EACH @ $7,345.00 ANNUAL I 'II 1'.DMINISTRATIVE ASSISTA!.'\/T - ONE MONTH @ $9,841.00 ANNUAL .. I ' !. .I i I �PERSONNEL Continued LPBORERS - 1, 8 00 HOURS@ $1.80/HOUR . cp~q,pENTERS - 4 0 HOURS @ $3.25/EOUR 3,240.00 130 .. 00 '; GENERAL MAINTENAi.~CE ViECHANIC II - TWO WEEKS @ $7i345.00 ANNUAL 282.50 EQUIPMENT OPERATOR I - 8 HOURS@ $2.05/HOUR 16.40 .I 26.00 i . ' - FORESTRY FOREMAN - 8 HOURS @ $3.25/HOUR TREE TRIMMER I I - 24 HOURS @ $ 2 .13/HOUR 51.12 TREE TRIM.V.i.ER I - 24 HOURS@ $1.88/HOUR 45 .12 ELECTRICIAN FOREMAN - 16 :HOURS© $3.68/HOUR 58.88 ELECTRICIANS - 32 HOURS @ $ 3 .11/HOUR 21L'.;: .50 SENIOR BUDGET ANALYST - TWO WEEKS@ $9,841.00 Af...1NUAL 378~50 COMPTROLLER - ONE DAY@ $76.85/DAY 76.85 CITY CLERK - ONE DAY @ $57 .40/DAY 57.40 DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENTAL LIAISON - ONE WEEK @ $17,628.00 A..~NUAL 339.00 DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL - TWO WEEKS@ $1$~82.00 ANNUAL 707.00 DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL - ONE MONTH @ $12,116.00 Af...TNUAL 1,009.00 PERSONNEL TECHNICIANS (3) - ONE MONT:--I EACH @ $7,34 5.00 ANNUAL 1,836.00 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS - ONE WEEK @ $3 2 ,000 . 00 Af...TNUAL, , 615 .00 I 769 .. 00 ASSISTANT SUPERI NTENDENT FOR SCHOOL PLANT & PLANNING - TWO DAYS@ $ 7 5. 00/DAY 15 0 . 00 COORDINATORS ( 4 ) - ONE WEEK EACH @ $10,000o00 ANNUAL I ! 271.00 ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR INSTRUCTION TWO WEEKS @ $20,000 . 00 ANNUAL DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY SCHOOLS - TWO MONTHS @ $15,360 ~00 ANNUAL i I 99.52 ASSOCIATE CITY ATTORl~EY - ONE WEEK@ $11.154.00 ANNUAL · RIGHT-OF- WAY AGENT - TWO WEEKS@ $7,046.00 ANNUAL i 2,560000 769 .. 20 ' �P~RSONNEL - Continued AI·GA SUPERINTENDENTS (5) ONE WE:SK EACH @ $18,000.00 Ai~NUAL SCHOOL COivlPTROLLER - ONE DAY @ $ 7 6., 85/DAY .i 76.85 I ' ACCOUNTANT - 01'.~ WEEK SCHOOL - ATTORNEY @ $,7, 982 .. 00 Al.~NUAL ONE DAY @ 153.50 $76.00/DAY 75.00 I PRINCIPALS (62) - THREE WEEKS EACH @ $12,000.00 ANNUAL . j- 42,921.36 1 I ·CUSTODIANS (62) - ONE MONTH EACH @ I $3,900.00' ANNUAL I 20,150 .. 00 I i ' I I SUB TOTAL $ 90,-714. 70 , II ' I I • j EV..PLOYEE BENEFITS AT 12¾ OF GROSS SALARIES OF ABOVE INDIVIDUALS (12¾ x $90,714.70). IT IS THE CITY'S EXPERI ENCE THAT TEE COST OF EMPLOYEE BENEFITS AVERAGE 12% OF THE COST OF DIRECT SALARIES. THE CITY MJI..TCHES EMPLOYEES' CONTRIBUTIONS TO WE PENSION FUND, WHICH IS 6¾ OF WEIR GROSS SALARIES. THE CITY ALSO PARTICI PATES IN THE CQST OF HEALIB AND LIFE INSURA.."I\TCE . THE EXACT .Ai."'10UNT DEPENDING UPON THE PARTICULAR POLICY AND THE NUMBER OF DEPENDENTS. 10,885.76 TOTAL II. III. $ ·i 101,600. 4 6 NONE CONSULTANTS AND CONTRACT SERVICES TRZI.VEL USE OF ONE CI TY OWNED BUS AND TWO STATION WAGONS FOR SUMMER $· 1,300.00 5 AREA SUPERINTENDENTS @ $ 1 5 . 00/MO. FOR 3 MONWS 2 25 .. 00 4 COORDI NATORS@ $ 1 5 . 00/MO. FOR 3 MONTHS 180 . 00 l SUPERINTENDENT@ $10 . 00/MO. FOR 3 MONWS TOTAL IV. \ SPACE 1WI $ COSTS AND RENTALS LDERJ.'IBSS CAJ1P, 47 3 ACRE1 TRACT ON LAKE Af..LATOONA $ 1,735. 00 .. ' �' SPJI.CE COSTS AND RENTALS - Con'cin"C.ed J. ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP , LAKE ALLATOONA 47 DAYS@ $100.00/DAY SWI143.215.248.55ING POOLS - 5 POOLS FOR 5 DAYS @ $200.00/DAY PER POOL z90 CLASSROOM - 5,.000.00 300 .. 00 3 MONTHS@ $100.00/Mo. SAVAf...'NAH STREET MJ.=SSION - 3 MONT'"dS @ 300 .. 00 $100.00/MO .. . 300.00 . 71 LITTLE STREET - 3 MONTHS@ $100 .. 00/MO. 40 P~AYLOTS - 7,200.00 3 MONTHS@ $60.00/MO. RENTAL VALUE OF TWELVE CO!v".J.vlUNITY CENTERS OPEN AN ADDITIONAL 23 4 EOURS FOR SUMMER @ $10.00 PER HOUR $2/340 EACH X 12 CENTERS 28,080.00 12 HIGH SCHOOL GROUNDS@ $200.00 EACH FOR SUM.L'1.ER 2,400 .. 00 50 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GROUNDS@ $100 .. 00 EACH FOR Sill-'.i.MER 5,000.00 118,800.00 396 CLASSROOMS - 60 DAYS@ $5.00 PER DAY EACH 12 SCHOOL GYMS 60 DAYS @ $20.00 PER DAY EACH 14,400 .. 00 12 AUDITORIUMS 30 DAYS@ $15.00 PER DAY EACH 5,400.00 25 AUDITORIUMS - 30 DAYS @ $10.00 PER DAY EACH 7,500 .. 00 2 STADIUMS - 10 TIMES EACH @ $500 .. 00 PER OCCASION 62 CAFETERIAS - 50 DAYS @ $15. 00 PER DAY EACII CENTRAL OFFI CE - 4 MONTHS · @ $200.00 PER MO. 800.00 5 AIIBA OFFICES - 3 MONTHS @ $100 . 00 PER MO~ 1,500 .00 TOTAL V. 10,000 . 00 $ 261,180.00 CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES SWIMMING POOL SUPPLIES - CHLORINE, SODA ASH, KICKBOARDS, WASHBASINS, CLIP BOARDS, ETC. RECREATION SUPPLIES - ARTS, & CRAFTS, GAMES, ETC . TO BE PROVIDED BY CITY FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS AT 12 REC REATION CENTERS@ $100000 PER CENTER FOR S~.IER ~ $ l,000 .. 00 . 1, 200 . 00 �CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES - Continued S.AJ.~D, LUMBER, PAINT, CONCRETE BLOCKS; AND OT3ER V.lA~E~~ALS INCLUDING COST OF EANDLING PURCHASE ORDERS - ESTIV.lATE BASED ON PAST EXPERIENCE OF CITY I VI. TOTAL • , $ 9,000.00 $ 7,125.00 RENTAL/LEASE/PURCHASE OF. EQUIPMENT ONE PORTABLE SWIMMING POOL TO BE PURCHASED AND INSTALLED BY CITY RENTAL VALUE OF 4 EXISTING PORTABLE SWIMMING POOLS@ $500.00 EACH FOR SU1,llV1'...ER 2,·000.00 RECREATION EQUIPMENT PROVIDED BY CITY FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS AT 12 RECREATION CENTERS @ $ 200 .. 00 PER CENTER FOR SUM.'1ER . 2, 4 00.00 EXISTING EQUIPMENT AT ATLA!.~TA RECREATION CAMP RENTAL VALUE OF $ 200. 00/wEE~Z FOR 8 WEEKS 1,600.00 22,000.00 TRUCKS - 2,000 HOURS@ $11.00/HOUR LOADERS 500 HOURS@ $17.50/HOUR 8,750.00 GRADERS 500 HOURS@ $15.00/HOUR 7,500.00 STATION WAGON (ENGINEER) - 400 HOURS@ $9.00/HOUR 3,600.00 50 FIRE HYDRAl.'\l"T WRENCHES - ·90 DAYS @ $1. 00/DAY EA .. 4,500.00 14 TYPEWRITERS@ $20.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 84-0 . 00 6 CALCULATORS@ $20.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 360.00 6 Ml~...EOGRAPH MAC.HINES@ $30.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 540.00 6 DITTO MACHINES@ $30.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 540.00 25 DESKS & CHAIRS @ ~ 1 , 125000 $15.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS ----"-'-.;;......;... TOTAL $ 62,88 0 .. 00 • I i ' �VII. OTHER COSTS FREE AD~ISSIONS TO CYCLORAM.A - 3000 CHILDREN @ $. 50 J~D 500 ADULTS @ $1. 00 EACH $ FREE AD.MISSION TO ATLAl.'-JTA BRAVES GA.L'\f.SS AND ATLANTA CHIEFS GAV.!.ES @ $ .50 EACH 30,000 TICKETS 1s.,900 .. oo 'JET RIDE ON SOUTHERN AIRWAYS PLAl.'qE ,· 1,000 CHILDREN@ $10.00 EACH 10,000.00 LECTURES BY CURATOR OF REPTILES, ZOO FOREMAN, ETC. 1,000 .. 00 UTILITIES (ELECTRICITY, GAS, WATER & TELEPHONES) .62 SCHOOLS@ $100.00/MONTH EACH FOR 3 MONTHS UTILITIES - ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP@ $100.00/MO. FOR 2 MONTHS UTILITIES - LIGHTS fOR 7 PLAYLOTS, WATER FOR 25 PLAYLOTS AND 50 FIRE HYDRAJ.'qT SPRINKLERS, UTILITIES FOR 4 HOUSES 18,600.00 200.00 2,000~00 UTILITIES FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS IN 12 RECREATION CENTERS - 3 MONTHS@ $20.00/MO. X 12 CENTERS 720.00 WATER AND OT"dER UTILITIES FOR 5 POR'I'ABLE SWIMMING POOLS - 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. EACH 750.00 WATER AND OTHER UTILITIES FOR 5 MAJOR SWIMMING . POOLS FOR EXTENDED SWIMMI NG PROGRAM 5 DAYS @ $.5. 00 PER DAY X 5 POOLS 125.00 UTILITIES AND TELEPHONES FOR CENTRAL OFFICE AND 5 AREA OFFICES - 6 LOCATIONS .@ $50.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 Y.DNTHS 900.00 I TOTAL TOTAL NON- FEDERAL Sn .ARE ' . ! $ . 51,295.00 $ 487,690.46 ~ . ... I �C~TY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 .April 21., 1968 . JACK C . DELIUS GEN ER.AL MANAGER Honorable Ivan Allen., Jrb Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta~ Georgia 30303 Subject: Summer Program of Recreation., Employment and Enrichment for the Disadvantaged Citizens of the City of Atlanta Dear Mr. Allen: ' As you know, we have presented to E.O.A., Inc. our proposal., in cooperation with the Atlanta School System, to conduct a special program ot recreation, employment and enrichment for the disadvantaged citizens of the City of Atlanta. We propose to begin the project June 1 and terminate it around Labor Day. In the next few days we intend to select and employ a coordinator/dire ctor for the program so that the central o ffice for this program can be fully functioning well before June 1. Mr. John Cox , of the Atlanta Youth Council~ has agreed with the undersigned to supply funds for the purppse of employing the coordinator/director and basic staff for the central office. The selection of a director and other personnel will be a cooperative venture on the part of the Departme nt of Parks and the Atlanta School system. , I Our proposal to E.O.A. exceeds $1.,300.,000 and calls for the operation of a total . of 140 locations within the target areas as defined by E.O.A. Some 62 of the locations are elementary and high school sites. On April 19, 1968, we were advised by Mr. Dan sweat of your office that the total funds available for this project including E.O.A. grant s and spe cial appropriations from City Hall would amount to $600,000 o Mr. sweat r equ est e d at that- time hat we b egin to scale down our budget to come within this figure . Accordingly, we are developing a new budge to It is my understanding that the City of Atlanta Department of Parks will not be able to receive substantially all of the funds made avai l able to E~O.A. for summer projects. In other words, other agencies (private and semi- public) will b e funde d for various types of programso \ \ �Honorable Ivan Allen, Jro I! - 2 - April 21, 1968 ~s soon as our new budget is completed, I will supply copies to your office, the Parks Committee, the .Application Review Board, the Finance Committee, the Advisory Committee on Civil Disorders, the Atlanta Youth Council~ and officials of the Atlanta School system. Sincerely, ck C~ Delius neral Manager of arks and Recreation Enclosure: Resolution, April 17, 1968 JCD:JW CC: Alderman Charlie Leftwich, Chairman, Parks Committee ·Alderman Buddy Fowlkes, Vice Chairman, Parks Committee Alderman G. Everett Millican, Member Parks Committee and .Advisory Committee on Civil Disorders Alderman Rodney Cook, Member Parks Committee and Advisory Committee on Civil Disorders Mr. Jim Parham, Director, E.O.A., Inc. Mr. Charles L. Davis, Comptroller, City of Atlanta ~ (Finance Committee) Mr. Dan sweat, Mayor's Office (Advisory Review Board) Dr. John Letson, Superintendent, Atlanta Schools Dr. John Martin, Deputy·supt. of Atlanta Schools Mr. John Cox, Director, Atlanta Youth Council Mr • .Al Koth, Director of Community Schools . Miss Virginia Carmichael, Director of Recreation Mr. Stan Martin, Administrative Assistant • I �.... ··. ,.. -~.., ; ·. / . .., / ·l _,...::-_,_~ , I FOR:,! 2Sr-S - 12 A T L A:,;TA , G:\. _ __ .· Apr:i..l' 15 6r> - 19---~ RESCI..0TIO~ : oy PARKS COl-'iL"lITTEE .•.:, •:I..- · -•.• ,"'. .' RESOLVED J3Y T HE \fAYOR ,~ND BOARD Of ALDER\iEN OF Tl!E CITY OF :\TLAS:rA !... , , :..;_:. that. 1-TI-JEREAS for t he third c onsGcut i ve year t.11e C:i_t.y o:c A-c.lant. c1 ·a.esirc.s ·co apply -c.o Economic Oppo:c-cuni ty A·i:.lan t.a , Inc., for a g-rc1n-i:. ·to cond.u c·c. 2. sp8ci 2l prog-rarn 6-.Z recreat.,ion , e ,n:::)loyr.1en-i:. and enrid1J.Tl<:mt. f:or - the di s2c\10.n-i:.29cd c i t izens o:c 'che Ci·cy of A-c.lan 'i.:.c: .. 2nd -·l.CIEREJ.\S; such a p ro gram i s decl ared v:L·cal and n e c essary by t he M2yor and .. --,, ·.. . Boa:r.:-d o f Al denn2n o;: the Ci'cy o :c Atl2n'ca,. and j . iilH:S?.K%1.S J . the Dspar-cment of Par}cs ,-;ill conduct -c.he p;:-09-ram in - co n jt:nc-c.im1 witn. the Ji:clan'ca School System"' 'i'H:SR:2£ORE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE Jv'iAYOR _i\ l,: D BOl',RD OF P..LD:8R.1Vi.EN OF 'THE CI'IY 01 .Es'I·LJ..NT A tha t: · t.he Depa.rtnx.mt of P2:cks is aut1'10rized t:.o- ._s1..1b::-n i·t., a }YCO}?:> sal to 'E·~o. A. Inc~ , said pro pos2 l h a ving })eJ:)i1 revi~i;!C_c1 ,by t.hs Pc:r"k.s CoinhitJ:.ee of the Board of Alde:c;ne.n , t~1.c A-o-olic,x i:..ion Rcvie\·: Boa:cd. ; the Finance Commi'ci:ce · of the: Boc.rd o:: .Z1,ld.err110n , • ~na~ :~he A9'y:Lsor~7 Commi<::.·co e on· Civil· Di s oro.ers ; c,nd , iur'dier -·t.hat: the Mayo r · b e and h e au,c.-'nori '-o s ..L..;JJ.l ~ a·'"' an .-:,c·re;,, ..,..,-=--.,., ,_ 'D \,,,.-:: ""'-··,T th ~ ""· ..C-i· ·'·y o.c -=--, -!-"" • s hr:,rr.-.by J. ~-t,; -- ·' Z"'a:i V l.C. _j 1,,._;..h1v.-L L-\ 1 er.:-·n ~... l..L ....,,,_ ....l L 1 -1_ C .J.-\...-U a nd I:conornic Opporcunit .y Atlant a , Inc. cove ring- a program of· ·r .ecr2: a t . ion 1 em:•_) loyment , · and enrichment for t'he disc1dvan'cag-ed ·ci'd . zens of the .. , Ci ty of At:l an ta. ..L l -· �April 6, 1968 'M r. Jim Parham Executiv Director Economic Opportunity Atlanta , Inc o 101 M riett street Atlanta, Georgi Dear Mr . Parham: ttaah h r to two copies of thi dep rtm nt ' s propo al for Surraner Recreation, Employment nd Enrichment Program. The project is in conjunction with th Atlant Public Schools and it repre nt requ t for feder 1 ssi t nee in the amount of $1,338,779. The in- kind contribution on th part of thi dep rtm nt nd School Department · unts to $487,6900 Thus, the totel budget is $1,826,469. I Siner ly, Jack c. G P Enclo ur liu ral Manag r of ks end Recreation JCD:jw CCI Honor bl Iv n All n, Jr., M yor, City of Atl nta Aldermanio Parks Committe Member Mr. Ch rl L. Devis, Comptroller, City of Atlant (for Finance Committ e) nt l Liai n (for Applic tion R vi Board) Mr. Dans~ t, Dir ctor Gov r �CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 April 8, 1968 JACK C . DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER Mr. Charles L. Davis Comptroller City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Charles: I am enclosing our proposal to E . O.A. for summer Recreation, Employment and Enrichment Program. You will note that the federal cash requested is in excess of $1,300,000. We were advised on April 5, 1968 by Mr. Jim Parham, the Director of E .o .A., that only $.~~ 0 , 000 would be available for all agency f unding. Thus, if we were to receive 100°/o of all available E.O.A. cash (we are making such a request), we would still be deficient many thousands o f dollars. I am assuming that the City of Atlanta can supplement our E.O.A. grant to some extent. Obviously, some items can be reduced or perhaps eliminated in the attached proposal. The proposal is sent to your attention per the recent ordinance requiring a review o f proposals by the Finance Committee, my Department's Committee, and the Application Review Board. incerely, Enclosure JCD: jw ck c. Delius eneral Manager of Parks and Recreation RECEIVE .. .. .., 1968 REh.:.hkED TO �, l. D~,s March 29, 1968 DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION CITY OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA (In Conjunction With Atlanta Public Schools) I. TITLE OF PROJECT: Duration: II. III. IV . Recreation, Employment and Enrichment Program From June 1, 1968, to September 2, 1968 (With certain programs ex tending to Dec ember 31, 1968). (a) Department of Parks and Recreation, City of Atlanta, Georgia, (In conjunction with Atlanta Public Schools), City Ha ll Annex , 260 Central Avenue , S. W., Atlanta, Georgia, 30303 (Public). Ja. 2-4463, Ex t. 311. (b) Jack C. Delius, General Manager, Pa r ks & Recreation, and Alan Koth, School Department. (c) Stanley T. Martin, Jr., Jack C. Delius. (d) Charles L. Davis, Comptroller Th e geographic area to be cover ed is tha t portion of the City of Atlanta desi gnated by E. O. A. as Tar ge t Ar ea; plus, Fringe Areas which are borde rline in respect to economic and social classifications. The persons to be serve d are f ive years of age to senior citizens; both s exe s, in-school and out-o f -school. V. I t is estima ted that 150 participants each da y will us e each location. Plans ca ll for 140 locations to be s erve d. Thus, 21,000 persons each day wi ll be s erved. Th is f i gure does not i nclude a cti vit ie s such as Award Day, audience s f or band concerts, e tc., and ot her spe ctator a ctivitie s. VI. Many a r eas of the city are def ici ent i n pa rk and recrea tion fa c i litie s . This fa c t had been clearly noted by the just comple t e d 1968 -1 983 Parks and Re creati on Plan . Sta ff of E. 0. A., Community Council, Ci ty Planning and Departmen t of Pa r ks conducted t he s t udy, The need f or th e pr ogram cover ed by th i s pr opos a l is c lear ly evid ent i n the t otal abs ~~ce of park a nd re crea tion fa c il i ties in many t arge t areas and t he i na de qua cy of fa ci l i ties where they do ex i st . I n re spons e to the s e defi c ienc ie s , some 40 p laylots have been c onstruc ted a nd s taf f ed, us i ng f or the mos t part, E. O. A. fund