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  • Tags = Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 21

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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 21
  • Text: tions that we have had in the past.” “IF TY HAD YOUR problem, armed with the local experi- ence I have had, I would pass a public accommodations bill,” said Allen. He asked that southern com- munities be given time to make the adjustment voluntarily be- fore being hauled into court. of. ‘squabbles and demonstra: In resnonse to questions, he suggested a _ fiwo-year Srace period for cities. and More for small communities. “But the point I want to emnhasize again.” he said, “is that now is the time for lecis- lative action. We cannot dodge ‘the issue.” “WE MUST take action now to assure a greater future for our citizens and our country ... the elimination of secrega- tion, which is slaverv’s. stev- child, is a challenge to all of us to make every American free in fact as well as in the- ory.” This strong statement in he- half of equal rights from a 52- year-old native of Georgia deeply moved liberal members of the committee. “I THINK,” SAID Acting ‘Chairman John @, Pastore (D- RI), “that when President Kennedy wrote his book ‘Pro- _ files in Courage’ he was think: ing of you.” ' It also led to a sharp ex- hanee between Pastore and Sen. Strom Thurmond (D-S.C.), all-out opponent of any civil rights legislation. WHEN THURMOND asked Allen if he would favor the legislation even if it meant closing every restaurant in Georgia, Pastore cut him off, calling it a “loaded” question of the have-you-stopped-heat- ing-yvour-wife? type. | Pastore said he wouldn't per- mit, questions asked to embar- rass witnesses and to “catch tomorrow morning’s head- lines.” “T DON’T WANT the mavor to go home and be known as the man who wants to close all the little restaurants in Georgia,” said Pastore. Thurmond called Pastore’s action “improper” and said he resented the “insinuation” that he had asked an unfair ques- tion. He said he was trying enly to get the truth to the American people. “Your truth is not my truth,” snapped Pastore, When the audience ap- plauded, Thurmond ¢alled them “leftwingers” and said he was “surprised” that Pastore | permitted the audience re- action.
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 20
  • Text: eg nat. Frank Adams Smith = Joe-Pye Ridge on Chechero Road us Clayton, Georgia Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor, City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 54

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_054.pdf
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 54
  • Text: ne OPE. oe ood a Mea Aiceper Ce elens dea. Cc RE ay thnk ee Go fol AA ig: el” sy Err aia Aim on me Biggin, Ging anf tl Clim ib eticdes Game flow P ton ante miner, Fay AoA: bef fits <
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 32

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_032.pdf
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 32
  • Text: 7 East 86th. Street New York 28, N. Y. July 27th. 1963 To the Wayor of Atlanta, Atlanta, Ga. Dear Mr. Allen, Having read in the New York Times an account of your testimonybefore the Senate Commerce Committee I feel I must tell you of my appreciation of every word you said. I am a southerner; my father was a confederate soldier, You are a christian stateman, a gentleman and a scholar, The world needs more men of your type and courage. May you be able to convince those who do not agree with you of the folly of their ways. Sincerely, Vrs. James Getaz.
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 59

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_059.pdf
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 59
  • Text: Mrs. FLEMING Law 4050 E. BROOKHAVEN DRIVE ATLANTA 19, GEORGIA July 27, 1963. Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Atlanta, Ga. Dear Mayor Allen, May I take this opportunity to com- mend and congratulate you on your courageous stand in the hearings of the Congressional Committee on civil rights? Your leadership in these troubled times makes me proud to be an Atlantan, and I only wish that our Congressional representatives had more of the insight into the problems that you have displayed. Sincerely, TMNaryareh K. bas Mrs. Fleming Law
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 41

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_041.pdf
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 41
  • Text: GA. S DUNKS Ke Kage Novy AE TOR] Anon WE gan Jou OSTA Be! Danske Barn AKRrn Ve hens ey - the UAE | Daas Yon tour n Hee coe A ee aah Ge hon Khe Ware Wehare Oe Te eatngs be Reg —$——$————— doo Tena Fina rc AS NA 6S auva Aipanyh cemmauegcn ny Sere nate ee ee Z “s niet a we “ < : % : & 3° ” © cee Poteet eka setac’e nete ea ate hey Peteute Meets ee" bans” wcttatttethe et 6a¢, Om« R KB og a, 2) “a
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 22

