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Box 8, Folder 16, Document 22

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_022.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 22
  • Text: Older Volunteer Participation in Community Life Task Force Report, June, 1969 The Task Force was comprised of five retired or semi-retired persons with known skills and varied background experience. They were employed on a part-time basis, during June, to assist Senior Citizen Services with the following tasks: 1. Explore existing volunteer service opportunities which may be suitable for the involvement of older volunteers as well as of the more traditional age groups. 2. Suggest new and untried service opportunities that might be developed by Senior Citizens and/or other agencies and organizations. 3. Contact sources of older volunteer recruits, or potential recruits, through organized groups and individual con- tacts. This was not intended as a specific recruitment effort, but rather a testing of attitudes toward, and interest in, participation as opportunities come to light. 4. Interpret the Educational Motivation school program now in the planning stages with the Atlanta School System. 5. Report findings to Senior Citizen Services for comment and future program planning efforts, including the Model Cities Program. Assignments were assumed by the Task Force workers on the basis of a contact area with which they were familiar rather than geograph- ically. However, different and varied economic levels of the community were reached. A more detailed report to follow will reflect the range of service opportunities and volunteer interest and willingness to serve in appropriate roles. A very brief summary of findings suggests the following: 1. Nursing Homes, with one or two exceptions, can and will welcome the skills and interest of older volunteers and will assure proper assignments and supervision. The same is true of the two large hospitals visited and other institutions concerned with mental and physical health. 2. Elementary Schools in low-income areas reiteriated their desire to involve older persons in one-to-one relationships with slow learners and with children lacking motivation. A limited number of older individuals expressed interest in this type of service. Public Housing, High-rise Apartments and contiguous communities - produced a vast need for personalized services and comparable interest in giving service to others by many residents. Simple service needs e.g., friendly visiting, home delivered meals, transportation to church and to markets, telephone re-assurance and others were obvious. Churches and related organizations were most enthusiastic about a movement which would engage many of their older members in other than so-called social clubs. By and large, each congregation cares for its own but has not moved beyond this concept in favor of serving the community at large. The Task Force workers report a receptive attitude toward the utilization of older volunteers and a surprising number of retirees were pleased, others somewhat surprised, to learn that there are roles and opportunities for them in this big Atlanta metropolitan area. The ever-present problem of transportation availability and cost is, and will be, a deterent unless special attention is given to ways and means of overcoming it. In conclusion - Senior Citizen Services will work closely with the newly established Volunteer Bureau of the Community Council to assure the involvement of Older Volunteers and will strengthen the volunteer service corps concept as a built-in dimension of its own agency programs. Elsie C. Alvis Task Force Director
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 18

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_018.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 18
  • Text: CITY OF ATLANTA August 7, 1969 OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM 673 Capitol Avenue, $.W. Atlanta, Ga. 30315 404-524-8876 Ivan Allen Jr., Mayor J. C. Johnson, Director Mr. John Martin Commissioner of Aging Department of Health, Education and Welfare Washington, D. C. Dear Commissioner Martin: The Atlanta Model Cities Program was very honored by your recent visit, and greatly appreciates your keen interest in our efforts. We have gathered together some descriptive material about the programs for senior citizens which we visited or discussed during your visit, and we are enclosing the same along with this letter. The Atlanta Model Cities Program has benefitted tremendously from its close working relationship with the Senior Citizens Services of Metropolitan Atlanta. In the spring of 1968, during our early planning period, Senior Citizens staff provided direct assistance to the Model Cities social services planner. Their professional staff drew up and conducted, with the help of Model Cities aides, a survey of about 300 senior citizens, and obtained valuable information about the needs and services of our older population. They also met with groups of senior citizens and with the resident social service committees to further SsproEe the problems and unmet needs of our senior citizens. Combining the material gained from the survey and the community meetings with their general expertise in the field of aging, they then developed with our staff an outline of the problems, causes, goals and program approaches for older persons living in the Model Cities neighborhood. This was a valuable contribution to Atlanta's Model Cities overall plan. Senior Citizen Services will receive Model Cities supplemental funds in two major projects; one for day care services and a second for a personal services center (see attached description). Since the beginning of this year, our respective staffs have worked closely to finalize plans for these projects. In addition, Senior Citizens has continued to lend assistance in our ongoing planning process. A timely example of this is our joint efforts, along with Fulton County Department of Family and Children's Services, to develop a protective services project for older persons in the Model Cities Area. This close working relationship between our two agencies has provided the Model Cities program with valuable expertise in the field of aging and has insured the inclusion of meaningful projects for senior citizens in our first year plan. Senior Citizens Services has, in effect, acted as an advocate - and a most successful one - for the senior citizens in Model Cities. Atlanta's Model Cities program has planned a wide variety of projects which will benefit senior citizens. These projects are described in greater detail in the attached material. Also included are descriptions of several projects which Senior Citizens Services has planned for both the Model Cities area and the city as a whole. We hope that you will find the enclosed material useful. We will be happy to supplement it with more detailed information about any particular project. Once again, thank you for your interest in our program. incerel our, James R. Shimkus Social Planning Director cc: Al Horvath