s . These playlo ts fail t o pr ovide f ul ly ade~uate phys i cal fa ci li t ies. Thus, s ome 62 s ch oo l s will be used dur i ng t he summer. The repor t Opportunity For Ur ban Excellence c i t e s a cl os e correlation between abs ence of f a cilities and incident of j uvenile de l inquency. VII. A coordinat or of summer activiti e s will be emp l oyed by May 1, 1968 . His duties will be to ·.initi? lly locate and r ecruit leaders of ALL a ge level s i n ALL t arget a r eas t o serve as an Advisor y Council f or planning and develop- , ment. The Coordinator wi l l be assisted in r ecr uitment by s choo l c ouncilors �at 62 elementary and high school locations; by E. O. A. Neighborhood Service Center Personnel; by the Community Council and by staff of Parks and Recreation Department. Leaders representing not only their age group but their respective neighborhoods will be asked to assist the staff in planning the surrnner pro gram . It is intended that each location (be it school, park or public housing project) will have local preferences as to types of programs. However, it is assumed that some identifiable basic list of prepared activities will emerge and 1.1:tilized as a base to insure "equal" programs on a city-wide basis. The program will initially be developed on ·a .pilot basis with constant evaluation by neighborhood leaders. Once assured of our acceptability and desirability of a given activity, it will be offered city-wide for the duration of the summer. Heavy emphasis will be placed on employing disadvantaged citizens in the operation of the program. Assignments of employment will range from actually operational, such as Recreation Aides to Advisory and Representation Roles in the various communities. It is planned that distinctive shirts will be supplied to teenagers ~10 will serve as cadre on a voluntary basis, approximately 1lOO teenagers and young adults will be transported to Atlanta Wilderness Camp each week to assist in its development while at camp. The young people will be taught swimming, canoeing, camping, nature interpretation, etc. VIII. IX. The project will have an overall Director, Assistant Director, Clerical Staff, Recreation Leaders, Recreation Supervisors, Camp Directors, Enrichment Personnel (Dance, Drama, Music, Arts and Craft). The number of poor youth , employed will be 336. Volunteers will exceed 100. The program will cover all areas within the defined boundries of E. O. A's. target zones. Some 140 locations will be staffed, using 62 schools and 78 parks and playlot locations. The hours of operation will be 9 A.M. - 9 P.M., Monday through Saturday. There will be a Central Headquarters located at Central Junior High School, 232 Pryor Street, S. E. The central office will coo:r.dirni.te all Pa r k and Recreation Department and Atlanta Public School Department's summer activites related to recreation, employment and cultural enrichment for the disadvantaged. The Program Director will be in overall charge of the project and wil l answer to a committee made up of School and Parks personnel as well as advisory committee of citizens. All supplies, e uipment, travel and transportaion, payroll, etc., will be handled at the Central Office. The City of Atlanta Purchasing Department will handle purchase transactions when requisitioned by the Central Office. The Central Office will maintain account records in order to have available current data. The Data Processing Division of Atlanta Public School s ,·;ri ll be utili zed if needed to analyze problems, expenditures, participation, etc. It is imperative that the Central Office be staffed by May 1, 1968 in order to establish procedures, communications with the neighborhood's recruitment and supply channels. This Parks/Schools joint venture will carefull y supplement and mesh with (1) regular City recreation problems, (2) Community Schools, (3) work-study and vocational education, (4) Title I Programs, (5) Neighborhood Youth Corps InSchool Enrollees, (6) contributing private agencies, (7) Academic Summer School. Program (8) Head Start, (9) individual contributions, (10) other public agency contributions . The Atlanta Children and Youth Council will serve as overall �coordinator acting for and with Mayor's Council on Youth Opportunity to see that all other support agencies are c arefully coordinated with the City's pro gram. This project will not pre-emp, but rather supplement regular City programs. Without Federal Funds, much, if not all, of the planned activities for disadvantaged areas would be curtailed. Thus, this Community Action Program complements the total City program. Youth, young adults, adults and senior citizens will assist in planning the program, its operation, and evaluation. Of special emphasis will be age group 5-25 years with the greatest attention directed to the teenager and young adult. The school drop-out, the potential drop-out, those with no immediate source of income, those with no positive cont a cts with Social Service Agencies, and those with no consistent work history on marketable skills will be located and employed by Central Office as an initial step in structuring and planning the program. Allocation of job slots will be based on geographical distribution and population so that all target areas will contribute. The Neighborhood Service Center, School Counselors and Social Agencies will be invited to assist in locating and screening applic ants . A police record will not necessarily preclude employment, but the Direc tor's judgement will prevail in cases involving morals, and in particular, sexual offenses. There will be no formal Civil Service Examination; selection will be based on (1) need for employillent as outlined above, (2) neighborhood identification, (3) le adership ability, and (4) skills tha t c an contribute to the program. The Pro gram Director will name final selection and assignment. Arrangements will be made for medical physicals to be given each applicant. Medical problems will be reported to Fulton County Medical Department for follow-up. Medical pro;.?lems will not necessarily bar employment, but rather serve as a guide in assignments. Five recreation districts will be established and supervised by r egular Park /School personnel. Youth will be used as Aides in each district office (as well as Control Office), each school and each park area. Activities to be offered: Crea tive Rhytmics Outdoor Games Quiet Games Folk Dancing Softball Volleyball Camp Crafts Sewing Ceramics Photography Musi c Appreciation Team Sports Weight Training Day and Overnight Camping Wood Working Ba ton Lessons Cheer leading Swimming Tr ack and Field Pu ppe try Tumbling Typing Fie ld Tr ips Teen Char m Jewelry Making Modern and Tap Dancing Judo �Obviously, not all of the a bove a ctivi t ies can be offered at each location. The Citizens' Advisoyy groups may delete a nd/or add to the list. As to freque ncy, i n t he c a s e of field trips, t hese wi ll be scheduled for at l e ast once a we e k per location. Definite schedules and programs wil l b e dis t ributed thru schools (before they recess for summer) Nei ghborhood Se rvice Centers, and. news media. Already, one tel e vision sta tion has agreed to publicize t he program on a continuing da ily basis. X. · Atlanta Youth Council. Coordination o f private and public agencie s in you t h opportunity progr am. Ga. Arts Commission. Contribution of technical assistance in arts and drama. Production of neighborhood movies and plays. Atla nta Braves and Atla nta Chie fs. to sta dium eve nts. Sports clinics, donated ticke ts Atlanta School System. Full partnership with Parks Department in summer program. Program will use some 62 schools. Army Corp's of En gi n eers. Full utiliz at ion of Lake Allatoon a proper t y, n amely, Atla nta Wilderne ss Camp s and At l a nta Re crea tion Camps. Atla nta Un ive rsity Cen t er . Su pp l y s ome 50 stude n t s ma joring in Phs . Ed . and Re creation to serve internship in summer. Childrens' Ac a d emy Thea tre . Publ ic Li bra ry. Pla ys in tar ge t areas. Read i n g clini cs. Band o f At l anta . At l e as t t wo con c erts in dis adv antaged areas. Theater At lanta . Se ri e s o f f re e pr o ductions. Buckhe a d Me n ' s Ga rde n Club . etc. " Ma g ic o f Growing " . Mr . Ge or ge Me y e r. Pr i vate Thea ter Gr oup - Mr . Eu gene Moore . Indiv i dua l . Farm". Dougla svi lle , Ga . Juni or Le agu e . Childr en ga rde n plots, Pla ys in Piedmont Park. Lar ge e sta te - appl e or char d. ' 'Day a t the Indivi dua l p ar tic ipation . P o ssible Donor - Wegn er Showmobile . XI. Al l fa ci l iti e s of t he De p a rtme nt o f Parks and The Atlanta Schoo l Sy stem which a re n eed e d to have a s u c c e s s f ul program will b e used, Th e loca ti on o f s chools is as f ollows: �TENTATIVE LIST OF SCHOOLS WITH A COMPLETE SUMMER PROGRAM AREA I Elementary High School English Avenue, 1., 2., 3. Craddock, 1. Bethune, 1., 2., 3. Ware, 1., 2., 3. Couch, 1., 3. Fowler, 1. Haygood, 1. Hardnett, 1., 2. Harris, 3. M. . A. Jones, 1., 2., 3. Ragsdale Herndon, 1. E. R. Carter Brown, 1. , 2. Washington, 1. O'Keefe Central (Office) AREA II Harper, 1. Parks ., Jr. High, 1. Gilbert, 3. Benteen Blair Village, 2., 3. Price, 1. , 2. Fulton AREA III Scott, 1., 3. Bolton Mt. Vernon Finch, 1. Hi ll, 1., 2., 3. F,orres t, 1. Butl er , 1. John Hope , 1. Inman Park, 1. Archer, 1. Grady, 2. AREA IV Mays on , 1 . Towns Fain Williams, 1., 2 . , 3. Carey , 1. Wes t Haven White Clement , 1. We s t Fu lton, 1. Turner , 1. , 2 . Harper �AREA V Reynolds, 1. Lin Pryor, 1. Cooper, 1. Capitol Avenue, 1., 2., 3. Slaton, 1. , 3. Cook , 1., 3. E. P. Johnson, 1. Daniel Stanton, 1. Hubert, 1. Coan, 1. Wesley, 1., 2., 3. Toomer Bass Roos eve l t , 1., 2. Murphy, 1. ELIMI NATED DUE TO CONSTRUCTION IMPROVEMENTS Chattahoochee Highland Bryant Howard - Hope CODE 1. 2. 3. Titl e I Academic Program Head Start PARKS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16, 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. Chattahoochee (undeve l oped) Gun Club Engli sh Par ks - supp l emen t Adamsvil le (us e Fain playground)_ - supp l ement Center Hi ll Grove ·- supplement Ande rson Park - supplement Mozley - supplemen t Maddox Park Washington Park University Park Couch Park Horne Park - supp l ement Te chwood (Housing Project) Piedmont Park Bedford-Pine (Hill School ) Butler Park Bass - supplement Savannah Street Oakland City Park Adair Park - supplement Pittman - supplement �PARKS (Cont'd) 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. Joyland - extended Carver - extended Rawson-Washington - supplement Thomasville - supplement Walker Park Wesley Park Branham Park - supplement 71 Little Street 253 Dodd Avenue 666 Parkway Drive Haynes Street Vine City Knight Park Harper Park (4 Senior High Rise) BLOCK PARKS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12 . 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19 . 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25 . 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. Aubur n Avenue - Boulevard, N. E. Forre st & Fort Avenue , N. E. An gi er-Parkway , N. E. Merritts & Bedf ord St ., N. E. Blvd. Pl. & Glen Iris Dr., N. E. Sampson - East Avenue , N. E. Wylie & Tye St ., S. E. Vernon Stree t, N. E. Hanover & Renfroe St., S . E. Con l ey St., S . E. Atlanta Stadium Windsor St., S. W. I r a St., S. W. Eu genia-Rawson St ., S. W. McDani e l St . & Ge orgi a Avenue Ashby Circ l e Harris Hornes Rhode s St. - Sunset Blvd. 3 73 Thurmond S t. , S . W• Vanier & Cap ita l Hubbard & University Park Avenue & Lansing Haygood & Crew Ladd St., S . W. Wi ls on Dr. , N. W. Verbena St., N. W. Habshal & Perry Bl vd., N. W. Perry Blvd, & Lively, N. W. Arlington Circle, N. W. Daniel Street, N. E. �XII. XIII. Constant monitoring and evaluation by Citizens' Advisory Corrnnittee as well as staff of School Board and Parks Department. This project compliments and extends normal agency program and fills gaps and deficiencies existing in disadvantaged areas. In addition to service to the .poor, the pro gram will clearly illustrate to the city and its citizens what can be done with sufficient financin g . It can not be stated a t this time what part of this program will be continued once federal funding is completed. However, on two previous occasi6ns, the j:;ity has continued parts of O.E.O. financed funding. �CITY OF ATLAl."\J'TA RECREATION, E}'f..PLOYV.lENT, AND ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR SU.MMER, 1968 BUDGET RECAP I FEDERAL SHARE ~II. III. IV. v. VI. VII. PERSONNEL $ 873,367 $ 101,.600 CONSULTANTS & CONTRACT .SERVICES , 3,000 None TRAVEL 90,410 1,735 2,025 261,180 282,297 9 ,0 00 80,550 62, 880 7,130 51,2 95 SPACE COSTS & RENTALS CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES RENTAL/LEASE/PURCHASE OF · EOUIPMENT OTHER COSTS $1,338,779 FEDERAL SHARE: $ 1,338,779 NON-FEDERAL SHARE: $ 48 7,690 TOTAL COST OF PROJECT: · $ 1,826,469 .,. I NON-FEDERAL SHARE $ 487 , f.>90 I I �CITY OF ATLANTA I RECREATION, EMPLOYMENT , AND ENRI CHMENT PROGRAM i' I 'I ' SUMMER, 1 968 I I BUDGET - FEDERAL SHARE I . FEDERAL SHA.t:IB I. II·:. i . I ! PERSO NNEL i I ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF : I I Dil:RECTOR - 4 MONTHS @ $1,000.00/MO. $ I 4 , 00 0 .0 0 I ASSISTANT DIRECTOR - 4 MONTHS @ $75 4 .00/MO. 3,016.00 · I BUSINESS MANAGER - 4 MONTHS @ $ 612 . 00/MO 2, 448 . 00 I, 1, 9 88 . 00 1· i I I• ACCOUNTING ~SISTANT - 4 MONTHS @ $497.00/MO. PAYROLL CLERK - 3 MONTHS @ $4 20.00/MO. i I·i 1 , 26 0 .. 00 I PRI NCIPAL STENOGRAPHER - 4 MONTHS@ $ 457.00/MO. l , 823 u0 0 I GENERAL CLERK - 4 MONTHS@ $3 26 .00/MO. 1 , 30 4. 00 I ! I I YOUTH ASSISTANTS (3) - 4 MONTHS @ $1. 4 0/HOUR EACH I I 2,6 8 8. 00 I REGI ONAL OFFI CES : AREA RECREATION SUPERVISORS (5) - 1 5 DAYS @ $ 3 2 . 00/DAY EACH AREA SCHOOL SUPERVI SORS ( 5 ) - 8 0 DAYS @ $32. 00/DAY EACH · ASSISTANT RECREATION SUPERVISORS. / ~ . ) - 3 MONTHS $ 438. 00/MO. EACH TYPIST CLERKS ( 5 ) - 3 MONTHS@ $3 2 b .00/MO. EACH I ' I ' I I 2, ,4 00 . oo 12, 8 00.00 6,570 . 00 4 , 89 0 .0 0 I YOUTH ASSISTANTS ( 10) - 3 MONTHS@ $1.40/HR. EACH 6 ,7 20 .0 0 PARKS/SCHOOLS/ BLOCK PARKS : COMMUNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS (1 3) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $ 20 . 2 5/DAY 21,060.00 COMMUNITY RECREATION LEADERS ( 5 7 ) - 8 0 DAYS EACH @ $ 16.40/DAY 74 ,7 84. 00 ENRICHMENT SPECIALISTS ( 36 ) - 560 HOURS EACH @ $ 4. 00/HR. 80,640.00 -~ �P~RSOm:J'EL - Co ntinue d YOUTH ASSISTANTS (336) - 12 WEEK S EACH @ $56.00/wEEK 225,79 2. 00 BLOCK PARK LEADERS (60) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $16 .40/DAY 78 , 7 20 .. 00 SENIOR CITIZEN LEADERS ( 8 ) - 8 0 DAYS EACH @ $16. 4 0/DAY 10, 496 . 0 0 SPECIALISTS (8) - 40 DAYS EACH @ $20.00?DAY ASSISTANT POOL SUPERVISOR - 13 WEEKS@ $100.00/WEEK WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTORS (22) - 280 HOURS EACH @ $2.25/HOUR ,. 6, 4 00 ... 0 0 1,300 . 00 13, 86 0 .0 0 II I ! WATER SAFETY ASSISTANTS (11) - 28 0 HOURS EACH @ $1. 751.tlOUR 5,390.00 WATER SAFETY AIDES (11) - 28 0 HOURS EACH @ $1. 4 0/HOUR 4 , 31 2 .. 00 AREA RECREATION DIRECTORS (12) - 60 DAYS EACH @ $22.95/DAY I iI II I· I,. I 16,5 2 4-.00 i ' I· COMMUNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS ( 62 ) DAYS EACH @ $ 20. 25/DAY 75,3 30.00 COMMUNITY RECREATION LEADERS (5 6 ) - 6 0 DAYS EACH @ $ 16. 4 0/DAY 55, 104 .00 INSTRUCTORS (12 4 ) - 15 HOURS PER WEEK EACH @ $ 4 .00/HOUR FOR 10 WEEKS 7 4 , 400.00 ·I I ' WILTIERNE SS CAMP: PROJECT DI RECTOR - 48 DAYS@ $26.00/DAY 1 , 2 48. 00 ASSISTANT PROJE CT DI RECTOR - 4 8 DAYS @ $2 4. 95/DAY 1,1 9 7 . 00 PROGRAM DIRECTOR - 48@ $24.95/ DAY 1,197.00 COUNSELORS ( 6 ) - 48 DAYS EACH @ $16.40/DAY 4,7 2 3 . 00 COOK - 48 DAYS@ $20. 00/DAY 9 6 0 .. 00 ASSISTANT COOK - 48 DAYS@ $12.50/ DAY 6 00 . 00 ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP: CAMP DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $26 . 00/DAY 2, 0 8 0. 0 0 I ASSISTANT CAMP DIRECTOR - 8 0 DAYS @ $ 20 . 2 5/DAY 1,620.00 PROGRAM DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $ 16.4 0/DAY 1,312 .. 00 ' I . I �PERSONNEL - Continued COUNSELORS (6) - 80 DAYS @ $15.00/DAY EACH 7,200 . 00 REGISTERED NURSE - 80 DAYS 2,0 80.00 @ $26 . 00/DAY DIETITIAJ.'\J - 80 DAYS @ $20 . 00/DAY 1,600 .. 00 COOK - 8 0 DAYS@ $20.00/DAY 1,600. 00 ASSISTANT COOK - 80 DAYS 1,000.00 @ $12.50/DAY ,I I I ! INSTANT RECREATION TASK FORCE: PROJECT DIRECTOR - 80 DAYS @ $20.25/DAY 1,620 . 00 RECREATION LEADERS (20) - 80 DAYS EACH @ $16.40/DAY 26, 24 0 .. 00 ROVING MAINTENANCE CREWS: GROUNDS FOREMEN (5) - 26 DAYS EACH @ $29 .. 45/DAY 3, 828 . 00 LABOR FOREMEN (10) - 26 DAYS EACH @ $21.10/DAY 5, 486.00 EQUIPMENT OPERATORS (10) - 26 DAYS EA.