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Box 18, Folder 21, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 3
  • Text: A ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, ING, NASH-WASHINGTON NELGHBORHOOD SERVICE CENTER 247 ASHBY STREET, N. W. ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30314 524-2084 April 12, 1967 Mr. Reese Cleghorn Atlanta Journal 10 Forsyth Street Building Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Cleghorn; You will never know how much the NASH-Washington Center appreciates your activities and accomplishment in connection with the recreational program at the Vine City Extension. The check for $200, which you spear- headed through your generous column in the Atlanta Journal and the Trinity Presbyterian Church,is highly appreciated. Mr. Eddie Murphy and I will use the funds to the best advantage in this area. Keep up the good work, Mr. Cleghorn! ‘There are many people who need to know inside their hearts what goes on in the slums, and that they are its neighbors. We have been thrilled, since our opening on March 29, 1965, with the opportunity to coordinate services and opportunities in the NASH-Washington neighborhood. It is a big job. With the help of such interested persons as yourself, your church group, your newspaper and others, we can do a small part toward the up-rooting of the patterns of poverty. Sincerely yours, erm r 5 aa ) / TN OU ga wt. tors ‘ins William A. Fowlkes, Director NASH-Washington Neighborhood Center WAF: eh ec: Mr. C. 0. Emmerich Mayor Ivan Allen Dr. Allison Williams Mr. Harold Barrett
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 7
  • Text: ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC. 101 MARIETTA STREET BLDG, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 §25-—4262 c. 0. EMMERICH ADMINISTRATOR February 28, 1967 Mr. Robert Dobbs 2455 Abner Place, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Dobbs: As Chairman of the Board of Directors of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., I am happy to give you this official notice of your selection as a member of the EOA Board of Directors to represent the Northwest-Perry Neighborhood Service Center area for the calendar year 1967. Your selection was the result of a recent democratic selection procedure among the citizens,served by the EOA program in your area. We congratulate you and wish for you full satisfaction in this important community activity. EOA Board meetings are regularly held at two o'clock in the afternoon of the third Wednesday each month at EOA offices on the fourth floor of the 101 Marietta Street Building. You will receive further information about the next meeting sche- duled for March 15. Sincerely yours, ae. oisfeuillet Jone Chairman, EOA i cc: Mayor Ivan Allen, City of AtlantaY Chairman James Aldredge, Commissioners of Roads and Revenues of Fulton County BJ:np
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_009.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 9
  • Text: ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC. 101 MARIETTA STREET BLDG. ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 525-4262 Ci0, EMMERICH ADMINISTRATOR i | | i February 28, 1967 Mrs. Beatrice Garland 1011 Smith Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia i | Dear Mrs. Garland: As Chairman of the Board of Directors of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., I am happy to give you this official notice of your selection as a member of the EOA Board of Directors to represent the Pittsburg Neighborhood Service Center area for the calendar year 1967. Your selection was the result of a recent democratic selection procedure among the citizens served by the EOA program in your area: We congratulate you and wish for you full satisfaction in this important community activity. EOA Board meetings are regularly held at two o'clock in the afternoon of the third Wednesday each month at EOA offices on the fourth floor of the 101 Marietta Street Building. You will receive further information about the next meeting sche- duled for March 15. Sincerely yours, Boisfeuillet Jorfés ~~~ Chairman, EOA cc: Mayor Ivan Allen, City of Atlantav Chairman James Aldredge, Commissioners of Roads and Revenues of Fulton County BJznp
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 13
  • Text: ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC. 101 MARIETTA STREET BLDG, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 525-4262 c. Oo. EMMERICH ADMINISTRATOR February 28, 1967 Mr. Erwin Stevens 799 Parsons Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Stevens: As Chairman of the Board of Directors of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., I am happy to give you this,official notice of your selection as a member of the EOA Board of Directors to represent the Nash-Washington Neighborhood Service Center area for the calendar year 1967. Your selection was the result of a recent democratic selection procedure among the citizens served by the EOA program in your area. We congratulate you and wish for you full satisfaction in this important community activity. EOA Board meetings are regularly held at two o'clock in the afternoon of the third Wednesday each month at EOA offices on the fourth floor of the 101 Marietta Street Building. You will receive further information about the next meeting sche- duled for March 15. Sincerely yours, sp fefeuiliet oe: Chairman, EOA cc: Mayor Ivan Allen, City of Atlanta we Chairman James Aldredge, Commissioners of Roads and Revenues of Fulton County Bd:np
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 1

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_001.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 1
  • Text: CITY OF ATLANTA. CITY HALL ATLANTS, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 April 18, 1967 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison MEMORANDUM TO: Mr. Dan E, Sweat FROM: Johnny H, Kobinson SUBJECT: Eviction of Mr, Willie J. Wylie and Family, h Walkers Alley, ‘5.E. Through coordination of the East Central BOA Center, Relocation Office at Bedford and Pine Project and Mayor's Office, Mr. Willie J. Wylie, nine children and wife have been relocated at 1:72 Broyle Avenue. His case will remain in the work load of Hast Central HOA Center in order to try to get his family relocated in public housing, because the address where he is now located is sub-standardj but will serve the purpose urtil we can relocate him and his family in standard housing.