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_004.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 4
  • Text: \ { , of the’ Mayor , ATLANTA, GEORGIA \ PHONE 524-8876 From: Johnny C. Johnson, Director Model Cities Program To __Mayor Allen Date 272769 [X] For your information {_] Please make necessary reply [_] Advise status of the attached Fo ST) ss: FORM 25-13-J
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_002.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 2
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 24

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_024.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 24
  • Text: Administering the Demonstration Cities Program in Atlanta I, Rationale: The draft prepared by several agencies in connection with the Mayor's Director of Government Liaison outlines the goals and steps by which posers can participate in the recently passed Model Cities or Demonstration Cities Act of 1966. What this statement neglects to outline is the methodology by which these goals and programs are to be accomplished. The implementation of this plan is perhaps its most crucial component. Plans there are in abundance. But the skillful execution of such plans remains the key to effective action. That Atlanta posses the fundamental resources it needs to meet the requirements of the Demonstration Cities Plan is without doubt. What is required is less the creation of new mechanisms than the effective harnessing and, where necessary, the reorientation of those which already exist. It is paramount that the essential thrust of the Demonstration Cities Program should be kept in mind. It is essentially designed to make a social impact on a low-income neighborhood, bringing together the tools of both physical and social planning agencies. As such the coordination and implementation of Be plan should begin with this end in mind and, accordingly, build from this base. As such the plan calls for an agency which carries both the capacity and means for integrating social and physical planning functions.’ The only agency which is currently geared to meet s eae need in terms:of action is the Economic Opportunity Atlanta Program. It. EOA & Demonstration Cities: On abeleast two bases, if not. alls three,, the Economic Opportunity Program is uniquely equipped to conduct the plan of attack outlined in the draft statement. The plan calls for Neighborhood Organization and Resident + R Rarioipaeston:: In each of the Pander nai ghborhoods delineatéd for the Demonstration Cities Program, EOA has developed well- organized and functioning nedghBerkood groups. Most of these have been Bonely involved in initiating planning activities for the Demonstration Cities Program. These neighborhood groups have made it possible for the first real "grass roots" leadership to participate in planning community life. Every aspect of the community is dealt with, from employ- ment to education, Housihg to health, recreation and aging. Secondly, the plan calls for the improvement of Health and Welfare and the physical renewal of the area. In both instances local neighborhood committees have organized to survey needs and recommended programs. These neighborhood committees stand ready to make their contribution. Saas Finally, as the Act is designed to bring about the coordination of agencies in an all-out attack on the conditions of poverty, the framework of the Neighborhood Service Center program is such that a Technical Advisory Committee is organized 1 to provide this added aaa much needed resource. In review it can be shown that the Neighborhood Service Centers in the target Demonstration Cities Area provide a ready made well-organized forum for "grass roots participation,” a mechanism for attack and a base on which additional program effort can be laid. ATI. Plan of Attack: It is, however, not the contention of EOA that its present structure is entirely sufficient to meet this task alone. Indeed, were it not for the fact that many agencies have made their services available from the outset would it be possible for EOA to have reached its present stage of:evolution. It realizes it is far from the desired goal. But it is on the right road and hopes ehis tatese effort (Demonstration Cities) will reinforce its role and future. There are some areas of need which go beyond the present structure and activities of the Neighborhood Service Centers. It remains only to outline some of these to indicate the gaps which should be closed with additional programs and personnel. A. Present activities include: 1. Employment - job placement, counseling referrals, training opportunities, etc. 2. Social Services - multi-purpose needs - (health, family counseling, day care, aging, ‘etc.) : 3. Education - community schools, adult education, etc. 4, Housing - relocation assistance and housing information B. Need Areas: 1. Economic infra-structures - businesses - lending institutions, commerical establish- ‘ment, etc. : ae Geode infra-structures-community clubs, recreation halis, etc. 3. Physical infra-structures-roads, parks, etc. IV. Implementation: It is recommended that these centers which are located in the Demonstration Cities Area should be merged into a Demonstration Cities Planning Task Force. As such they would be funded through the initial planning grant while providing services at the same time. These centers would be administered by the Mayor's office under a Demonstration Cities Project Officer who is responsible to the Mayor. Although officially responsible to the Mayor, these centers would continue to operate under the administrative _procedures of the local CAA, The local CAA, EOA, would provide at least one coordinator from its office to that of the Mayor's Demonstration Cities OFFiGe. . dy V. Evaluation: : Under terms still unwritten an evaluation of the Demonstration Cities Program, the Neighborhood Center Program and the coordination of these activities would be undertaken by a local educational institution. Hopefully, this negotiation would lead to a greater, sustained involvement of the academic community teas problems. ‘Ideally, Atlanta University and ‘Georgia State College @ and/or Emory University could fulfill this need.