@ $16. 4 0/DAY 4 ,2 6 4 .00 LABORERS (20) - 26 DAYS EACH@ $1 4 . 4 0/DAY 7, 4-88. 00 TOTAL PERSONNEL $ 873, 367.00 FEDERAL SHA."<.E II. CONSULTANTS AND CONTRACT SERVI CES CONSULTANTS FEES FOR FINAL EVALUATION TOTAL III. $ · 3, 000 .. 00 TRAVEL RENTAL OF BUSE S FOR FIELD TRIPS INSI DE CITY 1250 TRIPS@ $41.0 0 EACH $ 51,250.00 I I I, RENTAL OF BUSES FOR FIELD TR I PS OUT OF CITY 200 TRIPS@ $45.00 EACH 9,000 . 00 ALL DAY RENTAL OF BUSES - 420 BUSES@ $68,00 PER DAY EACH. 28 , 5 60.0 0 CAR ALLOWANCES: DIRECTOR - 4 MONTHS@ $80 .. 00/MOo 320 . 00 ' �TRAVEL - Continued · , ASSISTANT DIRECTOR - 4 MONTHS@ $80.00/MO. 320.00 PAYROLL CLERK - 3 MONT'"dS @ $50.00/MO .. 150 .00 RECREATION DISTRICT SUPERVISORS (5) 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 150 .00 . SCHOOL DISTRICT SUPERVISORS (5) - 3 MONTHS _@ $50.00/MO . 150.00 COMMUNITY RECREATION DIRECTORS (5) 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 150.00 ASSISTANT POOL SUPERVISOR - 3 MONTHS @ $ 2 0 • 0 0 /MO .. IV. 60 .. 00 PROJECT DIRECTORS (2)- 2 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. 100.00 ASSISTANT PROJECT DIRECTORS (2) - 2 MONTHS @ $ 5 0. 0 0 / MO • 10 0.00 PROGRAM DIRECTORS (2) - 2 MONTHS@ $50 .. 00/MO .. 1 00.00 TOTAL I L $ 90, 410.00 i I, q ,,I SPACE COSTS AND RENTALS INOOOR FACILITIES FOR TEMPORARY RECREATION I I CENTERS - 3 HOUSES@ $120.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS I I i' BLOCK PARKS - 45 RENTALS @ $ 7. 00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS TOTAL 9 4 5 .. 00 $ 2,025.00 FEDERAL SHARE V. CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES CENTRAL OFFICE: OFFICE SUPPLIES - $250.00/MO. FOR 4 MONTHS $ ·1 , 00 0 .. 00 �CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES - Continue d REGIONAL OFFICES: OFFICE SUPPLIES - 5 LOCATIONS @ $35.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 525 . 00 PARIZS/SCHOOLS/BLOCK PARKS: RECREATION SUPPLIES - BALLS, GAJ.'\IB S, ARTS . & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, ATHLETIC SUPPLIES  ; , FOR 140 LOC_ATIONS @ $ 500. 00/LOCATIONS 70,000 . 00 FOOD FOR LUNCHES - 100 CHILDREN PER DAY @ $.20/CHILD AT 140 LOCATIONS FOR . 60 DAYS 168,000.00 WILDER.1.~ESS CAMP: ATHLETIC -SUPPLIES, SHELLS, ARROWS, ARTS & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, GAMES, BLANKETS, SHEETS, FIRST AID SUPPLIES, CAMPING SUPPLIES 2,000 .. 00 FOOD FOR 48 DAYS FOR 111 TEENAGERS AND STAFF @ $ 4 .00/DAY EACH fl,31 2 .. 0 0 ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP: ATHLETIC SUPPLIES, ARTS & CRAFTS SUPPLIES, GAMES, BLANKETS, SHEETS, FIRST AID SUPPLIES 2,5 00.00 FOOD FOR 80 DAYS FOR 5 3 CHILDREN .AND . STAFF @ $4.00/DAY EACH TOTAL VI . $ 282, 297.00 RENTAL/ LEASE/ PURCHASE OF EQUIPMENT PARKS/ SCHOOLS/BLOCK PARKS: 18 POOL TABLES @ $350 . 00 EACH PARALLEL BARS & RELATED PHYSICAL FITNESS EQUIPMENT - 120 ITEMS @ 1 00 . 00 EACH WEIGHT LI FTING EQUIPMENT 10 SETS@ $5 0 . 0 0 EACH & $ 6 , 300.00 1 2 ,000 . 00 BENCH 50 0. 00 MATS FOR 1 0 AREAS @ $ 20 0 .00/AREA 2 , 000.00 25 BASKETBALL GOALS & BACKBOARDS@ $5 0 . 00 EACH 5 SETS OF SOCCER GOALS @ $ 1 5 0 000/SET 1, 25 0.00 7 5 0 .. 00 �RENTAL/LEASE/PURCHASE OF EQUIPMENT - Continued BASEBALL GLOVES FOR 100 TEh"-'.:S 100 TENNIS RACKETS @ @ J.,O,. 000 .,00 $100.00/TEAM $15.00 EACH . 1,.500.00 · I· i I . 1· i VOLLEY BALL STANDARDS - 100 PAIRS @ $25.00/PAIR 2,500 .. 00 300 ARCHERY BOWS@ $12.00 EACH 3,.600.00 100 ARCHERY TARGETS @ $ 20. 00 EACH 2,000.00 PORTABLE TOILET RENTALS FOR 50 LOCATIONS @ $45.00/MONTH EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 6,.750 .. 00 MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPJV.l.ENT RENTALS & PURCHASES - . FILM RENTALS, RECORD PLAYERS, ETC. FOR 140 LOCATIONS@ $100.00/LOCATION 14,.000 . 00 WILDERNESS CAMP: STOVE, ELECTRIC GENERATOR, COOKING SHELTER, STORAGE SHED, COTS, TOILETS, TOOLS, ETC. ESTIMATED BY CITY 10,000. 0 0 I I 2.,000.00 ELECTRIC PUMP AJ.~D WATER TANK !1 RENTAL OF PICKUP TRUCKS - 2 TRUCKS @ $150.00/MO. FOR 3 MONTHS 900 . 00 ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP: BOATS, PADDLES, BUOYS, CHAIRS, DISHES, UTENSILS AND MI SCELLANEOUS ITEMS ESTIMATED BY CITY 2, 50 0 .00 ELECTRI C PUMP & WATER TANK TOTAL VII. $ 80., 550.00 $ 3,500 . 0 0 OTHER COSTS PHYSICAL EXAMS FOR APPROXIMATELY 350 YOUTH EMPLOYE D @ $ 1 0 . 00/EMPLOYEE ADVERTISING EXPENSE 2 .,0 0 0 . 00 ADMISSION TICKETS FOR SPECIAL EVENTS 7 .ADDITI ONAL TELEPHONES@ $3 0.00/ MO. FOR 3 MONTHS 1,. 0 0 0 .00 TOTAL TOTAL FEDERAL SHARE 630.00 $ 7,130.00 $ 1,338,7 79 .. 00 J �SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM ., JUNE 1, 1968 - SEPT. 1, 1968 I .' TOTAL BUDGET - NON-FEDERAL SHARE I. PERSONNEL GENERAL MANAGER OF PARKS & RECREATION ONE MONTH @ $17,628.00 Al.~NUAL I' I, $ I ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER OF PARKS TWO . WEEKS@ $12,116.00 ANNUAL ' 46q.OO DIRECTOR OF RECREATION - ONE MONTH @ $12,116.00 ANNUAL I 820.00 ASSI STANT DIRECTOR OF RECREATION ONE MONTH @ $9,048.00 ANNUAL 75 4 •.00 I I. 1 2,260.00 OFFICE MANAGER - TWO WEEKS @ $9,048.00 ANNUAL 348.00 ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT - TWO WEEKS @ $5,967.00 ANNUAL 229.50 PRINCIPAL STENOGRAPHER - TWO WEEKS @ $5,486.00 ANNUAL 211.00 . '! SENIOR TYPIST CLERK - ONE WEEK @ $4,641.00 . STENO CLERK - ONE WEEK @ $ 4 ,264 .00 ANNUAL 82.00 TYPIST CLERK - ONE WEEK@ $3,913.00 ANNUAL 75. 25 PARKS ENGINEER - TWO WEEKS @ $11,154.00 ANNUAL 429. 00 DRAFTSMAN - TWO WEEKS @ $5 ,720 . 00 ANNUAL 220.00 I /' I PARKS MAINTENANCE SUPERINTENDENT - ONE MONTH @ $10,257.00 ANNUAL ~54.00 II ENGINEERING ASSISTANT - ONE MONTH @ $8,671. 00 ANNUAL 722.00 I ENGINEERING AIDE II ( 2) - ONE MONTH EACH @ $4,836.00 ANNUAL I I i i ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT - ONE MONTH @ $9,841.00 ANNUAL RECREATION SUPERVISORS (8) - TWO WEEKS EACH @ $7,345.00 ANNUAL I I: 806.00 I I I GROUNDS FOREMAN II .... ONE WEEK@ $7,657.00 ANNUAL 147 .. 25 LABOR FOREMAN - TWO MONTHS @ $5,486.00 ANNUAL 91 4,.00 I �PERSONNEL - Continued LABORERS - 1,800 HOURS@ $1. 80/HOUR 3,:240.00 130 .00 -CA.-qpENTERS - 4 0 HOURS @ $3.25/f-IOUR GENERAL MAINTENANCE Y.iECHANIC II - TWO WEEKS @ $7,345.00 ANNUAL 282 . 50 EQUI PMENT OPERATOR I - 8 HOURS @ $ 2 . 0 5/HOUR 1 6 . t.1: 0 FORE STRY FOREMAN - 8 HOURS @ $ 3 .. 25/HOUR I ! Ij \ /. 2 6 . 00 I TREE TRIMiv'.iER II - 24 HOURS @ $2.13/HOUR TREE TRI M:MER I - 24 HOURS ELECTRICIAN FOREMAN ELECTRICIANS - @ $ 1 . 8 8 / HOUR 1 6 : HOURS @ $ 3 . 68/HOUR . 4 5.12 i 58.88 I! I I $11.154.00 ANNUAL SENI OR BUDGET ANALYST I \I 99 . 52 32 HOURS@ $3.11/ HOUR AS SOCIATE CITY ATTORNEY - ONE WEEK @ I 51. 12 21 4 . 5 0 TWO WEEKS@ $9 , 841 . 00 ANNUAL COMPTROLLER - ONE DAY @ $7 6 . 85/DAY 7 6 .85 CITY CLERK - ONE DAY@ $57. 4 0/DAY 57. 40 DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENTAL LI AI SON - ONE WEEK @ $1 7, 628 .00 ANNUAL 339 . 00 DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL - TWO WEEKS @ $1S~8 2.00 ANNUAL 707-.00 DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL - ONE MONTH @ $ 1 2 ,116. 00 ANNUAL 1,009 .00 PERSONNEL TECHNICIANS ( 3) - ONE MONTH EACH @ $ 7 ,345. 00 ANNUAL 1,836.00 RIGHT- OF- WAY AGENT - Ti:rJO WEEKS @ $7 , 046. 00 ANNUAL 271 . 00 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS - ONE WEEK @ $ 32 ,000.00 ANNUAL, 615 . 00 I ! i ASSI STANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR INSTRUCTI ON TWO WEEKS @ $ 20, 000 . 0 0 ANNUAL . II 769.00 i J I ASSISTANT SUPERI NTENDENT FOR SCHOOL PLANT & PLANNING - TWO DAYS@ $7 5. 00/DAY I 150.00 I I I I I DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY SCHOOLS - TWO MONTHS @ $ 15,360. 00 ANNUAL COORDINATORS ( 4 ) = ONE WEEI( EACH @ $10,000 .. 00 ANNUAL 2,560000 769.20 �P2 RSONNEL - Continued AREA SUPERINTENDENTS (5) ONE WEEK E2\CH @ $18,000.00 ANNUAL I, SCHOOL COV.LPTROLLER - ONE DAY @ I 153.50 ACCOUNTANT - ONE WEEK @ $,7, 982. 00 Al.~NUAL 75.00 SCHOOL ATTORNEY - ONE DAY@ $76.00/DAY PRINCIPALS (62) - THREE WEEKS EACH@ $12,000.00 ANNUAL . ,, 42,921.36 ·CUSTODIANS (62) - ONE MONTH EACH @ $3,900.00' Al'"\J'NUAL SUB TOTAL I 76 .. 85 $ 7 6. 85/DAY 20, 150 •.00 $ 90,714.70 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS AT 12¾ OF GROSS SALARIES OF ABOVE INDIVIDUALS (12¾ x $90,71 4 .70) .. IT IS THE CITY'S EXPERIENCE THAT 'YriE COST OF EMPLOYEE BENEFITS AVERAGE 12¾ OF THE COST OF DIRECT SALARIES. THE CITY MATCHES EMPLOYEES' CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PENSION FUND, WHICH IS 6¾ OF THEIR GROSS SALARIES. THE CITY ALSO PARTICIPATES IN THE CQST OF HEALTH AND LIFE INSURA!.'"\J'CE. THE EXACT AMOUNT DEPENDING UPON THE PARTICULAR POLICY AND THE NUMBER OF DEPENDENTS. 10 1 885.7 6 TOTAL II. $ 101,600. 4 6 ,' II I NONE CONSULTANTS AND CONTRACT SERVICES i .I III. TRAVEL 'i USE OF ONE CI TY OWNED BUS AND TWO STATION WAGONS FOR SUMMER $ 5 AREA SUPERINTENDENTS@ $15.00/MO. FOR 3 MONTHS 225.00 4 COORDINATORS@ $15.00/MO. FOR 3 MONTHS 180.00 30.00 l SUPERINTENDENT@ $10.00/MO. FOR 3 MON'YrlS TOTAL IV., 1,300 .00 I I I . I I I I $ .l SPACE COSTS AND RENTALS WILDERNESS CAMl?, 473 ACRE\ TRACT ON LAKE ALLATOONA $ 3,000 .. 00 ' ! I �,_ SPACE COSTS AND RENTALS - Continued I ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP, LAKE ALLATOONA 47 DAYS@ $100.00/DAY i $', ·4, 700 .. 00 . ! I I I I SWIMJ.\1ING POOLS - 5 POOLS FOR 5 DAYS @ $200.00/DAY PER POOL z90 5,000.00 I I I CLASSROOM - 3 MONTHS@ $100.00/MO. 300.00 SAVANNAH STREET MISSION - 3 MONT'"dS @ $100.00/MO. 300.00 71 LITTLE STREET - 3 MONTHS@ $100.00/MO. 300.00 4 0 PLAYLOTS - 3 MONTHS@ $60.00/MO. 7,200.00 RENTAL VALUE OF TWELVE COMJ.vlUNITY CENTERS OPEN AN ADDITIONAL 23 4- HOURS FOR SUMMER @ $10.00 PER HOUR - $2,340 EACH X 12 CENTERS . 28,080.00 12 HIGH SCHOOL GROUNDS@ $200.00 EACH FOR SUMMER 2,400 .. 00 50 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GROUNDS@ $100.00 EACH FOR SUMMER 5,000.00 396 CLASSROOMS - 60 DAYS @ $5.00 PER DAY EACH 118,800. 00 12 SCHOOL GYMS - 60 DAYS @ $20.00 PER DAY EACH 14, 4 00 .. 00 12 AUDITORIUMS - 30 DAYS@ $15.00 PER DAY EACH 5,400.00 25 AUDITORIUMS - 30 DAYS@ $10.00 PER DAY EACH 7,500.00 2 STADIUMS - 10 TIMES EACH@ $500.00 PER OCCASION 10,000.00 62 CAFETERIAS - 50 DAYS @ $15.00 PER DAY EACH 4 6 ., 500 ... 0 0 CENTRAL OFFICE - 4 MONTHS· @ $200.00 PER MO. 8 00. 0 0 5 AREA OFFICES - 3 MONTHS@ $100 . 00 PER MO. 1,500.00 TOTAL V. I $ 261, 180 .00 $ 1,000.00 CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES SWI MMI NG POOL SUPPLI ES - CHLORI NE, SODA ASH, KICKBOARDS, WASHBASINS, . CLIP BOARDS , ETC . RECREATION SUPPLIE S - ARTS , & CRAFTS , GAME S, ETC. TO BE PROVIDED BY CITY FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS AT 12 RECREATION CENTERS@ $100.00 PER CENTER FOR SUMMER . 1,200 .. 00 I -I �' CONSUMABLE SUPPLIES - Continued S P..ND, LUMBER, PAINT, CONCRETE BLOCKS, AND OTiiSR V.lATERIALS INCLUDING COST OF HANDLING !?URCHASE ORDERS - ESTIMATE BASED ON PAST EXPERIENCE OF CITY 6,800 00 0 TOTAL $ ·1 9,000.00 I I VI. II RENTAL/LEASE/PURCHASE OF EQUIPMENT ONE PORTABLE SWIMMING POOL TO BE PURCHASED AND INSTALLED BY CITY $ 7,125.00 RENTAL VALUE OF 4 EXISTING PORTABLE SWIMMING POOLS@ $500.00 EACH FOR SUMMER 2, ·0 00 .. 00 RECREATION EQUIPMENT PROVIDED BY CITY FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS AT 12 RECREATION CENTERS @ $200 .. 00 PER CENTER FOR SUJY'l.MER 2,400.00 EXISTING EQUIPMENT AT ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP RENTAL VALUE OF $200 .. 00/WEEK FOR 8 WEEKS 1,600.00 22,000.00 .I LOADERS - 5 00 HOURS@ $17.50/HOUR 8 , 750.00 I GRADERS - 500 HOURS@ $15.00/HOUR 7,500.00 STATION WAGON (ENGINEER) - 400 HOURS@ $9 .. 00/HOUR 3,600.00 5 0 FIRE HYDRANT WRENCHES - 90 DAYS @ $1.00/DAY EA .. 4,500.00 II 1 4 TYPEWRITERS @ $20.00/MO. EACH FOR 3· MONTHS 8 4 0. 0 0 ! 6 CALCULATORS@ $20 .. 00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 3 6 0 . 00 6 M!MEOGRAPH MACHINES @ $30.00/ MO. EACH EOR .+°'10 NTHS 5 4 0.00 6 DITTO MACHINE S@ $ 30.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 5 4 0.00 TRUCKS - 2,000 HOURS@ $11.00/HOUR II I I I I I 25 DESKS & CHAIRS @ $15.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 MONTHS _ _ _1__._,1_2_5_o_O_O I TOTAL $ 62,88 0 . 00 I I �VII. OTHER COSTS FREE ADMISSIONS TO CYCLOR.AlvIA - 3000 CHILDREN @ $.50 Al.~D 500 ADULTS@ $1.00 EACH $ 2,000.00 'l' FREE ADMISSION TO ATLAl.~TA BRAVES G.Al.'1ES AND ATLANTA CHIEFS GAMES - 30 1 000 TICKETS @ $.50 EACH ' ' . I / 15,000.00 'J.ET RIDE ON SOUTHERN AIRWAYS PLAl.~E , 1,000 CHILDREN@ $10.00 EACH '; 10,000.00 I I I LECTURES BY CURATOR OF REPTILES, ZOO FOREMAN 1 ETC. UTILITIES (ELECTRICITY, GAS, WATER & TELEPHONES) 62 SCHOOLS@ $100.00/MONTH EACH FOR 3 MONTHS 1,000.00 r 18,600.00 I, ! I I.I I I UTILITIES - ATLANTA RECREATION CAMP@ $100.00/MO. FOR 2 MONTHS UTILITIES - LIGHTS fOR 7 PLAYLOTS, WATER FOR 25 PLAYLOTS AND 50 FIRE HYDRANT SPRINKLERS, UTILITIES FOR 4 HOUSES I I 200.00 · 2,000 ~00 I· ' UTILITIES FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS IN 12 RECREATION CENTERS - 3 MONTHS@ $20.00/MO. X 12 CENTERS 720.00 WATER AND OT"tlER UTILITIES FOR 5 PORTABLE SWIMMING POOLS - 3 MONTHS@ $50.00/MO. EACH 750.00 WATER AND OTHER UTILITIES FOR 5 MAJOR SWIMMING . POOLS FOR EXTENDED SWIMMING PROGRAM 5 DAYS @ $.5. 00 PER DAY X 5 POOLS 125.00 UTILITIES AND TELEPHONES FOR CENTRAL OFFICE AND 5 AREA OFFICES - 6 LOCATIONS@ $50.00/MO. EACH FOR 3 ~.ONTHS 900 .. 0 0 TOTAL NON-FEDERAL Sh .Ai:ill . I I TOTAL I 'l I I i I I $ 51,295 . 00 $ 487,690 .46 I �/. Sillh'.lER YOUTH OPPORTillJITY PROGRA.1."'1 VINE CITY FOUNDATION Proiect Recr e ation Plug-In This is a pilot employment progr ~ n·designed to utilize 11 indigenous teenage youth age s 16-20 to serve as coTTuu unity recr e ation organiz e rs. The youth Recreation Organizers will recruit> organi ze, plan, and supe rvise 10 other teenag~rs each to provide planned sumne r r e creation on a 24 hour b a sis. The project will last for 11 weeks. Budg e t Req1:1 e st $13,718 WAOK RADIO STAT ION, EOA, ~O~frflJNITY SCHOOLS Junior D. J. P~r am An employme nt, cultural, and communications program utilizing 10 Juri.ior ., D. J. 's from high dens ity to be trained in use of P~A o equipme nt to provide r e cord hops for about 10,000 high school and young adults age s 16-25 during th e evening hours (7:30-10;00 P. M.)~ These hops will be giVe n in all of the 14 Neighborhood Se r v ice Ce nter areas. The proj e ct will last 4 months. , tHt : l, •. ,!..l fr\Ai:: E (',- ) ~ t=\ (,:, '" ,c~ 1 ·r3 -J .-1 c"' r- r J33 cc c: 1 : :_: ,.. .::. u 1 Budget Re ques t ir 1 3 ~i: \ CENTRAL CITY, EOA pperation Youth This is an employme nt, r e cre ation, cultural, and ed_u cation a l progra~ . Se rving 500 ma l es a~d f ema l e s ages 5-25 in and out of s c hoo l in a compr eh e ns i v e program of recre a tion and cultural acti v it ies including d ive rs ifi ed p layg r ound pr ograms , field trips, craft s , dr a::12. tics , dance , gr ou p 4i s cu ss i on , e tc. The pr oj e ct will la s t 11 we eks . Budge t Request $3,070.12 CABBAGE TOWN RECREATIOX/ WORK YOUTH CENTER This is a pro g r am des i gne d t o invol ve 50-100 ma l es a nd f ema l e s in and out o f schoo l age s 12-21 in a pr og r am of r ecr e at i on , empl oy me nt, e du ca t ion , a c d cul tural e n r ic hme nt acti v iti es . The youth in th e pr o j e ct wi ll work s i x ho ur s p~r d a y in such ac t i v i ti e s as f iel d trip s , c avp i ng , t ut o ria l , e t c. Th e pro j ect will l ast for 12 wee ks . Budg e t Req ues t $15,0 00 �-2- THE CHURCH OF THE HA.STER , UN I TED PRESBYTERI AN USA Su1inne r Enr i chmen t P·L·ogram ' I This p rog r am ·{ s a r ec r e ation, edu ca tion and cultural enr .i c hment pr ogram serv i ng ________ __ youth age s · to · in art s · and cra f t, Lect ur1=:s ( spor t s , .socia l to p ic s , curre nt ~ t s ) , fi e ld tri ps , tu tor ial programs , d an cing ,- games , sports,. and coun se ling serv i ces . The project will last a pprox i ma t e ly 8 we e ks . $10,982 Budge t Re ques t EKALB YWCA V/ Job Prepara ti ori Yro gr am An emp l oyment program designe d t o ser v e 25 teenage g irls 16-18 years of age an d t r a{ni ng and c ouns e ling i n going ab out ge tting a job. The pr og r am will l as t for 7 mon th s . $5ll - Bud ge t Req ue st BOHL ANriEoA , rnc. Re cr ea ti on a l ( Bow l ing ) Pr ogram This r e cr e at i on , cultur a l, an d educat i on program wi ll s e r v e an d spo r t mansh ip, t eam an d i ndiv i dual pri de . The p rogram will l ast 12 weeks . 