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_022.pdf
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 22
  • Text: Mes. David €. Asin 125 Blackland Road, N.W., Atlanta 5, Georgia ; 0/96 | by 3 1963 e Vor Wh eo Alea Hew pote cf ant p. Ou speech 6 He Surat Octal of lrmemeree taal Jrifag / Neour phen mentedtes, solbhe ar bum b. | g a corte Wi ype neat Lowe AhariTe — hire body seed oe. Ntlanta bee teen teed with fre Leadnsbp, onl mb fF apperes Hal ue ae gory o7 LD coun gate hugee J Thank ae f
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 37

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_037.pdf
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 37
  • Text: \ 2 Jee gy \ fo63 7 ™ a “a a "> ‘Ss i a) % ~ Lig pe
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 55

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_055.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 55
  • Text: Mea) ecyy) Cleo, a pee tell
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 42

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_042.pdf
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 42
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 40

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_040.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 40
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 93

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_093.pdf
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 93
  • Text: f After the Treaty The historic treaty between the United States, ' Britain and Soviet Russia banning all nuclear ae weapons tests in the atmosphere, under water and in outer space is being hailed throughout the world as a promising beginning of a new epoch in Hast-West relations. After all the bleak years of cold war and the recurring crises that found their climax in the near-collision over Cuba, the world breathes easier today and there is new hope that it can banish the threat of nuclear holocaust. But, important as the treaty is for what it ‘ says and what it may portend, it is at best only a start toward larger goals. President Kennedy rightly warns that it is not the millen- nium and that the road ahead is still long and rocky, As he pointed out, it is a limited treaty _ ‘which does not even stop all tests, though it. would stop further lethal fallout. Both real dis- armament and the political settlements that must go hand in hand with it remain far off. The key to a solution of these problems is largely in Soviet hands, Premier Khrushchev agreed to the test-ban treaty he had previously rejected because, as Under Secretary of State _ Harriman says, he “very much wanted one at thia time.” The Soviet ruler says he wants more agreements, If so, the West will do its utmost ’ to reach them. But will Khrushchev? And on what terms? The hard fact is that Soviet Russia’s signa- ' ture on the treaty does not mark the end of ‘its drive toward a Communist world triumph, _ though it may now pursue that goal by means * teehee gas 4g short of nuclear war. In fact, both the treaty and the “nonaggression pact” Russia wants may bécome weapons in the Soviet “peace” arsenal —to line up Asia and Africa against the “war- mongering” Chinese Communists and to soften up the West for political settlements that would » impair itg alliances. As Mr. Khrushchev told the Chinese: “The struggle for peace, for peaceful coexistence, is organically bound up with the olutionary struggle against imperialism. It Piskent the front of imperialism, isolates its more aggressive circles from the masses of the “ people and helps in the struggle for national liberation,” The West is warned. Furthermore, the treaty itself can be abro- gated if “extraordinary events” jeopardize “the supreme interests” of any of its signatories. The Russians insisted on this reservation, over a narrower definition proposed by the West, as an obvious safeguard against nuclear armament ’ ‘by other powers. They may have Germany in mind and certainly they are eoncerned about Communist China, which boasts that it will soon break the “white” nuclear monopoly. They may _THE NEW YORK TIMES, SUNDAY, JULY 28, 1963) Che New Vork Cimes. ApoLpH S. Ocus, Publisher 1896-1935 Orvis E. Drrroos, Publisher 1961-1963 PUBLISHED EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK TIMES COMPANY ARTHUR Hays SULZBERGER, Chairman of the Board ARTHUR OcHS SULZBERGER, President and. Publisher HARDING F, BANCROFT, Vice President and Secretary FrAnNcrIs A, Cox, Treasurer to very little? Is it not a game that every country is playing with every other? A game that nobody can win? A game that isn’t worth the effort? Adjusting to Automation The United Steelworkers of America and the employers with whom it deals have again dem- onstrated that collective bargaining can produce constructive answers to the problems of techno- logical change without tests of economic muscle or Government coercion. The contracts just reached by the union and the major aluminum producers represent an imaginative extension of the progress-sharing principles embodied in the union’s agreements with the steel and can companies. All the aluminum workers—not just those with long seniority—will qualify for 10 weeks of vacation every five years, with 13 weeks’ pay to help them enjoy their sabbatical. Fringe bene- fits will also be liberalized, but there will be no increase in direct money wages. The changes are designed to give the workers a share in the benefits of increased productivity on a basis that will expand total employment opportunities and avoid any increase in aluminum prices. The new contracts, coupled with those already signed by the union through its joint Human Relations Committee in basic steel and its long- range committee in Kaiser Steel, ought to serve as a spur to the deadlocked negotiators in the nation’s railroads. The guidelines for a sound agreement have been laid down by two Presi- dential commissions, created only because of the atrophy of the bargaining process in this pivotal industry. Any formula Congress approves for barring a rail strike through legislative compulsion will set a damaging precedent. The month-long truce agreed to by the railroads provides a last oppor- tunity for the unions to demonstrate that their concept of bargaining is not summed up in the single word “no.” Up to now they have been gambling on the proposition that the Government will continue to retreat in the face of their obduracy, and that finally they can extort a settlement that will saddle the carriers with thousands of unneeded jobs. The trouble with this venture in brink- manship is not only that the gamble involves a strike in which the economy would be the chief victim but that a “victory” for the unions would jeopardize all job security by pushing the railroads