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 36

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_036.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 36
  • Text: Soand won took Bewmee pd eee S SECQTEM At 67; FarcLecio ey t - oe wus & 3 a 2/24/67 Tisny ‘ Pasidential Stability. The majority of the home cwners have moved out of the prosessd model neicnt box tea Leavin inexeasingly large percentage of Jow incema rental resides his ty ef this Group results in residential instability. sidence is not conducive t a eet iaterest : 2 sy Zor the improvement ef the con tentitics in hey live evect and ange of responsibility are kcal 2 icipation. Absence cf thes : adifficult, There is : erent #nd ether physical inpr ovenents ble eiticens will remtin tn attracted to it. - There i9 a lack of acceptance on the : of the “old settlers" of the -highly mobile newcenucys. ‘There needs to be developed a willingnces to relate to the neveomers and assure ¢t & place in the life of the coanunity so they wht hava a seuse of beling a save incomes of less than $1,053! All of . eople in 7 Ltica, en the wigsins o£ waitrents ecnforce theix sens : Nes ROSES SATE oe efforks re bie lpond hea by the City to impreve service mie Opportunity Atlanta, Commmity Gonnakh uvd other public and private 13 a5 they are working with sitleeas in the areca to help them help Crags Av These need to be greatly extended and ace celerated to restore the confidence of the citizens in thamselves and ethers, and to provide the motivation they need, Vevy signtileanat. evidence of the potential of xespontible citizenship has been demonstrated by residents of the ares, Examples of thair efforts axe ree ported elsawhere-in this 2 The number of citizens participating in these efforts needs to b Ring nature, vole, and preces $es eation and gpportuni ties sed. These sould help she te ninee in on setivities leg aud the quality ef their lives. eeeky sone level in the model neichboxhood area is less than | j ccording to the 1960 Cansus. e for more than 60% of the eé c reining aud experience pose ppeeial prohlienas in unters tanding S and e ‘Limtted e 2 Se aS of enfaniliay conecpts and mathods, Verbsl cosmmicatioan wanda ——————————— ‘ a9 to be in relatively simple language and at their level of experience, This limitation also greatly underscores the-need for citizen in volvement as @ learning and participation. residents of tha model neighborhood area have been subjected to the mal Life exparlences of peopie in poverty including eviction. Additional dibfatarian of people occasioned by urban renewal end expressway clearance in the area have inerea the fear of being moved. Citizens are-suspect of "naw" programs boing precipitated upon then, -Oz Sen + iveas, and the model neighborhood proposed is no that the residents do not relate to the city d om y in which ae live. Expan- nts of their om problems and conditions of L 3 amu ac The need is for information, interpretation and: participation to give re~- ‘assurance to sins people. Isolxtion, Physical, social and cultural isolation are characteristic of- en a people in poverty strick x exception, Exporience reveal as a sine or even the total imme Sion of the perspective of resid life in relation to others in the greatly needed. Efforts te.incre i vidual citizen“and group paxticipa- tion have begun and need to be gréatly strengthened and increased. mity and the’ akty at large is
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 27

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_027.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 27
  • Text: OPERATION “ERPOSURE™ Operation "Exposure", to be initiated and throw inate action on or about May 1, 1966, will be an intense, in-depth program of pententre) ting all available services of the Price Neighborhood Center in the Washington Street poverty area in a deliberate attempt to improve the standards of living for these residents. It is anticipated that every department of center operations will be brought to bear on every household in the area with a view toward inproving the general environment of the coommai ee: physical appearance ef the neighborhood; improving the family waits through counseling and home management services, improving individuals by exposing them to new employment oppor ey ye through our manpower department, recreation activities, and other services. Block clubs and sp’cial interest clubs will be orsenized, it is tentatively planned to conduct this experiment in cocenmity. organization and improvement for a six months period, with individual and family case records being kept, end with pericdic evaluations a3- to progress and improvement being made, “the Problems (Cbvious): : Some of the obvious problems existing in the Vashington Street 5 “> = Von ‘ t i 1 q ward housing, overerowding, unsightly ad filthy ex teriorvs, yards, and streets; low income, low morale, truancy, drop-outs, smeaployment; no recreation facilities, need for. day care. Thea Aporench: eptecepetet a irenmmetanie —_ To begin with a survey of the area will be made by Price Center Aides, visiting house by house to establish fasily composition, interpret E, 0. A. and pin-point obvieus family problems and what they think are their pro- blens. Folimring the survey aad its analysis, Community Organization Aides will then begin te organise block clubs and interest groups, including Mothers‘ clubs; clean-up clubs, beautification clubs, senior citizens elub, sewing