1200 yout h age a 7-1 8 in limit e d s k ill s in bowl i ng , f a ir pl a y Bud ge t Request $13,800 ACADEHY THEATRE Pr o je c t Cir cus A r ecr ea tiona l, ed uc a tio na l, a nd cul t u r a l program des igne d t o u ti l iz e s ome Sb youth t h r ougho ut Atl an t a , who wi l l be traine d in theat r e and dr ama tic t ec h n i ques . The y wi ll work with younger chil dr en i nvo l ve d i n see in g Cir cus '. Bu dg e t Re ques t $1 6 ,737 .2 0 RUTH MITC HELL DA.c\'CE COHPA.1\;Y Dan ce I ns tr uct i on i n Eocern J azz Ba ll e t A r ec r eationa l, e duc a ti ona l , and cu l tura l program des i gned to utili ze _ __ y ou th , ages 9- 15 in pr ovi d ing cl asses i n ~ode r n J azz Ball et in pr eparat i on f or a pro gram t o be pr esented-by t he Yo ut h . This p ro j ect wi ll l a st f or 10 we eks. Bu dget Reques t $975 �-3- Lawso n Apaitments A recreational and e4ucational program designed to serve 75-100 teenage boys and girls ages 7-12 (r esidents of the Apartments) in a recr-; ational and education progr a~ five .days a week, 9:00-5:30 which will includ e club pro gram , service project, dr amat ics, trips, for teen age girls and sports, game s, arts and cr afts, pond play activity for younger bo ys and girls . The proj ect wil l last for ap~r oximately 2 months. Budget Request ATLAi."JT A YWCA .. $3,028 The Originals An e xper i men tal ·p ilot· project designed to use social group work method, community org anizat ion and a historical approach in organizing a t een dr ama g roup to pre sent special programs f6r th e commun :i:.1 ty . The proj ect will utilize 50-500 poor youth between th e ages of 15-21. The yout h activ ity wil l includ e dance, dr ama , music , ~tc. The viewing audi ence will ran ge from 100-1000. Dur ~tion of project - 14 weeks. Budget Re quest $21,550 ATLA.l~TA YWCA \ Teen Partners This comprehensive education, emplo:yme nt, coun·seling, cultur a l and recre ation program is d esigned to help in th e developme nt of attitude s, goals , motivation, 'knm-, led ge and skill of 24-30 youth within a thr e-e ~ile ra dius of th e Cent r al 'fl-[CA . The youth along with th e training will be provided a compr ehensive r e creational pro gram. Dur~ tion of proj ect - 8 week s . Budge t Re quest $6,94 7.11 CENTRAL YWCA Job Exo lor ation for Teen Teams This empl oyme nt, ed ucation and r ecreat ional prog ram ,,, ill utili ze 40- 50 youth in a six week train ing pr ogram to wo rk with v ar i o us childre n prog r aas ( ages 5-11) in c l uding pl ayg r ounds , tutoring , story t elling etc . _ A group of 10 t eens (ages 15-17) and a young adu l t l eader ui ll work as a t ei.'\i:1 in areas. _The· pr o j ect w.ill ·last for ap proximate l y 7 ~ eeks . Bu dger Re qu 2s t $10, ir6 7. 28 �-4- CE NTRAL YWCA PR0GRAfl "Hi Ne ighbor" An inte r cultur a l, recr ea tional, educ a tion program designed for 60 children age s 6-12 fr om low cost h ou s ing with wo rk i,ng par ents. Specific activity includ es : group g ame s, folk dancin g , hikes, nature exporation, cook outs, and day camp. Duration of proj e ct - 5 weeks . Budg e t Re qu e st $9,551.80 PHYLLIS WHEATLEY YWCA Project A - Twili ght Enrichmen t Program This cultural, recr e ational, educational, group guidance and leadership de ve lo r,:irr:e nt project is des igne d to h e lp y outh enrich their social and spiritual lives in the Vine city, Simpson, Beckwith, Fair and Walnut Stree t area s . The project will attempt to help 45 prete ens (6-12) and 35 te ~nagers (13-16). The specific activity will include day camp activity. Dur ation of program - approximately 8 , weeks . Budiet Requ e st $6, 400 Project B - Teenag e Job Pr e par atio~ Clinic at Pe rr v Home s Thi s pilot project is desin J ed for 50-60 females, 13-16 years o f age. The activiti e s will includ e intensive leadership training in pr e pa ration for j obs; how to apply; job inter v iews, and holding a job. ~he y will also be g i ve n a s si s tanc e in findin g job pla ce ments. Duration of proj e ct Budget Requ e st $9,3 20 WESLE Y C0~Q.illNITY CENTERS Exp a nd ed and Nei:-1 Se r v i ces This edu q itiona l, emp lo yu1e nt, r e cre ation a l, and cultu r al pr og r am - is d es i gne d t o mee t th e ne e ds of bo ys and g irls 6 - 21. Pr ogram acti v iti es inc lu de s a s i x week t rai ni ng pr og r a~ f or 11th and 12th grade s, inc l ud i ng c raft sk ill s , c amp sk ills, so as to be · abl e · to wo rk with s ma ll e r ch il dr e n i n c a~p si tuat i ons. Dur 2. ti on - 10 weeks . Bud ge t Re que st $6,851.95 �\ -5- . GRADY HOHES COi-1:NUNITY GIRLS CLUB , me. Summer Day Ca~ and Teenage E~ployme nt Program This is a reGre ationa l, cultural and educatiori~l projec t designe d to utili ze 20 girls ages 16-21 to become day c amp Junior Counselor s for younger g irls ages 6-14. The proj ect will serve approx i mately 558 gir l s in th e Kirbv·ood Area by providing home maker training, singing , dancing , craft~, field trips, swimming, and evening r ecreation programs for older girls. Budge t Request $14,113 NORTHWEST GEORGIA GIRL SCOUTS COUNC IL This pr oj ect is designed to meet some of the employment, recreational, educational and cultural needs of 412 gir l s scouts ages 7-17 in day c amp activities. The project will last about 11 weeks. Budget Request $3,569 SOUTHEASTERN Yr!CA , ·. . Kirkwood Are a Day Camp This proj ec t is design to prov ide r ecrea t ion for app roximately 550 boys and gir l s ages 6 -12 wi th day camp activities. These activitie s will include crafts, archery , nature s tudy , swirnrning and movies. The project will l a st about 12 we e ks . 0 Budget Re ques t $10, 852 NORTH FULTON EOA CENTER A 12 week progr am de sign_e d to prov ide r e creat ional a ctivitie s for s ome 500- 600 you t h of both s exe s age s 8-18. The proj ec t will al so hire one youth work er in each local conmmnity t o work und e r the l oc a l su pe rv i s or . Activ iti e s for the project wi ll consist of softba ll , h or sesh oe , baske tb a ll, badmi nton , ba s eba ll, voll ey ball, and croque t. Budge t Re qu es t i $4 , 602 . 20 �-6ATLANTA YOUTH DEVELOPNENT CENTER SuwJ,,e r Cu l t ur a l Enr i chme nt Program Program des i g ned to prov i de emp l oymen t, e du ca ti on , a nd recre ationa l a ct i v i ties · i n t he f or m o f d ay c am~s fo r 300 - 400 youth ( ages 7~12) pe r d ay . The pro j ec t wi l l u t ili ze indigenous t eenagers age 16 a nd above to s u perv i se the ac t~vi ty. Duration - approx i mate l y 11 weeks. Budge t Reque st __ $35,53 3 . 49 PITTSBURG NE I GHBORHOOD EOA CENTER Pitts burg Corm.,unit y ' s Work, Educ a tion, Recrea tion Program Th is pilo t progr a~ i s des i gned t o ut i li ze you t h in a commun i ty beauti f i cat i on p rogram as we ll as prov ide manpower fo r e x i sting r e crea tiona l f ac iliti es . The pr oj e ct will emp l oy 20 ma l e s age d 15-20 in the Beau t if ic at i on Program, six fema l e t eam managers age 14- 20 and t hree ma l e l eag~e planne rs wil l be employed t o c arry on Li t tle Le ague Activi t i e s . The pro j e ct wil l a l so prov i de h omemaker training for girl s 9-1 7. Duration - 12 weeks . . Budge t Reque s t METROPOLITA'! ATL-\J."\!TA BOYS ' CLUB , INC. Th is c omp r ehe nsive empl oyment a nd r e c reat i on pro j e ct wi ll attemp t to mee t the n ee ds tif 10 , 000 boys in seve r a l Boys ' Cl ubs in the c ity age s 6- 18 : The pro j ec t will empl oy a numbe r o f youth age s 16- 21 to plan a nd de ve l op p ro g r ar.1s f or areas s e r ved. Summe r ac tiv it ies wi ll inc lude group clubs , d a nc i ng , cook ing , music apprecia t i on , pu ppe try , photogr aphy art , des k he lp , h a ndi cr af t , drama , ceramt .cs , and wood work . Dura tion - appro x i ma t e l y 12 weel(s. Bu dge t Re qu e s t $103 , 609 . 92 EMORY UNI VERS ITY - DIVI Srm; OF LI BRARIANSH IP St or v Te ll in2 Courses Th i s educ a tiona l progr am i s de s i g ne d t o pr ov id e e ff ec i ency for Stor y Te l l e r to be u sed dcr i ng t he surrr.T,e r in variou s r ec r eatio2 prbg r ams. The pro j ect wil l prov i de 12 cour s es ut i li z ing 20 en r o ll ees f or a 8 week pe riod . Du rat i on - 8 we eks . Budge t · Reques t J $2 ,9 79 . 50 �.-7- BUTLER STREET YNCA SuTirrne r Resident Camp The program propos es to e.:1p ioy 5 youth in summe r resident camp as cabin c ounse lo rs , kitchen he lp ers and as ma int enanc e pe rsonne l. The progr am wi ll prov ide c amp experience for 300 youth be t ween the ages of 7-16. Activi ty will incl~de mu~ic, painting, ~r ama , and a tuto ria l prog r am . Dur a tion - 3 weeks . $19,352.72 Budget Re quest Educ a t ion and E.np lo vrr:e nt A work-study _seminar-_to be conducted at resident camp for 12 high school grad~ates from poverty back~rounds. The activity of t he seminars wil l consist of information tha t would be applicab l e to college entrance, discu ss ion on cur rent social events, etc. Duration of project - 12 weeks. $12,649.82 Budge t Reque st Work Iri5entive De mons trat ion Progy:E! This proj ec t is designed to s erve 100 men between the' a ge s o f 16-21 in a work incentive program wi th th e hope of emp l oyment after complet ion of the project. Duration - 2 weeks. Budge t Request $11,01 8 . 59 Camp I mp r ove~ent Pr o iect This emp lOyment progri3.rn is designed to u t ilize 90 youth between the a ges of 16-21. The youth wi ll be involved in 3 ~eeks of camp s ite imp roverr,e nt o f the Butler Stre e t Y:'ICA ' s Lake All atoon2. Campsit e . Ac tiviti e s wil 1 includ e wint e r i•z a tion of exi s ting camp stru cture s , l andscaping a~d water f ront imp r ov ement . $17,7 80 . 92 Bud get Re que s t Ext ended S•,1i c!'£Li.. ng To prov i de swim...,.1i ng activ i t i es f or s o~e 195 boy s be·t wee-n th e age s of 7-1 6 . Duration 12 wee ks . Budge t Reques t 2. .:-id gir l s $4 ,129 . 80 T'l--1 i s pr(,gra.:-rr ~: i l 1- ~tte:r::pc to fulfill t>~ r e c r ~ =. tion n-~·2(:s o:E 6G0 b et:~-.'2 :~:1 the 2~g:::: s o f 14 -1 8 . P._c t i1.-itles c onsisting oE s~·/ i :-r-r:1 i ng , 1 you t h d anc ing , a r ts & c ra f t s , s l id2 pr esentat i ons , sin~ing, danci ng , and tal ent s:t:.-1 .~: ::, 04 i l l t.e ca.1-·(-Led rr for ~2 ~-:e2k.s . 1: 1 $ 14 , 2Sl! . 9 5 �-8- j. DE!l ALB YWCA ., Kirkwood Swi mming Cl ass . This pr ogram will pro vid e sHim.ming activities for 50 youth ages Dur a tion - approxi mate l y 12 weeks . 7-12 in school. Budget Request $607.50 WORKSHOPS rn c oRP OR..A.TE D This proj ect will provide a number of plays for recr eat ional programs throu ghout the cit y . . Budget Request ACADEMY THEATRE Circus This pro gram is designed to p rov i de some of the recreational ne e d s oi"Atlanta youth between t he age s 5-11. The Acade my wi ll prod uce fi ve shows (Circ us ) per we ek jor a s i x we e k pe rio d. The Th e atr e c a n handle 180 kids pe r performance . Bud get Requ e st · $39,3 61 ROYAL KNIG HTS .FOUi'WATIO ~; This p r ogr am ho pe s to provi ae tut ori a l, and cultural enrichmen t prog r a1t1s including t y pi ng, re ad i ng , bas eb al 1, fa s hio n shows anci e cc. for 600-7 00 yout h age s 5-20. -· Bud get Re que st $9,000 SlJH-:-lEC ~EIGHBORHOOD EO:\ CE:'iTE: R Ne chan i csv i l l e· Sur,·u--:1-.: r Pro i e c t - Edu cat i o~J Thi s pr og r ara wil l b e ope r at e d ou t of t he Pryo r St r e et Sch oo l. Re c r ea t i on and ed uc a t i o n ne ed s during th e suaae r mon t hs . La r ge a~o~ n t o f youth t o be h i red . Cit y Sc hoo ls doin g a bo u t th e s a ~e. The ~i o j ect will ru n 3 mont h s . Bud ge t Req ue s:: �-9- NASH HASHINGTO;~ NEIGH BORHOOD EOA CE NTER Keen Teens Progr am to work wit h hard co re youth . Youth working with youth. Cl ean up cr ews , r ec ruiting for other projects, etc. Good project - hi gh employment. Budg e t Reques t YOUl'J"G HEN 'S .CI VIC LEAClE, I NC. This uniqu e work-r ecreation proj e ct will utiliz e 2OO · youth and young adults, male and fe male ages 16-21 in a. program to u pgrade their conmunity . Activities will include cl ean ing streets, alleys, empty lots, and rodent control . Budg et Requ e s t SUH-NEC -NEIGHBORHOOD EOA CENTER A compr ehensi ve employ111e nt, r ecreat ion, education, and cultur a l ~reject to serve 20 , 000 youth ma l e an d female of all ages in th e SumMee Area . Activities will include tutorial, t y ping~ filmstrips, drama , ·~o uns e 1 ing , field trip s , etc. Budg e t Re quest NORTHWEST YOl'NG ~[E N CIVI C ASSOCI ATION Operation Ti ~ht e n Up This pr ogram i s designed to s e r v e s ome 7,00 0 te e n age a nd y oung adults ages 13- 25 in a mu lti- pur pos e youth progr am . The p~=gram will emp l oy a numbe r of ind ige nour youth a nd young adults . Activities will include l ectur e s , tour s , you th f orums, developr,1 e nt of youth busine ss, gene ral sports (in do or an d out of doors , and cr e a ti ve games . Bud ge t Reque s t NORTHWE ST PERRY EOA CE~TER "S ock It To ~-,e" - ··· An er;,pl oyue nt pro j e c t d~s i gr: 2 d to s e r ve 1,00 0 ma l e a n d f em.2. le a ge s 13- 25 i n a n i nte ns i v e p r ogr a~ of tr ai ni ng and counse li ng . Lead t e e n age r s a~d pr o fes s io nal s will wor ~ 3i t h t eenage r s who h a ve no wo r k h i sto ::- / a s "p ee r Gr oup Coun se l or s. Du ra t io n of pr o j e c t a pp r o~i~a te l y 12 wee k s . �.. -10- WEST CENTRAL EOA NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER Surmner Activiti es Prog r am A r ecreational , educational , cultural enrichment progrcun will s erve approximatel-y 5,400 persons of all ages. Employing _____ youth in di versif i ed jobs: Act i v iti es f or this pro gram wi ll include ind oor and out of door recreation, arts and crafts, h ead start, trips to int erest i ng pl a ces,· neighborhood cle§=m tips. Duration - a pproxima t e l y 11 weeks . Budget Request COLLEGE PAR.""1( Cl VIC Afm :C:DUCATIONAL CLUB , IN C. This r ecreationa l and educational will serve approximately 9,000 youth both male · encl f e;;,a ie of al l ages who r es i de in l ow-i ncome· com.m unities . The pr o ject will utili ze 60 poor youth as you th assis tant s and 9 young adults. Activities for the project wi ll include sports, arts and crafts, daily personal grooming , tri ps and excurs i ons , ceramics and diversified "playground progr ams . Dura t i on - 12 weeks . Budget Reques t . ·. EAST PO INT RECREATION DEPARTI!ENT This project wi ll co ver t he four target areas in the city. It is designed to meet the r e creational needs of 5,000 pe rsons of all ages . The proj ect wil l employ 8 youth and young adu lt s from each of th e area blbcks. Ac ti v ities will inc lude sports , playground acti v i Ei~s, arts and crafts, cer anics , sewing , personal hygiene and grooming , trips and e xcusions , t een pr ograras , s en ior citizen progr am , sw i ITl!-ning and pre- schoo l pr ograms . Durat i on 8 weeks Budget Request EDG E\-100D ;,.;EIGHBORHOOD EO.--\ CEN"TER Sumne r Cr ash Recr eat ion Proj_ect Thi s uniqu e pi l ot project will utiliz e six youth from th e area The proj ect wi ll ser ve 24 mentally r e t ar ded childr en by providing daily mental and ph ys ical acti v iti es . Duration - 9 weeks . t o work with mentally r e tard e d children . Budgel Request ., �\ -11- H. R. BUTLER SCHOOL A comprehensive erap loyment , recre at iona l, educ,a tional and cultural prog ra:-:i des i gned to employ a number of youth and young adults for the purpos e of supe rvising group activ ities. The program wi ll s erve a total of 500 persons ages 6-25. Activities for this program wil l includ e tutoria l in reading and gr ade improvement , ___arts and cra f ts, Neg ro history, story h~urs , dan ce instruction, sport s·, playg round activities, trips and swirrrrning. Duration 10 weeks. Budget Request ENNAUS HOUSE A unique program designe d to take 100 boys and gir l s in the Peopl estown - Sur:-.;,1erh ill area to J e kyll Isl a nd for one week in an attempt to replace a slum se tt ing with a memorable experience of a world the y have neve r known. Activities for this program will include recreation and counse ling . Af ter returning, these youth will be engaged in a 7 week remedial re ad ing progr am . Du r ation - 8 weeks . • Budget Request GWINNETT COU}ITY EOA A comprehe nsive emp loyme n t, r ec r ea t ion, e duc ation and cultural enri chmen t program to serve about 6,000 yo ung children , both mal e and f emal e . The project will emp loy 20 tee n l eaders to be divid ed amoung the four ce n ters . Pr6j ec t act i vit i es will i nclude field trips , pers ona l hygiene , sewing class e s; clas se s in water and hunting safety , fir st aid , body care , drana, and nrusical gr oups . Dur ation approx i raate l y 10 we e ks . Bud get Re'1 uest WEST E~D NEIGHBOR.HOOD EOA CENTER Thi s e:nr loyrr.