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 20
  • Text: January 9, 1967 Mr. C. O. Emmerich Administrator Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. 101 Marietta Street Building Atlanta, Georgia Dear Charlie: Thank you very much for your letter of December 30th and the suggestions contained therein. I am taking this up with Carl Sutherland, Personnel Director. Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. IAJr:am
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 21

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_021.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 21
  • Text: ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC. 101 MARIETTA STREET BLDG, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 525-4262 c. Oo. EMMERICH ADMINISTRATOR December 30, 1966 CONFIDENTIAL Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mayor Allen: As we reach the close of 1966, I would like to take this means of expressing my appreciation for the leadership you are giving to Atlanta and for the help and encourage- ment you have extended to EOA in its effort to fight poverty. I sometimes feel that you have a thankless and lonely job, but when you measure the effect in making Atlanta a great city, I am sure that you are pleased. Please permit me to point out a real problem which might be better solved without fund allocations. We have noticed many ads in our local papers seeking employees and at the same time, the city does have a small degree of unemployment and perhaps a large degree of under employment. Much is being done to correct this problem and for this we are all grateful. However, I would like to encourage you to call on your staff and department heads to help offer part of the solution to the real problem. I believe it could be done by present- ing four suggestions for their review and action. Satisfactory employment is considered by many as the best tool in fighting poverty. "The United States must learn to make better use of (1) unskilled workers, (2) older persons, (3) women, and (4) the mentally retarded, if economic growth is to continue;" says Commerce Secretary John T. Connor. Mayor Allen -2- December 30, If the City Administration (the department heads and personnel officer) could keep in mind the employment facet of our local problem, much might be accomplished. As an example, you might wish to suggest four avenues or approaches which the department heads could consider: Number 1. A greater use of Negro employees in all levels of each of the cities services. Statistics show that Atlanta cannot erase its poverty until the manpower pool of Negro men and women can share equal employment opportunities in both private and Federal agencies. I am aware much has already been done by some of the departments; however, this is not enough, if we are going to erase poverty in our city. According to the 1966 Human Resources Survey in Atlanta's low income areas, 83% of the available labor force are Negroes; 65% of the . labor force are Negro Women. Number 2. The lowering of job qualifications in at least six percent of the jobs in most of the city departments would allow many presently unqualified individuals to enter the city services. In order to insure success, department heads would most likely find it necessary to provide on-the-job training or some form of in-service training for this group of employees. Continued success would demand that these jobs not be dead end jobs. 1. Based on the recent Human Resources Survey 25% of Negro males and 26% of Negro females have less than a Grammar School Education. 2. 64% or 2/3 of the Negroes surveyed had not completed High School. Number 3. A great use of nonprofessionals as assis- tants to professionals in all areas of the city ser- vice would certainly help us to place many deserving Atlantans in our city employment. While this is not 1966 a new concept, since it has been tried by both private Mayor Allen -3- December 30, 1966 and by city departments, it has not yet been accepted to the point which we can expect the desired results. EOA has employed over 300 such workers, and we are happy to report that our results have been most gratifying, and we think most successful. l. 83% of Negro females who reported earnings in the Human Resources Survey earned less than $3,000.00. 2. 56% of Negro men who reported earnings earned less than $3,000.00. Number 4. A greater employment of women, especially Negro women, would be most helpful to Atlanta's War on Poverty. Without this effort, Atlanta's program will be unsuccessful. 1. 2/3 of all applicants visiting the Neighbor- hood Centers for employment assistance were females. 2. Of those surveyed in the Atlanta Human Resources Survey, women made up 89% of the available labor market. Negro women made up 65% of this available work force. Frankly, I cannot tell you how to get these four things done, but I feel certain if top administration of the city will support these four suggestions, they will be agreeably sur- prised how middle management will be able to augment these ideas and make them work. The reason EOA would like to see these ideas put into practice is because it does not add to our cost of fighting poverty, but it offers a real solution to many of our disadvantaged. If EOA can be of help in referring individuals to the employ- ment office, we will be glad to assist. Sincerely yours, teh aks Cc. O. Emmerich COE/np
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 36

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_036.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 36
  • Text: ATLANTA UNIVERSITY ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30314 July 10, 1967 o\ SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES y Mr. Eugene Patterson, Editor | Atlanta Constitution : 10 Forsyth Street Building | Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Patterson: Mr. Coffin's article in Monday, July 10, 1967, Constitution contains unfounded speculation concerning my desires in connection with the ‘selection of a new EOA Director. - There is no objection to the mentioning of my name as a possible< candidate, but Mr. Coffin goes beyond the bounds of reasonable judge- ment and speculation when he indicates that I "apparently want the job." The record will show that my former appointment to the program was made prior to any formal application and was accepted by me only after pressure from the Negro community was exerted. Many people, including some whites, have inquired about my avail~ ability for the position with EOA and all have received a negative reply. It would have been an easy matter for Mr. Coffin to check with me before writing the news release. Indeed, the article gives the impression of exceeding comment and analysis; it is dangerously close to attempting to influence what happens. I would appreciate having my feelings expressed accurately or having this letter published in your newspaper. Sincerely yours, Tilman C. Cothran, Chairman Department of Sociology TCG: BK cc: Mr. Alex Coffin, Reporter Atlanta Constitution “tege © = . xXERO xXERG KERO laeee rea jeory cory SoPy fa, 7 Sy ee mgr 6 ; ”