and cooking clubs, arts and crafts groups, recreation groups for different and age and sex levels. such as baseball, reading, dancing, singing, etc. Neighborhood Aides would also conduct an fntense femily-by-fanily interview to set eppointmenta for center Social Services or Manpower. Manpower will make an all-out and deliberate attempt to eliminate unenployment fron the area and up-grade euployuent of family heads where a Sceial Service vill seek to get every child of school age in school or into N, ¥, C, er Job Corp programs, Social Service will also try to get those wio need it into basic education, “uplift" or M.D.T.A, classes. + Legal, Social Security, and Mental Health roferrais will also be made when indieated At the same tin enter will spensor a class in “apart- ts > fa & hd e ae o ie] © 4 sient managetsent and upkeep, for prospective re ident apartment managers within and without the Washington Street area. This will be done throuzh the cooperation of the is sadiords of that and other areas and the Gcorgta . State Department of Distributive Ydueation Services. Also a Clean-up - Paint-up, fix-up caspaize will follow closely wpen the organization of the block clubs ad interest group. The ccoper- ation of landlords, and other civic volunteers, such as the "Mennonites Society", oe church groups will be called upon for this physical fm- provenent piograt. it .is proposed that a May 1, 1966 target date be set to launch this a . this "Operation Exposure" project, an exposure of the Washington Street areca residents to everything E. 0, A, has to cffer in a gigantic attempt to eliminate poverty from this area. oS bee te a ee le ee eee ee eee
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 34

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_034.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 34
  • Text: ie II. COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Sanitation Department A. G. Motorized Street Sweepers = The City's Sanitation Department, has assigned four motorized street sweepers to the Sum-Mec area. These machines are used on all paved streets with some degree of regularity. Garbage Collections = Garbage collection increased from no pick-up or one pick-up a week to two or more times a week. Trash Pick-Up - Trash pick-ups increased from forty-five loads a week to one hundred or more loads a week. Abandoned Automobiles - Tickets are placed on automobiles that have been abandoned on vacant lots, streets, and occupied areas. These cars are to be moved as soon as storage space is available. At present, approximately ninety cars have been moved from the area. Litter Baskets = Litter baskets were requested for some areas. Eight litter baskets have been placed to date. City Work Crews = City work crews were sent to some areas to cut grass from sidewalks and vacant lots, and to remove trees and ‘roots from walking areas. Sanitation Inspectors are now giving tickets and notices to citizens in the area who continue to neglect and litter their premises. Housing Code Enforcement and Inspection A. Building inspectors are working in the area on a limited basis and in response to calls from area citizens. A great number of tickets have not been given perhaps due to the lack of adequate housing to accomodate the displaced families. Ill. Iv. - 2 - B. Approximately forty unfit dwellings which received tickets from the Coding Inspector have been demolished. School Improvements A. Peter James Bryant is adding portables to accommodate its over- flowing student body. B. The Community School Program is underway and is doing a very fine job in its adult programs. Recreation A. Capitol Avenue School has added a full program in recreation to its playground facility for the young people in the area. B. Sum-Mec Center's Recreation Room is a much enjoyed facility for some of the area's teen-agers and adolescence. C. The Connally Play hot carried a capacity crowd until school opened and is still doing big business after school hours. Street and Traffic Improvements A. The area citizens are very proud of the following streets which were paved: Terry Street from Georgia Avenue to Bass; Bass Street from Martin to Capitol Avenue; Glenn Street from Reed to Connally; Terry Street from Glenn to Crumley; Little Street, Crumley Street from Fraser to Martin. B. Partially paved streets are Rawson, Formwalt, Windsor, Cooper, Eugenia and Fulton. Side walks are being repaired and replaced in Census tracts 45 and 46. Crosswalks and school zone control lights placed on the corner of Martin Street and Memoria] Drive, Census Tract 48, -~ 3 «= This effort was a real echievement on which area citizens had been working for ten or more years. They had had meetings with City officials, had written letters with Signatures of organizations attached, had protested to the Board of Education. Finally, one of the area groups, "The Friendly Citizens", protested on the corner of busy Memorial Drive with radio, television, and some City officials present. After the demonstration, these much needed items were installed. A group of citizens in Census Tract 46 registered a complaint about the poor lighting on Bass Street between Pryor and Formwalt. The group wrote a protesting letter concerning these conditions, stating that people leaving the trolley at Bass and Cooper Streets had great fear of this unlit area, particularly in both directions on Bass Street, The City responded with lights in both directions on Bass Street.