-2 nt , r e cre8.tion2 l and cu l tural enr i chmen t pro gra~,,_ i s designed to se rve a numb2r of youth i n t he are2 _ T~ pro j ect ~i ill--e ~!) l oy a nu mber of youth t o d oo rdic12te and super,,eise r ecreati.ona l a nd e nriclcen t pr ogra:-o·,s ( ages 17-1 8 ). Act i vities wil l incl ude base ba ll, basketba l l , volly~a ll, soccer , s tory hours, 2nd t rips . Du r at ion · - 1 3 ,-~eeks . Bud ge t R2ques l �-12JOHN HOPE SCHOOL "Project Uplift " The project will provide educ a tion and recreafion a l acti~ities for 300 youth , young adult s , a nd Se nior Citiz e ns . The pro j ect will employ 15 junior lead e rs (16-21) fro m the area t o provi de lead e r s hip for children, youth and Se nior Citizens. Aciivities will include Negro history, basic edu,:: a t ion i mpr ovem·e nt, tours, arts and cr a fts , dance , s,-, im..u ing, sports, movi e s, track and field events , and instrumental music . Duration - 3 we eks Budget Requ e st EDG EWOOD NEIGHB ORl-ICOD EOA CENTER Edgewo od - East Lake You t h Summe r Re cr ea tion Program This summer recr e a tional prog r am will serve about 500 youth of all age s . Activities wiil includ e - s ewing, crafts, stamp collecting , guitar l e ssions , piano les s ion s , d anc e , wood work, and sports. Duration - approxima tely 9 wee k s . , . Budget Requ es t Edgewo od - Kir b -rn od Skati n$ Proi e ct A pr ogram to prov id e s k a tin g activitie s for 200 you th and young adult s a ge s 6-25. The pr o j e ct will e mploy 12 young ad u lts fro m th e co1rnnuni ty. Du rat ion appr ox ima t e ly 10 wee ks. ', Bud get Re qu e st ROCKDALE C01..:YIY EOA Ai'iD RECR?.:ATIO;; c o:,.rr i'I SSI ON The proj e ct will pr ov i d~ r e cr eat i ona l, ed ucati ona l~ a nd cultu ra l activi t i e s for s ome 600 you t h and young adults . The p ro j e c t will e mp lo y 30 t a r ge t area yo u th t o su pe r v i s e t he ac ti v iti es as t ea che r aid e s, g r ound ke epers , eq ui pme n t ma na ge r s an d con c essio n wor ke r s . Ac ti v iti e s will in c lud e s ports , art s a nd cr af ts, dr a ma , an d a c ti ng . Du ra ti on - 12 wee ks . Budge t Req ues t THE AT RE ATL\.:·;IA Thi s pr oj e c t wi ll pr od uce thr ee or r;.or- e p l a :,'s to be prese n t e d on a r.10 '.Ji l e t he at re fa c ili t y t o f: ot'r EO~\ t 2:..-ge t a rea s . The pro j ect ·wi ll s e r ·,1 e. _ _ _ _ a du l t s i r~ t he ~ l a.~~.n i~tg 1 G.L I t v.:o u l d c m~ loy - --·-- - - --- y out ft a od y ct..:ng p r~) j 2C t . D::;r.:;.t i c n - S ~-1,2 eks . �I. -13- PRICE NEIGHBORHOOD EOA CENTER PAT Y (Pr{c e Aid to Ybuth) This project will attempt to prepare 100 yout h ages 14 -24 for employment . . Its activities wil l i nc lu de r ecreation , counseling, tutoring, and recrui tment a ctivi ti es. Duration 12 weeks. Budge t Request . CITY OF ATLA2·1 TA, DEPARnlENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION Recr eatioE~ Er.1plo v:nent and Enrichmen t Program The Cit y 's ·programs ~vil l provide a diversity of recreational and enrichment programs for youth and .Senior Cit izens through out th~ metropolitan area. It will se rve approximately 21,000 persons during th e sumn,er. It will employ 336 poor youth. Activities to be off e r ed : C~e a tive Rhytmics {)iJt.door games . Softb a ll Vally Ball Camp Cr afts Sew:i.ng Ceramics Pho tography Music Appreciation Team Sports Weight Training Day Camp Wood work Baton Less on Cheer. Leading s~~imming Tract & Field Pupp etry Tumblin Typing Field Trip s Te en Dances Modern and Tap dance Judo Dur a tio n - 12 weeks Budget Request FOLLOW UP SERV ICE TQ LOH- DICO~fE Ut,'c·T.-iRRI.W This progr am will b2 t o fin d and h e l? young girls in findi ng work - c ar ing for youth, etc . This is only proj ect working with u nwed mot he rs. Bud ge t Req uest �
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 12, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 15, Folder 11, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_011_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 11, Document 5
  • Text: VINE WAOK SUMMER YOUTH OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM CITY FOUNDATION Project Recreation Plug-In This is a pilot employment program’designed to utilize 11 indigenous teenage youth ages 16-20 to serve as community recrea- tion organizers. The youth Recreation Organizers will recruit, organize, plan, and supervise 10 other teenagers each to provide planned sunmer recreation on a 24 hour basis. The project will last for 11 weeks. Budget Request $13,718 _ bus Gof 2) RADIO STATION, EOA, COMMUNITY SCHOOLS Junior D. J. fi cba An employment, cultural, and communications program utilizing 10 Junior D. J.'s from high density to be trained in use of P.A. equipment to provide record hops for about 10,000 high school and young adults ages 16-25 during the evening hours (7:30-10:00 P.M.}. These hops will be giYen in all of the 14 Neighborhood Service Center areas, The project will last 4 months. mAcw with MAKE 2HeR £ CowinRiBeypier ef A3cece Fined Budget Request /!, 25¢ ($4,350) SmtARIES. : a4 : ‘ CENTRAL CITY, EOA Operation Youth This is an employment, recreation, cultural, and educational program. Serving 500 males and females ages 5-25 in and out of school in a comprehensive program of recreation and cultural activities in- cluding diversified playground programs, field trips, crafts, dramatics, dance, group discussion, ete. The project will last 11 weeks. Budget Request $3,070.12 CABBAGE TOWN RECREATION/WORK YOUTH CENTER This is a program designed to involve 50-100 males and females in and out of school ages 12-21 in a program of recreation, employ- ment, education, and cultural enrichment activities. The youth in the project will work six hours per day in such activities as field trips, camping, tutorial, ete. The project will last for 12 weeks. Budget Request $15,000 THE CHURCH OF THE MASTER, UNITED PRESBYTERIAN USA Sunmer Enrichment Program This program is a recreation, education and cultural enrich- ment program serving youth ages _-_to ' in arts and craft, Lectures (sports, social topics, current events), field trips, tutorial programs, dancing, games, sports, and counseling services. The project will last approximately 8 weeks. ' Budget Request $10,982 DEKALB YWCA Job Preparation ,Program An employment program designed to serve 25 teenage girls 16-18 years of age and training and counseling in going about getting a job. The program will last for 7 months. +. Budget Request $511 FUN BOWL AND' EOA, INC. Recreational (Bowling) Program * This recreation, cultural, and education program will serve 1200 youth ages 7-18 in limited skills in bowling, fair play and sportmanship, team and individual pride. The program will last 12 weeks. Budget Request $13,800 (dsecc) ACADEMY THEATRE . . ° Project Circus A recreational,educational, and cultural prosram designed to _utilize some 50 youth throughout Atlanta, who will be trained in theatre and dramatic techniques. They will work with younger children involved in seeing Circus! -.. Budget Request $16,737.20 RUTH MITCHELL DANCE COMPANY Dance Instruction in Modern Jazz Ballet A recreational, educational, and cultural program designed to utilize youth, ages 9-15 in providing classes in Modern Jazz Ballet in preparation for a program to be presented-by the Youth. This project will last for 10 weeks. a Budget Request $975 DEKALB YWCA Lawson Apartments — A recreational and educational program designed to serve 75-100 teenage boys and girls ages 7-12 (residents of the Apartments) in a recreational and education program five days a week, 9:00-5:30 which will include club program, service project, dramatics, trips, for teenage girls and sports, games, arts and crafts, pond play activity for younger boys and girls. The project will last for approximately 2 months. Budget Request $3,028 TLANTA YWCA The Originals : An experimental pilot project designed to use social group work method, community organization and a historical approach in organizing a teen drama group to present special programs for the community. The project will utilize 50-500 poor youth between the ages of 15-21. The youth activity will include dance, drama, music, etc. The viewing audience will range from 100-1000. Duration of project - 14 weeks. Budget Request $21,550 ATLANTA YHCA ‘ ‘teen Partners This comprehensive education, employment, counseling, cultural and recreation program is designed to help in the development of attitudes, goals, motivation, ‘knowledge and skill of 24-30 youth within a three mile radius of the Central YMCA. The youth along with the training will be provided a comprehensive recreational program. Durdtion of project - 8 weeks. Budget Request $6,947.11 CENTRAL YWCA Job Exploration for Teen Teams This employment, education and recreational program will utilize 40-50 youth in a six week training program to work with various children programs (ages 5-11) including plavgrounds, tutoring, story telling etc. A group of 10 teens (ages 15-17) and a young adult leader will work a team in areas. The project will last for approximately 7 weeks ay Budger Request $10,467.28 CENTRAL YWCA PROGRAM "Hi Neighbor" An intercultural, recreational, education program designed for _ 60 children ages 6-12 from low cost housing with working parents. Specific activity includes: group games, folk dancing, hikes, nature exporation, cook outs, and day camp. Duration of project - 5 weeks. é Budget Request $9,551.80 PHYLLIS WHEATLEY YWCA Project A - Twilight Enrichment Program This cultural, recreational, educational, group guidance and leadership development project is designed to help youth enrich their social and spiritual lives in the Vine city, Simpson, Beckwith, Fair and Walnut Street areas. The project will attempt to help 45 pre- teens (6-12) and 35 teenagers (13-16). The specific activity will include day camp activity. . Duration of program - approximately 8 » weeks. Budget Request $6,400 Project B - Teenage Job Preparation Clinic at Perry Homes This pilot project is desinged for 50-60 females, 13-16 years of age. The activities will include intensive leadership training in preparation for jobs; how to apply; job interviews, and holding a job. They will also be given assistance in finding job place- ments. Duration of project Budget Request $9,320 WESLEY COMMUNITY CENTERS Expanded and New Services This educational, employment, recreational, and cultural program -~is designed to meet the needs of boys and girls 6-21, Program activities includes a six week training program for llth and 12th grades, including craft skills, camp skills, so as to be able to work with smaller children in camp situations. Duration - 10 weeks. Budget Request $6,851.95 3 GRADY HOMES COMMUNITY GIRLS CLUB, INC. Summer Day Camp and Teenage Emplovment Program This is a recreational, cultural and educational project designed to utilize 20 girls ages 16-21 to become day camp Junior Counselors for vounger girls ages 6-14. The project will serve approximately 558 girls in the Kirkwood Area by providing home- maker training, singing, dancing, crafts, field trips, swimming, and evening recreation programs for older girls. Budget Request $14,113 NORTHWEST GEORGIA GIRL SCOUTS COUNCIL This project is designed to meet some of the employment, recre- ational, educational and cultural needs of 412 girls scouts ages 7-17 in day camp activities. The project will last about 11 weeks. Budget Request =} $3,569 SOUTHEASTERN YMCA “ , Kirkwood Area Day Camp This project is design to provide recreation for approximately 550 boys and girls ages 6-12 with day camp activities. These activities will include crafts, archery, nature study, swimming and movies. The project will last about 12 weeks. Budget Request $10,852 NORTH FULTON EOA CENTER Fi A 12 week program designed to provide recreational activities for some 500-600 youth of both sexes ages 8-18. The project will also hire one youth worker in each local community to work under the local supervisor. Activities for the project will consist of softball, herseshoe, basketball, badminton, baseball, volley ball, and croquet. Budget Request $4,602.20 ATLANTA YOUTH DEVELOPMENT CENTER Summer Cultural Enrichment Program Program designed to provide employment, education, and recre~- ational activities in the form of day camps for 300-400 youth(ages 7-12) per day. The project will utilize indigenous teenagers age 16 and above to supervise the activity. Duration - approximately 11 weeks. 7 Budget Request $35,533.49 ' PITTSBURG NEIGHBORHOOD EOA CENTER Pittsbure Community's Work, Education, Recreation Program This pilot program is designed to utilize youth in a community beautification program as well as provide manpower for existing recreational facilities. The project will employ 20 males aged 15-20 in the Beautification Program, six female team managers age 14-20 and three male league’ planners will be employed to carry on Little League Activities. The project will also provide homemaker training for girls 9-17. Duration - 12 weeks. - _ Budget Request METROPOLITAN ATLANTA BOYS' CLUB, INC. This comprehensive employment and recreation project will attempt to meet the needs of 10,000 boys in several Boys' Clubs in the city ages 6-18. The project will employ a number of youth ages 16-21 to plan and develop programs for areas served. Summer activities will include group clubs, dancing, cooking, music appreciation, puppetry, photography art, desk help, handicraft, drama, ceramics, and wood work. Duration - approximately 12 weeks. Budget Request * $103,609.92 EMORY UNIVERSITY - DIVISION OF LIBRARIANSHIP Story Telling Courses This educational program is designed to provide effeciency for Story Teller to be used during the summer in various recreation programs. The project will provide 12 courses utilizing 20 enrollees for a 8 week period. Duration - 8 weeks. Budget Request $2,979.50 BUTLER STREET YMCA Summer Resident Camp The program proposes to employ 5 youth in summer resident camp ‘ as cabin counselors, kitchen helpers and as maintenance personnel. The program will provide camp experience for 300 youth between the ages of 7-16. Activity will include music, painting, drama, and a tutorial program. Duration - 3 weeks. ; Budget Request ~ $19,352.72 Education and Emolovment A work-study seminar to be conducted at resident camp for 12 high school egradtiates from poverty backgrounds. The activity of the seminars will consist of information that would be applicable to college entrance, discussion on current social events, etc. Duration of project - 12 weeks. ; Budget Request $12,649.82 Work Incentive Demonstration Program This project is designed to serve 100 men between the' ages of 16-21 in a work incentive program with the hope of employment after completion of the project. Duration - 2 weeks. Budget Request $11,018.59 4 Camp Improvement Project This employment program is designed to utilize 90 youth between the ages of 16-21. The youth will be involved in 3 Weeks of campsite improvement of the Butler Street YMCA's Lake Allatoona Campsite. Activities will include winterization of existing camp structures, land scaping and water front improvement. Budget Request $17,780.92 Extended Swimming To provide swinnaing activities fo between the ages of 7-16. Duration 12 weeks. Budget Raquest $4,129.80 feenaze This t youth 0 2 ages of SB. Act Bs consisting i dancing, arts & crafts, s presentations, singing, dancing, and talent shoes will oe carer ao for i? weaks, Budzet Request $14,254.95 DEKALB YWCA ' Kirkwood Swimming Class This program will provide swimming activities for 50 youth ages 7-12 in school. Duration - approximately 12 weeks. . Budget Request $607.50 WORKSHOPS INCORPORATED This project will provide a number of plays for recreational programs throughout the city. Budget Request ACADEMY THEATRE Circus This program is designed to provide some of the recreational needs of Atlanta youth between the ages 5-1l. The Academy will produce five shows (Circus) per week for a six week period. The Theatre can handle 180 kids per performance. ' Budget Request $39,361 ROYAL KNIGHTS FOUNDATION This program hopes to provide tutorial, and cultural enrichment programs including typing, readiuy, baseball, fashion shows and etc. for a 600-700 youth ages 5-20. Budget Request $9,000 SUM-MEC NEIGHBORHOOD ECA CENTER Mechanicsville’ Summer Project - Educational This program will be operated out of the Pryor Street School. : Large saa Recreation and education needs during the summer months Oto. amount of youth to be hired. City Schools doing about the The project will run 3 months Budget Request -9- NASH WASHINGTON NEIGHBORHOOD EOA CENTER Keen Teens Program to work with hard core youth. Youth working with youth. Clean up crews, recruiting for other projects, etc. Good project - high employment. Budget Request ¢ YOUNG MEN'S CIVIC LEAGUE, INC. This unique work-recreation project will utilize 