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 26

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_026.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 26
  • Text: EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT « CITY OF PROVIDENCE e RHODE ISLAND MAYOR JOSEPH A. DOORLEY, JR. 0 November 4, 1967 LP Dear Ivan: I have been informed by members of my own Congressionsl delegation, who fully support the concept of the poverty program, and from other numerous sources that the authorization bill for the Office of Economic Opportunity is in for "rough sledding" and as one newspaper source said "9 real bloodletting". Needless to say I do not have to tell any municipal chief? executive what this will mean to the programs under way in his city. It is not my intention to be gored to death without witnessing the bull in action. I urge those of you who share my concern to join me in Washington this week s0 that we can properly demonstrate our interest. T may be contacted at my office on Monday or at the Congressional Hotel in Washington on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Very truly yours, ayor of Providence
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 23
  • Text: November 6, 1967 Mr. Bradley H. Patterson, Jr. Executive Director The National Advisory Council on Economic Opportunity 1016 Sixteenth Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. 20036 Dear Mr. Patterson: This will acknowledge receipt of your letter regarding the use of my views concerning the Economic Opportunity programs. You certainly have my permission to make that letter public. Sincerely yours, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor lAJr/br
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_004.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 4
  • Text: an \ ¢c. 0. EMMERICH DS ADMINISTRATOR hd ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC. 101 MARIETTA STREET BLDG, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 525-4262 April 6, 1967 Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Director of Governmental Liaison City Hall City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Dan: Reference is made to your letter of April 5 in which you requested information in certain areas of the City. I am requesting Mr. Harold Barrett, Associate Administrator for Operations, to furnish you this information as he is keenly aware of the things which are going on in these areas. Incidentally, I think you should know that we are making three efforts to come up with local recreational programs in each of our twelve target areas this summer. First, we are trying to get each of the Neighborhood Ser- vice Centers to develop a program within the limits of their ability, and at the same time we are calling upon all local groups to assist. Second, Mr. Allison is requesting assistance from a number of both public and private agencies at the overall City level. Third, the Chairman of our Board plans to discuss this. matter with Sargent Shriver with the hope that funds can be found to at least give us a program equivalent to last summer's program. Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. -2- April 6, 1967 * We will keep you posted and encourage you to keep us advised also. Best of luck. Sincerely yours, . f fi - EE Ar pte C. O. Emmerich COE/ch
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_025.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 25
  • Text: . WILLIAM H. AYRES : . COMMITTEES: 14TH Bistricr, OHIO EDUCATION AND LABOR VETERANS' AFFAIRS Congress of the Euited States Bouse of Representatives s Washington, D.C. October 13, 1967 Mr. Morris I. Leibman Leibman, Williams, Bennett, Baird and Minnow 208 South LaSalle Street Chicago, Illinois 60604 Dear Mr. Leibman: In your capacity as Chairman of the National Advisory Council on Poverty, I understand that you recently directed letters to numerous public officials at all levels of government and organizations seeking their views on the War on Poverty. 2 In my work with the Education and Labor Committee, I am likewise trying to keep up with all aspects of the Poverty program. My immediate interest lies in the area of the role of, and coordination with, the states in the adminis- tration of the program. It occurred to me that the responses to your inquiry, perhaps from Governors and/or others, might have contained some enlightening information on the subject of state participation. If your staff has compiled the results of your inquiry or 1f there is any information you have regarding state participation which I could be furnished, I would be most grateful. Best personal regards, A ies Tillian ef es
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 8
  • Text: ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC. 101 MARIETTA STREET BLDG, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 525-4262 c. 0. EMMERICH . ADMINISTRATOR February 28, 1967 Mr. Edward Young 2279 Hill Street, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia { Dear Mr. Young: 1 As Chairman of the Board of Directors of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., I am happy to give you this official notice of your selection as a member of the EOA Board of Directors to represent the West Central Neighborhood Service Center area for the calendar year 1967. Your selection was the result of a recent democratic selection procedure among the citizens served by the EOA program in your area. We congratulate you and wish for you full satisfaction in this important community activity. . EOA Board meetings are regularly held at two o'clock in the afternoon of the third Wednesday each month at EOA offices on the fourth floor of the 101 Marietta Street Building. You will receive further information about the next meeting sche- duled for March 15. Sincerely yours, ee : fica poneti™ Boisfeuillet gonés Chairman, EOA cc: Mayor Ivan Allen, City of Atlanta VY Chairman James Aldredge, Commissioners of Roads and Revenues of Fulton County BJ:np