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 44

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_044.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 44
  • Text: CITIZEN PARTICIPATION we Es fat ee spencers a Community Council =o { ( valte Ae Recruit’“and train’residents to do a survey on social problems in Summerhill, Mechanicsville, Peoples Town, Pittsburgh, and Grant Park } Be Organize’ meetings of residents of the( target a area) model cities}for the purpose Or Oyen “Sa is of obtaining information for the CIP Report and the. Re ta Commissions. Report. Gast “Le oh, eg Citizens also- Barticipated in the development of the Legal Aide Program and the proposal to curb absenteeism from school. ds ae Lov 7 Oy Dr breed vesé LAS eo, ‘Technical assistance and registration and get-out-to-vote campaigns: and where and how to obtain services. ; et J5. In_the--process-of Davetopite a directory of neighborhood organizations, their purposes and _their programs. . } t i 0 SY chy wanes ' d,s \ee te “2 ganized—Netghborhood-Groups—— Se PTA \way Shron, Oe \ou i Sas “ Walag Carre Gu Cucts ux Wrewiag has = ch et OS Ste ads eet ines Cur \ a.--Do- fund raising for Community Chest, Cancer Drive, March of Dimes. Sponsor welfare fund to benefit less fortunate children. b. Aid in sponsoring boy scout and girl scout troops not present in every school. Cc. ne Caltucal enrichment program ‘for children. d. Support a city-wide PTA council. KH Orctnine ( Neitboluad Grau ~TI.~.Social- and- Hettese=Gtoups B305S Orcas reed, 0 Trp hh OR Wes is A a a. Do Felendly visiting to the aged, aiek, and shut-in, Ac ote On SOcia 0 af a de we eae b. Support community projects’ wera AcAe Wikies walk, ; a AL Vou, rae Y~ pre Tons fo es VaQnnted + +o Lo VARY 9 OA vital d. Support the Summerhill YMCA ; c. Entertainment e. Donate flowers at desk and comfort neighbors in bereavement + £. Emergency assistance to less fortunate families g. Give campships and scholarships h. Savings co-op i. Out-of-town trips and outings je Conmunity Improvement III. Churches ao a. Spansor scout troops b. Support Community projects ane d. Aid less forevaate residents’ of /the communi 4y d. Ceeitaa meeting facility for neighborhood groups e. Spiritual’ and salvation influence ,/ | es Cota d Vp OW Opera tof SHO , =~ a i
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 45

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_045.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 45
  • Text: le be Cron Fiit- f2 hy CITIZEN PARTICIPATION ern (30° Se eee Gommunity Council ake. ' A Recruit’“and train’ residents todo a a survey on social problems in Summerhill, Mechanicsville, Peoples Town, Pittsburgh, and Grant Park * | ee on ‘ (2 Organize’ meetings of residents of theCtarget ae cities)for the purpose er Cnt * > of obtaining information for the CIP Report and the. Rte Commissions. Report. me Oat me oh By \ Citizens aiso- “participated in the development of the Legal Aide Program and the proposal to curb absenteeism from school. 7 = pee ‘ , hy ed vest AAS ae hoe eeehnteal assistance .and registration and peeteutebosveke laud ones and how to obtain services. gt k5< In_the-process-of veloping a directory of neighborhood organizations, their purposes and.their programs. i Ose Sy chute Ls a 5 of +\ a+ WH <_Organized-Neighborhood-¢roups— a\ aR PTA Jias Gwen, Oe ai 2 eto + Ait Cave QU Acttuc Weds has oF Cex. {. ea Ss Sa. ‘e wks atta heae eur \ hest, Cancer Drive, March of Dimes. Sponsor welfare fund to benefit less fortunate children. b. Aid in sponsoring boy scout and girl scout troops not present in every school. & Mite eal enrichment program for anilaved. d. Support a city-wide PTA council. = oat acc VN aidh botureel CGreaue5 ~II-- ~S0ckal- and- ‘Welfare-Groups ; » Orta, a een) Speech, OR woheas ‘Oust Led sho Cin Ci. as Do , gehend ly visiting to the aged, sick, and shut-ine Ay or On Socal at b. Support community projects \ehhor ck wibi cs ir i rg long i Shae ee re yw ho athe toted ney lvboly ‘c. Entertainment / d. Support the Summerhill YMCA e. Donate flowers at desk and comfort neighbors in bereavement £. Emergency assistance to less fortunate families IIT. g- Give campships and scholarships h. Savings sents. i. Out-of=town trips and outings je Community Improvement Churches oo a. Sponsor~scout troops b. Support Community projects o 0 c. Aid less Socnate residents/ of /the communi t4y d. Provide meeting facility for neighborhood groups e. Spiritual’ and salvation influence ,/ Pisesi $s S red \ te on ee ant f S Ane Ol
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 5
  • Text: of the’ Mayor { | ATLANTA, GEORGIA sal PHONE 524-8876 From: Johnny C. Johnson, Director Model Cities Program To _Mayor Allen Date 6-25-69 [X] For your information [_] Please make necessary reply {_] Advise status of the attached FORM 25-13-J
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_009.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 9
  • Text: ATLANTA, GEORGIA / | eer te Maye ROUTE iy 4) TO: Ve Dry } FROM: Dan E. Sweat, Jr. {_] For your information {| Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the necessary reply. [_] Advise me the status of the attached. FORM 25-4-S
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 14

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_014.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 14
  • Text: Office of the Mayor ATLANTA, GEORGIA ROUTE SLIP TO: FROM: Dan E. Sweat, Jr. [_] For your information {_] Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the necessary reply. [_] Advise me the status of the attached. FORM 25-4-S
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 37

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_037.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 37