200 youth and young adults, male and female ages 16-21 in a program to upgrade their community. Activities will include elesniag streets, alleys, empty lots, and rodent control. ‘ Budget Request SUM-MEC NEIGHBORHOOD EOA CENTER A comprehensive employment, recreation, education, and cultural ‘ project to serve 20,000 youth male and female of all ages in the Sum- Mec Area. Activities will include tutorial, typing, filmstrips, drama, Counseling, field trips, etc. Budget Request NORTHWEST YOUNG MEN CIVIC ASSOCIATION Operation Tighten Up This program is davisued to serve some 7,000 teanage and young adults ages 13-25 in a multi-purpose youth program. The program will employ a number of indigenour youth and young adults. Activities will include lectures, tours, youth forums, development of youth business, general sports (in door and out of doors, and creative games. . : Budget i aa we . NORTHWEST PERRY EOA CE "Sock It To Me" “An employment project de ages 13-25 in an intensive progre ee training and counseling. Lead teenagers and professionals will work with teenagers who have no work history as "peer Group rouiioetere Duration of project - approximately 12 weeks. : signed to serve 1,000 male and female oom a TL “2 ill wo Budzet Recuest -10- . WEST CENTRAL EOA NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER Summer: Activities Program A recreational, educational, cultural enrichment program will serve approximately 5,400 persons of all ages. Employing _ youth in diversified jobs. Activities for this program will include indoor and ovt of door recreation, arts and crafts, headstart, trips to interesting places, neighborhood clean ups. Duration - approximately 11 weeks. Budget Request COLLEGE PARK CIVIC AND EDUCATIONAL CLUB, INC, This recreational and educational will serve apieaniuanaly 9,000 . youth both male” and female of all ages who reside in low-income communities. The project will utilize 60 poor youth as youth assis- tants and 9 young adults. Activities for the project will include sports, arts and crafts, daily personal grooming, trips and excursions, ceramics and diversified playground programs. Duration - 12 weeks. Budget Request 4 EAST POINT RECREATION DEPARTMENT This project will cover the four target areas in the city. It is designed to meet the recreational needs of 5,000 persons of all ages. The project will employ 8 youth and young adults from each of the area blocks. Activities will include sports, playground activities, arts and crafts, ceramics, sewing, personal hygiene and grooming, trips and excusions, teen programs, senior citizen progran, swimming and pré~-school programs. Duration 8 weeks Budget Request | é EDGEWOOD NEIGHBORHOOD EOA CENTER . Summer Crash Recreation Project This unique pilot project will utilize six youth from the area to work with mentally retarded children. The project will serve 24 mentally retarded children by providing daily mental and physical activities. uration - 9 weeks, Budget Request H. R. =[is BUTLER SCHOOL A comprehensive employment, recreational, educational and cultural program designed to employ a number of youth and young adults for the purpose of supervising group activities. The pro- gram will serve a total of 500 persons ages 6-25. Activities for this program will include tutorial in reading and grade improvement , arts and crafts, Negro history, story hours, dance instruction, sports, playground activities, trips and swimming. Duration 10 weeks. ' Budget Request EMMAUS HOUSE A unique program designed to take 100 boys and girls in the Peoplestown-Summnerhill area to Jekyll Island for one week in an attempt to replace a slum setting with a memorable experience of a world they have never known. Activities for this program will in- clude recreation and counseling. After returning, these youth will be engaged in a 7 week remedial reading program. Duration - 8 weeks. “4 * Budget Request GWINNETT COUNTY EOA WEST West End Sur: A comprehensive employment, recreation, education and cultural enrichment program to serve about 6,000 young children, both male and female, The project will employ 20 teen leaders to be divided amoung the four centers. Project activities will include field trips, personal hygiene, sewing classes, classes in water and hunting safety, first aid, body care, drana, and musical groups. Duration - approximately 10 weeks. 2 Budget Request 5 END NEIGHBORHOOD EOA CENTER tonal and eureueee enrichment program This em is designed of youth in the area. The project Will. emoloy to deordinat and supervise recreational and enrichme 17-18). Activities will include base- ball, basket all, soccer, story hours, and trips. Duration - 1 oe JOHN HOPE SCHOOL “Project Uplift" k The project will provide education and recreafional activities for 300 youth, young adults, and Senior Citizens. The project will employ 15 junior leaders (16-21) from the area to provide leadership for children; youth and Senior Citizens. Activities will include - Negro history, basic education improvement, tours, arts and crafts, dance, swimming, sports, movies, track and field events, and in- strumental music. Duration - 8 weeks ; Budget Request EDGEWOOD NEIGHBORHOOD EOA CENTER Edgewood - East Lake Youth Summer Recreation Picetiim This summer recreational program will serve about 500 youth of all ages. Activities will include - sewing, crafts, stamp collecting, . guitar lessions, piano lessions, dance, wood work, and sports. Duration - approximately 9 weeks. “a * Budget Request Edgewood - Kirkwood Skating Project A program to provide skating activities for 200 youth and young adults ages 6~25. The project will employ 12 young adults from the 1 community. Duration - approximately 10 weeks. \ Budget Request ROCKDALE COUNTY EOA AND RECREATION COMMISSION “A The project will provide recreational, educational, and cultural activities for some 600 youth and young adults. The project will employ 30 target area youth to supervise the activities as teacher aides, ground keepers, equipment managers and concession warkers, Activities will include sports, arts and crafts, drama, and acting. Duration - 12 weeks. Budget Request THEATRE ATLANTA This project will produce three or more plays to be presented on a mobile theatre facility to fovr EOA target areas The project will serve __+ It would employ ss youth and young adults in the placning af project. Duration - 8 weeks ~13- PRICE NEIGHBORHOOD ECA CENTER P AT Y (Price Aid to Youth) 7 This project will attempt to prepare 100 youth ages 14-24 for employment. Its activities will include recreation, counseling, tutoring, and recruitment activities. Duration 12 weeks. Budget Request CITY OF ATLANTA, DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION Recreation, Employment and Enrichment Program The City's‘programs will provide a diversity of recreational and enrichment programs for youth and Senior Citizens throughout the metropolitan area. during the summer. be offered: Creative Rhytmics Outdoor games Softball Volly Ball Camp Crafts Sewing Ceramics Photography Music Appreciation Team Sports Weight Training Day Camp Duration - 12 weeks Budget Request FOLLOW UP SERVICE TQ LOW-INCO? This progran work - caring for unwed mothers. Budget Request will be youth, It will serve approximately 21,000 persons It will employ 336 poor youth. Activities to Wood work Baton Lesson Cheer Leading Swimming Tract & Field Puppetry Tumblin : Typing \ Field Trips Teen Dances Modern and Tap dance Judo fh UNMARRIED id and help young girls in findine n o> etc. This is only project working with wa
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 11, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 11, Document 11

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_011_011.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 11, Document 11
  • Text: March 13, 1968 DRAFT Attached is a copy of the summary recommendations of the President's Commission on Civil Disorders. It is imperative that the City of Atlanta not take this historic report lightly. We must carefully review every recommendation and take whatever action is necessary to improve and protect the lives of all our citizens. I am asking each of you to make a thorough analysis of the sections of the report which fall within your area of operation. You are requested to prepare a detailed course of action outlinjmg those steps you intend to take on all recommendations which apply in the City of Atlanta. Most of you were involved last year in the development and executivn of a special program of coordination of city services during the summer months. The results of that program were highly favorable. It is imperative that we continue and expand the City Services Program and discuss what specific actions we should take on the Commission's report. I am asking that you meet with me Tuesday, March 19, at 2:30 p.m. in Committee Room 2, City Hall. At that time we will review what actions are being taken to prevent civil disorders in Atlanta. Sincerely yours, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor Attached is a list of the department and agency heads who should receive this letter. 4:00- Ture Qvess Con - ¥ Mr. Karl Bevins, Taaffic Engineer x Mr. Henry Bowden, City Attorney _/Miss Virginia Carmichael, Recreation Director iw Mr. John Cox, Director, Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council JMr. Charles Davis, Comptroller J/Mr. Jack Delius, Parks Director 4M. Collier Gladin, Planning Director Jchief C. H. Hildebrand, Fire Chief ioe William S. Howland, Director, Citizens Advisory Committee on Urban Renewal ‘ Sas Ralph Hulsey, Sanitary Engineer _/eniet Herbert Jenkins, Police Chief ./Mr. Carl Johnson, Fulton County Manager J Mr. Johnny Johnson, Director of Model Cities Program “Col. Malcolm Jones, Housing Coordinator Mr. Earl Landers, Acministrative Assistant 7) Dr. John W. Letson, Superintendent, Atlanta PublicSchools i Mr. Ray Nixon, Director of Public Works uv Mr. T. H. (Jim) Parham, Administrator, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. (’ Mr. Johnny Robinson, Community Development Coordinator SJ Mr. Carlton C. Rochell, Director, Atlanta Public Library Jae. M. B. Satterfield, Executive Director, Atlanta Housing Authority ™., at ; ; st, Spbert Sostmervid, chateman,| Cited Advisory Committee forUrhan Renewal “ —~ Mr. Dan Sweat, Director of Governmental Liaison Ale. Paul Weir, General Manager of Water Department Reverend Samuel Williams, Acting Chairman, Community Relations Commission /Me. William R. Wofford, Building Inspector x General William R. Woodward, Director, Atlanta Metropolitan Area Civil Defense
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 11, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 11, Document 17

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_011_017.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 11, Document 17
  • Text: PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT _ The Street Maintenance Division of the Construction Department will implement plans for resurfacing the following streets: AREA I Summerhill, Grant Park, Mechanicsville, Peoplestown, Adair Park, Pittsburgh, Chosewood Park, Highpoint and Joyland, South Atlanta, and Lakewood Heights: Boulevard, S. E. Pryor Street, S. W. Meldon Avenue, S. W. Middleton Street, S. W. Stillman fee see Ss. E. Buena Vista Street, S.W. Park Avenue, S. E, Park Avenue, S. E. Bass Street, S. E. Sydney Stveet: S. E. Taft Street, S. W. Hipp Street, S. W. Aiken Street, S. W. Thornton Street, S. W. Upshaw Street, S. W. Confederate Avenue to Memorial Drive Georgia Avenue to Ridge Avenue Capitol Avenue to Pryor Road Meldon Avenue to Bullock Street Lakewood Avenue to Lakewood Terrace Pryor Street to Fortress Street Memorial Drive to I-20 Berne Street to Glenwood Avenue McDaniel Street to Cooper Street Cherokee Avenue to Park Avenue Thornton Place east to end of street 250 feet east of Aiken Street - 1, 000 feet west - Thornton Street to Hipp Street Thornton Place east to end of pavement East Aiken Street - 1,000 feet west Public Works Department Page Two AREA II Edgewood and Kirkwood: Arizona Avenue, N. E. - DeKalb Avenue south to end of street Hallman Street, N. E. - Warren Street to Howard Street Saunders Street, N. E. - Boulevard Drive to Hallman Street: Caroline Street, N. E. - Moreland Avenue to Marion Place Mortimer Street, S. E, - Arkwright Place to Wylie Street Merlin Avenue, S. E. - Moreland Avenue to Battlefield Avenue ’ Wrenwood Place, N. E. - Hardee Street to Wrenwood Drive Screven Street, N. E. - Boulevard Drive to Hardee Street Locust Street, N. E. - College Avenue to Trotti Street AREA UI Glen Iris, Bass Community, Cabbagetown-Reynoldstown: Edgewood Avenue, N, E. - Peachtree Street to Hurt Street Angier Avenue, N. E. - Pine Street to North Avenue Bavabion Street, N. E. - Irwin Street to East Avenue Auburn Avenue, N. E. - Randolph Street to Irwin Street Harralson Avenue, N. E. - DeKalb Avenue to Alta Avenue _Public Works Department Page Three AREA IV English Avenue and Vine City: Marietta Street to Northside Drive Jones Avenue, N. W. Neal Street, N. W. Ashby Street to Griffin Street Western Avenue, N. W. Vine Street to Gray Street Johns Street, N.W. - Northside Drive to Gray Street Northside Drive to Elliott Street Simpson Street, N. W. Peters Street to Simpson Street Haynes Street, S.W./N.W. 4 . Chestnut Street, N. W. - Bankhead Avenue to Jefferson Street Mitchell Street, S. W. Ashby Street to Jeptha Street Beckwith Street, S. W. Ashby Street to Walnut Street Lena Street, N. W. - Ashby Street to Ollie Street AREA V Watts Road, Carey and Almond Park, Center Hill, Dixie Hills, Grove . Park and Hunter Hills and Western Avenue: Hightower Road, N. W. - Jackson Parkway to Hollywood Road Hollywood Road, N. W. - Johnson Road to Hightower Road AREA VI Riverside, Chattahoochee, Lincoln Homes, Scotts Crossing, Bolton, Hills Park and Perry Homes, Rockdale: Main Street, N. W. - Hollywood Road south 1, 791 feet ‘ Church Street, N. W. ~- Main Street west to end of street Public Works Department Page Four Burtz Street, N. W. = Hollywood Road west to end of street Wales Avenue, N. W. - Whittier Avenue to Spad Avenue Wales Avenue to Parrott Avenue Spad Avenue, N. W. Whittier Avenue, N. W. Maco Street to Wales Avenue Macaw Street, N. W. - Whittier Avenue west to end of street Maco Street, N. W. Whittier Avenue to Bolton Road 1 Parrott Avenue to Wales Avenue 1 Butler Way, N. W. Layton Avenue, N. W. Butler Way to Spad Avenue oa
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 11, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 11, Document 14

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_011_014.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 11, Document 14
  • Text: FIRE DEPARTMENT ‘The Fire Department has taken the necessary action to implement ’ the following programs: l. Publication of a brochure that will outline the responsibilities of each Division of the Fire Department to explain their functions and to emphasize to the citizens of these areas that the Fire Department exists for only one purpose - the protection ' of life and property of all citizens. This booklet will contain such information as the requirements for employment, the training, and benefits derived from being employed by the City of Atlanta Fire Department, an open invitation to all- personnel to visit their Fire Department, how to report a fire, how to obtain emergency responses, the need for pro- tecting fire apparatus, many fire prevention steps to be taken by each citizen, and an explanation that the Fire Prevention Bureau is available to assist any group by making Fire Prevention talks, demonstrations, and showing of film, A program of visitation into various communities for the purpose © of distribution of Fire Prevention literature, demonstrations of fire equipment, and providing for dwelling inspections on request. During the inspection an invitation will be extended to residents to visit their community Fire Station, Merit Badges will be purchased and maintained at each Fire Station in sufficient quantities to give to all children visiting the Fire Station, along with the comment that in.receiving this badge they are assuming a helpful citizen's role in assisting the Fire Department in preventing fires. Coordination with the Water Department and Parks Department in providing street showers for children in these areas utilizing the fire hydrants, Assignment of a coordinator to cooperate fully with City Services Coordinators in answering complaints and grievances that come under the jurisdiction of the Fire Department, Provide prompt response to all alarms.