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 6

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_006.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 6
  • Text: ¢. 0, ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC. 101 MARIETTA STREET BLDG. ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 ~§25-4262 EMMERICH ADMINISTRATOR February 28, 1967 Mrs. Susie LaBord 101 Bell Street, S. E. Apartment 77 Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mrs. LaBord: As Chairman of the Board of Directors of EConomic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., I am happy to give you this official notice of your selection as a member of the EOA Board of Directors to represent the East Central Neighborhood Service Center area for the calendar year 1967. Your selection was the result of a recent democratic selection procedure among the citizens served by the EOA program in your area. We congratulate you and wish for you full satisfaction in this important community activity. EOA Board meetings are regularly held at two o'clock in the afternoon of the third Wednesday each month at EOA offices on the fourth floor of the 101 Marietta Street Building. You will receive further information about the next meeting sche- duled for March 15. Sincerely yours, ye ee Jonégs Chairman, EOA cc: Mayor Ivan Allen, City of Atlanta Y Chairman James Aldredge, Commissioners of Roads and Revenues of Fulton County BJ:np
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 18

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_018.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 18
  • Text: January 30, 1967 Mrs. Lester R. Hasty, President Palmer House Center Council Apartment 801-C 430 Techwood Drive, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mrs. Hasty: May I accept your letter regarding the crafts classes for the senior citizens at the Palmer House, May I assure you that the city has taken every action possible te have the funds restored to Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. This program continues to have our support. Sincerely yours, Ivan Alien, Ir. Mayor IAJr/br
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 33

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_033.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 33
  • Text: Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., proposes a comprehensive manpower program to place as quickly as possible in jobs or training positions, 2,500 hardcore unemployed persons residing within the following target areas of the city: (1) Pittsburg, (2) Price, (3) Nash-Washington, (4) Summerhill-—Mechanicsville, (5) West End. The Program will be called the Atlanta Concentrated Employment Program (ACEP). 1. PROGRAM COMPONENTS The Atlanta Concentrated Employment Program shall bring together the resources of public and private agencies in a comprehensive approach to the problems of unemployment: Ae. Contractor Economic Opportunity Atlanta is the prime contractor for ACEP and will assume responsibility for the coordination and implementation of the objectives of the entire program. B. Recruitment Through 5 multi-purpose Neighborhood Service Centers in the target area, EOA's staff will recruit and provide supportive services for all participants. In addition EOA job coaches will provide a continuous follow-up relationship with the enrollee. The House of USE will utilize its special recruitment techniques to bring into ACEP hard-to-reach adolescents and young adults who are culturally disadvantaged and deliquency prone. The House of USE will coordinate its job development, testing, counseling, placement and post-placement efforts with the work of the employment service personnel in the Neighborhood Service Centers and pre-vocational training centers. C. Job Referral 1 The Georgia State Employment Services has been sub-contracted to provide basic employment services to ACEP. These services include: intensive job placement, counseling, and evaluation. The Georgia State Employment Service will solicit jobs, screen applicants, provide transportation of applicants to jobs, prepare MDTA applications and have the direct responsi- bility of providing enrollees with training allowance. GSES will also employ representatives in the pre-vocational training centers and place an additional employment counselor in each of the 5 Neighborhood Service Centers « Job Orientation and Preparation One of the requirements of the program is the introdjction of the chronic- cally unemployed person to the World of Work in a manner which will develop his confidence. The Community School Program and the Division of Vocational Education through the Atlanta School System will provide 6-12 weeks of vocational orientation training which will include basic and remedial education, skill training, and work adjustment activities. MDTA allowances will be paid in the orien- tation period. The State Department of Education, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, under a contract with EOA will provide intensive evaluation through the Atlanta Employment Evaluation and Service Center. Job Placement and Training Wherever possible, it is anticipated that enrollees will be placed directly on jobs. Under the Manpower Development and Training Act, the Vocational Education Division through the Atlanta Board of Education, will provide regular institutional training, on-the-job training, and coupled (insti- tutional and on-the-job combined) training. For this phase of the program the private sector has committed over 500 jobs, and anticipated a number of additional jcb opportunities. Under the New Careers Program EOA will act as principal agent for the development of sub-vrofessional positions. This program is an attempt to implement a new conceptin employment for the poor in that it places them in new fields of employment such as education, recreation and welfare as aides and assistants. Under the Special Impact Project, EOA will contract with the City of Atlanta in a special project, the Atlanta Beautification Corps, to employ chronically unemployed persons. This project will have as its prime objective the physical improvement of the ACEP target area. Eligible