  • Text: Atlanta, Georgia Part ZIT, Page N2Z February 17, 1967 ng | Department a. Urban renewal. Meetings have bsen held between the Planning Departe ment and neighborhood groups which reside in proposed urban renewal . areas. the meetings have been held on request from residents of ‘the target areas, EO4 Staff, and as a result of solicitation of resident opinions by the Planning Department. b. Zoning and code enforcement. Fublic hearings are required by law to be held before any land may be officially rezoned. There has been good attendance from the people of the Model Neighborhsod Area at thee w e hearings. 4 e. Aldermanic meetings and committee masting fj *. hese meetings are open to the public. The Planning Department has tried te inform some of the residents and EOA Staff from the Model Neftghborheed Area when issues arise that concern its residents. There has been public attendance at these meatings which has mainly confined itself to EOA Staffl and residants working through its agency. d. Speaking engagements, Members of the Planning Department Steff have spoken about physical, social, and economic problems and possible solutions at neighborhoed meetings in the Model Neighborhood Area, e. Radio and television programs and interviews. Physical, secial and economic problems and solutions of the Model Neighborhood Area were discussed during the year o1 slevision programs. City of et : radis and Atlanes Sesft Bh s © ticipated. Be Atlenta, Georgia Part IfI, Page N3 February 17, 1967 Model neighborhood public meetings. Three mass meetings were planne? by the Planning Department and the Mayor's Office and held in the Model Neighbor heed Area during the first week of February. The Moéel Neighborhood Pregram was explained by the Mayor and ite Department Stsff to groups of 300 to 500 people at each meetirs. A brief susstionnates was circulated in an effort to dis- eover Che areas of greetent need as viewed by the residents theme selves. A discuszion of the Model Neighborhood Program was held aiter the questiornaire was collected. The questionnaire will be used to help establish priorities for the Model Neighborhood Proe EPATM. Gitizean involvement in planning the structure of the Citizen Parti- , of the Model Neighbcrhocd Application. Three meete itizen participation in EOA and Counell of Neighe- Community Council and Held later in January to Third Msectre, Planning Department, Urban League, Police Dee ee & pertmens, Crime Preventive Eureayn, EQOA, CCAA, CNAC, and resi= us ahs 4 aah G Ve uv tL wis) et or = sania ot Ting det.ts of area. . Structure as in applicatian discussed and infarmaliy dasidead upon, Atlanta, Georgia Part III, Page N4 February 17, 1967 Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. (EOA), The Community Action Agency operates three Neighborhood Service Centers in the Model Neighborhood Area: Price, Pittsburg, and Summerville-Mechanicsville (Sum-Mec). Organized block clubs held elections for official representatives on three Citizens Neighborhood Advisory Councils (CNAGs). These neighborhood groups meet monthly, discuss community problems, work with component Area Block groups, and become exposed to total city resources and problems. The CNAC acts as a sounding board for problems from individual Ne Area Blocks and a vehicle for the EOA center staff in communicating with the community. CNACs have representation on a Citizens Central Advisory Council. EOA works with neighborhood, social and church groups at their request who have specific interests or group needs. A Technical Néighborhood Advisory Council in each area, composed of leaders and professionals living or working therein, are resource people to help the less fortunate people of the center area. The CNAC for each neighborhood center discusses physical, economic and social problems and possible solutions. Selected and trained residents of the center areas serve as salaried neighborhood aides for each phase of EOA activity. Citizen participation activities in center programs include: Price Area recreational council, Price business improvement classes, Pittsburg community center project, Sum-Mec Development Enterprises, Inc., Good Neighbors Club (Sum-Mec), and Sum-Mec Pilot Project in citizenship training. Atlanta, Georgia Part III, Page N5 February 17, 1967 Specific activities concerning Model Neighborhood Program in center programs are: beginning in February, 1966, EOA, Summec and Price leaders held meetings of staff, CNAC and heads of organizations of southeast Atlanta to acquaint themselves with Demonstration Cities bill and determine a plan of action. They requested the city to make application for Demonstration Cities funds, asked to be the first | area to receive assistance under Demonstration Cities Act of 1966 and | finally uddoiness themselves into: a temporary Summec-Price-Pittsburg | "Demonstration Cities" group. About the time it became known that this area was to be included in the eity’s first Model Neighborhood Application, Area Block elections for CNAC representatives in the Model Neighborhood Area were being held. The Summec-Price-Pittsburg group held a Model Neighborhood Community Group Workshop on February 15, 1967 to discuss the program and divided into committees according to the Program's major activities such as housing, health and recreation. 3. Atlanta Housing Authority The Rawson-Washington Uxban Renewal Project was the only area within the Model Neighborhood Area with which the Atlanta Housing Authority has had contact. Within this area, the Authority has set up an on-site project office for the purpose of providing information to citizens living in the project area, Through the Atlanta Housing Authority's Public Information Office, in- formational brochures on various aspects of the program are made available to citizens in the project areas. Slide presentations to civic, church, school and club groups are presented, allowing for discussion afterward. For special activities, radio and TV programs are arranged. 4 se wr Atlanta, Georgia Part LIZ, Page N6 February 17, 1967 in Fublic Housirg Projects occurs through the Chiid care canters, pleyground activities, nd Girl Scout troops, securing teachers for sewe- and hyvetene clasgzes, stimulation of church groups to ine c ee fe wu ban {mn te fe ta (b 3 oe te asency programs such as EGA, Health, Eéucation & Welfare, Senior io 3 wf ae , : * ce iwens Services, Fubiic Housing managers encourage residents to C3 oot engage themselves in the activities of the Yenants Association program, * * yg 3 *, * JM 2 2 end excourgge cutsids community organizationg to involve public housing “a ~«, a 3 as + " a pl a at — i rs everéll netghborhosad activizies. irben Renewsl ts y the Mavor to promote citizen partie ur th a Ped eet ae ; ari “nis comm? sacs has bee renewsl project. The committee isory committees within the urban renewal proe jest 4reas 26 serve 2s 4 sounding board on the different aspects of urban This projece fe fumded by she Stern ganily Fund and will be carried on for oe year. A Community Jevelopmert Director was employed January 9, 1367 %o He fs attached to the Mayor's Office, nate city services in selece sad neighborhoods and develop maximum communication and participation The Gomruntsy Bevelopment Sirector has beer involved in the Model Cities Frogran, #e hes aided in the plernrirg of the program and is directly s Atlenta, Georeia Part Til, FageN7 February 17, 1967 echecduling end publicity for the three neighborhood to 311 civic groups, schools, the greater percentage of the d ‘< 220) nm ane, a «2 mtr + - + 2, Restuited s so make 24 survey on social problens “ ¢ = 9 = a is Summernily Feoples Towa, Pittsburgh, and Grent Pers. + oe “ao e+ ES. she p G. Orse ee Aid a AaVe on a Ss JeVve numbers but tend to concentrate on