closer to bankruptey. This is the lesson the disastrous 116-day strike of 1959 taught both sides in steel. Unfortunately, there is no sign yet that the railroad unions have achieved comparable enlightenment. samc aml a a A I a La | - @I5U Itai DLaAUCE, VUBILY VULIUIIE ILS UW WuuicaL force,, President Kennedy is trying to persuade Presi- = dent de Gaulle to adhere to the treaty, but -- success is unlikely unless France, an acknowl- edged nuclear power, is put on a par with Britain _. and supplied with the same nuclear information we now give the British. If we did so, the pur- . pose would not be to “cause, encourage or partic- -- ipate in’ further French tests, which is forbid- = den by the treaty, but to make such tests unnecessary without hampering France’s nuclear development. French adherence to the new pact might prove “* a preliminary to agreement by France to join Peete. F ri ies s @ ‘in building a NATO nuclear force and to restore ‘Western solidarity. That is still an essential safeguard of peace. The Art of Spying Do not implicitly trust anything you read about spies and spying even if the source is im- _ peceably official. By the accepted rules of the . game, government statements may be deliber- ately false in order to mislead “the enemy.” But, of course, they may be true. Naturally, truth is - often very confusing. The layman can be excused for ruminating in * this fashion as he reads his morning newspaper. The cast of characters needs a Dickens or a _ Dostoievsky (not a historian, of course) to do - justice to the parade of diplomats, scientists, - journalists, homosexuals, prostitutes and—best of all—intelligence agents who betray their out- “. fits and their fellow spies. Nothing could be '— more devious or fascinating than a double agent. ~ At least, it is comforting for the layman to ~ contemplate the bungling and blindnesses of the .. professionals, Devotees of the whodunits surely .. could do better. Trained by Eric Ambler, Georges » Simenon and Jan Fleming, they would never have ' permitted a Bay of Pigs invasion; a successful ' Christine Keeler; a fantastic 10-year career of - ex-Nazi German intelligence officers providing . the Russians with 15,000 photographs, 20 spools of tape and many a secret of the West Germans and NATO. Not that the Russians should boast; - they had Penkovsky. . Even though the real spy cases may he : stranger than fiction, you don’t get the solutions : as you do in the thrillers. Nothing could be -more fascinating than the stories of the British journalist H. A. R. Philby, or the Swedish Air - Force Col. Stig Wennerstrom; but at their most “interesting points the volumes are snapped shut and put away in secret places where even in- _telligence chiefs, like characters in a Kafkaesque ‘tale, probably cannot find them. The outsider must be forgiven for believing _ that any time any government wants to arrest - and/or expel X-number of spies, it digs into its ' files and comes up with the requisite quantity. - When spies are under surveillance they are, ’ * unbeknownst, spying for the country they are spying on. The most dangerous spies of all are, to be sure, the ones who are never caught. There is nothing that the C.I.A., MI-5, K.B.G., Sureté and all the other intelligence and counter-intel- ligence organizations can do about them. _ Is it not possible, in fact, that all this es- pionage and counter-espionage; all these agents and double agents, intelligence officers, counter- intelligence officers, plots and paraphernalia from infinitesimal microphones to beds, add up ADEA We are we On. rare occasions the oratorical fog on Capitol Hill is pierced by a voice resonant with courage and dignity. Such a voice was heard when Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. of Atlanta testified before the Senate Commerce Committee in sup- port of President Kennedy's bill to prohibit racial discrimination in stores, restaurants and other public accommodations. On the basis of the very substantial accom- plishments that his city of a half-million, the largest in the Southeast, has made in desegre- gating publicly owned and privately owned facili- ties, he might have come as a champion of “states’ rights’ and of the ability of localities to banish discrimination without Federal law. Certainly, he would have had much more war- rant to espouse that view than the Barretts, the Wallaces and the other arch-segregationists who raise the specter of Federal “usurpation” as a device for keeping Southern Negroes in subjection. But Mr. Allen was not in Washington to boast. He was there to warn that even in cities like Atlanta the progress that had been made might be wiped out if Congress turned its back on the Kennedy proposal and thus gave implied en- dorsement to the concept that private businesses were free to discriminate. He left behind this charge to finish the job started with the Emanci- pation Proclamation a century ago: “Now the elimination of segregation, which is slavery’s stepchild, is a challenge to all of us to make every American free in fact as well as in theory —and again to establish our nation as the true champion of the free world.” The Fiddlers The long-legged, rasp-winged insects now come into their own, and we won't hear the last of them till hard frost arrives. They are the leaping fiddlers, the grasshoppers, the crickets and the katydids. Grasshoppers are spoken of in the Bible as “locusts,” and their hordes have contributed in many lands, including our own West, to the long history of insect devastation and human famine. Walk through any meadow now, or along any weedy roadside. and you will see them leaping ahead of you, hear the rasping rattle of their harsh wings in brief flight. But they do little real fiddling. The fiddlers now are the crickets. Listen on any hot afternoon or warm evening, particularly in the country, and you will hear the crickets even though you seldom see them. In the afternoon you will hear the black field crickets, chirping as we say, and often into the warm evening, But in the evening, from dusk on through the warm night, the more insistent sound will be the trilling of the pale green tree crickets. Individually the tree cricket's trill is not so loud, but because all those in the neighborhood synchronize their trills the sound can be as insistent as were the calls of the spring peepers back in April. The loudest fiddlers of all are the katydids, which look like green, hunch-backed grasshop- pers. Night after night they rasp wing on wing and make that monotonous call, shrill and seem- ingly endless, But the katydids won't be heard for another two weeks or so. Meanwhile the crickets possess late July, chirping and trilling — the warm hours away as though summer endured | forever.
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 77