persons will work under the coordination and supervision of departments in the city government. The Neighborhood Youth Corps, one of EOA's existing programs, will develop NYC slots solely for ACEP. A strong training component with good possibi- lities for permanent placement will be included in this program. It. ACEP PERSONNEL -— STAFF Administration — EOA 1 Director 40 Aides and Assistants 2 Assistant Directors 7 Office Staff A Career Developers 2 Finance Account and Payroll 7 Counselors (full time) 5 Technicians 4 Finance Staff (part time) Georgia State Employment Service 7 Employment Service Clerks 11 Employment Service Representatives House of USE — Butler Street YMCA Director Assistant Director Counselors Aide Coaches Stenographer Janitor Se a Oe Atlanta School System 2 Supervisors 4 Office Staff 2 Curriculum Staff 1 Personnel Director 9 Area Specialists (part time) 15 Counselors 1 Statistician 18 Instructors 1 Payroil »Accountant 16 Teachers (part time) New Careers — EOA 1 Assistant Director of Training 2 Career Developers 13 Trainers and assistants 1l Office Staff 1 Supervisor 1 Buyer (part time) Atlanta Employment Evaluation and Service Center (12% of time) 6 Supervisors Lt Psychologist 1 Staff Officer 3 Finance Staff 3 Counselors 8 Office Staff 1 Physician 1 Caseworker 1 Nurse 1 Evaluator Nyc 1 Coordinator 5 Counselors 1 Secretary 2 Stenographers 5 Rectuiters 1 Intake Worker 1 Record Clerk 1 Job Development & Placement Ae =A) s II. ENROLLEE ELIGIBILITY Georgia State Employment Service The GSES will solicit jobs, screen applicants, prepare MDTA applications and provide basic employment services to ACEP. In order to be eligible for ACEP: 1. one must be a resident of the target area 2. one must be in the poverty range 3. one must be unemployed and underemployed 4. Aides now employed by EOA in additional 1,2,3 above are also eligible for the New Careers Program House of .USE The House of USE will recruit approximately 500 culturally disadvantaged and deliquent—prone youth ages 16-21. Atlanta School System The Atlanta School System will probide 6-12 weeks of pre-vocational orientation and tS5Saining for all ACEP enrollees, with the exception of those who are directly placed. Atlanta Employment Evaluation and Service Center The AEESC will provide intensive evaluation for approximately 250 ACEP clients, when such proves necessary. On-the-Job Training Whenever possible, enrollees will be placed directly on jobs. However, MDTA will place apporximately 750 youths and adults in on-the-job training positions for a period of 18-24 weeks; 250 on OJT-—Coupled training for a period of 30-32 weeks; and 500 in institutional training positions for 8-11 weeks. New Careers The New Careers Program will place 250 ACEP enrollees into new fields of employment. The creation of new entry level jobs in Human Service fields that have maximum prospect for advancement. Special Impact Special Impact will hire approximately 50 chronically unemployed persons to work in community beautification programs in their own area. NYC The NYC will develop 250 new job training slots for ACEP enrollees, 16-21. This program will last for a period of 6 months with eventual job placement. SPECIAL IMPACT EOA Administration Staff Costs Operational Costs TOTAL Administration EOA Operation Supportive Services Enrollee Costs Staff Costs Operational Costs TOTAL Operation 25 ACEP BUDGET Federal 47,857 13,236 61,093 155,750 $72,127 98,545 566,422 Atlanta Employment Evaluation Service Center Enrollee Costs Staff Costs Operational Costs TOTAL Evaluation Center House of USE -— Butler St. YMCA Enrollee Costs Staff Costs Operational Costs TOTAL House of USE City of Atlanta Enrollee Costs Staff Costs TOTAL Atlanta TOTAL SPECIAL IMPACT MDTA Georgia State Employment Service Enrollee Allowances Staff Costs Operational Costs TOTAL GSES Atlanta School System Staff Costs OP€rational Costs TOTAL Schools 4,000 55,193 73,965 133,158 1,000 36,321 13,513 50,834 168,670 none 168,670 980,177 590,262 120,906 1,195 712,363 393,474 465 652 859,126 Non-Federal 12,000 none _ 12,000 none 60,000 none 60,000 none none 18,000 18,000 none 8,000 4,000 12,000 none 20,000 20,000 122,000 none none none none none none Total 59,857 13,236 73,093 155,750 312,127 98,545 626,422 4,000 55,193 21,965 151,158 1,000 44,321 17,513 62,834 168,670 20,000 _ 188,670 15102197 590, 262: 120,906 1,195 712,363 393,474 465,652 859,126 ACEP Budget Page 2 Federal Non-Federal Tota On-The—Job-Training Training 400 ,000 none 400 , 000 Direct Costs i, 28,511 none 28,511 TOTAL OJT 428,511 > none 428,511 TOTAL MDTA 2,000,000 none 2,000,000 NEW CAREERS EOA New Careers Enrollee Costs 769,950 none 769,950 Staff Costs 182,733 110,000 292,133 Operational Costs 47,317 none 47,317 TOTAL NEW CAREERSL 1,000,000 110,000 1,100,000 Total New Career 1,000,000 110,000 1,100,000 NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH CORPS Neighborhood Youth Corps Out-of—School Enrollee Costs 409,975 5,000 414,975 Staff Costs 111,652 96,830 208 , 482 Operational Costs 68,989 none 68 , 989 TOTAL NYC 590,616 101,830 692,440 Total NYC 590,616 101,830 692,440 GRAND TOTAL 4,570,793 333,830 4,904,623
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 31

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_031.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 31
  • Text: ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC. 101 MARIETTA STREET BLDG, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 525-4262 TWO AND ONE-HALF YEARS A brief summary of programs funded through Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. from January 1965 to July 1967 RRKKEREKEK KARKEEE During the past two and one-half years Atlanta's community action program has moved with great speed. It has, in many ways, become a model for the nation. Thousands of Atlanta citizens and many agencies and organizations have participated in planning the variety of opportunity programs now available. NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICE CENTERS Twelve multi-service neighborhood centers have been established in Atlanta and Fulton County. Two additional centers serve families in Gwinnett and Rockdale counties. The 14 neighborhood centers have held a total of 116,203 interviews. Employment counselors located in neighborhood centers placed 7,630 individuals in jobs, not including Job Corps, Neighborhood Youth Corps etc. Of the centers' total intake, 72% wanted jobs. Social Service