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 11, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 11, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_011_002.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 11, Document 2
  • Text: = DEPARTMENT Streets Water Fire Traffic Engineering Parks/Recreation Opera: Garbage and trash pickup two times weekly - sweep streets once a week, wash streets - remove abandoned autos, Special clean up campaigns. Rat control training. Resurface 5] streets - Pave 1 - 3 streets in each area - Repair and improve sidewalks Installation of mains for necessary water and fire protection services Assignment o : officer to each EQOA center - Special 40-man task force on evening watch - Employment of "ghetto" community service officers. Distribution of fire safety literature, neighborhood visits and fire equipment demonstrations, open houses at fire stations, street showers, Cleaning and re-lamping of street lights, Night inspections of lamps. Re-checking and priority installation of traffic speed control signs. Resurface 15 streets - Pave 1 - 3 streets - Repair and improve side- walks 7 installation projects for fire protection improvement and water service ~ ree — ste - ~~ Ts ie me prevention office: assigned to Summec, Price, and Pittsburg EOA centers, Genera: programs at fire stations in area, Resurface 9 streets - Pave 1 - 3 streets - Repair and improve EOA center. General programs at fire stations in area wood Branch Library NORTHWEST PERRY HOMES EAST CENTRAL wood Branch Library - smobile stops at Bowen es and Dixie Hills opping Center, Bookmobile stop at Perry Homes 7 * e urface 2 streets - Resurface 10 streets - e 1 - 3 streets - : Pave 1 - 3 streets - ir and improve side- to erry Homes EOA Center ia General programs at fire stati in area Inman Park Branch Library - Bookmobile stop at Capitol Homes Resurface 5 streets - Pave 1 - 3 streets - Repair and improve side- walks 2 installations assigned to E EOA Cente General programs at fire stations in area General programs : fire stations in area
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 11, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 11, Document 16

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_011_016.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 11, Document 16
  • Text: PARKS DEPARTMENT The City Parks Department will operate approximately 134 centers, schools, playgrounds and parks, Heavy emphasis will be placed on teenage activities, such as social dances, civic councils, field trips to our Lake Allatoona property, and work experiences, Every neighborhood has been carefully inventoried from the viewpoint of the availability of either a school or a park and recreation facility. It is anticipated that not all of the currently existing forty odd playlots will be staffed; however, those not staffed will-:be adjacent to operational schools, Heavy emphasis will be placed on employment using in-school and out-of-school Neighborhood Youth Corps enrollees, as well as additional young people who come from disadvantaged areas. The entire summer program will be heavily publicized, using all news media and, if necessary, paid advertisements in the press, The Parks Department will attempt to have a comprehensive program going some twelve hours a day, six days a week that will provide recreation and cultural enrichment, as well as education in every identifiable neighborhood within the target areas. a
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 11, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 11, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_011_004.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 11, Document 4
  • Text: SUMMER PROGRAMS REQUIRING ADDITIONAL FUNDING * Some 55 proposals have been received by EOA and the Atlanta Youth Council. These total approximately $3, 000, 000,_EOA will receive $600, 000 from OEO this year, receive at least $300, 000 of this for Parks Department programs, Program Department Funding Requested Status Source Amount Summer Recreation* . Parks OE O/City/ $1, 300, 000 $300, 000 plus Labor of EOA $600, 000 Extra Departmental Personnel City 100, 000 0° Summer Jobs . Youth Council Atlanta Youth Council City 588, 000 0 Special Sanitation Crews Public Works -_ City 109, 886 0) Sanitation Summer Coordinating Funds Atlanta Youth Council HUD 30, 000 '$30, 000 from HUD - CRP Additional Library Services Atlanta Public Library City 6, 440 0 - Traffic Engineering Traffic Engineering City 449,590 ) Services City Services Mayor City . 12,700 $12, 700 approved Coordinators by City , TOTALS $2, 596, 616 $342, 700 The City will
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 11, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 11, Document 22

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_011_022.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 11, Document 22
  • Text: OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER GENERAL STATE OF GEORGIA The Comptroller General has held exploratory sessions with local property and casualty insurance executives on the subject of the recommended "voluntary plans" to provide fair access to property insurance for property owners, . A joint industry - government group is being formed to develop voluntary plans and give the opportunity to the industry to respond without the necessity of mandatory legislation creating insurance pools to facilitate insuring property in urban core areas,
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 11, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 12, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_012_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 12, Document 8
  • Text: PROGRAM DIRECTION This program plan outlines the direction which this year's program will hcepefully No plan, however great, can succeed without the sincere effort of us all. take. PRIORITIES FOR 1968 A. B. 1. 2. 9. 10. Age Priorities Youth employment 14-21 years of age. Programs that will act positively and affirmatively to deter civil disorder, sscial conflict, and general delinquency. Remediai Educational Programs in poverty schools, low cest transpor~ tation to jobs, recreation, and education. Recreational programs fer older youth during evenining hours. Make-yp programs for children attending half-day classes. Opportunities to work in useful community services, leadership and citizenship activities. Tutorial and study help pregrams. Programs that will provide individualized guidance and social services to youth so that youth may make better life adjustments. Educational and cultural eerchment programs. Organized athletic activities for inner-city youth. Unemployed pocr youth 16~21 years of age. Social and acadenically retarded youth 6-18 years of age. Delinquent and potentially delinquent youth 14-21 years cf age, Culturally deprived youth of all ages. Community services and leadership development among youth 14-21 years of age. 6, Children age 6-13. 7. Children and ycuth exhibiting special individual, personality and health problems. The 1968 Youth Opportunity Program is coordinated by the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council. The Council is serving as staff to the Metropolitan Youth Opportunity Council. The ccuncil is composed of approximately 85 agencies and organizations. : The Mayor of the City of Atlanta serves as General Chairman cf the Youth Oppor- tunity Program. The Board of Directors of the Atlanta Children and Youth Services © Council serves as Executive Committee of the Youth Opportunity Program. The repre- sentatives of the various participating organizations serve as the membership of the Youth Opportunity Pregram. Planning Process - Several community-wide exploratory meetings were held early in 1968. These meat~- ings included youth and adult residents of the prospective target areas as well repre- sentatives from government, business, civic, religious, and educational organizations. Every community organization, social agency, Neighborhood Service Center, youth club, and other private non-profit groups were invited to submit programs and alter~ natives which could be operated with or without federal funding. A narrative summary of these proposals is contained herein.’ Education In the educational aspect of the YOP, efforts will be made to (1) prowide needed remedial and tutorial programs for poor youth; (2) provide vocational infcrmation and educational activities needed by youth to enter into the labor force; (3) allow crea- tive and innovative educational programs not possible during winter months; (4) ailow coupling of educational, employment cultural enrichment and recreational programs; and (5) offer programs and courses not generally available to poor youth during regular school year. The major operating programs will be summer schools opperated by the Atlanta, Decatur, Fulton and DeKalb Counties School Systems. A fee is charged for these schools, however, the Atlanta Public School System has indicated that no needy chiid will be denied admission to summer school.because of money. PTA's and other community groups are promoting attendance of summer school for children needing remediai work. In addition to the regular summer program, several special programs wiil be provided under Title I and I1I EASA by the Atlanta and DeKalb County Boards of Educa~ tion. ae «Ds erdaticn fourd in the target areas, six be planned and implemented. Arc education 3 Tne Arts Council and its Associate x ft of the educaticnal pregram. og Because cf tne serious academic re tutorial and/or study-help pregrams wi will be developed in several cf the ta members are spearheading the art ed a . oO fh Po A. Specific Geais The goals of the edurarienal aspect. of the Yop are: 1. To provide Stisser remtdial programs for 2,024 srudeats. | 2: To provide tutecriai services for 1,362 scudents. a To previde vocational, technical, and occupational information for 2,185 students, 4. To provide enricoment and advance programs for 1,090 students. 5. To provide creative and experimental pregrams combining employment, enrichment, recreacional and occupational information for needy students. 6. To latnch aa intensive back-tceschool effort to gat 2,500 students te return to scheol to the fall. he To assist needy high school graduates to chtain scholarship and tuition 5 & P aid to continmye their education, giving special attentioa te “high risk" eraduates. 8. To assist the schoot and cezmunity in meeting the special nee students with the special persenal, social and economic problems. Ct hain Goals eee ae ye eee B. Planned Programs to 1. Summer Schcoi. Summer schools will be conducted by Atlanta, Fulton and DeKalt Schoris, . Several agenctes plan te and will y~nelp pregrams. Presently, 6 such programs : are planned inveiving a tectal of 1362 students. The tutorial and study“help programs are: : ae Cabbage Tows Recreation e. -H. R. Butler Scheol b, Central YWCA Program f. Jchn Hepe School ez Butler Street YMCA d. SiimeMec EOA Service Center sites 3. NovationalsTechoical, Fdvcational and Occupational Txfcrmatton Program. s Some plans are being developed along this lire with Atlanta Area Tech- nical School. Many groups are planning to offer cultural enrichment and advanced pregrams. 4, BacketorSchool Etrervt. The Atlanta Area Schools, Youth Council, EOA, and Chest: agencies will sgain isunch an effort to ger youth to return to school. This effort will take place beginning August. 5. "High Risk", LoweIncome., In late May, a comnittee will be formed to develop a project te expicre and deal with the problem of high risk, peer student warhing te go te college. 6. Specisi Problem Students. The Youth Council, varicus Boards of Education and other community groups will and are warking on projects that will help schcols deal with such preblems as absenteesm, incorrigibility, over age promoticn, dropouts, pregnaceies, emotional disturbances, mental health, and teacher=pupil relationships. Presently, the Youth Council is cocperating with Atlanta University, EOA, Family Counseling Center, the County Welfare, The Atlanta Board of Education and several other’ groups in.a pilot absenteeism project. Tne Atlanta Board of Education is planring several projects with various groups that will have a significant impact on their preblems. 7. Education Sub-Comnittee. The Mayor's Couricil on Youth Opportunity has organized a sub=-ccmmittee on education. This comuittee is chaired by Mrs. Betty Canten. Recreation, Social and Cultural Pregrams A. tn a aa introduction There are approximately 500,009 children and youth in Greater Atlanta. Most of these will be seeking ways to spend their sunner leisure time. Unfor- tunately, the lack of recreational and informal educational programs are most acute in the peverty commnities. Realizing the great need and shortage of whelesome recreational activities year-round, the varécus Parks and Recreation Department, The public schccls and libraries, the arts group, the EOA Neighborhood Service Centers, the Chest agencies and several youth groups have planned approximately 68 prejects. These projects combine recreation, education and employment. Mary of these will be youth managed and operated. wlpes Objectives Lis To provide meaningful recreational leisure time and cultural activities for needy children and youth. 2% To provide such activities at hours and places suitable to the needs, interest, and convient to the youth to be served. , 3. To previde a well rounded, well organized, and very inclusive recrea~ tional program. 4, To provide programs that significantly involve youth in planning, operation and evaluation processes. Coals The goal is to provide available recreational and/or leisure time activities in amsunt cf frequency and distance. It would be intéresticg to briefly summarize the recreational aspects of the Youth Opportunity Program. A total of 35 proposals will be proposed. The federal - budget request on these propesais total $600,000. An integral part ef the recreational-cultural aspect’ of the program will be resident and day camping programs. Effort was made to increase the number of day ard resident camp sicts available to poor children and youth. Presently slots are avail- able for 2.538 youek iz resident and day camp activities.in this program. Many agen- cies are making many of their regular summer camp slots available to poor yeuth. These include the Boy Scouts. Girl Scouts, Camp Fire Girls, YMCA and YWCA, Bethlehem Centers, etc. These crganizaticns will provide day and resident camp for non-members. In addition the City cf Atlanta Recreation Department will operate a camping program. The Jewish Community Center will make its day camp facilities available to groups of poor youth throughect the susmer. Many youth wili spend weekend camping trips at the State and National Parks. Equally as impor ant is the fact that these projects will employ approximately 1,000 peer teenage: n ES ‘s acd young adults. Be Operatioual Orsanizations The Citw ef Atlanta Parks, Recreation and School Departments wiil carry the majcr responsibili y for EM recreational program. In addition, the cities of East Feint The United Appeal Agencies, the EOA Neighborhood Service Centers, and several comunity based yeuth and young adult groups will provide special programs. The sembers end asseciate members of t In @ re Arcs Council will provide meaningful art and cultural pregrams. no erder to supplement these prograus, several ousizessmer and women as well as several club groups will provide special programs of recreation fer needed children and youth. Geographic Spread In addiction to planning creative and innovative programs, every effort will be made to spread the prajects geceraphicaily. Frojects are bein, planned ta be distributed as follows throughoul the target areas: Neighbertcod Service Centers: Central City Center East Central Center Area Block "EB" Cabbaze Town Youth Development Center 4 Edgewecd Center Mobile Day Camp Mentally Retarded DeKalb "y" Nash-Washiceten Center North Fulton Center Pittsburg Center Price center United Appeal: Central YMCA Bey Sccuts Metrepolitat Boys’ Ciub Wesley Comnunity Centers Girl Sceuts South Pulte: East Peirnt Recreation College Park Recreation Sum=-Mec Center Young Me's C Mecharicsvi.ti ivic League e Project Northwest Perry Homes Center Young Men's Civic Association West Central Center West End Center Gwinnett County Reckdale County Salvation Army (See Central City) Butler Street "y" Atlanta Giris’ Club Grady Hemes Ciris’® Ciub Atlanta Urban League
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 12, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 12, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_012_002.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 12, Document 2
  • Text: THE RESPONSE OF THE CITY ATTORNEY TO THE INQUIRY OF THE HONORABLE IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA UNDER DATE OF MARCH 19, 1968, WITH RESPECT TO HIS INQUIRY CONCERNING REQUESTED ACTION TO BE TAKEN BY CITY DEPARTMENTS AND PUBLIC AGENCTES « » es Following the format adopted by Mayor Allen in his communique to all department heads dated March 19, 1968, please be advised that no report was filed with respect to Paragraph 1 thereof inasmuch as the Law Department of the City of Atlanta is not the type of department which would be involved in the type © of activity set forth therein. ‘ Consequently, no report is made i this department concerning that feature of the letter. @ With respect to Paragraph 2 of the report dealing with Chapter 10 of Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, please be advised that the following represents a report of that chapter as the same is broken down in the book itself. The chapter is broken into two phases which shall be discussed in seritam fashion. The first phase concerns short range work which should be done and after each suggestion, a comment will be made concerning how the Law Department may aid in the implementation thereof. (a) Establish neighborhood action task force - it is the opinion of this department that we might do nothing effective with respect to the implementation of this. -(b) Establish effective grievance - response mechanism - it is the opinion of the Law Department that we would be in a position . to assist here in that should such grievance - response hearings be held, an Associate City Attorney could be present in order to determine whether or not any proposed action taken would be legally aa permissible. (c) Expand legal services fee Hie poor - inasmuch as the function of the City Attorney's Office is to represent the Mayor and Board of Aldermen, it is eux opinion that this matter should be best be left to the Atlanta Bar Aseosiarion and related agencies, such as, but not limited to, The Emory University School of Law. (d) Financial assistance - we do not feel we could be of any assistance here. (e) Hearing ghetto problems and enacting appropriate local legislation - we could be of assistance here as indicated under (b) (as=in=boy} above. (f) Expand employment by City Government of ghetto residents - this department would not be able to assist in this particular function. -~ With respect to the long term recommendations set forth in Chapter 10, and adopting the same format above set forth, this is our response to those. (a) Establish neighborhood city halls - the Law De- partment would in all probability not be of any assistance in this respect. (b) Develop multi - service centers - this appears to deal with such things as parks and recreational facilities .and the Law Department would in all probability not be in a position to be of any assistance here. (c) Improve political representation < At has long been the opinion of ids department, as the sewed ‘tei been - expressed through the City Attorney, that eh disproportionate representation created by malapportioned wards is, if not unconstitutional, a bad practice. This is even though all aldermen are elected on a city-wide ‘basis. Admittedly, the law's present posture seems to be city-wide elections are sufficient to take this situation out of any constitutionally infirm problem areas; however, a recent case in the Supreme Court of she United States, coming out of Texas, and which we have not had an opportunity to digest, might indicate chat opposition is not as sound as it was prior to the opinion set forth in the case. In any event, this department stands ready, willing and able to assist in such legislation as is necessary to cure malapportioned wards. (d) More effective community participation - it is doubtful that the Law Department could serve in this particular function. _ With respect to the specific questions asked in Para- graph 2, we feel that (a), (b) and (c) have already been answered in the analysis and as to estimating the probable cost involved, we deem that the functions which we would do, as the same are set forth above, would be done without any increased cost to the City of Atlanta over and above the retainers currently being paid to the several attorneys connected with the Law Department. With nénpeck to the third paragraph of the letter of March 19, 1968 from Mayor Allen to the several department heads, the following constitutes our response as the same concerns itself with Chapter 13 of the report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders. A work is necessary with respect to some of the con- siderations raised in this chapter and how the same has been analyzed by this department. In all probability the report pretty well hits the nail on the head when it indicates in Chapter 13 that the handling and prosecution under a mass arrest situation is totally different from any normal type of operation that obtains in the several courts that would have jurisdiction over the type of offenses that are normally committed during times of riot and violence. Also, the report seems to hit the nail on the head when it indicates that the administration of justice is an incomplete function when primary emphasis is placed on the quelling of the riots and virtually no emphasis is placed upon the prosecu- tion and conviction’ of people who were involved in the riots. The report of this department will primarily concern itself with these two features of Chapter 13. It is the feeling of this department that the City of Atlanta have on a standby basis, certain members of the local bar to act as both pro haec vice judges and prosecutors. The reason no recommendation is being sia. etch respect to defense counsel is that it is our feeling that the public defender system now established by the Fulton Superior Court is sufficient to take ene of this feature of the administration of justice. It is our thinking that the local bar would rise to the occasion and that these services would be furnished the City of Atlanta at no’ cost to the City of Atlanta. * Inasmuch as: the cry goes up concerning police brutality during post arrests, this department feels‘ that responsible members of the negro community should have access to devention areas of the city jail for the purpose of assuring the negro public that no abuse of prisoners is taking place. As a concomitant of/ this, of course, the police would not abuse prisoners. Also, a matter which should be considered is the possibility of holding neighborhood courts for bondable and resogeiuenve offenses in an effort to keep the jails to a normal ° population. The implementation of this recommendation would be difficult: however; we might even go so far as to have the basements of setienils utilized during periods of crisis for the purpose of having a judge set bond and for the purpose of having representatives of the several bonding companies present. In addition to schoois, perhaps other public buildings located near the areas would be permissible for this type of situation. _ As above set forth, one of the grave problems concerning the aftermath of riots is that in very few instances have pro- secutions which ensued as the result of riots been successfully carried forward to conviction. We feel that this shortcoming might in part be attributable to lack on the part of policemen of knowing what state or local Laws are violated in a riot situation. To this end, it is our thinking that a representative of the Solicitor- General's office, the Solicitor of the Criminal Court of Fulton County and the City Attorney, acting as a team, make lectures or talks to the police force in order to refamiliarize them with what does in fact constitute criminal activity in this area. Also, it is respectfully requested that the police begin using photographic equipment and motion pictures in order that proper demonstrative evidence might be used by the prosecution for the conviction of people who violate the law in this type of situation. No recommendation is made with respect to bonding provisions inasmuch as it is our opinion that the criterion pinendy established by the several judges of the Municipal a Court are sufficient. "Sy
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 12, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 11, Document 52

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_011_052.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 11, Document 52