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_077.pdf
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 77
  • Text: BROTHERHOOD | GooD BUSINESS sh VF pay, Vagwgps 5 Mela in Metropo hire her, but I wanted her to know that we had several Negro girls on the staff and she would have to work closely with them, eat in the same employees’ lunch room, and treat them courteously. Her reply was, “We don't do it that way where I come from, but if you say that is the way it has to be, I'll give it a try.” It wasn’t a month before J saw her and a Negro girl re- turning from a coffee break, arm in arm. Unfortunately, there are still businesses in my community, and in yours, that practice discrimination in hiring, mainly because they are afraid to make the break. I understand this, because I was afraid, too. However, the time is so late on the clock of human relations that we need to encourage these busi- nessmen to make a start toward integrating their staffs. Our best hope for the future, in my opinion, is in the schools. If we could get really integrated schools much of the prejudice that still exists would, in a generation, disappear. My children go to a school that is 90 per cent Negro. Because it is a good, well-run school, they are happy even in this minority situation. But it would be so much better for all concerned in this school if the percentage of white children could get to be 25 per cent of the school population. We are working hard to achieve that goal. In addition to three children born to us, my wife and I have an adopted American Japanese daugh- ter named Jill. One day, when she was seven years old, Jill came home from school and said; “Daddy, I wish I could be Negro at school and white at home.” She hasn’t been able to achieve that, but last month her Sth grade classmates did elect her for an “Outstanding Student Award,” so apparently she has solved her problems in other ways. I seriously doubt if we do our children any favors by making their lives too easy, considering the world which they will be inheriting from us. In closing, I want to express my appreciation, and I'm sure, that of the other awardees, not just for the award, but also for the continuing work of the National Conference of Christians and Jews in fur- thering true brotherhood, I want to urge that we all keep everlastingly at the job of making the practice of brotherhood a reality in our homes, in our schools, in our businesses, and in our communities. COOHUAHLOUE et o 1 = 1% “| by WALKER SANDBACH It seems a little strange to me to be accepting an award for doing what comes naturally. In my case, and I imagine many of the awardees here today could say the same, the award probably belongs to my par- ents and to my teachers. There are others who practice brotherhood when they, because of their background and up-bringing, don't believe in it and don’t like it. I have friends in that position, and I have great ad- miration for them. They do it out of a sense of fairness and, sometimes, economic necessity. They have prac- ticed brotherhood while deep within they have wished desperately that the tremendous changes in our social and economic life had never occurred. It is interesting to contemplate on how we arrive at the beliefs and principles which. guide our lives. A short time ago my father, who is a Methodist minister in Iowa, was visiting me. | was telling him, with some pride, of this award. He replied, “I’m not surprised that you are getting an award for practising brotherhood, because that is what we taught you. What I don’t understand is why you accepted our teachings on brotherhood but completely ignored our training and example in politics.” Fortunately, brotherhood knows no party lines. If you were to poll this group of awardees I am sure you would find both major parties well represented. I personally am very much encouraged by the progress that has been made in Chicago toward the ideal of having jobs available on the basis of ability without regard to race, or color, or creed. Of course, we still have a long way to go. When I hired my first Negro sales girl in 1947 I was told by some of my business friends that I was committing economic suicide. The first day this girl went on duty, | began to wonder if they were right. I manage a Co-op supermarket. This girl was hired as a checker. At one time during that first morning two other girls who were also on duty were doing stock work on the floor, leaving the Negro girl as the only checker. A customer refused to be checked out by her and called for the manager. When I arrived she said, “I’m going to sit-down until you bring on a white girl. I'm not going to have a colored girl han- dling my food.” I don’t need to tell you how ridiculous was her stand. Her calling this