workers have made 71,938 referrals to put families in touch with agencies offering appropriate help, in aldition to the numerous cases completed at the neighborhood centers. Resident Participation: Two democratic elections have been conducted to select representatives of low-income neighborhoods for EOA committees. Nearly 12,000 people voted in the 1967 EOA elections. Approximately 10,000 people participate in 200 block organizations and other EOA committees. More than 500 low-income citizens are serving as elected block captains and representatives to neighborhood center advisory councils, a city-wide advisory council and the EOA Board of Directors. One-third of the EOA Board of Directors is composed of low-income citizens. Neighborhood Services Aides: Low-income residents of neigh- borhoods served by EOA have been trained and employed by EOA to assist with its programs. Aides (214 before 1967 budget reductions, 145 now) have contacted 124,004 families to discuss opportunities available through EOA. They have provided continued contact with 53,697 families. Aides also assist with community organization and the work of the neighborhood centers. CHILD DEVELOPMENT Summer Head Start classes have provided cultural enrichment for 3,000 children each of the last three summers. Nine Day Care Centers provide supervised recreation and enrichment for 700 children of working parents. COMMUNITY SCHOOLS Twelve Community Schools have provided education and enrichment in the afternoons and evenings for a total enrollment of 70,482. Funds for this program were cut 82% because of 1967 budget reductions. NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH CORPS (Out-of-School Program) Eighty-nine agencies are cooperating to provide jobs for approximately 650 youths. In two and one-half years 3,620 youths have participated in the program. Another 3,000 youths have participated in a Neighborhood Youth Corps program for high school students administered by the Atlanta Public Schools. JOB CORPS EOA recruits boys from an eight county area for the Job Corps. To date, 1,654 have been accepted for Job Corps training, 658 are known to be employed or in the military service. Recruiting for the Women's Job Corps is handled by WICS. To date, 270 girls have been accepted for training. LEGAL ASSISTANCE Attorneys from the Atlanta Legal Aid Society, under contract with EOA, have served 21,502 cases and have closed 2,760 court cases. PLANNED PARENTHOOD The Planned Parenthood Association, under contract with EOA, has served 4,184 individuals. FOSTER GRANDPARENTS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT Forty-one men and women over 60 years of age are employed to work with children at three institutions. PROJECT ENABLE Over 300 low-income parents have participated in a group discussion program designed to increase motivation for self-help. MULTI-SERVICE CENTERS FOR THE’ AGED Recreation, social services and day care are being provided for a total of 1,794 family units in three apartment buildings for the aged. ATLANTA EMPLOYMENT EVALUATION AND SERVICE CENTER This is a centralized service, the first of its kind in the country, to diagnose and evaluate work potential and training needs of difficult cases. Approximately 40% of those who have been evaluated are now employed. SUMMER RECREATION City-wide recreation programs were conducted in the summers of 1966 and 1967 with funds from OEO. The total 1966 attendance at summer recreation programs was 277,000. ATLANTA CONCENTRATED EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM This is a new program designed to place 2,500 consistently unemployed or underemployed people in jobs or training during the next year. Approximately 70 Atlanta businesses and social agencies have volunteered to remove unnecessary entry level job qualifications so that newly trained people might become employed. Many businesses will also cooperate in training enrollees. PRICE AREA HEALTH CENTER A new health center will provide complete medical services, except hospitilization,’ for 22,000 low-income people living in the Price neighborhood. The Fulton County Medical Association, Emory University School of Medicine and 15 other health and planning agencies are cooperating with EOA to establish the center. VOLUNTEER TASK FORCE More than 200 local volunteers have been trained and placed in 19 locations to assist with Atlanta's war on poverty. VOLUNTEERS IN SERVICE TO AMERICA (VISTA) Forty-two VISTAS work with EOA. DISCONTINUED PROGRAMS Due to Congressional reductions in 1967 OEFO funds the following programs were deleted: Bees-Biz: job training for unemployed, out-of-school youths. Small Business Development Center: closed as of July 31, the Center interviewed and counseled 850 individuals, approved 300 loans totaling $326,225. Home Management Training: classes and demonstrations by qualified personnel to teach cooking, budgeting, sewing, child care, hygiene, consumer buying, housekeeping. Neighborhood Center Recreation Programs: qualified personnel helped residents develop neighborhood recreation programs. Homemaker Services: substitute homemakers were provided for low-income households during emergencies. Public Health Program: four Public Health nurses worked with EOA neighborhood service centers. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Fifty-one local agencies have contracts with EOA to administer EOA programs. Total community support, including both cash and non-cash contributions, represents 194% of all programs coming under the approximately $17,000, 000 CAP umbrella. Cash contributions from the city and county | governments total $137,744. in 1967. -EOA employs 427 people (145 Aides and 282 regular employees). Before 1967 budget reductions EOA employed 574 people (214 Aides and 360 regular employees). The City of Atlanta has placed four city employees, called City Services Coordinators, in EOA neighborhood centers. The Fulton County Commissioners have authorizéd decentralized voter registration at EOA neighborhood centers and have trained and deputized 65 EOA employees as assistant registrars. More than 1000 people registered to vote at EOA neighborhood centers the first month this program was in operation.- The Atlanta Police Department has placed 10 Crime Prevention Officers in EOA neighborhood centers. Numerous other agencies, as well as businesses, churches, civic clubs and private citizens are cooperating with EOA in a wide variety of projects.