  • Text: TRAFFIC ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT Atlanta, Georgia 30303 : April 1, 1968 KARL A. BEVINS Traffic Engineer The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: In reply to paragraph #2 of your instruction sheet dated March 19, 1968, and entitled "Requested Action to be taken by City Departments and Public Agencies", we submit the following report. We believe that the Neighborhood Task Force concept is the most effective way now/known to “communicate” with the residents of the six areas. Residents of other areas usually write letters, telephone, and/or work through civic clubs, PTA groups or similar means of communication. However, we recognize the very grave danger involved in opening this channel of communication without providing the means of quick response with action that will be recognized by the individual citizen as relief. The lack of civic clubs and similar organizations makes "reasoning" with the person filing the request or complaint very difficult, if not impossible. Therefore, we see an urgent need for additional personnel and operating funds to provide (1) the field investigation service, (2) the additional traffic studies needed to determine proper corrective action and (3) the work crews to install and maintain the needed signs, markings, signals and street lights. These needs are listed below. . Signs and Markings 1 Sign Crew (2 men and truck) § 12,610.00 Traffic Engineering Serviceman $4,446.00 Semi-Skilled Worker 4, 264.00 Truck 3,500.00 Service for Truck 400.00 Sign and Marking Materials 10,000.00 TOTAL (Signs and Markings) $ 22,610.00 Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. April 1, 1968 Street Light Nighttime Inspection 1 Traffic Engineering Assistant II @$5,720.00 Auto Allowance ($70/month) 840.00 Desk and Chair 335.00 TOTAL (Street Light Nighttime Inspection) $ 6,895.00 Traffic Signals Equipment for 62 new installations @§6,000) $ 372,000.00 1 Electrical Construction Crew 40,349.00 Electrician Foreman 6,487.00 2 Electricians(@$5, 967) 11,934.00 2 Semi-Skilled Wor.(@, 264) 8,528.00 Aerial Truck 13,000.00 Service for Truck 400.00 Soa be “To fq 2 $ 412,349.00 Engineering, Specifications, Timing, etc. 1 Traffic Engineer I 8,671.00 Auto Allowance ($55/Month) 660.00 Desk and Chair 335.00 “ 1 Jr. Traffic Engineer 7,345.00 Auto Allowance ($55/Month) 660.00 Desk and Chair 335.00 Sub Total § 18,006.00 Field Traffic Studies to document needs for traffic signals if Federal or State funds are obtained to purchase the equipment 1 Traffic Engineering Asst. II 5,720.00 Auto Allowance ($55/Month) 660.00 Desk and Chair 335,00 2 TE Assistant I (@$5, 265) 10,530.00 2 Auto Allowance ($55/Month) 1,320.00 2 Desk and Chair (@$335) 670.00 Sub Total $ 19,235.00 Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. April 1, 1968 The above listed personnel, equipment and material needs are summarized as follows: Signs and Markings Personnel : $ 8,710.00 Equipment 3,900.00 Materials 10,000.00 TOTAL § 22,610.00 Street Light Night Inspection Personnel 6,560.00 Equipment 335.00 TOTAL $ 6,895.00 Traffic Signals Personnel (Construction) 26,949.00 Personnel (kngineering) 17,336.00 Personnel (Documentation) 18, 230,00 Equipment (for Personnel) 15,075.00 Traffic Signal Equipment 372,000.00 TOTAL $ 449,590.00 This listing shows an estimated grand total of $479,095.00 which includes $77,785.00 for Personnel, $19,310.00 for Equipment and $382,000.00 for Materials. The needs for sign and marking materials are not great ($10,000) as outlined above. However, the need for prompt service is urgent. The best our "normal! service can do is 10 days to 2 weeks after the field investigation is complete and the work orders are written. "Normal" time for field investigation is also 10 days to 2 weeks. Experience has shown that this is not fast enough for the needs of the six special areas. Field investigation must be done within 48 hours and work crews must be in the area within 3 or 4 days of the time that the request or complaint is filed. This time table requires the additional personnel outlined above, Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. April 1, 1968 Experience during 1966 and 1967 clearly shows that regular night inspections are necessary to locate lamp outages, street light fixtures broken by rocks and/or rifle shots and report these items to the Georgia Power Company for immediate repairs. Normal maintenance by the Georgia Power Company calls for cleaning and re-lamping only every 2 to 3 years. In other sections of the city, residents usually notify us of lamps that burn out ahead of schedule or of physical damage that occurs. During 1966 and 1967, we found that (in the six areas) most of these items went unreported until we made a night inspection. There is a “backlog” of traffic signal needs (city wide) consisting of about 150 locations where signals have been requested and where signals would be helpful and are warranted. Approximately 62 of these locations are in the six areas. Most of these are the "Merrill and Oakland't type of situations and there is no way of accurately predicting when or if a sudden pressing need will occur. New Federal Safety Standards will probably require certain additional equipment over and above our present standards. Accordingly, our estimate of the cost of these installations is slightly higher than in the past. Also, if Federal Funds are obtained to help purchase signal equipment, a substantial amount of field work and data gathering will be necessary to satisfy Federal and State documentation requirements, Estimated needs to develop this documentation are also listed above. In closing, we assure you that we recognize the importance and the urgency of this segment of our service to the city. We believe that the"™Neighborhood Task Force" type of communication should be opened. We urge that_this improved communication be backed by improving the City's ability to respond with "desirable" as well as urgently needed services. In our field of endeavor, it is frequently difficult to define (explain) the difference between a "desirable™ service or traffic control device and one that is urgently needed. Sincerely, Pa OL Ce ‘2 tk Karl A. Bevins KAB/fd ec: Alderman G. Everett Millican, Chairman“ Advisory Committee on Civil Disorders Alderman Richard C. Freeman, Chairman Traffic, Parking and Transit Committee
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 11, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 12, Document 12

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_012_012.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 12, Document 12
  • Text: ADULT VOLUNTEER PROGRAM I.. Introduction A key to success of the entire youth opportunity program will be the number of volunteers recruited. The manpower needed to carry out the many activi- “ties in this program is too numerous to be obtained from the limited funds available. Effort will be made to recruit, train and place a total of 500 full: and part time volunteers. ; ' These volunteers will serve in a variety of ways: Camp counselors, employ-. ment interviewers, game room supervisors, gym instructors, coaches, tutors, bus supervisors, homemake teachers, arts and crafts instructors, and hundreds of other types of leaders. IT. Recruitment Recruitment of volunteers will be primarily through public media, speaking engagements, brochures, and flyers. A full page ad will be placed in the three major newspapers. The Federal Government, Labor Unions, several trade associatiops, professional organizations, churches, and religious groups will be solicited for volunteer services. The Federal agencies are asking all of its 27,000 volunteers to work in this program. TEE. Training Training of the volunteers will be done by VISTA, the American Red Cross, and the user agencies. IV. Placements A special volunteer placement committee is presently at work and will place the volunteers. Special Events An important part of the Youth Opportunity Program will be special events. Several special events will be planned and implemented by the individual agencies and organizations. The School and Recreation Department are now planning special events such as Jr. Olympics, Field Days, Chattanooga-Atlanta Games and other similar events. In addition, arrangements are being made to obtain tickets and admission to movies, theaters, athletic events, and cultural activities. Bus,cplane, train “Qa and boat trips are being arranged. Picnics, outings, and special sight-seeing tours are being arranged. The Special Events Sub-Committee is being chaired by Mr. Steve Fox. ‘ TRANSPORTATION One of the most crucial and critical problems to be solved in the youth Opportunity program is transportation. Ninety-five percent of all the proposals submitted requires transportation. The present plan is to centralize all transportation and dispatch by request and regular routing. The buses will be obtained from the following sources: The Atlanta Transit Company The Third Army and Other Military. The [Fulton County Schools The /DeKalb County Schools Private owners of buses used by the Counties Church owned buses The Greyhound Bus The Trailways Bus The Continental Trailways Bus The major Rail Companies State National Guard An estimate of the transportation needs is illustrated by the requests made in sub- mitted. projects. An estimated $158,000 is needed to provide the needed transportation Resident Camps Day Camps Trips Tours ar
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 12, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 11, Document 35

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_011_035.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 11, Document 35
  • Text: echmebe ae 4ocn we Gk ee yo =. Wwe wen tees ba. Bag wn ety ee Mee oe ie * 2S b Per ey ee Fe anew ee ae % pk Patent eho ee Pe a ee 6 eee a fins ey sete ess wee eT ow Paras ‘ . s ayta \ : nS feat eh eet Ned ewe ee ee the hee ~~ fe — Re eee hoa tiare & ' i sat ines : aa " eS wut ay ea wae tes Ged myn eta avai ‘ aes oie Dp 4 ety ‘ ~-} See 4 as a = s alee hat boi Cit CE UE EEO SI cee ay es ee le ee A EL EE ; we a “ Tees € -s =o “Wo a rae ele af ° i * y 4 * “iy net oy ore i) = sae Noa! Me ane ont e e if yee ere ‘ an Pye ees ye se 7 ~ : 3 “ Ce Re eaten RS bee wa ee lo ee ee CLchOG oe ete, “ry ae eoopers t: > eee Zo ene Ge CoC lca mee) Weewse Gieagae a Ms — J rye ae em Siies wt 3 REO 7 é Neamt we he OA te he re bow Glace Couas 5 9 5 ae eae aes if tan + fees we ay 4S FYI ae, C84 we ‘7 ne rer +e a ct Lyi ek Wabi woke eos hice Be tee wb Becien Alt wae ome . Ln be Pig Lora age wee et ee wee Ne eed bel ete ee ale ene mel ot ewe “ * fh a tes ey el 2s ot oe Recta he Pina Nt ed Mere Bat ee le A al Re POLE Of =F on, toe mts es Slice tae kage ago Se res, Pe pom el] om pany he eee hres * = - . a “ ae a ge ee ee oom, Holacn ts Cen 5 fea Te etm " ey ea yee, BVot.. 28 eg het nee be Be we ee ee eee tel der fee ement —ew i a ri a a teets of ney pensar? dey HGS OF Fite Gysssle, ve “are fer es tL te tee Os ee * fe fe eon SAPs tie eg etD per eon fee 2 on a Re ee ee ata ete ade boleehee in ate eee ke Se > he - — res ~ = ° eta. att Bese Tp ten en eee OR teehee Lae COUT 9 sale heey hg ia ie xe +, Sey ee fa ann et re fe te tay é are Peqves coca ca attend. ; wee ee bee Le * « « at eradtyen or : GOI UC» | . od 2 ee
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 11, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 11, Document 45

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_011_045.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 11, Document 45
  • Text: . OUTLINE OF SUMMERTIME PROGRAM 1968 1. Assign Arvell Crowe as ovr representive on the task force, his job will be to coordinate this program with the neighborhood coordinator or his representive. 4e will supervise the efforts of the Sanitmmey Division in the 6 areas involved. hiust be available at all times. 2e Arrange for a trash pickup twice weerely in these areas, or whenever it is needed. 5. Arrange for garbage pickup twice weekly, plus arrangements for emergency pickups. 4. Arrange for brooms to swee} the streets at least once a week, more often if needed. Make use of water wagon to wash the streets. Cooperate with the Police Lepartment in removing abandonded cars from the streets. 5e Remove abandonded autos wherever we can locate the owner and secure @ release from him, this is per instructions of the City Attorney. 66 Cooperate with HOA to coordinate cleanup of yacsnt lots and private property. Intensify the ABC & NYC programs. . 7. Cooperate with the Atlanta Children & Youth Service Council in the Rodent Control program in these areas. We will train 5 of their people to act as sanitary supervisors anc these will supervise crews of & persons each to clean uo vacant lots and private residences. Be Make an effort to put into operation Operation wonpbwnies will be an extra effort in these treas, 27¢ will supplement the sunmer program anc eventuelly be made a permanent program in these areas |
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 11, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 12, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_012_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 12, Document 3
  • Text: April 1, 1968 CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR CECIL A. ALEXANDER, Chairman Housing Resources Committee MALCOLM D. JONES Housing Coordinator The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mayor Allen: Pursuant to your directive of March 19, 1968 pertaining to action to be taxen by City Departments and Public Azencies in implementation of the U.S. Riot Commission 2eoort, with special emphasis on Chapters 10 and 17, the portion on "Housinz", snoecifically assigned to the Housing Resources Comittee “oo 2 is herewith submitted, for file with the Mayor's Office and the Advisory Committee on Civil Disorders. . * Attention is called to my initial letter report of March 22, 1966 copy attached (Mncl.1). . A more detailed report worked up by the Housing Coordinator and reviewed by this Committee's Consultant, and with which I generally concur is attached a Encl.2). Sincerely, - LE or Lf _t 14 © ? ‘L teed é Cecil A. Alexander, Chairmen Housing Resources Committee a Enels: Copy of letter cated March 22, 1968 Report developed by Housing Coordinator
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 12, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 12, Document 24

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_012_024.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 12, Document 24
  • Text: 7b Lihue April 6, 1968 Mr. Jim Parham Executive Director Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. 101 Marietta Street Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Parham: I attach hereto two copies of this department's proposal for Summer Recreation, Employment and Enrichment Program. The project is in conjunction with the Atlanta Public Schools and it represents a request for federal assistance in the amount of $1,338,779. _ The in-kind contribution on the part of this department and School Department amounts to $487,690. Thus, the total budget is $1,826,469. Sincerely, Jack C. Delius General Manager of Enclosures Parks and Recreation JCD: jw ec: Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor, City of Atlanta ' Aldermanic Parks Committee Members Le Mr. Cherles L. Davis, Comptroller, City of Atlanta ~ (for Finance Committee) Mr. Dan Sweat, Director Governmental Liaison (for Application Review Board)
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 12, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 11, Document 37

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_011_037.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 11, Document 37
  • Text: CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of POLICE Atlanta 3, Georgia March 27, 1968 HERBERT T. JENKINS Chief Mayor Ivan Allen, Jre, and Advisory Committee on Civil Disorders City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Sirs: In accordance with your request of March 19, 1968, I submit herewith, my comments and recommendations for action in Atlanta, Yours very truly, GO. wo Naso ake ere ent GAR:b
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 11, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 11, Document 27

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_011_027.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 11, Document 27
  • Text: REPORT TO MAYOR IVAN ALLEN JR. CONCERNING NEEDS AND ESTIMATED COSTS OF IMPLEMENTING THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE *ON CIVIL DISORDER - SUBMITTED BY Robert M. food, Chairman Atlanta Children and‘ Youth _— Services Council. J, In order to assess the feasibility of implementing the recommendations of the National Advisory Committee on Civil Disorder, the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council will first indicate the extent and intensity of youth problems as related to civil disorder. Observing the report of the National Advisory Committee, the Youth Council immediately noticed the extent of youth participation in Civil Disorder. For example, the Committee reports that the typical rioter in the summer of 1967 was a Negro, unmarried male between the ages 15 and 24, In Detroit, 61.3% of the self reported rioters were between the ages 15 and 24 and 86.3% were between 15 and 35. The arrest data indicated that 52.5% of the arresteces were between 15 and 24, and 60.8 percent were between 15 and 35. In short, the - typical rioter was a teenager or young adult, a life long resident of the city in which he rioted, a high school drop-out. In Atlanta preliminary data revealed that riot participants were between the ages 9 and 35. The overwhelming majority of those arrested in Atlanta's riot of 1967 were less that 30 years old. These data reveal that riots are by and large initiated, prolonged, and participated in by youth and young adults, These data also bear witness to the lack of interest, energy, and resources needed to deal with youth problems and needs realistically and honestly. In Atlanta, the need for more concentrated and realistic allocation of personnel and resources to deal with youth problems increases ever year. For example 57% of Fulton County's Juvenile Delinquents were residents of Atlanta's poverty areas in 1964, In 1965 43% of all people arrested for major crimes in Atlanta were below 17 years of age. The delinquency rate has increased 114% faster than the general population, The recidivist rate for Fulton County Youth offenders is 40%. The general restlessness of inner city Atlanta Youth has increased to a dangerous level. ‘In addition there are 3,000 school drop- outs in Atlanta. In 1965, 40% of the youth tested by the Fulton County Juvenile Court were 5 years or more below their proper grade level, Another 40% were three or more years behind. These statistics merely reflect some of the problems facing Atlanta's youth, Other problems are: 1. high illigitimacy rates, 2. increasing delinquency in affluent areas 3. increasing belligerent postures by minority youth, particulary in civil rights activities, 4. rebellion on college campuses, 5. youth anti-draft and anti-war activities. Concomitant and correlated to youth participation in civil disorders and riots is their participation in normal delinquent activities, individually and collect- ively. Considering the broad range of needs and problems facing Atlanta's youth the ' Atlenta Children and Youth Services Council specifically reconmend the following courses of actions aimed at reducing tensions and the possibility of civil disorders in slums and blighted areas for the summer 1968. 1. 3. 7. 8. That the city of Atlanta emphasize and provide more recreational programs and facilities in Slum areas for teenagers and young adults. If this is not geographically feasible, then the city should subsidize and/or provide transportation to areas where such programs and facilities are available. This recreational provision should be totally devoted to late afternoon, evening and night activities as well as evening activities. That the city sponsor an outreach Street Workers ' Program where outreach workers may go into potentially trouble areas and work for periods of time with detached and unreached individual youth helping them become involved in meaningful employment, recreation and education. This program will be coordinated by the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council and will be operated on @ contractual basis with other operationg agencies to supervise street workers. That several youth from the Youth Congress be appointed to the Mayor's Civil Disorder Advisory Committee. That a workshop be conducted by the Atlanta Children and Youth Service Council, the Police Department, Social Agencies, Civil Rights Groups, and Youth Organizations around athere of "Police- Youth Relationships" in which all divisions of the police department will participate. The Community Relations Services, U.S. Department of Justice will assist in sponsoring such a program. That all city departments channel all youth requests, grievances, complaints, etc. to the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council] which is the agency established to deal with these matters. That the work of the Crime Prevention Bureau and Juvenile units of the Police Department be more closely related to the Youth Covncil in the planning and implementing of their programs. That the switchboard in City Hall be open daily from 5:00 p.m, until 12:00 a.m. with persons available to receive complaints and grievances and furnish names and telephone numbers of persons to call during emergency or crisis periods. That the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council and the Comunity Relations Comnission be provided funds to hire community organizers, for youth and adults in racially transitional areas such as West End, Bellwood, Grant Park, Capitol Homes and
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 11, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 15, Folder 11, Document 28

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_011_028.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 15, Folder 11, Document 28
  • Text: ¢* i >? & A oo. ~ ce me fy ys i L ¥ x. . Zé i I = i “SJ i fru PERSONNEL BOARD CITY HALL ANNEX 260 CENTRAL AVENUE, 5. W. ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 CARL T. SUTHERLAND ; Director April 2 1968 Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: Pursuant to your guidance at the organizational meeting of the Advisory Committee on Civil Disorders held in the City Hall March 19, 1968, and to careful reading of Chapters 10 and 17 of Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, I have reached the conclusion that the City Personnel Department for several years gradually has been putting into practice most of the recommendations of the Commission pertaining to employment. I agree, however, that other steps should be taken and have prepared two recommendations, one that requires action and money from the Mayor and Board of Aldermen. Both require cooperation from all departments of the City government. Though it is true that the objective of the City Personnel Department to provide the City government with the best qualified personnel available and to do so by operation of a competitive merit system designed to give priority to the best qualified applicants, the Civil Service Act is suf- ficiently flexible to provide for certain types of temporary employment in the unclassified service. The Civil Service Act also gives the Personnel Director wide latitude in estab- lishing requirements for applicants, and I have exercised the authority given me to adjust standards to meet condi- tions that have confronted the City government during the past several years. Requirements have been reduced for nearly all classes of jobs. Establishment of minimum standards is avoided as Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. -—2= April 2, 1968 -™much as deemed practicable, and for most jobs the word "desirable" has been substituted for "minimum" in listing education, training, and experience standards. Performance tests have replaced written tests wherever practicable. With approval of the Personnel Board, employment of per- sonnel with criminal records has been liberalized except for positions concerned with law enforcement, working with children in the schools and recreation departments, and in other positions of trust and responsibility. Upon the recommendation of state and county parole authorities, we have approved employment of parolees with good prison de- portment records. The age limits have been lowered to 20 for Police Patrolmen, 18 for Firemen, and 17 for clerical and unskilled personnel. Locker attendants and life guards may be employed at age 16. Few job classes have maximum age limits except those set by statute. Though there is reluctance by many department heads to employ personnel above age 40, considerable numbers above age 50, and several above age 60, have been employed. As you are aware, since January 1, 1962, Negroes, whose ap- plications prior to this time were accepted only for entrance level jobs, have been encouraged to apply for all classes of jobs, and many have been employed in jobs above the entrance level. The Personnel Training Coordinator with the cooperation of the Public Works Department has established a training program for truck driver aspirants, enabling both White and Negro Laborers and Waste Collectors to be trained and to meet the requirements for promotion. This program will be continued. Also, with the cooperation of the Atlanta Public Schools, a training program for first level supervisory personnel has been established to upgrade the qualifications of incum- bents of first level supervisory positions and to qualify applicants for promotion to these positions, Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. =—3— April 2, 1968 The Personnel Training Coordinator also planned and organized with the cooperation of the Sanitary Department (now the Sanitation Division of the Public Works Department) the At-— lanta Beautification Corps, a federally financed program under the sponsorship of Economic Opportunity Atlanta. This program employs approximately fifty disadvantaged persons ranging from age 18 to age 68 and is composed of about 88% women, largely Negro. Mr. Farrow still exercises overall supervision of this program. Numerous favorable comments concerning the deportment and accomplishments of this group have been received from interested citizens and personnel of the City government. Mr. Farrow reports that if funds were available, several hundred additional personnel could be employed in the Atlanta Beautification Corps with advantage to both the employees and the City. The positive actions referred to above have done much to provide career opportunities for disadvantaged minorities, but much still needs to be done. Two programs prepared by members of my staff, outlines of which are attached hereto, are proposed to assist in implementation of some of the em- ployment objectives of the Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders. These programs would provide employment opportunities for approximately 200 disadvantaged personnel. Respectfully, CARL T,. SUTHERLAND Director of Personnel CcTS:cbt Attachments (2)
  • Tags: Box 15, Box 15 Folder 11, Folder topic: Departmental reports on Civil Disorders Commission report | 1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021