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 30

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_030.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 30
  • Text: A Report of Citizen Participation in the Pittsburg Community The Pittsburg Neighborhood Service Center, as is true of all other centers, has a citizen's advisory committee, whose primary function is to keep the staff of the center advised on changing needs and sug- gested remedies. Since the Pittsburg Neighborhood Service Center is still operating with a temporary committee, and is only now holding elections for its first permanent committee, the ad hoc committee in this community is much larger and has a broader base than normal. The prior function of this group had been to generate sufficient community concern and interest, and to demonstrate to EOA Headquarters a need for a center in the Pittsburg Community. To this end, meetings were held over a period of a year during which all of the committees and sub-committees functioned. When the Pittsburg Neighborhood Service Center opened, this temporary committee continued to advise. Representing approximately four hundred (400) people, this group has been able to give direction to the center from a variety of experiences, and from a general know- ledge of community problems. Things for which this community is or has been directly responsible are: 1 - recommendations for indigeneous and indigent persons to be employed 2 - determination of priorities of service 3 - selection of site 4 - advocates for the center. A further evidence of citizen involvement may be demonstrated by the neighborhood elections which are now in progress. The entire community, which has been subdivided into groups called area blocks, is at work electing persons to represent them on a permanent committee, and this is being accomplished via the same procedure used in all local and national elections. The same machines used in general elections are being used in these neighborhood elections, and the same registration procedures are being employed. After a survey conducted by the center staff, and after finding that voter registration did not account for a reasonable percentage of the total community population, the ad hoc committee of the Pittsburg Neighborhood Service Center felt that in conjunction With the election process, some emphasis should be placed on voter registration. In all of these instances, the entire staff of the center has operated both at the direction of the com- mittee, and in response to the obvious need for organization. One major project, which is still continuing, is a cooperative effort of the center and the Pittsburg Civic League toward the ac- quisition of a community center. The extension and housing departments, along with the director, have had plans drawn up, inspected sites and written proposals, all at the direction of the Pittsburg Civic League. Contact has been made with Dr. Phillip Weltner of The Whitehead Foundation with the hope that funds for this project may be made avail- able. Due to some difficulty with a will, the first choice was re- luctantly rejected. Title searches are in process to determine the availability of other sites, and, hopefully, the Pittsburg Civic League will be able to realize this ambition in the very near future. There are other instances of general community involvement which are usually on a smaller scale, and would require a more specific and numerical presentation. All of the above are submitted as examples of the involvement of the Pittsburg Community through the Pittsburg Neighborhood Service Center in the solution of their own problems.
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 40

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_040.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 40
  • Text: Atlanta, Georgia Part Ill, Page N6 February 17, 1967 Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal An aggressive and effective force for citizen participation in urban renewal and associate activities is the Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal, Authorized by resolution of the Board of Aldermen, this committee has a membership of some 80 citizens, appointed by the mayor, The membership represents all sections of the city and the various economic strata of business and professional life, Special care is taken to have at least 40 per cent of the membership from the minority race, Ever since Atlanta became actively engaged in urban renewal, this citizens committee has been very forceful in broadening public understanding of the aims and actions in the various projects, It has subcommittees specifically assigned to each point in the city's workable program. A special subcommittee has worked closely with the Community Improvement Program since its inception. The Citizens Advisory Committee as a whole headed up a campaign which played a leading role in strengthening the city's housing code enforce- ment program to meet workable program requirements, The full committee meets four times a year, At the first meeting of each year, the mayor outlines his plans for the year in urban renewal and housing, as was done in January of the present year, The executive committee meets during each of the other months of the year, At its February meeting the executive committee centered its program on the plans for the city's application to be included in the model neighborhood demonstration program, To obtain fuller citizen participation in each new urban renewal project added to the Atlanta program, the main Chairman of the Citizens Advisory Committee appoints an associate committee in the project area, Chairman of this associate committee meets regularly with the