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 38

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_038.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 38
  • Text: £04 fetes Dear Mr. Leftwich: ° Mr. Vaughn of Pittsburg Civic League asked me to write you a letter, thanking you for coming out to see him. You will receive it later. I just wanted to tell you what a good thing it was--your coming out. You always do all you can to help but there are circumstences you don't know anything about that made this doubly a good move. As you probably know, EOA is trying to force the City to turn Model Cities over to them. They know it is just a matter of time for EOA and want to insure keeping their jobs thisway. This is what is behind their charges of "no citizen participation". John Hood is helping them because he gets votes by getting people jobs at EOA. The Center Directors in the "Model City" area are meeting with John a couple of times a week--at the Southside Day Care Center (the EOA nursery where he has an office). They are really stirring people up against the City---the people don't know what it is all about--they just do what they are told. The latest development is that EOA Centers are working on voter registration---I am in charge of it here and at a staff meeting I remarked that it was hard to get people to come register in a non-election year. Terrill told me I was neg#Zative thinking. To tell them that the aldermen and representatives in this area weren't doing anything to protect them from Model Cities--that this meant their homes would be taken--and for them to come PEES SESE so they could vote new aldermen and representatives in next year. We really had it after the staff meeting was over--I told him I didn't appreciate the references to you, Hugh and G. D.--that he didn't even live in this part of town ari we resented people coming in trying to run our politics. Also, that he didn't even know when the elections would be held, as the next City election would be in 1969. He told me that EOA was the biggest vote getter in the City and EOA could make or break any politican because the people in the areas served by EOA would vote for anybody they were told to. After a few more words, he threatened -2- to fire me for disloyalty to EOA. I told him I owed my loyalty to the City and to the City Administration and if he could find any conflict in that with the EOA operation--to go ahead. Things haven't been too pleasant since. Meantime, Eliza Paschall complained to Mrs. Crank, who is Terrill's Supervisor about the business about the phone calls--said she thought I should file charges withthe Community Relations that I was being discriminated against. He jumped me about this too, but when I told him Mrs Paschall was not the only one complaining about the phone~-that John Greer had complained to Emmerich--he calmed down. John Greer, who I am close to in the Democratic Party, is on the board of EOA. I take my complaints to him-- since this way Terrill cen't claim political pressure. It is terrible the way the three remaining white girls are treated here---but I am not going to quit until I get ready---where else could I draw a good salary for doing about an hours work a day. I run the entire department--there were three of us in Housing originally--I am the only one left and I still don't hurt myself working--which shows how over-staffed the Centers are. I have good work habits, I get along with the other employees, and I respect supervision--so if he fires me, he is going to have to come up with some pretty good charge. | I have checked up and found that this bit about the Aldermen not helping the people about Model Cities is true at all Centers--this is what the people are being told. My idea of what EOA should do is to work with the City--but all they are doing is encouraging people to fight it! When I hear all this it really burns me up. Especially when the criticism comes from a Vista volunteer--all they do is stir people up. I don't want any of my friends to get mixed up in my personal problems, but something should be done about the breach EQOA is creating between the City and the people in the “odel Cities areas. I have talked to G. D. and told him to keep in touch with Mr. Vaughn, Mrs. Billingsley and Mrs. Wright---they are the leaders in Pittsburg and while they are on the Advisory Board of EOA--they are not fooled by it. They all. beg me to stay ota every time I threaten to quit because they say it is the only way they have to know at is going on. Most of- the Advisory Boards go to meetings and agree with all they hear-=but not the Pittsburg leaders. As proof of the poor com-unication --most people would have gone to EOA----Mr. Vaughn came directly to you with his problems, and all the "street corner hanger outers" have been praising you ever since=-because you bothered to come out! ‘These are good people in Pittsburg, if the west side negroes would not come out here stirring them up. I have good influence over all the leaders but I cannot get them to believe anything against John Hood. Something needs to be done to stop him from knocking the City however. I had some phone calls from some of the negroes in the Democratic Party wita me-- telling me what all they had heard about the negroes "going after" the Wrens Nest until they changed their admittal policy. With Calvin Craig meeting in Vest End, I figured it would really cause trouble if the negroes started breaking out windows and storming the dors as they were threatening to do. I discussed this with Irving Kaler and made the motion