girl colored reminds me of a recent suggestion by Harry Golden, editor of the Carolina Israelite. He says, “Since so many people insist on referring to Negroes as colored, we should start referring to whites as colorless.” Then newspapers could run stories of today’s event as follows: “The James M. Yard Brotherhood Award ceremonies, held today at City Hall, was attended by a large group of colored and colorless people.” To return to the woman who was on a sit-down strike, I told her she was welcome to sit. I even got a box for her to sit on. She had to wait an hour until the other girls were needed at the checkouts. You know, that was the only trouble we ever had. And yet, how close I came at that point to back- ing down on my decision to have an integrated staff because | had half accepted the propaganda that disas- ter would strike if we tried to serve the public with an integrated staff. 1 was told by some that I would lose most of my employees and half of my customers. Actually, we lost no employees and our busi- ness has prospered. It has prospered, as it turned out, in part just because we have had a policy of being willing to hire people of many different races, creeds and nationality backgrounds. We now include in our staff of 50: American Negroes; American Japanese; an American Puerto Rican; and an American Indian. In the matter of creeds we have had Buddhists, Jews, Catholics, and Prostestants, as well as some young men who thought they were agnostics or atheists. One of our advertising slogans has been that the Co-op is a United Nations in miniature. Recently a newspaper reporter asked me if our open hiring policy would work in places other than Hyde Park, which is a community of people of many races and creeds. My answer was that we had copied from Gimbel’s in New York the idea of using the United Nations approach in advertising our integrated staff. It has worked. In addition, I was able to say that today our open hiring policy is not an uncommon one in Chicago and more and more retail businesses, par- ticularly in the field of food distribution, have open hiring policies. Another interesting incident comes to mind that I want to tell you about. Several years after we hired our first Negro, I had an application for a checker’s job from a colorless girl with a strong south- ern accent. She had just arrived in Chicago and was an experienced checker. I told her I would like to hire her, but I wanted her to know that we had several Negro girls on the staff and she would have to work closely with them, eat in the same employees’ lunch room, and treat them courteously. Her reply was, “We don’t do it that way where I come from, but if you say that is the way it has to be, I'll give it a try.” It wasn’t a month before I saw her and a Negro girl re- turning from a coffee break, arm in arm. Unfortunately, there are still businesses in my community, and in yours, that practice discrimination in hiring, mainly because they are afraid to make the break. I understand this, because I was afraid, too. However, the time is so late on the clock of human relations that we need to encourage these busi- nessmen to make a start toward integrating their staffs. Our best hope for the future, in my opinion, is in the schools. If we could get really integrated schools much of the prejudice that still exists would, in a generation, disappear. My children go to a school that is 90 per cent Negro. Because it is a good, well-run school, they are happy even in this minority situation. But it would be so much better for all concerned in this school if the percentage of white children could get to be 25 per cent of the school population. We are working hard to achieve that goal. In addition to three children born to us, my wife and I have an adopted American Japanese daugh- ter named Jill. One day, when she was seven years old, Jill came home from school and said; “Daddy, I wish I could be Negro at school and white at home.” She hasn’t been able to achieve that, but last month her Sth grade classmates did elect her for an “Outstanding Student Award,” so apparently she has solved her problems in other ways. I seriously doubt if we do our children any favors by making their lives too easy, considering the world which they will be inheriting from us. In closing, 1 want to express my appreciation, and I’m sure, that of the other awardees, not just for the award, but also for the continuing work of the National Conference of Christians and Jews in fur- thering true brotherhood. I want to urge that we all keep everlastingly at the job of making the practice of brotherhood a reality in our homes, in our schools, in our businesses, and in our communities. [—COOHUAHLOUE ae
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 71