full committee and the executive committee, The committee's executive director meets with the associate committees and attends citizens meetings in the project areas, The committee conducts citizen tours of present urban renewal projects and areas being considered for future projects, Groups from 40 to 75 citizens are thus given a first hand view of slum conditions, These tours are conducted all through the year, averaging at least one a month, During the first two months of 1967, such different groups as two Georgia Tech classes, a Georgia State college class, the provisional members of the Atlanta Junior League and a women's club in an area adjacent to the model neighborhood target area were taken on tours by the Citizens Advisory Committee in conjunction with the Atlanta Housing Authority which is the city's agent for urban renewal, The Citizens Advisory Committee is supported by public contributions and a matching fund from the city. It is staffed by an executive director, who is a former TIME and LIFE staff writer of 25 years experience and a secretary, The chairmanis Robert L. Sommerville, president of the Atlanta Transit Company, and one of Atlanta's topmost civic leaders,
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_019.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 19
  • Text: *2. wife 8/8/69 ATLANTA MODEL CITIES PROGRAM FIRST YEAR PROJECTS SERVING SENIOR CITIZENS Child Care Services: Senior Citizen Services of Metropolitan Atlanta - A multifaceted child care program which includes two child care centers, ten family child care homes and 10 block mothers. Approximately 60 senior citizens will be used as aides in the child care center and in other supporting positions. Senior Citizens Personal Service Center: Senior Citizens Services of Metropolitan Atlanta - A service center to provide assistance to senior citizens of the Model Cities area. Services will in- clude day care, transportation, low cost meals and an advocacy program. Specialized Passenger Van Program: Economic Opportunity Atlanta A program to meet the transportation needs of the aged, handi- capped, infirm, etc. Three vehicles and drivers will be assigned to the EOA neighborhood service centers. Model Cities Shuttle Bus: Atlanta Transit System - A circumferen- tial bus route to improve transportation within the Model Cities area. It is expected that the senior citizen population will greatly benefit from this service. Homemaker Program: Fulton County Department of Family and Children's Services - A unit of six homemakers to serve the Model Cities area. They will be of special importance to the aged population. Neighborhood Consumer Services: Economic Opportunity Atlanta - This project will work with residents of all ages to develop skills in consumer buying, food preparation, etc. Project Expand: Economic Opportunity Atlanta - An expansion of EOA centers and an extension of their present EOA staff serving in centers in the Model Cities area. Two new centers are planned in areas with a high concentration of senior citizens. Health Program: (Not Determined) - This program is not in its final form, but its implementation will result in improved health care to older persons. *Not yet approved by Model Cities Executive Board.
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_025.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 25
  • Text: 4 The proposed administrative structure of Atlanta's participation .in the Demonstration Cities Program follows: 1. The City Demonstration Agency - is responsible to the Mayor. This body would be composed of representatives from City Planning, EOA, Atlanta Housing Authority, CCAA, and HUD. The Planning Director or an appointee from his office would act as coordinator. _2. Social planning functions would be coordinated jointly by EOA and CCAA. Other public and private groups would comprise advisory committees. 3. Physical planning functions would be coordinated jointly by the City Planning Office, Atlanta Housing Authority and the Metropolitan Planning Commission. PROPOSED ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE - Mayor Director of . Gov. Liaison City Planning Mayor's Office Ww CCAA - Social Planning EOA - Local CAA AHA - Housing ARMPC - Metro Planning HUD rep. - Federal Government CLEA Demonstration Agency Price ;' Sum-Mec Pittsburgh Social & Social & | Social & | Physical Physical Physical I. Neighborhood Planning A, Planning Goals 1. Long-range - 100 years Vie Middle-range - 10 years a Short-range - now Agency coordination eo 2. Private Neighborhood Organization l. Center Structure 2. Additional component 3 |) Clty Administration Communication and Information Evaluation. - University - Urban Extension Program APPENDICES NSO Organization EOA Organization Technical Advisory Committee Gita. Onpabten ta Related Agencies
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 35

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_035.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 35
  • Text: RESIDENT PARTICIPATION - EOA The sponsoring Neighborhood Advisory Councils and their supporting Area Block organizations have just completed their annual elections; the following results have been obtained for the area comprising the Model Neighborhood Program: No. Registered NSO Center Area Census Tracts Area Block to vote t Pittsburg L. S7F-575 14 1,395 F-58 F-44 F-45 F-46 Sumnec F-47 20 2,891 F-48 *P-55A *F-56 Price *55A 9 1,140 56 ne oe 11 43 5,426 *Parts of Census Tracts 55A and 56 lie in both Price and Summec. Number Voted 585 1,793 618 2,996
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 8, Folder 16, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 8, Folder 16, Document 20
  • Text: 8/8/69 ATLANTA MODEL CITIES PROGRAM PROJECTS FOR SENIOR CITIZENS NOT RECEIVING SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDS Housing Aid to the Aged: Fulton County Department of Family and Children's Services - This is a program to provide specialized housing assistance to old age recipients. (Note: this project is still pending in HEW) Golden Age Legal Aid: A legal aid project sponsored by the National Council of Senior Citizens for the Office of Economic Opportunity. The GALA office is located within the Model Cities area and will provide direct services to senior citizens.
  • Tags: Box 8, Box 8 Folder 16, Folder topic: Model Cities | 1967-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021