Box 22, Folder 17, Document 14

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Box 22, Folder 17, Document 14

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‘| Establish a program of tu-

‘students from high schools and

WWHIMY LAL AUL UNL

| WIDE SCHOOL PLAN

| Wsofce OL
Seeks to Help the Poor by)
Making Permanent the

Gains of Head Start

By HAROLD GAL
Special to The New York Times

WASHINGTON, Nov. 19—
Sargent Shriver has proposed a
broad program to help under-
privileged children retain the
gains they make in the Govern-
ment’s Head Start project.

The director of the Office of
Economic Opportunity, which
administers the program for pre-
kindergarten children, warned
that the present elementary
school system was "critically
inadequate to meet the needs
of children of poverty.” He
urged educators across the:
country to do the following:

€Provide one teacher for
jevery 15 children.

€Utilize new sources of edu-
cational manpower, such as
teacher aides, “subprofession-
jals" and volunteers,



torial assistance in which older

college would take part.

Establish neighborhood coun-
cils and community associa-
tions, outside of parent-teacher
groups, that would get parents
involved in the activities of
every public school,

€Provide an adequate supply
of all necessary supplies, includ-
ing toys and films, and make
broad use of electronic learning!
aids. ‘

Initiate programs to train}:
“childhood development” spe-|;
cialists who would work exclu-
sively in early primary grades,
diagnose obstacles to a child's
progress and prescribe help by
other professions, such as psy-
chologisis, sociologists and read-
ing specialists.

Mr. Shriver put his proposals
forward in an address yester-
day before the opening session
of the annual meeting of the
Great Cities Research Council
at the Pfister Hotel in Milwau-
kee,

The session was attended by
top educational officials and
other leaders from. the 1 larg-
est cities in the United States,
Mr. Shriver spoke from notes,
and the official text of his re-
marks was made public in
Washington today. E

The Shriver program, which
he called Project Keep Moving, }



———

= —





|“a short-term experience, and a

THE NEW YORK TIMES - NOV. 19, 1966



SHRIVER PROPOSES
WIDE SOHOOL PLAN

Continued From Page 1, Col. 7

was inspired by a major study
made public on Oct. 23. That
study found that the education-
al advantages gained by a pre-
school child in the head start
program tended. to disappear
six to eight months after the
child had started his regular
schooling.

The study -was directed by
Dr. Max Wolff, senior research
sociologist at the Center for
Urban Education in New York.
It was sponsored by the Fer-
Kauf Graduate School of Ed-
ucation at Yeshiva University
and supported by funds from
the Office of Economic Op-
portunity.

‘One Grade at a Time

Mr. Shriver conceded that his
proposals could not be accom-
plished all at once. He said,
however, that “any urban school
system with imagination and a
reasonable use of resources
could tackle the job one grade
at a time.”

He calleg Project Head Start

shot of educational adrenalin
whose effects can wear off in
the grinding boredom and frus-



tration of slum classrooms.”
Acknowledging that if would

ov]

teacher for every 15 children,
Mr. Shriver said that putting
teacher's aides and other adults
into the classroom could make
up for any failure to achieve a
1-to-15 ratio.

hood be drawn into the school
so that children and parents

was a basic part of their total
environment.

Mr. Shriver said that elec-
tronic aids had already proved
their effectiveness in Head
Start classrooms.

He did not say in his address
where funds for Project Keep

lieved that funds would be
made available through Federal

enough pressure from communl-
ties throughout the country.
Mr. Shriver said that
many children “gained in Head
Start has been crushed by the
broken promises of first grade.”

Project Keep Moving, he said,
could stir “a revolution in edu-
cation from preschool through
college.”

“Only if we maintain the
pace of Head Start throughout

‘fhe school system,” he said,|:
“can we create an educational),
process which will give every/:
disadvantaged child in our na-/,

tion a chance to obtain the high-
est education level



be difficult to provide one

He urged that the neighbor-|

alike could feel that education}

Moving would come from. An).
aide in the Office of Economicl
Opportunity said in Washing-|’
ton today that Mr. Shriver be-

and state agencies if there was).

Pointing to the Wolff study,}:
“thel,

readiness and receptivity” that)

in his}



power.”


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