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_071.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 71
  • Text: Mrs. THOMAS V. BOCKMAN 356 Pinerase Duive N. B. ATLANTA 5, GEORGIA ay 3/, L963. HO. ite. GED: od gO toa tn Tang tx Co dures col {= te SE a Oe ee in ian ar ae a = Pherae ccihs ncn an “— Hui. Aine Gf Sor I a | Li ee
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 80

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_080.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 80
  • Text: WILLIAM M. SACKS eeemnennigaspt oso a 71 MARTIN ST., APT. 21 ‘ “\ = a — CAMBRIDGE 38, MASS. O2132/ °° (Gui SIDEOF CARD IS FORADOREES) Mason Sen Atle Sh. Coy Hall PrQenta’, Reng Ses
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 79

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_079.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 79
  • Text: Mis. Charles Bs Negron 105-37 632d Drive Forest Hills 75, New York peed >, 7763 Libis BR tite Ti, . esr drarpern Rtn . sbictbgumhia, Titre pty Snel tihey, nes mom tony mre Lawre a ee e
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 94

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_094.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 94
  • Text: Vala Bi, \Al 4 SNauer “vavw A\ew Cry ral\ ANA wo | Georgia Deas Mauer A\eL Nour ~ereseak Stand own “Presideur Kennedy's pullic accom mMadakiowns Wil) Nas Wied out ANY Error Cu May have_ Mode Concer mig “he “ AS\aUtTa Wall,” My Conquavulotions Ye you, Vored Bre. “Pu Ww Woe e\ecs tow AWA Loi RrOPAS\Y Ao So Aaqain. SS wocmee\ 4 \ Ama R Srude (mss) lay riwgs lee Creole, l1E, Atlanta Ss; Georgia
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 106

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_106.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 106
  • Text: Archbishep Faw) 3%. Hall tine, Nn Cathelr Cel eerie, ¢ | Cee. AEGF Gu age” 5 epee * of 9 i ih pf nol i) Hh “VV eer Kew pe (" aL L fo heb jf te ) wy) | Nean we ON. gc Yaefe pS i Mm Yr Sane an) FrunQ stan - met Wehr thy Senay Cmmuces fe We lLeg Yow Hirtlen, te « China, Una cam Cmeri can, they yrs _— Menpaee ioe, ps |
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 92

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_092.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 92
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 17, Document 72

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017_072.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 17, Document 72
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 17, Folder topic: Letters expressing appreciation for Ivan Allen's stand on the public accommodations bill | 1963
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021