that the Commnity Relations ask the Wrens Nest to change their policy. Don't know if this will help, but figured it would show good faith on our part or as Helen Bullard puts our movements "act as a asprin towards helping the headache. I really enjoyed seeing Richard Freeman in action at the Commnity Relations meeting last week. Concerning this Dixie Hills mess, he really pinned down some of the people who claimed they witnessed "police brutality"----when he got through --all they knew was what somebody else told them! He is really good in this job and the best police committee chairman we have ever had. Mrs. Leftwich told me you had to go back into the hospital---hope you are feeling all right now. Take it easy, cause wecan't get along without you. Mary Terrill backed down on the phone calls---I can have incoming calls--I just can't make any §
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 46

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_046.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 46
  • Text: CITY MALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel, 522-4463 Aroa Coda 404 DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING COLLIER B. GLADIN, Direcior May 18, 1967 EMOR A NDUM TO: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Alderman Rodney M. Cook Mr. Collier B. Gladin, Planning Director Mr. Isadore Candeub, Candeub, ous & Associates Mr. John Brown, Candeub, Fleissig Veo re qual a in Housing Report FROM: Mr. George L. Aldridge, Jr. SUBJECT: Meeting on May 12, 1967 o On Friday May 12, 1967, the Equal Opportunity in Housing report, dated December, 1966, prepared by Candeub, Fleissig & Associates in connection with the Community Improvement Program was discussed. The following persons were in attendance: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., Alderman Rodney M. Cook, Mr. Isadore Candeubd, President, Candeub, Fleissig & Associates, Mr. John Brown, Candeub, Fleissig & Associates, Mr. Collier B. Gladin, Planning Director, and Mr. George L. Aldridge, Jr., Community Improvement Program Director. The following represents those areas on which agreement was reached and which the consultant was advised to follow: 1. The City requested and the consultant agreed to rewrite certain portions of the report provided the integrity of the report is not destroyed. To assist the consultant the City agreed to provide them with the Planning Staff comments used at the meeting by Alderman Cook. 2. The City requested and the consultant agreed to incorporate obvious changes and/or trends that have been made or have taken place in public facilities and services in the City within approximately the last 5 years. The City is to provide the consultant with this information. 3. Interview results and material contained in the report were discussed, Two alternative approaches evolved, neither of which achieved complete agreement. Consequently, the consultant is advised to follow (a) or (b) or a combination of (a) and (b) below: a) j OV #2 : May 18, 19 (a) Delete the interview material from the report, but provide the City with a separate and complete supple- ment on the interviews and/or (b) Retain the interview material in the report but provide a blanket statement with heavy emphasis to the fact that the interview results do noc necessarily agree with the facts. The text should stress that the interview results represent opinions and discuss the dangers inherent in public opinion surveys. Additionally where the opinion and the facts do not agree, the consultant might refer the veader to an appropriate factual section or illus- trate this with facts. 4. Program Recommendations The City requested and the consultant agreed to the following: (a) Tie in the finding of facts or factual determinations with the program recommendations and the approach toward solutions. {(b) In addition to making the recommendations the report should spell out the levels or degrees within each ' program recommendation which the City should attain within a practical or feasible period of time.
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 18, Folder 21, Document 44

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_021_044.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 18, Folder 21, Document 44
  • Text: ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC. 101 MARIETTA STREET BLDG, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 525—4262 c. oO. EMMERICH ADMINISTRATOR May 11, 1967 Mr. R. Earl Landers Mayor's Administrative Assistant City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Earl: I hope that you can attend a one-hour meeting of the Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. Technical Advisory Committee on Thursday, May 25, 1967. The meeting will be held at the EOA Central City Neighborhood Service Center, 840 Marietta Street, N. W., at 2:00 p. m. I especially want you to see the Academy Award winning VISTA film, "A Year Toward Tomorrow." Much of this 28- minute film shows one of our EOA VISTAs, Eric Metzner, working in Atlanta's Blue Heaven. In addition, William Allison, Associate Administrator for Program Development, will give a brief report on our newest programs and proposals. I would like to hear your ideas and suggestions about these. If you find you will be unable to attend this meeting, please contact Mrs. Burnett, 525-4262, Ext. 41. I look forward to seeing you there. Sincerely yours, Cc. O. Emmerich COE:1b
  • Tags: Box 18, Box 18 Folder 21, Folder topic: Economic Opportunities Atlanta | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021